itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Adding hyperlinks to pdf documents software control cloud windows azure html class 2010-040-part1807

Over, Under, Around, and Through:  
Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation
Michele Combs 
Syracuse University 
Mark A. Matienzo 
Yale University 
Merrilee Proffitt 
OCLC Research 
Lisa Spiro 
Rice University
A publication of OCLC Research in support of the RLG Partnership 
Adding hyperlinks to pdf documents - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding a link to a pdf; add url to pdf
Adding hyperlinks to pdf documents - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links in pdf; add url link to pdf
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 2 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research and the RLG Partnership 
© 2010 OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc. 
All rights reserved 
February 2010 
OCLC Research 
Dublin, Ohio  43017  USA 
www.oclc.org
ISBN:   1-55653-376-4 (978-1-55653-376-1) 
OCLC (WorldCat):  526855333 
Please direct correspondence to: 
Merrilee Proffitt 
Senior Program Officer 
proffitm@oclc.org
Suggested citation: 
Combs, Michele, Mark A. Matienzo, Merrilee Proffitt, and Lisa Spiro.  2010.  Over, Under, Around, 
and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation.  Report produced by OCLC Research in 
support of the RLG Partnership.  Published online 
at:  www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 3 
Contents 
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 5 
Section I: Political and Logistical Issues ........................................................................................... 7 
I’m preaching to the unconverted .................................................................................................. 8 
Let me just tidy this up first… ...................................................................................................... 12 
Who will do the work, and when? ................................................................................................ 13 
It’s so complicated!..................................................................................................................... 15 
I don’t know where to start! ......................................................................................................... 17 
Section II: Addressing Technical Problems...................................................................................... 18 
I want my data to be stored in a format that will give me flexibility going forward ........................ 19 
Table 1. Tips for producing EAD from managed content under various export scenarios. ............. 20 
Problems with publishing ........................................................................................................... 23 
EAD can be complicated (but there’s hope…) .............................................................................. 26 
Getting through it ........................................................................................................................ 27 
Acknowledgements ........................................................................................................................ 28 
Appendix I. Consortia and EAD Aggregators .................................................................................... 29 
Appendix II. Tools ........................................................................................................................... 31 
Templates ................................................................................................................................... 31 
Web-based forms ........................................................................................................................ 31 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 4 
Standalone forms ....................................................................................................................... 32 
Style sheets for authoring finding aids ........................................................................................ 32 
XSLT stylesheets for displaying finding aids ................................................................................ 33 
Commercial XML tools for EAD encoding ..................................................................................... 33 
Content Management Systems for Archives ................................................................................ 33 
Archival management systems that support publishing .............................................................. 34 
Various other commercial archival management systems can import and export EAD, including: 34 
XML publishing platforms ........................................................................................................... 35 
Specialized migration or conversion tools ................................................................................... 36 
Papers, production guides, case studies, etc. ............................................................................. 37 
Appendix III. EAD Migration, Creation and Publication Paths .......................................................... 38 
Notes  ............................................................................................................................................. 41 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 5 
Introduction 
This report frames some of the obstacles that archivists have experienced adopting Encoded 
Archival Description (EAD). It also suggests pathways to help you get out of the ruts, around the 
roadblocks, and on the road to success. This report is addressed to those who have a basic 
understanding of standard archival descriptive structures and modest acquaintance with EAD. Our 
objective is to help you communicate EAD’s value as a key element of successful archival 
information systems and overcome potential barriers to its implementation. This paper does not 
contain an EAD primer, or cover the basics of document encoding. For those who are not familiar 
with EAD, we recommend the EAD Help Pages as an excellent starting place for more information.
1
Archivists have been encoding finding aids using EAD for over a decade. An impressive number of 
institutions have implemented EAD, but many have not. A 2008 survey revealed that nearly half of 
respondents (79 out of 168) had not yet implemented EAD.
2
Our professional literature articulates obstacles ranging from political to technical, and much in 
between. over the last ten years a growing body of relevant articles detail barriers: Jill Tatem’s article 
“EAD: Obstacles to Implementation, Opportunities for Understanding”; James M. Roth’s “Serving up 
EAD: An Exploratory Study on the Deployment and Utilization of Encoded Archival Description 
Finding Aids”; and Elizabeth H. Dow’s “EAD and the Small Repository.”
A further analysis of the characteristics 
of those who had not yet adopted EAD reveals that all types of institutions are represented, 
including archives affiliated with large and small universities and those with a range of information 
technology (IT) services, from no professional IT staff to those with access to the services of a large 
IT department. 
3
These early works were 
followed by Katherine M. Wisser’s EAD Tools Survey and Sonia Yaco’s article, “It's Complicated: 
Barriers to EAD Implementation.”
4
Political or logistical issues may keep you from getting going; technical issues may get you bogged 
down along the way. Against this backdrop of challenges, there are a growing number of tools that 
support EAD.
5
Nevertheless, real and perceived barriers to EAD implementation still exist, all of them 
well documented. For every roadblock, as Sesame Street’s Grover says, there is a way “over, under, 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 6 
around, and through.”
6
Section I of this report addresses political and logistical issues. These include gaining buy-in from 
institutional decision makers, overcoming the urge to achieve perfection, finding ways to maximize 
scarce resources, and getting over the initial humps of dealing with a relatively complicated 
standard and what can be perceived as overwhelming logistical issues.  
This paper presents useful tools—informational, persuasive, or technical—
for overcoming barriers you may encounter in your journey towards EAD implementation.  
Section II navigates technical problems and solutions, such as thinking about lossless data streams 
in conversion and management, selecting software (and challenges around open source software in 
particular), publishing, and mitigating the complexity of the standard.  
Members of this working group (under the auspices of the RLG Partnership and OCLC Research) 
authored this report jointly. We all have had experience with EAD and have struggled with the range 
of issues. Thus, the advice we offer comes from practical experience.  
This paper addresses a wide range of needs because of the assortment of issues. We hope that you 
will dip directly into the sections that are most appropriate to your particular need. We present 
barriers as articulated in published literature. We then propose one or more solutions that may work 
for you. Our goal is to show you that implementing EAD is easier than you think. We hope these 
strategies will be helpful and will smooth the way to successful implementation. 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 7 
Section I: Political and Logistical Issues 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 8 
I’m preaching to the unconverted
7
Solution: Prepare effective arguments about EAD’s significance  
The following arguments may help you communicate that EAD is a good investment of institutional 
funds and staff resources. We begin with a brief “elevator speech” to introduce the nature and 
purpose of EAD, followed by more specific points.  
The elevator speech—What is EAD, and why should my institution invest in it?  
EAD is an international standard for encoding finding aids established to meet the needs of both 
end-users and archivists. EAD is represented in XML (Extensible Markup Language), a platform-
neutral data format that ensures data longevity when migrated from one software environment to 
another. EAD ensures the long-term viability of your data by encoding intellectual rather than only 
presentational data (HTML, for example, only accomplishes the latter). EAD can be produced from 
(or mapped to) a variety of formats, including relational databases, MARC, Dublin Core, HTML and 
others, which makes it an excellent format for porting data. In addition researchers can have a more 
robust interaction with EAD finding aids because EAD enables better searching and subsequent 
delivery from a single source document. 
…and more!  
Pick and choose from among the following ideas that will be the most persuasive in your 
circumstances.  
EAD is an internationally-used encoding standard 
EAD complies with data content standards such as ISAD-G (the 
General International Standard 
Archival Description
, developed by the International Council of Archives) and DACS (
Describing 
Archives: A Content Standard
, developed by an international working group under the auspices of 
the Society of American Archivists).
EAD is global; EAD has been implemented by a wide variety of 
institutions, not only in the US and Canada, but also throughout Europe, Australia, New Zealand and 
Asia.  
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 9 
EAD plays well with others 
EAD has been mapped to and from other data encoding standards such as MARC and Dublin Core.
9
EAD encoding facilitates aggregation 
Because EAD supports hierarchical description, you can map data from a relational database; many 
commonly-used EAD tools are, in fact, built on relational databases. EAD need not be the 
environment in which you produce, store and manage your description, but it works well as a global 
transfer syntax.  
It would be difficult, if not impossible, to create effective subject gateways like the American 
Institute of Physics’ Physics History Finding Aids Web site, or regional collection gateways such as 
the Online Archive of California, without the consistency imposed by EAD.  
An abundance of tools support EAD implementation 
Tools exist to facilitate every aspect of EAD use, from encoding to publication.
So many tools exist 
that we’ve included only a selection in Appendix II. An even wider variety of tools are covered in 
Archival Management Software: A Report for the Council on Library and Information Resources
(2009).
10
EAD implementation is supported by significant opportunities for training and collaboration 
Opportunities abound for formal and informal EAD training, advice and consultation to support the 
growing population of EAD implementers. Some examples include the EAD discussion list, courses 
offered by the Society of American Archivists and Rare Book School, and workshops at local, 
regional and national conferences.
11
EAD is good for researchers 
Various state and regional consortia offer EAD training 
opportunities, tools, and guidelines.  
...in a number of ways: 
1)
Researchers can discover collections in more places through wider availability. EAD’s 
consistent coding and structure means it’s easy to submit your finding aids to multiple 
access points (to the Online Archive of California, or to OCLC's ArchiveGrid, or to a subject-
based portal such as the one maintained by the Niels Bohr Library & Archives at the 
American Institute of Physics, for example) so they’re more likely to be found by researchers.  
2)
Inexperienced researchers can use finding aids more easily. Consistency of content and 
presentation eases the use of collection descriptions for inexperienced researchers. Finding 
aids that are exposed online are far more likely to be found by inexperienced researchers—
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 10 
an audience whose needs we must always bear in mind—than collection descriptions that 
are only available locally.
12
3)
Researchers can filter and refine searches. Some applications can utilize EAD’s structured 
tags. This makes it possible to limit searches to scope and content notes or collection titles, 
for example. 
As user studies reveal better and more intuitive ways to present 
finding aid content, reformatting collection guides encoded in EAD is painless. If one 
presentation/display method proves problematic or confusing for researchers, you can 
change it with minimal time and effort and zero rekeying or editing.  
4)
Display and output can be tailored for research needs. One single EAD encoded file can 
provide multiple output versions for multiple researcher needs (online version, printer-
friendly version, etc.). You can also easily create different display options for different 
audiences.  
5)
Researchers can explore old data in new ways. EAD enables archives to offer researchers 
new, interesting, powerful, and productive visual explorations of collections. There are some 
great new tools under development. Examples include: Jeanne Kramer-Smyth’s ArchivesZ, an 
“elastic list” prototype at Syracuse, and relationship mapping tools such as NNDB Mapper.
13
EAD gets you money 
Grant agencies and other funders look favorably on and encourage EAD implementation as part of 
their granting process. For example, the guidelines for the NEH Preservation and Access, Humanities 
Collections and Resources encourage the use of EAD.
14
The NISO/IMLS A Framework of Guidance for 
Building Good Digital Collections includes EAD as an appropriate metadata scheme for archives.
15
NHPRC similarly endorses EAD in their guidelines.
16
Knowledge gained mastering EAD is applicable in other contexts 
In learning EAD, you will also develop skills that extend beyond encoding finding aids by gaining a 
basic understanding of XML and XML tools. So much digital data—in the library and archival 
communities and beyond—is stored and/or exchanged in the form of XML. These skills for staff will 
allow them to work with other standards such as MARCXML, MODS, and METS. 
EAD paves the path to the future 
Although today’s researchers find collection descriptions using keyword searching on search 
engines, the Web of the future will be no place for unstructured data. The future is the “semantic 
Web” or linked data. Implementing EAD will help to position your institution for the future of internet 
applications.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested