itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Add links pdf document Library SDK component .net wpf windows mvc 2010-042-part1809

Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 21 
Option 3: Migrating to a database or content management system capable of producing 
EAD for permanent storage and maintenance 
Using a database to create and store data elements of finding aids simplifies data entry, reduces the 
possibility of tagging errors, ensures consistency in output, and offers the possibility of exporting to 
formats other than EAD. However, some full-fledged archival management systems may be “overkill” 
for a legacy conversion project in terms of features, price, and learning curve.  
If your data is in spreadsheet or word processor format, or in a database that will not map directly to 
EAD, migrating to an EAD-capable database may be a useful solution. The key question here is 
whether the data is easily mapped to the target database, and whether the time involved in 
migration will in the long run result in the best solution for your needs. A list of content management 
systems is included in Appendix II. 
Add links pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link open in new window; add hyperlink to pdf online
Add links pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink pdf; pdf link to attached file
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 22 
Doors are closed to open source
33
Solution: Outline the upsides of open source software  
Making a choice  
The open source/commercial distinction is one of many factors that should play a role in your 
archival management system decision-making process. The most important part of selecting a 
system is to choose one that has the features you need. Resources such as 
Archival Management 
Software: A Report for the Council on Library and Information Resources 
will help you with the 
selection process.  
Availability of open source software  
At least two tools that produce EAD are distributed as open source software (OSS).
34
Your institution is most likely using open source software already in some context and that may 
make it easier to bring in an open source EAD tool. You may be using the Apache Web server, 
database platforms such as MySQL, and desktop applications such as the Mozilla Firefox Web 
browser. Several open source integrated library systems are available, including Koha and 
Evergreen
OSS is 
produced in a way that allows others to adapt, modify and redistribute the underlying code and is 
frequently associated with a “community” of developers.  
35
Open source digital repository systems include Fedora, DSpace, EPrints, and 
Greenstone.
36
Lack of conflict with commercial software/commercial enterprises  
Some institutions have a policy against implementing open source software, preferring instead to 
license or purchase software that includes support or is backed by a reputable company. Open 
source software does not preclude commercial support. Support contracts are available for many 
open source software packages, including the open source ILS system previously mentioned. 
Commercial support for OSS EAD tools is not currently available, but this is evolving.  
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Add necessary references:
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add links to pdf acrobat
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically. Document
add link to pdf file; pdf email link
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 23 
Problems with publishing
37
Solution: Let the browser do the work, or use existing tools that incorporate publication 
functionality. 
A major obstacle preventing wide-scale adoption of EAD is delivering EAD-encoded finding aids to 
users online. Creating EAD finding aids may require a different set of skills than publishing them, 
including authoring XSLT stylesheets, installing software, configuring a server, and so forth. There 
are few inexpensive, “out-of-the-box” solutions for publishing EAD online. However, archives have 
several options. From simplest to hardest, these include: contributing records to a shared finding 
aids repository; delivering EAD directly to the browser; converting records to HTML or PDF for Web 
display; using inexpensive tools to enable searching of HTML and XML files; using an archival 
management system; and using an XML publishing platform.  
Contribute to a shared finding aids repository 
Rather than developing their own technical infrastructure for delivering finding aids, some archives 
choose to deposit them in regional finding aid repositories. The finding aids are hosted centrally and 
provide a single point of access to finding aids from multiple institutions. We’ve included a partial 
list of finding aid repositories/regional consortia in Appendix I.  
Some archives may want to contribute finding aids to a repository 
and
make them available via their 
own Web sites. 
Deliver EAD directly to the browser 
This is by far the simplest and easiest approach. You can deliver XML directly to most recent Web 
browsers (e.g. IE 5+, Firefox .9+). To transform the EAD XML file to HTML within the Web browser (on 
the client side), include a processing instruction in the XML document pointing either to an XSLT 
stylesheet
38
(the preferred method) or CSS file.
39
However, some institutions may not want to 
provide access to their raw XML files, particularly if they include sensitive information in their finding 
aids that they don’t want to display to the public. Moreover, browser support for XML is still 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
add hyperlink to pdf; add link to pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add hyperlink to pdf in; pdf link
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 24 
uneven
40
Convert your EAD to HTML or PDFs for Web display 
(for instance, at the time of the writing of this report, Google’s Chrome browser is reported 
to not provide full XML support).  
Instead of displaying the raw XML using a Web browser, convert EAD finding aids to a static files in a 
human-readable format. By applying XSLT stylesheets to XML finding aids, archives can generate 
multiple forms of output, including HTML and PDF. Such conversion can be accomplished in batch. 
HTML or PDF files can then be uploaded to a standard Web server to support research and discovery. 
Developing XSLT stylesheets requires some technical knowledge, but several consortia and archives 
have made available XSLT stylesheets that archives can easily adapt for their own institutions. Some 
examples are listed in Appendix II. 
Delivering HTML or PDF rather than EAD may be attractive to archives that lack technical staff to 
support XML publishing, but these methods have several drawbacks. They do not take full 
advantage of having archival information marked up in EAD; searches cannot be restricted to 
particular EAD elements. Moreover, every time the finding aid is updated, the HTML must be 
regenerated and uploaded to the server. Some archives use a hybrid approach; indexes are created 
from EAD files to enable fine-grained searching, but the HTML file is delivered to the user when they 
want to view the finding aid. Syracuse University Libraries take this approach.
41
Use inexpensive tools to enable searching of HTML and XML files 
Even if an archive lacks a substantial budget or large technical staff, it can choose from several 
inexpensive, easy-to-implement tools that support indexing and searching EAD files. One example is 
Swish-e, “a fast, flexible, and free open source system for indexing collections of Web pages or 
other files.”
42
Google Site Search also provides an inexpensive, customizable way of searching your 
Web pages.
43
Use an archival management system that supports publication 
Many archival management systems enable publication via export of finding aids in EAD, HTML, or 
PDF. By using archival management systems, archivists can streamline workflows, avoid duplicating 
data in multiple places, find and share information more easily, manage collections, and generate 
reports and statistics.
44
Archival management systems have some drawbacks: they may enforce a rigid workflow, it can be 
difficult to import data, and some are costly to implement. On the other hand, archival management 
systems can enable archives to create, manage, and share archival information more efficiently.  
A list of archival management systems that support Web publishing of 
finding aids are listed in Appendix II.  
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
pdf link to email; add hyperlinks pdf file
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add hyperlink pdf document; add links to pdf in preview
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 25 
For the sake of interoperability, the selection criteria for a commercial archival management system 
must include the ability to import and export EAD files, ideally both one at a time and as a batch 
process. Commercial packages provided by Adlib, CALM, CuadraStar, and Eloquent Systems all 
provide batch and individual import and export of EAD finding aids. If your institution requires a 
hosted solution, many vendors offer such an option.  
Use an XML publishing platform  
XML publishing platforms enable documents to be searched, browsed and displayed. Implementing 
them requires fairly sophisticated systems administration and programming knowledge. Some XML 
publishing platforms are listed in Appendix II. 
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively. are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf hyperlinks; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
accessible links in pdf; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 26 
EAD can be complicated (but there’s hope…) 
EAD was designed to be flexible in order to accommodate a broad range of archival practice. In 
offering flexibility, the standard has succeeded almost too well.  
Freedom of choice in implementation means, for example, that three people could encode the 
extent of a collection in three different ways. This flexibility in implementation can cause difficulties 
for aggregators who harvest EAD data from multiple institutions for indexing and searching. It also 
hinders tool development since tool builders must either allow for multiple encoding options or 
choose one “right way,” when there are multiple correct ways to encode the same thing. EAD’s 
inherent complexity makes it difficult for institutions to make decisions regarding implementation. 
Those who are choosing tools must evaluate the choices made by tool builders to ensure that 
outputs meet their own best practice guidelines.  
So what to do? Make a decision. Document the decision. Apply it consistently. Until the flexibility 
inherent in EAD is in reigned in, institutions can maximize the consistency of their data by: 
1.
Selecting a template in use at one or more institutions, or creating a template that adheres to 
a “best practice” document in use at one or more than one institution. Once you’ve 
established a template, deviate from it as little as possible. 
2.
Clearly document how dates, extent, etc., should be encoded. Follow your own 
documentation rigorously. 
3.
Refrain from excessively complex coding (for example, nesting duplicate 
scopecontent
elements within each other). 
4.
Refrain from adding unnecessarily elements such as 
list
elements within a control access 
simply to achieve a desired appearance in the output. EAD should be only be used to encode 
the structure and content of a document; appearance should be controlled by the stylesheet. 
Remember, too, that the entire EAD tagset need not be used. As mentioned above, limiting yourself 
to collection-level descriptions and the DACS minimum-level description elements can simplify EAD 
immensely. 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 27 
Getting through it 
Despite a more than a decade of practice, archivists still encounter significant barriers in EAD 
implementation. We hope this paper gives you options to get over hurdles, under obstacles, around 
complexity, and through difficulty.  
We recognize that EAD can be challenging. Examples of EAD's complexity can be found easily by 
looking through the EAD Tag Library. Many elements, including 
accessrestrict
controlaccess
bioghist
, and 
note
, may be repeated within an element with the same name to an arbitrary depth; 
for example, EAD allows one to encode nested 
controlaccess
elements with no restrictions on 
how deep that nesting goes. In addition, EAD has seventeen linking elements; of those seventeen, 
twelve of those elements allow the 
href
attribute, which allows linking to resources external to a 
given EAD file. Elements that allow “mixed content” (those that can contain both text and other 
elements in arbitrary order) can present problems when importing EAD to a database or porting to 
another data scheme. Some elements that can be full of mixed content and contain information that 
would be lost in migration to a database (or would require additional tagging after export) are 
p
listitem
bibref
, and 
head
EAD will be under active review in the near future. We recommend that the Technical Subcommittee 
for EAD (the soon-to-be charged successor to the EAD Working Group) and the archival community 
as a whole consider ways in which EAD can be simplified. 
As reflected in the large number of EAD tools listed in this paper and its appendices, there are many 
choices for would-be EAD implementers. While diversity and choice is a good thing, the range and 
number of available tool choices provide additional complexity. By highlighting tools that are 
already available, we encourage institutions to utilize work that has been done elsewhere and not to 
invest what might be unnecessary development effort.  
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 28 
Acknowledgements 
We are grateful to the reviewers who provided valuable and useful feedback on early drafts of this 
document: 
Doug Dunlop 
Smithsonian Institution 
Glenn Gardner 
Library of Congress 
Suzanne Pilsk 
Smithsonian Institution 
Michael Rush 
Yale University 
S. Diane Shaw 
Smithsonian Institution 
Bradley D. Westbrook 
University of California, San Diego 
Jackie Dooley 
OCLC Research 
Ricky Erway 
OCLC Research 
Jennifer Schaffner  
OCLC Research 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 29 
Appendix I. Consortia and EAD Aggregators 
Almost all can provide a means of publishing finding aids, or may serve as an additional distribution 
channel for collection descriptions. Many also have tools to aid in EAD creation, provide instruction 
opportunities, and have developed best practice guidelines.  
United States 
Archival Resources in Wisconsin: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/wiarchives
s
Archives Florida: http://palmm2.fcla.edu/afl/
/
Arizona Archives Online: http://azarchivesonline.org
g
Black Metropolis Resources Consortium: http://www.blackmetropolisresearch.org/
/
[
forthcoming
 
Historic Pittsburgh: http://digital.library.pitt.edu/pittsburgh/
/
Kentuckiana Digital Library: http://kdl.kyvl.org/
/
Mississippi Digital Library: http://msdiglib.net/
et/
Mountain West Digital Library: http://mwdl.org/index.php/search/results?format=ead
d
Northwest Digital Archives: http://nwda.wsulibs.wsu.edu
u
OhioLINK: http://ead.ohiolink.edu
u
Online Archive of California (OAC): http://www.oac.cdlib.org/
/
Pennsylvania Digital Library: http://padl.pitt.edu/
u/
Rhode Island Archival and Manuscript Collections Online (RIAMCO): www.riamco.org
g
[
forthcoming
 
Over, Under, Around, and Through: Getting Around Barriers to EAD Implementation 
www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
February 2010 
Combs, et al., for OCLC Research 
Page 30 
Rocky Mountain Online Archive: http://rmoa.unm.edu
u
Texas Archival Resources Online (TARO): http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro
o
Virginia Heritage Project: http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/small/vhp/
/
UK and Continental Europe 
A2A (Access to Archives, United Kingdom): http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/
/
Archives Hub (United Kingdom): http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/
/
Archives Portal Europe: http://www.apenet.eu/
/
[
forthcoming
]  
MALVINE (Europe): http://www.malvine.org/
/
National Archival Database of Sweden: http://nad.ra.se/static/back_eng.html
ml
Subject based 
Navigational Aids for the History of Science in Europe 
(NAHSTE): http://www.nahste.ac.uk/
Guide to Australian Literary Manuscripts: http://findaid.library.uwa.edu.au/
u/
Irish Literature Collections Portal: http://irishliterature.library.emory.edu/
/
Physics History Finding Aids Web site 
(PHFAWS): http://www.aip.org/history/nbl/findingaids.html
Other 
ArchiveGrid: http://www.archivegrid.org
g
OCLC’s Archive Grid combines finding aids with MARC records to create one-stop-shopping 
for users. Heavy representation from US institutions, also representation from outside the US. 
Contribution is free and open to any institution. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested