itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Clickable links in pdf from word control Library platform web page .net asp.net web browser 2012-VCU_Engineering_Senior-Design-Projects2-part1820

Tympanometry 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Lance Cheng 
Keri Davis 
Dr. Martin Lenhardt 
Biomedical Engineering 
Tympanometry is a diagnostic technique to examine middle ear conditions. The usage of the device 
has declined and is now presently used mostly in audiology clinics and has limited usage in 
developing countries. Older model tympanometers are commonly used in audiology clinics and are 
absent in pediatric offices due to the high costs of the device. Pediatricians also lack the training to 
operate the tympanometer. There is also an inherent fear in some children of the device, especially 
handheld tympanometers, which arises from the exterior resemblance to a gun.   
Disassembly of an old tympanometer was done followed by analysis of the manual. Shadowing 
audiologists at the Nelson Clinic provided experience to clinical issues concerning tympanometry 
and practitioner feedback tympanometers commonly used. To solve for the problems encountered 
during preliminary research and analysis, a novel design to improve existing tympanometers to an 
affordable, child-friendly handheld tympanometer was developed, which will also be a simplified 
version  of  current  devices  to  enable  more  widespread  usage.    Rather  than  displaying  a 
tympanogram, similar to current devices on the market, it will be a simple pass or fail test that could 
be performed by people of varying degrees of experience. 
Literature reviews and shadowing led to a concrete design idea. To develop a prototype of the 
design, a microcontroller was programmed to determine compliance of the eardrum from an input 
pressure. The compliance value is then evaluated within the microcontroller to determine a pass or 
fail test result that will display on the device. The use of a probe tone in the tympanometer to 
measure acoustic reflex was eliminated in the design to simplify the device.   
Reinvigorating the current tympanometer design to a cheaper, more child-friendly and simplistic 
device has the potential to increase the applications of the device, specifically in the pediatric 
environment and in developing countries.   
Acknowledgements:  Dr. Christine Eubanks 
7
Clickable links in pdf from word - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; change link in pdf
Clickable links in pdf from word - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding a link to a pdf in preview; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Extendable Membrane Bioreactor with an Air Liquid 
Interface 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisors 
Department 
Kevin Lessard 
Jiten Narang 
Dr. Rebecca Heise 
Dr. Christopher Lemmon 
Biomedical Engineering 
Currently it is impossible to culture bronchial epithelial tissue in an environment that mimics what 
cells experience in vivo on a tissue sized scale. The environment is characterized by cyclic stretch, 
and an air-liquid interface (ALI) at human body temperature. While there are systems that mimic 
these conditions individually, none do both together that are commercially available. 
The approach was to combine the capabilities of the Transwell™ and Flexcell™ systems yielding an 
extendable porous membrane at an ALI. The device should have a capacity of ½ to 1 million cells per 
well. The design should allow for 6 wells. Cells should be cyclically elongated up to 33% on a 
membrane with .3-4um pore diameters. A porous membrane will be constructed using a mold made 
from photolithography. This design will be validated using a MTS for material data, and cell culture 
comparisons to current systems. 
A linear actuator was selected to create the stretch force instead of a vacuum, like the Flexcell™, 
because the membrane is porous.  Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was selected for the membrane 
due to its ease of molding and biocompatibility. Using the VCU Wright Microelectronics Lab 
photolithography equipment, a mold for the PDMS membrane was designed. The device will have a 
base plate with the actuator, a well plate, and membrane plate and a cover plate all of which were 
machined.  This design stretches a membrane with three .7in diameter cell growth areas with 5um 
pores spaced 15um apart at an ALI by pressing the media wells below into the membrane plate 
which is constrained to the base. 
This device will allow for better replication of in vivo lung conditions and potentially skin and ocular 
cultures. Despite some fabrication limitations, this design can easily be upgraded or modified to 
allow for more or less wells. 
Acknowledgements:  Joshua Starliper 
8
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Standardization (ISO). Clickable links and buttons, form fields and video can be inserted into a PDF file without quality loss. Documents, forms
adding links to pdf document; pdf link to email
Non-invasive Therapeutic Hypothermia 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Dilawar S. Khokhar 
Zachary M. Zemore 
Dr. Gary L. Bowlin 
Biomedical Engineering 
This  project  is  aimed  at 
designing  and  constructing  a 
novel device  to  cool patients 
suffering  from  a  variety  of 
conditions such as myocardial 
infarction,  stroke,  malignant 
hyperthermia and many other 
afflictions.    By  cooling  the 
human body one can mitigate 
damage at the cellular level by 
decreasing 
cerebral 
metabolism, 
reducing 
apoptosis,  and  inhibiting  free 
oxygen  radical  production 
among other mechanisms.  The current technology uses either invasive means or an uncontrolled 
method that utilizes large surface areas.  No current device is either easy to use or apply.  The 
unique design of this device allows cooling in a rapid, non-invasive manner that minimizes the risk of 
over cooling while monitoring patient temperature.  The size and features of this apparatus are 
specifically designed to be used by first responders in emergency response vehicles.  The use of this 
device will allow hypothermia induction at the earliest stages of treatment leading to significantly 
improved patient care and recovery.  
Acknowledgements:   Our thanks  go  to Dr.  Gerald  Miller, Dr. Afroditi Filippas, and Michael 
Pfaffenberger for funding assistance and aid in this project. 
9
Evaluative Eye-Tracking System 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Laura Deal 
Andrea Elkovich 
Dimitri Karles 
Dr. Paul Wetzel 
Biomedical Engineering 
Between 40% and 60% of soldiers returning 
from overseas have some form of traumatic 
brain injury resulting from a blast.  Often, 
this diagnosis is based off of self-reported 
symptoms in the weeks and months after 
their  return.    Since  current  diagnostic 
methods for this condition are most often 
qualitative or unreasonably expensive, there 
is  a  need  for  a  cheap  and  quantitative 
evaluative tool.  
A limbus eye-tracking system was chosen as 
an  inexpensive  option  for  collecting 
oculomotor  data,  and  for  its  sufficient 
precision for this application.  The system is 
small and can be easily mounted onto a pair 
of safety glasses.  The tracker is positioned using a projected crosshair onto the subject’s pupil.  The 
entire system is portable, and can be housed in a single enclosure.   
In limbus eye-tracking systems, two phototransistors are positioned on the sclera.  The eye is 
flooded with IR light, which is picked up by the two phototransistors as voltages.  The built-in bridge 
circuit subtracts these voltages and the output corresponds to the eye’s position relative to the 
calibrated origin. 
An inexpensive limbus eye-tracking system can provide insight into cognitive function through 
measurement of horizontal eye movements. The system has been mounted on a pair of stabilized 
safety glasses so that it remains relative to the head for accurate data acquisition. 
An enclosure element serves multiple purposes. The box’s display includes 7 LED’s functioning as 
calibration points, as well as a surface for reading prompts. The enclosure also safely houses the all 
project components. 
The project design proved to be effective.  During simulation, the system properly monitored and 
recorded horizontal eye movements, indicating the system is capable of detecting characteristic 
abnormalities of mTBI.    
Acknowledgements:  Our team would like to thank the Mark Sternheimer Senior Design Award 
Grant Committee
10
Longitudinal Hand Traction System 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Kirubel Feleke 
Paolo Erico Gimeno 
Jae Kim 
Dr. Jennifer Wayne 
Biomedical Engineering 
Surgical procedures of the hand, wrist and forearm 
often require application of longitudinal traction to 
stabilize the limb for such needs as arthroscopy or 
facilitating reduction during fracture repair. A hand 
traction device would provide a mechanical alternative 
to manual manipulation which can be inefficient and 
cumbersome. The purpose of the project is to design 
an  effective  hand  traction  system  to  provide 
longitudinal traction of the hand for use in treatment. 
The  team  designed  a  tensile  applying  mechanism 
across the hand using a set of wedges, which pulls the 
hand by locking between proximal phalanges of the 
fingers. This wedge component attaches to the tensile 
applying component of the frame. A counter traction 
strap on the upper arm maintains a fixed elbow flexion 
position. 
Various  mechanisms  and  techniques  of  applying 
precise  tension  were  implemented  throughout 
development. Through consultations with orthopedic 
practitioners and viewing  OR/ER  environments,  the team concluded  that a stand-alone  and 
lightweight design is needed. By simplifying the initial frame design and mechanisms in SolidWorks, 
the team developed a more ideal traction model for which a prototype was built. Tension in this 
model is controlled via a scoping mechanism at the arm. By using anthropometric arm/forearm 
average lengths, the team was able to optimize material usage and reduce weight. 
Implementation of an effective longitudinal traction system can ultimately reduce risks of vascular 
and neurological complications that result from manual manipulation of the forearm.  Based on 
evaluation of the prototype models, lighter and user friendly tractions models are deemed suitable 
for clinical use. 
Acknowledgements:  Drs. Charles McDowell, Wilhelm Zuelzer, Jonathan Isaacs, and Victoria Kuester 
of the VCU Department of Orthopaedic  Surgery 
11
Reducing Action Tremors during Laparoscopic Surgery 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Khoa Le 
Steven Kaplan 
Dr. Dianne Pawluk 
Biomedical Engineering 
Laparoscopic surgery presents many benefits to patients ever 
since it was first developed in the early 1900‘s. However, one 
problem that plagues most surgeons is action tremor, the 
onset of which occurs by holding their arm in a position for a 
period of time against gravity. This negatively affects the 
surgery  as  the  action  tremor  results  in  shaking  of  the 
laparoscopic instrument. Since laparoscopic surgery is free 
standing, surgeon fatigue is a major issue for long surgeries. 
Fatigue causes the surgeon’s arms and hands to be less stable 
and hinders the outcome of the surgery. The goal of this 
project is to design a device to reduce the negative effects of 
these tremors during laparoscopic surgery.  
The solution we are proposing is the use of ‘articulating arm rests’. The arm rests theoretically 
stabilize a surgeon’s forearm by providing an additional support system. By providing range of 
motion in 3 degrees of freedom the surgeon can use the arm rests while performing the surgery. In 
addition, they are designed to not interfere with other instruments in the O.R. and all parts are safe 
for use in the autoclave. To verify the functionality of the arm rests a testing procedure has been 
devised. Using a motion monitoring system and a simulated laparoscopic surgery environment the 
tip of the laparoscopic instrument will be tracked. The subject is given specific directions to perform 
a pick and place activity using and not using the arm rests. Multiple trials and subjects will be used 
to test the device and its applicability in the O.R.   
Initial experiments were performed to determine baseline frequency responses for both project 
members performing the pick and place activity. Both group members were tested and completed 3 
trials each. The power spectrums produced from the tests concur with the background research on 
normal and active tremor frequency ranges. To validate the testing algorithm a 9Hz sine wave was 
input and a spike in magnitude at 9Hz indicated that the program is working correctly. Once the arm 
rests have been machined the group members will test as many subjects as possible and present the 
results at the symposium. 
The proposed design is currently in the process of being machined, so no testing has taken place yet. 
Hypothetically, the results will show a decrease in frequency from the power spectrum which 
indicates suppression of hand tremors when the subjects use the articulating arm rests to perform 
the pick and place activity. 
12
Minus the Mouse:  “Hands-Free” Device for Function of a 
Computer Mouse 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Shawn Joshi 
Soorya Namboodiri 
Dr. Paul Wetzel 
Biomedical Engineering 
This device is targeted toward patients that only have mobility of their head. Using this device, 
patients will be able to interface with any computer containing a USB port, to access complete 
mouse function without needing the use of their limbs.
The design goals for this project were to integrate the existing technologies of the eye-blink 
interface with a head-movement detection gyroscope circuit. Integration of these yielded the 
ultimate  design  goal  of  creating  a  device  that  uses gestures  (namely eye blinks  and  head 
movements) to mimic the functions of a computer mouse, “hands-free.” 
The investigators have integrated the eye-blink detection circuit with the head-gesture gyroscope 
circuit and are eager to see the design compacted for general use. With respect to the “eye-blink” 
hardware, the technology was reworked to enhance simplicity and effectiveness of the design. 
Regarding the head-gesture design, the investigators made key decisions on finding technologies 
that would better enhance accuracy of the cursor. Several approaches were considered including 
webcam detection and other software detection of movements. Considering all variables in the 
design, gyroscope hardware was chosen due its economic feasibility and features. Since integration 
has been completed, making the device more compact is the next step toward putting this product 
on the market. 
The design process undertaken so far has set considerable groundwork toward the ultimate 
product. The investigators have attempted the complete integration of the two functions of the 
device and ultimately look to manufacture and package the device for the target market. 
Acknowledgements:  The investigators would like to thank Dr. Fei, Dr. Bai, Ms. Pallavi Ramnarain, 
Mr. Charles E. Taylor, and Ms. Grace Pigott for their invaluable support during our design process. 
13
Redesigning Prescription Bottles for a Geriatric 
Population 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Victoria Hribar 
Chelsea Powell 
Dr. Jennifer Wayne 
Biomedical Engineering 
Opening the child resistant medication closures can be difficult for many older adults, and this can 
lead to the use of non-child resistant closures or improper use by failing to close the lids completely. 
Efforts to make medications easier to access can compromise the safety of children and cause 
accidental child poisonings. In order to reduce the amount of accidental poisonings, prescription 
bottles must be redesigned to meet the needs of elderly adults and also meet the government 
standards for child resistant packaging.  
Opening and closing a child resistant medication bottle is comprised of visual, cognitive, and manual 
components. All three of these functions deteriorate due to aging and other conditions, and this 
must be considered when redesigning a bottle. The primary difficulty for older adults is applying the 
two dissimilar forces required to open the child resistant caps currently used in prescription 
packaging. The focus of this project is to create a new bottle design which relies less on strength and 
will incorporate several features that will meet the needs of the elder adult population.   
The bottle has been designed in SolidWorks and constructed in acrylic using a laser cutter. The user 
unlocks the bottle by twisting a child safety ring. To dispense medication, the user then twists the 
upper half of the bottle and a diaphragm mechanism opens giving access to medication. 
This new design is expected to meet the needs of older adults since they no longer need to apply 
two dissimilar forces simultaneously to open the bottle. In the future, an IRB approved study will be 
conducted to compare this design with several child resistant bottle caps currently in use.   
Acknowledgements:  Thanks to Charles Taylor, Graham Kelly, and Sean Higgins for their assistance 
on this project. 
14
AHL: Variable Cracking Pressure Swing Check Valve 
Project Members 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Cameron Grover 
Samantha Leach 
Dr. Gerald Miller 
Biomedical Engineering 
Our project was to create a variable pressure swing check valve. The purpose of this project was to 
accurately model aortic valve sclerosis using Dr Miller’s mock circulatory loop. Aortic valve sclerosis 
is a condition where the valve leaflets begin to become calcified, making them less compliant and 
more difficult to open. The normal cracking force for a healthy aortic valve is about .3N, which 
increases in patients with a sclerotic valve up to about 1.0N. We have designed a valve to model this 
by using a strong rare earth magnet and a piece of ferromagnetic metal. With the metal attached to 
the valve, the proximity of the magnet determines the cracking force. Using a motor driven linear 
actuator being controlled using a step promoter, will allow us to very precisely control the required 
force to open the valve. When we run tests, we expect that the flow velocity will range from normal 
levels up to about 2m/s when the cracking force is at its maximum. 
15
Micro-Bead Maker 
Project Member 
Faculty Advisor 
Department 
Faisal Savaya 
Dr. Gary Bowlin 
Biomedical Engineering 
Alginate gels are used as a cell delivery vehicle due to their 
biocompatibility,  gelation,  and  stabilization.  Their  water 
retaining properties and structure plays a big role as well. The 
ambient gelation  preserve  the  bioactivity  of  the cells  and 
growth factors by allowing the passage of liquids and minerals 
through its pores, while at the same time acting as a capsule to 
keep large particles from contact to the cells and growth 
factors. Sodium alginate capsules are prepared by dripping 
alginate gel fine droplets into calcium chloride solution which 
will solidify the gel into a hard shell that form micro sized 
spherical beads which act as a cell delivery vehicles. Electro-
hydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) or electro spray is used to 
fabricate  micro  sized  alginate  beads.  However  in  cell 
microencapsulation  for  therapy  treatments,  the  biggest 
challenge is making a large number of beads in a small amount 
of time. The EHDA is a slow process that take hours to spray 
few milliliters; cells and growth factors should not be bathed in 
calcium chloride bath for a long time. This design project aims 
to solve this problem by designing a multi nozzle system that 
increases the production rate of alginate micro beads. The 
multi nozzle device increases the production and it is very cost 
effective. 
16
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested