c# 2015 pdf : Adding links to pdf Library software component .net winforms web page mvc 383931150-part1906

Unclassified 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL
Organisation de Coopération et de Développement Economiques 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
12-Apr-2007 
___________________________________________________________________________________________
English - Or. English 
DIRECTORATE FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INDUSTRY 
COMMITTEE FOR INFORMATION, COMPUTER AND COMMUNICATIONS POLICY 
Working Party on the Information Economy 
PARTICIPATIVE WEB: USER-CREATED CONTENT 
JT03225396 
Document complet disponible sur OLIS dans son format d'origine 
Complete document available on OLIS in its original format 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
Unclassified 
English - Or. English 
Adding links to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links pdf document; add links to pdf in preview
Adding links to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf edit hyperlink; adding an email link to a pdf
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
2
FOREWORD 
This report was presented to the Working Party on the Information Economy (WPIE) in December 
2006 and declassified by the Committee for Information, Computer and Communications Policy in March 
2007.  
The report was prepared by Sacha Wunsch-Vincent and Graham Vickery of the OECD's Directorate 
for  Science,  Technology  and  Industry  as  part  of  the  WPIE  work  on  Digital  Content 
(www.oecd.org/sti/digitalcontent
). It is published on the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the 
OECD. 
© OECD/OCDE 2007 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can
accessible links in pdf; pdf link to specific page
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
detail guides on these functions through left menu links. guide on C#.NET PPT image adding library. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add links to pdf document
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
3
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SUMMARY..................................................................................................................................................4
PARTICIPATIVE WEB: USER-CREATED CONTENT (UCC)...............................................................7
INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................7
DEFINING AND MEASURING THE PARTICIPATIVE WEB AND USER-CREATED CONTENT....8
Definition..................................................................................................................................................8
Measurement.............................................................................................................................................9
DRIVERS OF USER-CREATED CONTENT...........................................................................................13
TYPES OF USER-CREATED CONTENT AND DISTRIBUTION PLATFORMS.................................15
VALUE CHAINS AND EMERGING BUSINESS MODELS..................................................................21
The emerging value and publishing chain of user-created content.........................................................21
ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL IMPACTS....................................................................................................28
Economic impacts of user-created content..............................................................................................28
Social impacts of user-created content....................................................................................................35
Social and legal challenges of user-created content................................................................................39
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR USERS, BUSINESS AND POLICY.............................40
Enhancing R&D, innovation and technology in content, networks, software and new technologies.....40
Developing a competitive, non-discriminatory framework.....................................................................42
Enhancing the infrastructure...................................................................................................................42
Regulatory environment..........................................................................................................................43
Conceptualisation, classification and measurement................................................................................59
ANNEX......................................................................................................................................................60
BIBLIOGRAPHY.......................................................................................................................................62
NOTES.......................................................................................................................................................67
Boxes 
Examples of drivers of user-created content...........................................................................................14
Politics, news and blogging in France.....................................................................................................37
Digital content policies............................................................................................................................40
Fair use and copyright limitations...........................................................................................................46
Copyright liability of online intermediaries............................................................................................50
Participative web technologies................................................................................................................60
User-created content in China: Video.....................................................................................................61
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF other mature image viewing features, like adding or deleting page And you can find the links to these professional
check links in pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
4
SUMMARY 
The concept of the “participative web” is based on an Internet increasingly influenced by intelligent 
web services that empower the user to contribute to developing, rating, collaborating on and distributing 
Internet content and customising Internet applications. As the Internet is more embedded in people’s lives 
“users” draw on new Internet applications to express themselves through “user-created content” (UCC). 
This study describes the rapid growth of UCC, its increasing role in worldwide communication and 
draws out implications for policy. Questions addressed include: What is user-created content? What are its 
key drivers, its scope and different forms? What are new value chains and business models? What are the 
extent  and  form  of  social,  cultural  and  economic  opportunities  and  impacts?  What  are  associated 
challenges? Is there a government role and what form could it take? 
Definition, measurement and drivers of user-created content 
There is no widely accepted definition of UCC, and measuring its social, cultural and economic 
impacts are in the early stages. In this study UCC is defined as: i) content made publicly available over the 
Internet, ii) which reflects a “certain amount of creative effort”, and iii) which is “created outside of 
professional routines and practices”. Based on this definition a taxonomy of UCC types and hosting 
platforms  is  presented.  While  the  measurement  of  UCC is  in  its  infancy,  available  data  show  that 
broadband users produce and share content at a high rate, and this is particularly high for younger age 
groups (e.g. 50% of Korean Internet users report having a homepage and/or a blog). Given strong network 
effects a small number of platforms draw large amounts of traffic, and online video sites and social 
networking sites are developing to be the most popular websites worldwide.  
The study also identifies: technological drivers (e.g. more wide-spread broadband uptake, new web 
technologies),  social  drivers  (e.g.  demographic  factors,  attitudes  towards  privacy),  economic  drivers 
(e.g. increased commercial involvement of Internet and media firms in hosting UCC) and legal drivers 
(e.g. the rise of more flexible licensing schemes). 
Emerging value chains and business models 
Most user-created content activity is undertaken without the expectation of remuneration or profit. 
Motivating factors include connecting with peers, achieving a certain level of fame, notoriety or prestige, 
and self-expression. Defining an economic value chain for UCC as in the other OECD digital content 
studies is thus more difficult. 
From a creator’s point of view, the traditional media publishing value chain depends on various 
entities selecting, developing and distributing a creator’s work often at great expense. Technical and 
content quality is guaranteed through the choice of the traditional media “gatekeepers”. Relative to the 
potential supply, only a few works are eventually distributed, for example, via television or other media.  
In the UCC value chain, content is directly created and posted for or on UCC platforms using devices 
(e.g. digital cameras), software (video editing tools), UCC platforms and an Internet access provider. There 
are many active creators and a large supply of content that can engage viewers, although of potentially 
lower or more diverse quality. Users are also inspired by, and build on, existing works as in the traditional 
media chain. Users select what does and does not work, for example, through recommending and rating, 
possibly leading to recognition of creators who would not be selected by traditional media publishers. 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
5
Most UCC sites have been start-ups or non-commercial ventures of enthusiasts, but commercial firms 
are now playing an increasing role in supporting, hosting, searching, aggregating, filtering and diffusing 
UCC. Most models are still in flux and revenue generation for content creators or commercial firms 
(e.g. media companies) are only now beginning. Different UCC types (e.g., blogs, video content) have 
different although similar approaches to monetising  UCC. There  are five basic models: i) voluntary 
contributions, ii) charging viewers for services - pay-per-item or subscription models, including bundling 
with existing subscriptions, iii) advertising-based models, iv) licensing of content and technology to third 
parties, and v) selling goods and services to the community (“monetising the audience via online sales”). 
These models can also remunerate creators, either by sharing revenues or by direct payments from other 
users.  
Economic impacts of user-created content 
User-created  content  is  already  an  important  economic  phenomenon  despite  its  originally  non-
commercial context. The spread of UCC and the amount of attention devoted to it by users appears to be a 
significant disruptive force for how content is created and consumed and for traditional content suppliers. 
This disruption creates opportunities and challenges for established market participants and their strategies.  
The more immediate economic impacts in terms of growth, entry of new firms and employment are 
currently with ICT goods and services providers and newly forming UCC platforms. New digital content 
innovations seem to be more based on decentralised creativity, organisational innovation and new value-
added models, which favour new entrants, and less on traditional scale advantages and large start-up 
investments. Search engines, portals and aggregators are also experimenting with business models that are 
often based on online advertisement and marketing. On social networking sites and in virtual worlds, for 
example, brands increasingly create special sub-sites and new forms of advertising are emerging. 
The shift to Internet-based media is only beginning to affect content publishers and broadcasters. At 
the outset, UCC may have been seen as competition as: i) users may create and watch UCC at the expense 
of  traditional  media,  reducing  advertising revenues,  ii)  users  become  more  selective  in  their  media 
consumption (especially younger age groups), iii) some UCC platforms host unauthorised content from 
media  publishers.  However,  some traditional media  organisations  have  shifted from creating  on-line 
content to creating the facilities and frameworks for UCC creators to publish. They have also been making 
their websites and services more interactive through user comment and ratings and content diffusion. TV 
companies are also licensing content and extending on-air programs and brands to UCC platforms.  
There are also potentially growing impacts of UCC on independent or syndicated content producers. 
Professional photographers, graphic designers, free-lance journalists and similar professional categories 
providing pictures, news videos, articles or other content have started to face competition from freely 
provided amateur-created content. 
Social impacts of user-created content 
The creation of content by users is often perceived as having major social implications. The Internet 
as a new creative outlet has altered the economics of information production and led to the democratisation 
of media production and changes in the nature of communication and social relationships (sometimes 
referred to as the “rise - or return - of the amateurs”). Changes in the way users produce, distribute, access 
and re-use information, knowledge and entertainment potentially gives rise to increased user autonomy, 
increased participation and increased diversity. These may result in lower entry barriers, distribution costs 
and user costs and greater diversity of works as digital shelf space is almost limitless.  
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
6
UCC can provide citizens, consumers and students with information and knowledge. Educational 
UCC content tends to be collaborative and encourage sharing and joint production of information, ideas, 
opinions and knowledge, for example building on participative web technologies to improve the quality 
and extend the reach of education. Discussion fora and product reviews can lead to more informed user and 
consumer decisions (e.g. fora on health-related questions, book reviews).  
The cultural impacts of this social phenomenon are also far-reaching. "Long tail" economics allows a 
substantial  increase  in  availability  and  a  more  diverse  array  of  cultural  content  to  find  niche 
audiences. UCC can also be seen as an open platform enriching political and societal debates, diversity of 
opinion,  free  flow  of  information  and  freedom  of  expression.  Transparency  and  some  “watchdog” 
functions  may  be enhanced by  decentralised  approaches  to  content  creation. Citizen journalism,  for 
instance, allows users to correct, influence or create news, potentially on similar terms as newspapers or 
other large entities. Furthermore, blogs, social networking sites and virtual worlds can be platforms for 
engaging electors, exchanging political views, provoking debate and sharing information on societal and 
political questions. 
Challenges related to inclusion, cultural fragmentation, content quality and security and privacy have 
been  raised.  A  greater  divide  between  digitally  literate  users  and  others  may  occur  and  cultural 
fragmentation may take place with greater individualisation of the cultural environment. Other challenges 
relate to information accuracy and quality (including inappropriate or illegal content) where everybody can 
contribute without detailed checks and balances. Other issues relate to privacy, safety on the Internet and 
possibly adverse impacts of intensive Internet use. 
Opportunities and challenges for users, business and policy 
The rapid rise of UCC is raising new questions for users, business and policy. Policy issues are 
grouped under six headings: i) enhancing R&D, innovation and technology, ii) developing a competitive, 
non-discriminatory framework environment, iii) enhancing the infrastructure, iv) shaping business and 
regulatory environments, v) governments as producers and users of content, and vi) better measurement.  
Apart from standard issues such as ensuring wide-spread broadband access and innovation, new 
questions emerge around whether and how governments should support UCC. The maintenance of pro-
competitive markets  is  particularly  important with  increased commercial activity and  strong  network 
effects and potential for lock-in. UCC is also putting existing regulatory arrangements and the separation 
between broadcasting and telecommunications regulations to a test. With the emergence of increasingly 
advertising-based business models and unsolicited e-mail and marketing messages, rules on advertising 
will play a particular role in the UCC environment (e.g. product placements, advertising to children).  
In the regulatory environment important questions relate to intellectual property rights and UCC: how 
to define “fair use” and other copyright exceptions, what are the effects of copyright on new sources of 
creativity, and how does IPR shape the coexistence of market and non-market creation and distribution of 
content. In addition, there are questions concerning the copyright liability of UCC platforms hosting 
potentially unauthorised content and the impacts of digital rights management. 
Other issues include: i) how to preserve freedom of expression made possible by UCC, ii) information 
and content quality/accuracy and tools to resolve these, iii) adult, inappropriate, and illegal content and 
self-regulatory (e.g. community standards) or technical solutions (e.g. filtering software), iv) safety on the 
“anonymous” Internet, v) dealing with new issues surrounding privacy and identity theft, vi) monitoring 
the impacts of intensive Internet use, vii) network security and spam, and viii) regulatory questions in 
dealing with virtual worlds (taxation, competition etc.). Finally, new statistics and indicators are urgently 
needed to inform policy. 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
7
PARTICIPATIVE WEB: USER-CREATED CONTENT (UCC) 
INTRODUCTION  
Wide creative  participation in  developing digital content, driven  by rapidly diffusing broadband 
access  and  new  software  tools,  is  a  new  feature  of  society  and  the  economy.  Initial  work  on  the 
participative web was developed for the Information Technology Outlook 2006,
1
and sudden awareness of 
the growth and potential impacts of user-created content was one of the main outcomes of the international 
conference on The Future Digital Economy: Digital Content Creation, Distribution and Access organised 
by the OECD and the government of Italy in January 2006.
2
As the Digital Content Conference progressed, participants increasingly observed that the Internet is 
embedded in people’s lives and that with the rise of a more “participative web” an inflection point for its 
impact on governance and civic life has been reached (OECD, 2006a, b). New user habits where “users” 
draw on new Internet-based applications to express themselves through “user-created content” and take a 
more active and collaborative role in content “creation and consumption” were central topics. More active 
users, consumers and user-centred innovation were seen to have increasing economic impacts. These new 
forms of user creation and distribution are spurring new business models, presenting challenges for access 
to content, and are starting to bypass, intersect with, and create new opportunities for established media 
and other industries.  
As an extension of existing OECD work, this study explores the rise, development and actual and 
potential impacts of user-created content (UCC) in greater detail, and draws out implications for policy.
3
Questions addressed include: What is user-created content? What are its key drivers, its scope and the 
different forms it takes? What are new value chains and business models? What are the extent and form of 
its social, cultural and economic impacts? What are associated challenges? Is there a government role and, 
if there is, what form could it take?  
The analysis is structured in six main parts. The first part defines UCC. The second and third parts 
identify  the  key drivers  of  UCC  and  provide  a broad  overview  of  various  UCC  types  and  related 
distribution platforms. The fourth part analyses associated “value” chains and new business models while 
the fifth part examines social and economic impacts of UCC. The final part analyses opportunities and 
challenges for users, businesses and government.  
Certain  questions  are  raised  by  this  paper  which  are  answered  only  in  part,  mainly  because 
developments are very recent and general trends, developments and policy are not clear as yet.
While the development of open source software is often included in discussion of the participative 
web, this topic is excluded from the scope of this study. In terms of impact, such large-scale collaborative 
efforts may merit further attention.  
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
8
DEFINING AND MEASURING THE PARTICIPATIVE WEB AND  
USER-CREATED CONTENT 
Definition 
The use of the Internet is characterised by increased participation and interaction of Internet users who 
use it to communicate and express themselves. The most prominent concept to describe this evolution 
which uses the Internet’s inherent capabilities more extensively is called “participative web”. It represents 
an Internet increasingly influenced by intelligent web services based on new technologies empowering the 
user to be an increasing contributor to developing, rating, collaborating and distributing Internet content 
and developing and customising Internet applications (O’Reilly, 2002, 2005; MIC, 2006; OECD, 2006b). 
These new web tools are said to enable commercial and non-commercial service providers to better harness 
the “collective intelligence” of Internet users, using information and knowledge embedded in the Web in 
the form of data, metadata, user participation and creating links between these. One characteristic of the 
participative web  is  also the  communication between  users  and  between different separate  software 
applications via open web standards and web interfaces.  
The rise of user-created content (UCC) (French: “contenu auto-créé”) or the so-called “rise of the 
amateur creators” is one of the main features of the so-called participative web.
4
This comprises various 
forms  of  media  and  creative  works  (written,  audio,  visual,  and  combined)  created  by  Internet  and 
technology users. Despite frequent references to this topic by media and experts, no commonly agreed 
definition of user-created content exists.
5
Also referred to as “user-generated” content, sources such as 
Wikipedia refer to it as “on-line content that is produced by users [i.e. non-media professionals (i.e. 
“ordinary people”)] as opposed to traditional media producers such as broadcasters and production 
companies. […]”.
6
A central aspect is also that users recommend and rate content.  
To have a more solid understanding of UCC, it is useful to agree on the characteristics of user-created 
content (i.e. an indication of what is UCC and what is not). Three central characteristics are proposed. 
UCC, however, is hard to define and based on criteria which are likely to evolve in time. As such these 
characteristics lay the ground only for identifying a possible spectrum of UCC.  
•  Publication requirement: While theoretically UCC could be made by a user and never actually 
be published online or elsewhere, we focus here on the work that is published in some context, be 
it on a publicly accessible website or on a page on a social networking site only accessible to a 
select group of people (i.e. fellow university students). This is a useful way to exclude email, 
bilateral instant messages and the like. 
•  Creative effort: This implies that a certain amount of creative effort was put into creating the 
work or adapting existing works to construct a new one; i.e. users must add their own value to the 
work. The creative effort behind UCC often also has a collaborative element to it, as is the case 
with websites which users can edit collaboratively. For example, merely copying a portion of a 
television show and posting it to an online video website (an activity frequently seen on the UCC 
sites) would not be considered UCC. If a user uploads his/her photographs, however, expresses 
his/her thoughts in a blog, or creates a new music video this could be considered UCC. Yet the 
minimum amount of creative effort is hard to define and depends on the context.  
•  Creation outside of professional routines and practises: User-created content is generally 
created outside of professional routines and practices. It often does not have an institutional or a 
commercial market context. In the extreme, UCC may be produced by non-professionals without 
the expectation of profit or remuneration. Motivating factors include: connecting with peers, 
achieving a certain level of fame, notoriety, or prestige, and the desire to express oneself.  
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
9
Although  conceptually useful, the last characteristic is  getting  harder to maintain.  While in  the 
beginning UCC was a grassroots movement, there is now a trend towards the monetisation of UCC from 
the user-side (see section on economic impacts). Increasingly established media and Internet players are 
acquiring UCC platforms to derive revenues. At times users are being remunerated for their content and 
some  users  develop  to  be  professionals  after an  initial phase of non-commercial  activity. It  is  also 
important  to  remember  that  some  works  are  created  by  professionals  but  in  their  spare  time 
(e.g. professional video editors creating a film at home). The mere term UCC may thus be inadequate as 
content creators are much more than just “users”. Still, the creation of content outside of a professional 
routine and organisation is a useful concept to separate it from content produced by commercial entities. 
Measurement 
Measuring  UCC  is  not  straightforward.  Several  factors  complicate  such  measurement:  the 
decentralised nature of UCC production, the fact that the same UCC content is sometimes accessible on a 
variety of sites (problem of double-counting), the fact that not all registered users of UCC platforms are 
actually active users (inactive accounts), the problem of users setting up multiple accounts at the same site 
(problem counting unique users) and the sometimes difficult distinction between user-created and other 
content (such as the uploading of clips from copyrighted television shows). The first two factors may lead 
UCC platforms to overstate the figures about their active unique users. 
Currently also little official data from National Statistical Offices (NSO) are obtainable concerning 
the number of users creating content, the amount of such content that exists, the number of users accessing 
such content and the patterns that are emerging from such creation. NSOs have only started to include such 
questions in surveys (e.g. the European Union, Japan, Korea, Canada). It may take some time before 
official national data is available for all OECD countries in an internationally comparable way. 
Existing data however show that broadband Internet users produce and share content at a high rate 
and do not merely consume it. All data sources point to large intergenerational differences in web media 
usage and to considerable gender differences. 
Data available from national statistical surveys and the OECD show that the typical online behaviour 
of Internet users consists of the following activities: mainly search, consulting general interest and portals, 
using Internet tools and Web services such as email, e-commerce, using sites from software manufacturers, 
consulting classifieds and participating in auctions, using broadcast media, and financial services (OECD, 
2004a; OECD, 2005a).  
When data is available on content creation, however, this is shown to be a very popular activity 
among young age groups. As shown for the European Union in Figure 1, posting messages to chat rooms, 
newsgroups or forums, using peer-to-peer file sharing sites and creating a webpage – the closest yet 
sometimes imperfect statistical proxies on offer for UCC - are already very popular among Internet users.
7
In countries such as Finland, Norway, Iceland, Portugal, Luxembourg, Hungary and Poland, in 2005 
around one third of all Internet users aged 16-74 were engaged in these activities. One-fifth of all Internet 
users in some OECD countries report having created a webpage. Younger age groups are more active 
Internet content creators. In countries such as Hungary, Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway, Germany, 
Poland and Luxembourg (in increasing order), in 2005 between 60 and 70% of Internet users aged 16-24 
have posted messages to chat rooms, newsgroups or forums. One-fourth but sometimes half of all Internet 
users in some OECD countries in that age group have created a webpage. In France, about 37% of 
teenagers have created a blog.
8
In 2005, 13% of Europeans were “regularly contributing to blogs” and 
another 12% were “downloading podcasts at least once a month” (European Commission, 2006). 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
10
Figure 1.  User-created content in the EU as a % of the number of Internet users, 2005 
Age Group: 16-24 years 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Ireland
Czech Republic
Slovakia
Sweden
Greece
Austria
Portugal
Netherlands
United Kingdom
EU 25 average
Hungary
Denmark
Iceland
Finland
Norway
Germany
Poland
Luxembourg
Post messages to chat rooms, newsgroups or forums
Use peer-to-peer file sharing 
Create a webpage
Age Group: 16-74 years 
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
Ireland
Czech Republic
Sweden
Slovakia
Netherlands
Austria
United Kingdom
Denmark
Germany
EU 25 average
Finland
Norway
Iceland
Greece
Portugal
Luxembourg
Hungary
Poland
Post messages to chat rooms, newsgroups or forums
Use peer-to-peer file sharing 
Create a webpage
Source: OECD based on Eurostat. 
According to Table 1, 35% of all US broadband users have posted content to the Internet. For 
broadband users under the age of 30, 51% have placed content on the Internet, 25% have their own blogs, 
and 41% have posted content online they created themselves. 57% of teenagers in the US have created 
content on the Internet as of late 2004 (Lenhart, 2005). More than half (55%) of all of online American 
youths ages 12-17 use online social networking sites (Lenhart and Madden, 2007). In general, girls seem 
over proportionally active users of social networking sites for communication, chat and other forms of 
socialising and exchange, but less so when it comes to just viewing content, for example, on online video 
platforms.
9
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested