c# 2015 pdf : Adding a link to a pdf control Library platform web page .net wpf web browser 336308310-part1903

Usability Issues
rting Establishment Surveys to 
Web-Based Data Collection 
an E. Fox 
am Mockovak 
Sylvia K. Fisher 
Christine Rho 
o encourage 
e option of selecting 
ternet is one of the 
n access the 
nvenience.  Properly 
respondents’ task 
of view, the Internet 
ces data entry costs, because respondents enter data themselves.  Further, Web surveys 
ost-data collection 
al for enhancing 
addition, the potential 
ection mode might 
On the other hand, there are some possible drawbacks to Web data collection.  One major problem is 
vey operations, such 
t costs.  The cost of 
over, preliminary research 
ple modes can 
ion of these and other 
ons that may include 
b survey is too 
espondents often 
lize from a negative 
experience on one Web survey to others, even though different agencies may be involved.  Therefore, to 
encourage participation, survey managers need to design Web surveys that will provide as positive an 
experience as possible for the widest range of respondents.  A key element of that design is ensuring the 
usability of Web surveys.  
This paper focuses on the usability of dedicated Web-based government surveys, where usability is 
defined as the effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction experienced by respondents as they provide the 
requested survey data.  At BLS, we are dedicated to developing usable Web surveys.  This paper 
describes our experiences and lessons learned in designing Web surveys for establishments. 
Associated with Conve
Je
Willi
Office of Survey Methods Research, Bureau of Labor Statistics
1.  Introduction 
In an effort to combat non-response, survey managers continually seek new ways t
respondents to participate in their surveys.  One approach is to offer respondents th
from multiple reporting modes so that they can select the mode they prefer.  The In
newest modes available and offers a variety of benefits.  For example, respondents ca
Internet easily from their desktop PCs, so they can complete the survey at their co
designed surveys can introduce instructions, edits, and help screens that simplify the
by guiding them through the completion process.  From a survey manager’s point
eliminates or redu
can check data as the respondent works, so the need for follow-up phone calls or p
processes is minimized.  With these obvious benefits, the Internet offers the potenti
response rates, improving data quality, and improving timeliness of reporting.  In
for cost savings also exists, although in some cases offering an additional data coll
actually increase costs. 
that the use of multiple data-collection modes complicates data integration and sur
as follow-up efforts.  Further, developing Web surveys can actually raise up-fron
building, maintaining, and integrating different systems is expensive.  More
with Web surveys indicates that rather than enhancing response rates, offering multi
actually depress overall response rates (Griffin et al. 2001).  For a detailed discuss
problems, see Fricker and Schonlau (2002).   
In establishment surveys, the Internet is likely to be one of several reporting opti
mail, phone, and fax.  While respondents may select another reporting mode if a We
difficult to complete, they may also decide not to report at all.  Further, since r
participate in more than one government survey, a respondent may genera
Adding a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to specific page; add links to pdf in acrobat
Adding a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf; add hyperlink pdf
2.  Usability Issues in Web Survey Design  
d largely on existing 
er modes, and the 
se research 
er, after some 
t issues related to the usability of Web surveys.  
F
w
and constraints that we believe federal survey managers 
that in some cases, 
respondent’s 
perspective, it is logical to expect that the look and feel of all Web surveys from the same agency will be 
of Labor Statistics 
e “Internet Data Collection 
tandards for user 
opters (i.e., surveys 
ere being 
ers had the extra responsibility of providing input to 
determ
, later adopters were faced with some established 
place, they are often 
wing our standards.  
s, and from requests made 
ta-Collection Modes 
roduce different 
of Web surveys is 
edia, and are 
teristic is especially 
ending on the 
respondent’s hardware and software configurations.   
Therefore, if a survey uses multiple data collection modes, survey managers need to ensure that 
rent modes.  Since federal establishment surveys deal 
vey managers may discount research findings on 
multi-modal differences, because these studies have dealt primarily with attitude questions or question 
formats not typically used in establishment surveys.  However, caution is warranted.  Assuming that 
different data collection modes do not affect the reporting or accuracy of establishment data may be a 
questionable hypothesis until the necessary research is done. 
As with any new technology, early attempts to develop Web surveys have relie
conventions for Web design, coupled with research on designing surveys for oth
personal preferences of designers.  This heuristic approach is understandable, becau
regarding the design of large government Web-based surveys is still limited.  Howev
experience at BLS, we have identified several importan
ollo ing are some of the design considerations
should be aware of when considering the use of Web-based surveys. 
2.1  Importance of Standardization across Surveys 
Many government agencies conduct numerous establishment surveys, which means
the same establishment (and respondent) responds to more than one survey.  From a
similar.  To accommodate respondents and allow for adequate security, the Bureau
offers a common portal or gateway into its data collection Website, called th
Facility” (IDCF).   
In addition to a common gateway, the IDCF requires that all surveys meet internal s
interfaces.
1
One of the challenges of applying these standards was that the early ad
introducing Web collection first) were designing their Web survey as the standards w
developed.  Therefore, these survey manag
ine appropriate standards.  On the other hand
standards that were not quite appropriate for their purposes.  Once standards are in
difficult and costly to change.  At BLS, we are just beginning the process of revie
We expect that support for changes will come from research, from respondent
by survey managers using Web-based data collection. 
2.2  Consistency across Survey Da
Research has found that different modes of data collection for identical content can p
results (e.g., Dillman, 2000; Dillman et al., in press).  As noted by Couper
2
, design
important because they are self-administered, interactive, visual, potentially multim
distributed over a wide variety of hardware and software systems.  This last charac
important because the most carefully laid out design can appear quite different dep
comparable data are being collected using the diffe
largely with reports of factual information, some sur
1
GUI and HTML Standards.  Internal Bureau of Labor Statistics document. 
2
Workbook for JPSM seminar in Web Survey Design, February 18-19, 2003. 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program. APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add links in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
clickable links in pdf from word; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
2.2.1  Creating a Unique Design for the Web vs. Reproducing the Paper Form 
when converting a 
rm already in use.  
paper form will 
efore, have little 
using an electronic copy 
mentioned above, the representation of the form may be affected by the respondent’s hardware and 
very different types 
ple, it can be displayed 
with little or no scrolling, and screen display concerns have been addressed.  Surveys that are longer and 
lity concerns.  These 
e the respondent’s 
effort. 
.  If respondents are 
dditional effort 
r logging on.   
vantages, which should 
be exploited.  For example, paper allows more of the survey to appear on a single page, and affords 
m
f
he Web allows you to walk respondents through the process 
ey, and also providing 
gram managers prefer to 
ily make the 
s that take better advantage of the computer. 
options are offered: 
l certificate offers a 
itially, digital 
rs, the process was 
simplified substantially. 
lties.  The log-on 
oncerns.  Existing 
security requirements also demand the creation of a fairly complicated permanent password (it must 
meet multiple criteria) that many users are not used to, and which many find confusing.  Finally, 
respondents must be able to recall permanent passwords for future access to the system.  To help 
minimize confusion with temporary passwords, we have found that it helps to provide passwords that do 
not contain 0 (zero) or o (oh), or 1 (one), l (el), or I (eye), as they may be difficult to differentiate. 
Although necessary to protect respondents’ confidentiality, Web security procedures introduce an 
additional hurdle compared to other response modes.  In addition to increasing respondent burden, the 
net impact of security procedures associated with Web reporting is that these gateway functions will 
increase operational demands on the surveys and require a larger support or help staff.  For example, 
Some survey managers make the immediate assumption that the best Web design
paper form to the Web is one that simply adopts an electronic copy of the paper fo
The argument for this approach is that respondents who are already familiar with the
transfer their knowledge of the paper form to the Web version of the form and, ther
difficulty completing the Web version.  Also, it may be tempting to believe that 
of the paper form will result in similar data collection results across all collection modes.  However, as 
software configurations.  At a minimum, a computer screen and a piece of paper are
of displays and may require different types of behaviors from the respondent.   
The “direct copy” approach would seem to work best when the form is fairly sim
more complex often need a different interface for the Web version to avoid usabi
surveys can also take advantage of automated skip patterns and edits to streamlin
Another concern is that the direct copy approach may discourage Web reporting
completing exactly the same form, they might wonder why they should expend the a
necessary to enter data on a computer, which requires the additional step of signing o
Since the Web and paper are two different modes, they each have their own ad
ore  lexibility in layout and formatting.  T
using automated skip patterns, exposing them only to the relevant parts of the surv
validation checks, where appropriate.  Our experience at BLS has been that pro
start with the “direct copy” approach, but then once they see the actual product, read
transition to design
2.3  Security and Confidentiality on the Web 
Our gateway requires identical log-on procedures for all surveys, but two security
(1) Personal ID Number (PIN) and password or (2) digital certificate.  A digita
higher degree of security, but is somewhat complicated for respondents to obtain.  In
certificates were confusing to users, but after usability testing and a change of vendo
Although easier to use, the PIN & password approach also presents possible difficu
information must be sent to respondents, which, in itself, presents some security c
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. How To Tutorials.
add hyperlink to pdf online; pdf link
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
add hyperlinks pdf file; add link to pdf
Web reporting for the Current Employment Statistics survey generates ‘trouble tick
percent 
ets’ from about 15 
of the sample each month, versus about 4 percent for the long-established touchtone data entry 
h
e might assume that 
ity, as well as save 
ate balance exists 
den imposed on a 
r improper use of edits 
he survey or 
critical to the overall 
he design process. 
oncerns their enforceability.  
ommended changes.  If a 
er hand, if a soft 
edit is triggered, respondents are notified that there may be a problem, but they are not required to make 
uld be used.  
entries is 
y, when the respondent 
ould appear in a 
ext to the entry field, or on a separate page.  A common problem 
see them, even 
failed to click a 
ick Continue again.  In 
blems as soon as 
possible.  However, some edits can only be run when respondents indicate that they are finished, such as 
c
B
en to use survey edits, 
there is no ideal solution at this time.  However, some general guidelines may be helpful.  For example, 
t
r, they cannot be 
ove
l design guidelines 
are proposed: 
d screen design).   
•  Use plain English (avoid jargon), and keep the explanatory message as brief as possible. 
•  Give control to users.  Allow them to either change the answer or leave it as is, and to move on 
when ready. 
•  Consider offering a comment box, so the respondent can explain the entry. 
•  Err on the side of introducing too few edits into the initial Web survey.  Study the resulting data 
and then gradually introduce edits into future releases to see if data quality issues are addressed. 
elp desk.
3
2.4  Validation Checks 
Obviously, paper forms lack any type of validation checks or edits.  Therefore, on
any editing done in a Web form would automatically result in improved data qual
money by reducing the number of follow-up phone calls.  On the other hand, a delic
between the survey designer’s need for the highest possible data quality and the bur
respondent when trying to respond to edits.  If the scale tips too far, the overuse o
could lead to frustration, increased burden, and either possible premature exits from t
refusals to report in the future.  What is important to keep in mind is that edits are
design and should not be viewed an afterthought to be dealt with as a last step in t
Although the use of some edits may seem perfectly justified, another issue c
Surveys use both hard and soft edits to distinguish between required and rec
hard edit is triggered, respondents must address the problem to continue.  On the oth
any changes.  A related question regarding edits in Web surveys is when they sho
Possibilities include (1) immediately after an entry is made, (2) after a table (grid) of
completed, (3) after a complete screen of entries, or (4) at the very end of a surve
submits the data.  Each option imposes different demands on the respondent.   
Edits can be implemented in several different ways.  For example, the edit message c
separate window (pop-up box), as text n
when edit messages are displayed on the same screen is that respondents may fail to 
when different color text is used.  When this happens, respondents think they either
button properly or that the same screen has redisplayed in error, so they simply cl
general, it is usually better to let respondents know about problems or potential pro
hecks for consistent data across multiple entries. 
ecause there is a lack of research that addresses the general issues of how and wh
o be useful, edits must be noticed, read, understood, and then acted upon.  Moreove
rly burdensome.  With these common sense goals in mind, the following genera
•  Take steps to ensure that edit messages are noticed (e.g., through goo
3
Personal communication with Richard Rosen, Program Manager for the Current Employment Statistics program. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add url link to pdf; pdf reader link
C# Image: C# Image Text Annotation Drawing & Inserting Tutorial
Q 2: I want to add a text annotation to my PDF document and I want the Q 3: Can RasterEdge C#.NET Image Text Annotation Library support adding a link to the
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add links to pdf in preview
Admittedly, these are rough guidelines, but until definitive research is done, they provide a useful 
st
o keep in mind is 
me expectations 
ormation about a topic, 
tasks which people do because they want to (Schober, Conrad, Ehlen, and Fricker, 2003).  Numerous 
stion or survey 
swer.   
vious experience on 
on the browser, click X to 
al information, or try to tab among multiple 
nd check boxes for 
nts are likely to engage 
rface responds 
um the respondent should be able to 
m
r field to another, either automatically (cursor is controlled by the 
the survey before it is 
estion, and either review or 
survey; and access a 
ments 
A
r u
electronic and information technology 
(
ured, maintained or used by the federal government to be 
a
ies.  This law also applies to self-administered, Web-based surveys, 
w e
ally challenged respondents.  Some of the most 
i
ned to a graphic, which screen readers can 
interpret) 
view the site,  
•  data tables must be properly coded with headers,  
•  frames should be named properly,  
•  alternatives must be provided for scripting languages,  
•  if plug-ins are used, a link to the download page must be included,  
•  forms should be coded properly and logically, and  
•  repetitive navigation should be coded so that it can be skipped. 
arting point. 
2.5  Navigating Among Survey Questions 
Any Web application requires some basic level of navigation.  An important point t
that respondents do not approach the task of completing a Web survey with the sa
elicited by other on-line tasks, such as ordering merchandise or searching for inf
observations in usability tests indicate that when respondents encounter a survey que
form, they expect a structured task, where a question is posed and they provide an an
Respondents also approach tasks with behaviors and expectations acquired from pre
the Web.  For example, they are likely to do things like use the Back button 
close the application, click on underlined words for addition
answer fields.  Moreover, many respondents will know how to use radio buttons a
choosing answers.  Therefore, a Web survey designer must expect that responde
in expected, conventional behaviors when completing a Web survey.  If the inte
differently, then respondent confusion is likely, which could lead to error. 
In terms of navigating a survey questionnaire or form, at a minim
ove from one question or answe
survey) or with the use of a mouse or tab key; leave (exit) or be able to close 
completed and return to the same point; back up to a previously answered qu
change the answer; access question-specific help and return to the same point in the
survey home page from within the survey as a navigational anchor. 
2.6  Section 508 Require
critical issue in the development of government Web surveys is the need to meet Section 508 
eq irements.  Section 508 is a federal law that requires
including Web sites) that are developed, proc
ccessible to people with disabilit
h re a major concern is the accessibility by visu
mportant guidelines are the following:
4
•  images must have equivalent ALT text (text assig
•  color and stylesheets must not be mandatory to
4
See http://www.webaim.org/standards/508/checklist
for a Section 508 checklist. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add links to pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
adding a link to a pdf in preview; add url to pdf
2.7  Other Screen Design Principles and Issues 
There are a variety of other screen design issues that affect the usability of Web surv
are many sources of guidelines for designing web applications, very few foc
eys.  Although there 
us on surveys.  Dillman and 
y propose 14 
nd addressing four major sources of survey error.   
U f
yet been resolved.  For example, designers 
o
proach or a single scrolling page? 
•  Which labels should be used for navigation buttons (e.g., “Submit” vs “Save” vs “Continue”)? 
ecks? 
eb design practices.  
include the Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines 
(available online at www.usability.gov
Bowker (2001) is one of the few sources that specifically address web surveys.  The
principles for guiding Web survey design a
nortunately, many issues specific to web surveys have not 
f federal surveys may face the following questions:  
•  Which is better, a page-by-page ap
•  What is the optimal way to present on-screen instructions or validation ch
•  How should “help” functions be presented?   
At present, the best we can do for many of these questions is to follow general w
Sources for helpful information
), Shaping Web Usability by Albert N. Badre (2002), and 
seful sources include Nielsen and Tahir (2002), 
Spool, Scanlon, Snyder, DeAngelo, and Schroeder (1998).  There are many other good books on 
ign guidelines 
all lifecycle,” where one stage of 
development follows the previous, with little or no feedback to repair problems in earlier stages (Royce, 
design the survey 
d (5) deploy it.  
pment team would have 
requirements were met.  
contain numerous 
ly leading to inaccurate data or non-response. 
e found that the cost of 
od of having major 
cur.  Fraser (2002) 
added that the waterfall approach to usability testing leads to a poor user interface and reliance on 
outsiders.  Since production schedules will often not permit major changes late in development, a 
common strategy using the waterfall approach is to make the easy, more cosmetic changes in the current 
release, but to save the major changes for the next release.  Unfortunately, this list often grows rapidly as 
users find more and more problems. 
In response, Boehm (1988) created the “Spiral” lifecycle model.  In this model, development starts 
small, at the “center of the circle.”  Each cycle around the center consists of analysis, development, and 
testing.  Each cycle, or iteration, includes more and more functionality, building on previous iterations.  
Designing Web Usability by Jakob Nielsen.  Other u
designing and building web pages as well.  We have included some general web des
relevant to web surveys in Appendix A. 
3.  Incorporating Usability into Your Development Culture 
Many large survey development projects follow the “waterf
1970).  For example the development team would (1) prepare the specifications, (2)
and associated database, (3) build the system and program the survey, (4) test it, an
Fraser (2002) adds that in newer incarnations of the waterfall model, the develo
a contractor conduct a usability test just before deployment to ensure that user 
If you follow this approach, you will probably find that the resulting survey may still
usability problems, potential
Boehm (1988) noted that the waterfall lifecycle model is inflexible and risky.  H
making changes increases exponentially from one stage to the next, and, the likeliho
problems is very high because there are few opportunities to fix problems as they oc
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
and editing functions, you can link to VB TIFF Pages Modifier. Opposite to page adding & inserting in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change link in pdf file; add url pdf
This method not only helps developers find problems earlier, but also makes it possible to incorporate 
design (Norman and 
rocess ensures that the 
the design of the software from the beginning and throughout 
e easily incorporated into the development, 
test
ral model.   
Gou
1
ble systems: 
nual focus on users 
ed and experienced in 
each stage of 
implement the methods, 
w to present the results to the development team and 
four challenges 
h (1990) created the 
lied by developers knowledgeable about the 
method was most 
s always possible to 
ent. 
ately, it is highly 
uffice in early 
umber of users.  For 
hat five users will often be satisfactory, with diminishing returns from 
tional users.  Members of the development team should observe the usability test, so that 
, we generally test 
ign changes.  As 
Gould (1988) suggests, we have also found that it is critical to test all parts of the system.  Therefore, we 
also evaluate advance mailings, instructional brochures, or e-mails, since they will directly impact use of 
the system and the users’ experiences. 
4.  Summary 
To make effective use of the Web for conducting surveys, survey managers must address a variety of 
issues, many of which are currently unresolved.  This paper summarizes key issues that survey managers 
should be aware of when they design new surveys for Web collection or convert existing surveys.  At 
BLS, we have found that a process called user-centered design is extremely helpful to ensure that Web 
feedback from users before development is nearly final. 
One process often utilized as a way to focus on the users is known as user-centered
Draper, 1986).  Within BLS, survey programs are strongly encouraged to implement a user-centered 
design approach (Fox, 2001; Mockovak and Fox, 2002).  Simply defined, this p
needs of the users are incorporated into
the design process.  User-center design activities can b
ing,and feedback cycles of the spi
ld ( 988) lays out four principles for designing usa
(1)  Early and conti
(2)  Integrated design (coordinate work on all components) 
(3)  Early and continual user testing 
(4)  Iterative Design 
It is important that the user-centered design activities be led by those who are skill
the field of usability.  They have to know (1) which methods are appropriate at
development, specifically within a particular development schedule, (2) how to
(3) how to interpret the results, and (4) ho
management.  Although the methods themselves may seem straightforward, these 
highlight the specialized skills that are required.  For example, Nielsen and Molic
“Heuristic Evaluation” as a method that could be app
product but not necessarily about usability.  Nielsen (1992) later found that the 
successful when conducted by usability specialists. 
Incorporating a user-centered design approach does not have to be expensive.  It i
incorporate some level of effort within the expected development schedule.  When the effort is made 
early on, it can prevent expensive problems later in developm
Usability testing is one of the most common tools of user-centered design.  Ultim
desirable to test actual users, but users with roughly comparable characteristics will s
stages of the testing.  Moreover, in most situations it is not necessary to test a large n
example, Virzi (1992) argues t
testing addi
they can see firsthand the types of difficulties that users are encountering.   
The frequency of usability testing depends on the application being built.  At BLS
Web surveys every 2-3 months or so, giving developers the time to incorporate des
surveys are easy for respondents to use.  This paper provides some basic suggestions for incorporating a 
tered design approach into the development of government surveys.  
ddison-Wesley. 
1(5). 61-72. 
D
n Wiley & Sons. 
D
ologists.  In Dimensions of 
.  Ulf-Dietrich Reips & Michael Bosnjak (Editors).  Lengerich, Germany:  Pabst Science Publishers. 
and Measurement 
e Internet.  Draft 
%20Gallup_%20POQ.pdf. 
for the CPI.  Proceedings of 
sting program.  New 
Architect.  Available at http://www.newarchitectmag.com/documents/s=7457/na0802b/index.html. 
F
vidence from the 
lau.net/publication/02fieldmethods.pdf. 
an-Computer Interaction.  
lsevier Science Publishers, 757-789. 
erican Community Survey.”  
nce of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Montreal, Canada, 
d Design into CAI Development.  
ent, Evaluation, and Testing Methods 
online at 
http://www.usability.gov/guidelines/index.html
user-cen
References 
Badre, A.N.  (2002).  Shaping Web Usability:  Interaction Design in Context.  New York:  A
Boehm, B.  (1988).  A spiral model of software development and enhancement.  IEEE Computer, 2
illman, D.A.  (2000).  Mail and Internet Surveys: The Tailored Design Method (second ed.).  Joh
illman, D.A., and Bowker, D.K. (2001).  The Web Questionnaire Challenge to Survey Method
Internet Science
Dillman, D.A., Phelps, G., Tortora, R., Swift, K., Kohrell, J., and Berck, J. (in press).  Response Rate 
Differences in Mixed Mode Surveys:  Using Mail, Telephone, Interactive Voice Response, and th
document available at 
http://survey.sesrc.wsu.edu/dillman/papers/Mixed%20Mode%20ppr%20_with
Fox, J.E. (2001).  Usability methods for designing a computer-assisted data collection instrument
the FCSM Conference, Washington, D.C. 
Fraser, J.  (2002).  The culture of usability: How to spend less and get more from your usability-te
ricker, R.D., and Schonlau, M. (2002).  Advantages and disadvantages of Internet research surveys: E
literature.   RAND document, available at http://www.schon
Gould, J.D.  (1988).  How to design usable systems.  In Helander, M. (Ed.), Handbook of Hum
North-Holland:  E
Griffin, D.H., Fischer, D.P., and Morgan, M.T. (2001).  Testing an internet option for the Am
Paper presented at the Annual Confere
also available at http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/ACS/Paper29.pdf. 
Mockovak, W. and Fox, J.  (2002).  Approaches for Incorporating User-Centere
Proceedings of the International Conference on Questionnaire Developm
(QDET), Charleston, SC. 
National Cancer Institute. (2002).  Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines.  Available
  
N
ing Web Usability: The Practice of Simplicity.  Indianapolis:  New Riders Publishing. 
9-256. 
New Riders Publishing. 
N
.A. and Draper, S.W.  (1986).  User Centered System Design: New Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction 
Hillsdale, NJ:  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 
Royce, W.W.  (1970). Managing the development of large software systems: Concepts and techniques, Proceedings of IEEE 
WESTCON, Los Angeles, 1-9. 
Schober, M., Conrad, F., Ehlen, P. & Fricker, S. (2003).  How Web surveys differ from other kinds of user interfaces.  Paper 
presented at The 58th Annual Conference of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, Nashville, TN. 
Spool, J. Scanlon, T., Snyder, C., DeAngelo, T., Schroeder, W.  (1998).  Web Site Usability.  Morgan Kaufmann 
Virzi, R.A.  (1992).  Refining the test phase of usability evaluation:  How many subjects is enough?  Human Factors, 42(4), 
457-468. 
ielsen, J.  (2000).   Design
Nielsen, J.  (1992).  Finding usability problems through heuristic evaluation.  In CHI ‘92, 373-380. 
Nielsen, J. and Molich, R.  (1990).  Heuristic evaluation of user interfaces.  In CHI ‘90, 24
Nielsen, J. and Tahir, M.  (2002).  Homepage Usability:  50 Websites Deconstructed.  Indianapolis:  
orman, D
Appendix A 
These are some general web design guidelines that may be useful to those designing web surveys for 
federal agencies. 
Bas
buttons for “Check 
ents on User names and passwords to keep them simple; avoid 1 (one), i (eye), 
little oh).  However, your agency may have 
ts may print it, fill it out, then transcribe 
the data. 
ovide information on privacy, confidentiality, and ADA issues. 
Provide links to sites that show how your “products” (i.e., data) might be useful to the 
umber). 
ation 
tand them. 
mistakes. 
the page. 
n 508 requirements). 
animation, unless it helps the respondents. 
g where possible. 
Data Entry 
•  Use appropriate data entry tools (e.g., radio buttons vs. check boxes). 
•  Make text boxes large enough to accommodate the longest possible response (use scrolling on 
very long fields). 
•  Drop-down lists can be helpful in limiting the responses to valid values.  However, some 
responses may be “hidden” if respondents don’t scroll the list. 
•  Label each data entry field clearly. 
ic Web guidelines 
•  Be consistent within the web site. 
•  Use standard interface controls as they are supposed to be used (e.g., radio
one” and check boxes for “Check all that apply”). 
•  Use a simple URL that people can remember. 
•  Limit requirem
and l (el), as well as 0 (zero) and O (big oh) and o (
specific security requirements you must follow. 
•  Consider how the page will print out.  Some responden
Pr
respondent. 
elp (e.g., an email address or phone n
Provide easy access to h
Navig
•  Make it obvious what respondents should do next
•  Label links clearly so respondents unders
•  Make it easy to correct
Layout 
•  Put important information at the top, left-hand side of 
•  Limit the use of graphics (minimizes download time and helps meet Sectio
•  Do not use 
•  Eliminate horizontal scrolling. 
•  Minimize vertical scrollin
’t make respondents enter data twice (e.g., birthdate and age) unless you are using it to verify 
pondents need responses from one question to answer another, display the questions 
together. 
Tex
s. 
well-designed headings to guide the respondents. 
•  Use a sans serif font, as the serifs don’t display well. 
Don’t make the lines of text too long, as it’s hard to find your place when going from one line to 
Color 
•  Use high contrast colors (e.g., black text on a white background). 
•  Use color coding appropriately and consistently, without overusing color. 
•  Do not rely on color coding as the only way to convey information. 
•  Don
a value. 
•  If res
h
Use short, simple sentences and paragrap
•  Avoid jargon and acronyms, unless they are very familiar to the respondents
•  Use 
the next. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested