DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
41
parental controls, age ratings), and securing intellectual property rights. These technologies for content 
creation and diffusion are increasingly R&D-intensive (faster networks, new platforms, content-intensive 
products,  data-base  management)  and  the  challenge  is  to  establish  business  settings,  policies  and 
approaches that encourage innovation.  
Market participants and institutions create and commercialise innovative products, but governments 
are supporting relevant basic R&D and address market failures and provide an environment conducive to 
R&D and innovation (e.g. with R&D tax incentives, specific R&D support, etc.) and usually encourage 
linkages between commercial and  not-for-profit R&D and  innovation-related activities.
68
Basic R&D 
receives major public sector support, e.g. for military and space, and a lot of this is about software for 
virtual environments, 3-D modelling etc. To  the extent that there are general  market  failures in  the 
development  of  new  software  or  platforms  governments  should  ensure  that  an  innovative  business 
environment is maintained, without becoming explicitly involved in choosing particular commercial or 
non-commercial developments.  
Ensuring technological and other spillovers 
Content delivery technologies and the content itself are increasingly relevant to non-entertainment 
sectors. Technological spillovers from UCC to other sectors are desirable, especially in areas such games 
imaging and virtual world technology which can be of relevance to medical and other fields.  
Creative environments, skills, training, education  
The creation of UCC and the necessary services and technology to support its evolution rests on the 
existence of creative environments, skills and education. A central question is if and how governments 
shall encourage and promote UCC and if there are new models to foster creativity and reward it.  
Governments have a role in influencing skills via scholastic and vocational training. For the creation 
of  UCC,  basic  and  sometimes  more  advanced  ICT  skills  are  needed.  Younger  generations  will 
automatically have these required ICT skills. But the inclusion of older generations or the disabled may 
warrant special efforts.  
Fostering user-created content as local and diverse content 
Culture and language issues are seen as important in the development of digital content, particularly 
for small countries and cultural minorities. There is significant government support for local content 
development where market failures are perceived to exist. 
Many OECD member countries have vibrant markets for the creation of UCC and related non-
commercial and commercial services. The creation of UCC usually boosts the availability and diversity of 
local content  in diverse languages. With lower entry barriers downstream and increased demand for 
content and lowered entry barriers upstream, the creation of content and overall cultural wealth could be 
positively influenced and the identification of artists facilitated.
69
Public institutions may have a role in driving the creation of UCC. In some countries, such as the 
United Kingdom, for example, public broadcasters have established initiatives which allow citizens to 
download their content, and rip, mix, and burn it (see the example of the British Broadcasting Corporation, 
BBC).
70
Other  means  to  foster  this  phenomenon  may  exist  in  the  context  of  cultural  policies  and 
institutions.  Museums,  musical  conservatories,  other  cultural  institutions  but  also  schools  with  the 
increasing express public policy objective to foster creativity and cultural expression may innovate around 
Pdf link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
c# read pdf from url; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
Pdf link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf; pdf email link
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
42
the UCC phenomenon. Support programmes for the creation and diffusion of local content may have to be 
revised to take account of the potential behind UCC and associated outlets.  
In the United Kingdom, making available free content for downloading, remixing and other uses has 
however also triggered concerns around the idea that freely provided public content could “crowd out” the 
creation of commercial content (i.e. free public content competing on an unequal footing with commercial 
content).  
Developing a competitive, non-discriminatory framework 
User-created content is based on the assumption of widely-accessible access to networks, software, 
content and other services. Increasingly commercial players are involved in supporting the creation, search, 
aggregation, filtering, hosting and diffusion of UCC.  
As a result, policy makers will be interested in maintaining and developing further competitive, non-
discriminatory framework environments, creating a pro-innovation business environment that promotes 
experimentation and competition in value chains and business models. This starts with the market for 
telecommunication services but also extends to other players who increasingly are active in this field (e.g. 
traditional and new content industry entities, Internet portals, search engines). Control over parts of the 
value chain should not unduly restrict new entrants or users creating content (in particular for small firms). 
This holds particularly true in new fields such as digital rights management, an increasing concentration in 
search services, and technologies/services, which prevent interoperability. Very strong network effects, 
potential for lock-in and high switching costs have to be taken into account when making competition-
related assessments of UCC services which have a critical mass of users. 
It needs to be kept in mind however that, in principle, new forms of digital content innovations seem 
less based on traditional scale advantages and large up-front investments but more based on decentralised 
creativity,  organisational  innovation and new  value models  behind content production  and  diffusion 
(OECD, 2006a). These factors favour new entrants, particularly for new platform aggregation models, 
where content owners had no legacy advantages (IBM, 2007). Very popular services were started by a 
small group of individuals and rapidly competed with the web presence of established entities
Still, maintaining the open nature of the Internet and sustaining the “innovation at the edges” seems a 
necessary condition for the further evolution of UCC. The question is whether the Internet will preserve its 
open nature with interoperable services or whether it may evolve into “walled gardens” which may be 
preferred by some users for simplicity, quality and security. The role of policies is to ensure that the users 
can choose and are not limited to only a “walled garden” option. Finally, the growth and development of 
UCC may have to be taken into account when determining policy on the prioritisation of network traffic. It 
is unlikely that individual users creating content on an informal basis would have the ability or funds to 
negotiate agreements with ISPs.  
Enhancing the infrastructure  
Broadband access  
Universal, affordable access for broadband technology – a necessary condition for UCC - is a policy 
target  in  many  OECD  countries.  Ensuring  effective  competition  and  continued  liberalisation  in 
infrastructure, network services and applications in the face of convergence across different technological 
platforms that supply broadband services should remain a key policy priority.
71
Broadband policies to 
ensure  (regional) coverage  and  access to  infrastructure and applications  across  all  levels  of society 
promoting access on fair terms and at competitive prices to all communities, irrespective of location, are 
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; change link in pdf file
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
adding a link to a pdf in preview; add links to pdf in acrobat
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
43
being pursued. A regulatory environment which is promoting investment in communication networks and 
technologies and related  competition and which  adapts to new  technologies such  as next  generation 
networks is desirable.
72
Initiatives such as the provision of municipal broadband networks can – in the 
absence of market solutions providing a similar degree of access – be beneficial to the creation of UCC 
(including the accessibility of broadband services to the disabled).  
One key technical problem for the evolution of UCC is the absence of symmetrical networks. Most 
contemporary Internet connections such as asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (aDSL) are “asymmetric” 
in nature as they provide high download speeds but rather low upload speeds.
73
As today there is greater 
potential  for  symmetrical  exchange  of  content  and  related  commercial  opportunities,  the  current 
infrastructure may not be conducive to such one-to-one relationships. The deployment of new distribution 
technologies such as fibre (as in Japan and Korea) can help overcome this problem.  
Convergence as challenge for regulation 
Many related new services (so called non-linear services) have appeared which support the diffusion 
of these videos on an on-demand and one-to-one basis. Companies such as ISPs, new video services and 
others are now involved in the creation, hosting and diffusion of such content. This technological and 
business convergence is putting existing regulatory arrangements and the traditional separation between 
broadcasting  and  telecommunications  regulations  to  a  test  (OECD, 2004b;  OECD, 2006e). Whereas 
telecommunication regulations mainly focus on establishing competition, broadcasting  policy  tries to 
achieve certain public policy objectives (e.g. the protection of minors, cultural diversity).  
Many OECD member countries are in the process of realigning their regulatory regimes to deal with 
convergence in light of the disparities that have arisen as Internet content has proliferated.
74
The essential 
question, while taking into account the particular nature of the on-demand video services, is to determine 
up to what point the new services should be subjected to similar rules as those applicable to traditional 
broadcasters or rules inspired by those.
75
Examples of such regulations are broadcasting and production 
quotas (e.g. transmission time reserved for works of independent producers), rules on television advertising 
and sponsorship (e.g. maximum advertisement time per daily transmission tie, identification of advertising, 
rules on  surreptitious advertising,  restrictions  on  certain advertisements such  as  alcohol and product 
placement and sponsoring), the protection of minors, rules on incitement to hatred, the right of reply (i.e. a 
person whose legitimate interests have been damaged by an assertion of incorrect facts in a television 
programme must have a right of reply), and how events of major importance for society have to be treated.  
With the emergence of increasingly advertisement-based business models and unsolicited email and 
marketing messages, rules on advertising will play a particular role in the UCC environment (in particular 
product placement in virtual worlds, and in the context of advertising to children). 
A question which has also been raised is if and how UCC types and platforms can fulfil, extend or 
complement  certain  functions  more  effectively  which  up  to  now  have  been  attributed  to  public 
broadcasting (public debate, social cohesion etc.).  
Regulatory environment 
UCC raises certain issues with respect to the business and regulatory environment in which this 
content is created. Throughout a broader question arises: As users are increasingly involved in deriving 
non-pecuniary and pecuniary benefits from the creation of content, the treatment of these individuals or 
groups of persons in the face of many applicable legislations may be in question as they evolve from being 
consumers to actual producers / commercial entities (e.g. in the area of consumer protection, intellectual 
property rights and taxation). 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add links to pdf acrobat; adding links to pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
clickable links in pdf from word; add link to pdf
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
44
Intellectual property rights and user-created content 
Copyright law is intended to encourage the creation and dissemination of works of authorship and 
thereby  to promote cultural and economic development. From an economic perspective, copyright is 
designed to provide exclusive rights for a limited time to authors to recompense their creative effort in 
return for enabling their works to be widely appreciated and to encourage further creativity. This section 
discusses the salient intellectual property rights (IPR) issues in the areas of UCC and points to areas where 
further work may be needed.
76
For a work to enjoy copyright protection, it must be an original creative expression of the author.
77
Generally, copyrights confer to authors and/or right-holders a set of exclusive rights, i.e. the control over 
reproductions, the preparation of derivative works (i.e. adaptations), distribution to the public, public 
performances and public display. In some countries copyrights are also intended to protect the rights of 
integrity and attribution sometimes identified as the moral rights of authors (i.e. ability of authors to 
control the eventual fate of their works). These rights expire when the copyright term ends and a work falls 
into the public domain. Moral rights may continue even after the economic rights have expired (for 
example, in France). 
Copyright regimes in OECD countries aim at balancing a creator’s exclusive rights and the public 
interest in the creation, access to and wide dissemination of knowledge and creative works. This is pursued 
through exceptions and limitations to the creator’s rights. These exceptions and limitations may be specific 
statutory exceptions and limitations which may or not include fair use and fair dealing principles. In 
addition,  information  in  the  public  domain  is  not  subject  to  copyright  protection.  Under  certain 
circumstances, exceptions and limitations allow the reproduction and adaptation of copyrighted works 
without the authorisation of rights-holders. Both exclusive rights and exceptions and limitations have been 
clarified to apply to existing norms in the new digital environment, notably through the ratification of the 
WIPO Internet Treaties
78
(see WIPO, 2003; OECD, 2005b). The Recommendation of the OECD Council 
on Broadband Development recommends that Member countries should implement regulatory frameworks 
that balance the interests of suppliers and users, in areas such as the protection of intellectual property 
rights, and digital rights management, without disadvantaging innovative e-business models.
79
Copyrights in the context of user-created content 
Copyright issues related to UCC arise in a number of different ways. At the outset, it may be helpful 
to distinguish between “original works” created by users and works created by users from pre-existing 
works (commonly called “derivative works”). Original works identified as UCC raise the same copyright 
issues as original works created under other circumstances and can present relatively familiar issues of 
control, commercial exploitation, and protection in the online environment. Derivative UCC works (such 
as fan fiction or a blog that incorporates some or all of a protected work) highlights a difficult copyright 
issue, i.e. whether such derivative works are acceptable uses permitted by the respective jurisdiction’s 
exceptions  and  limitations  (sometimes  referred  to  as “fair  use”) or  an unlawful  infringement  of  the 
creator’s exclusive rights.  
Original works created by users: A large amount of UCC consists in individuals or groups uploading 
their  own  original content  (e.g. photos,  videos,  art)  to  their personal blogs  or  other platforms.  The 
originality requirement to obtain copyright does not necessarily imply an elevated standard of quality or 
effort (WIPO, 2006a). The  creators of works identified  as UCC  are automatically granted the  same 
exclusive rights as creators in other circumstances are granted. Infringement issues surface when third 
parties exercise one or more of the UCC creator’s exclusive rights without permission or the use is not an 
exception or limitation (sometimes referred to as “fair use”). In the same vein as for other forms of content 
creation, copyright for UCC can be considered a catalyst to the production of original works. This holds 
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
add links in pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add a link to a pdf file; add email link to pdf
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
45
especially  true  when  creators  are  interested  in  pursuing  some  gainful  activity  through  the 
commercialisation of their works. Through the control of reproduction and derivative work, these creators 
also retain control of the way their work is used (including how it is commercialised) and can hence avoid, 
for example, unwanted modification of their works. 
Alongside traditional copyright protection, creators or UCC platforms may – in parallel or in addition 
– also opt for different licensing schemes, such as the Creative Commons licence. Under these licences 
others are automatically allowed to copy and distribute a work provided that the licencee credits the 
author/licensor. In addition, other rights may be reserved or waived (e.g. right to create derivatives on non-
commercial terms). Examples would be an attribution licence, whereby others can copy, distribute, and 
remix the work as long as the original author is attributed. While such licensing schemes may permit 
copying and non-commercial re-use, original authors can specify certain restrictions which have to be 
observed by those interested in creating derivative works. 
Derivative works: Because of copyright law, creators of content, identified as UCC, have to respect 
the exclusive rights of other content producers, i.e. of those who choose to work within and those who 
choose to work outside professional routines and practices (or some combination thereof). Copyright 
infringement issues may arise whenever someone who is not the copyright holder (or a licencee) exercises 
an exclusive right, such as adapting the work to create a derivative work, be it for commercial or non-
commercial purposes. Copyright issues may thus arise when users create content by using – in part or in 
full – pieces of others’ work without authorisation or where the use does not fall within an exception and 
limitation. Examples which  entail replicating or transforming  certain works are the use of  particular 
characters (e.g. from Lord of the Rings) in writing fan fiction, using certain images and texts while 
blogging (e.g. using press agency pictures when blogging, using large excerpts of news reporting video 
footage in one’s news commentary), creating lip-synching videos or music mash-ups with samples of 
existing songs, and the creation of UCC videos while using copyrighted characters, texts or video images.  
Copyright  laws  typically  limit  in  one way  or  another  the copyright  holder’s  ability  to  control 
derivative works.
80
Depending on the OECD country, “fair use”- and “fair dealing”-principles and/or 
specific statutory exceptions allow courts to avoid the rigid application of the copyright statute’s exclusive 
rights when, on occasion, it would discourage creativity, and the public interest in or wide dissemination of 
knowledge through copyrighted works. Under these circumstances, portions of works can be used without 
permission and without payment if their use is within one of the copyright exceptions and limitations. Most 
copyright acts  contain  limitations for  the  following activities:  personal  use,  quotation and  criticism, 
comment, parody, news reporting, teaching, scholarship or research, educational and library activities, and 
– depending on the country in question – other forms of use. In all OECD countries, the latter exceptions 
are varied reflecting local traditions and are decided on case-by-case basis. These differences between fair 
use and copyright limitations are described in Box 4.
81
In general, when large portions of a work are taken 
over or when commercial implications arise, fair use exemptions are less likely to apply (see Gasser and 
Ernst, 2006). 
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to pdf
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
For the respective tutorials of these Document or Image Mobile Viewer in VB.NET prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile Viewer within VB.NET
accessible links in pdf; pdf link to specific page
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
46
Box 4. Fair use and copyright limitations 
At the international level, under Article 9(2) of the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic 
Works and other international copyright treaties
82
signatories are permitted to establish limitations and exceptions on 
the national level but are subject to the so-called “three-step test”: The “three-step test” requires that limitations and 
exceptions must be i) confined to special cases, ii) not in conflict with a normal exploitation of the work and iii) of no 
unreasonable prejudice to the legitimate interests of the author.
83
The agreed statement concerning the three step test 
in article 10 of the WIPO Copyright Treaty also underlines that these provisions permit signatory countries to devise 
new exceptions and limitations that are appropriate in the digital network environment.
84
National approaches to the determination of exceptions and limitations vary. Rather than specifying a closed list 
of limitations, common law countries allow for a particular type of limitation on exclusive rights, i.e. fair use and/or fair 
dealing exceptions (Guibault, 1998, WIPO, 2006b). Under US copyright law, for example, a use is permitted if it is 
determined to be “fair use” as that term is defined by U.S. statutes and case law.  US copyright law lists categories of 
uses that may be fair use under the copyright law, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, 
and research. This listing is not exhaustive. To determine whether a use is fair, a US court would consider i) the 
purpose and character of the use (e.g. use for non-profit educational purposes), ii) the nature of the copyrighted work, 
iii) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and iv) the effect of 
the use upon the potential market of the copyrighted work.
85
The approach in other OECD countries such as Australia, member countries of the EU, Korea and Japan is 
rather to define a set of closed purpose-specific exceptions to exclusive rights.
86
In Australia, “fair dealing” is a use of a 
work specifically recognised as not violating exclusive rights. However, in order to qualify for such exceptions a use 
must fall within closed purpose-specific exceptions (e.g. review or criticism, parody, satire, research or study, news-
reporting) and certain circumstances must be met (depends on the nature of the created work, effect of the use on any 
commercial market for the work, etc.). In the United Kingdom, the “fair dealing” approach also specifies a list of 
situations where “dealing” with a protected work is permitted.
87
“EU Directive 2001/29/EC on the harmonisation of 
certain aspects of copyright and related rights in the information society (EUCD)” introduces an exhaustive list of 
optional exceptions and limitations.
88
This list is amenable to the various legal traditions of the EU member states. The 
EU Directive also mandates the adherence to the three-step test described above.
89
Finally, Korean and Japanese Copyright Acts contain categories of uses for which the exclusive rights of authors 
does not hold: e.g. educational uses, quotation, news reporting, etc.
90
In particular, the fair use exception connected to 
non-profit performance may – under certain circumstances – be relevant to UCC.
91
No matter whether copyright systems follow a “fair use” doctrine or whether they opt for a specific 
list of exemptions, broadly speaking the application of these standards is complex and it is difficult to 
predict what a court will decide when applying them.
92
Also, in the digital UCC environment one question 
is how to adapt the parameters of certain copyright exceptions and limitations, such as fair use, when 
citations and compilations are increasingly prevalent and easy. In a multi-media environment with mixes of 
text, video, and graphic works, concepts such as “citation” may be blurry. As with any other use being 
made of a work still under copyright protection, if no exemption can be invoked, the creator of derivative 
UCC has to obtain permission from the original authors to create the UCC (e.g. for remixes, mash-ups). 
There remains a degree of legal uncertainty on the side of the creator of the original work as well as with 
the creator of the derivate work. While this legal uncertainty may lead to the creation of less derivative 
works, it also has advantages, namely that courts maintain some degree of flexibility when deciding on 
whether a use is a permissible exception.  
The general question for UCC is what are the effects of copyright law on non-professional and new 
sources of creativity and whether copyright law may need to be examined or does not need to be re-
examined, in order to allow coexistence of market and non-market creation and distribution of content, and 
spur further innovation.  
Current legal interpretation maintains that standard copyright rules and its exceptions are a necessary 
condition  for creativity  and  that the  exceptions and  limitations work  well  (e.g. Ginsburg, 2002).  In 
principle, copyright limitations provide ample opportunity for a use to qualify as a permissible exception or 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
47
limitation. Future case law may determine the boundaries of exceptions and limitations and produce clarity 
in the UCC context. This is also the thinking pursued in recent national and international legislative 
approaches  (i.e.  the  WIPO  Internet Treaties)  which  propose  a  combination  of  exclusive  rights  and 
exceptions and limitations. If necessary, existing limitations can also be amended. The Gowers review in 
the  United Kingdom,  for example, suggests amending applicable EU copyright  law to allow for  an 
exception for creative, transformative or derivative work, within the parameters of the Berne three-step test 
and to broaden the list of exceptions to copyright for the purpose of caricature, parody and pastiche (UK 
Treasury, 2006). Overall, it must be clear that a sizeable share of original UCC works is not concerned by 
these considerations as no derivative works are involved, and many examples of UCC qualify for the 
standard limitations on copyrights. 
On the other hand, proponents of UCC have voiced concerns which are largely based on the idea that 
non-commercial users have different incentives to create, use, and to share than established professional 
content holders and that these incentives should be preserved due to their social and cultural impact (see, 
for example, OECD 2006a, for related discussions and follow-up discussions of the World Summit on the 
Information Society
93
). These concerns centre on how the copyright law on derivative works could stifle 
some of the creativity that digital technology enables (Lessig, 2004; Fisher, 2004, 2006). It has been 
argued that some would-be users are deterred from engaging in conduct that could fall within the ambit of 
fair use (and hence be legal), due in part to concerns over incurring legal fees and also to the uncertainty 
and unpredictability of the fair use approach itself (Cotter, 2006). The idea that the IPR system may not 
have kept pace with progress in this sense and that content production based on the reuse of existing 
materials – such as sampling or mash-ups – should not be penalised per se has been echoed at the policy 
level.
94
Facilitating UCC creation: More flexible and efficient licensing processes for copyrights (including 
for non-UCC  areas) have been suggested  in the  digital  context (EU,  2006;  OECD, 2006c).  Current 
licensing regimes have been seen by some to be unduly burdensome because of the costs involved or the 
inability to identify and locate the author of the original work. In some cases the original author of a work 
will not be identifiable and cannot be contacted, and hence no legal use of the material can be made.
95
Solutions such as new ways to license copyright or new technologies to facilitate licensing could be 
explored and have – in some cases – been implemented. This could, for example, involve the creation of 
clearing houses/centres for the attribution of rights to UCC and other creators.  From the point of view of 
commercial copyright interests, any such changes should not be solely to benefit creators of UCC and to 
the detriment of their commercial interests. 
Furthermore, the expansion of fair use-type provisions to derivative works that are more than just 
copying (i.e. that have real transformative and creative value) and that are non-commercial, have also been 
proposed (Litman, 2006, Fisher, 2004) – often based on the argument that remixing of others’ work can 
also serve to benefit original creators by providing increased exposure. Commercial use of such derivative 
works would continue to be regulated by the regular statutory rights and limitations.
96
These suggestions may imply changes to copyright laws, and they rely on a clear dividing line 
between commercial and non-commercial content, which may be difficult to establish taking into account 
the diversity of UCC services and related business models. Moreover, the suggested benefits from such 
new approaches would have to be weighed very carefully against their costs, including, for example, to the 
established commercial content industry which produces significant economic value. Beyond suggestions, 
more study is needed of the extent to which UCC creates proven, valuable creative works and associated 
private and public benefits, as well as what the potential economic damage is, if any, to the established 
commercial content industry. So far the available statistics seem to demonstrate rapid growth of UCC 
within current frameworks. One question is to what extent could this growth be even more rapid, whether it 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
48
comes at the expense of the commercial content industry and other creators, and whether there is a 
likelihood of constraints on further growth due to difficulties encountered under copyright law. 
To date, the attention of rightholders is mostly focussed on UCC platforms which host unmodified 
snippets or entire reproductions of their original works without authorisation (see section below). So far 
there seem to be relatively few legal cases directly aimed at the creation of non-commercial derivative 
works by individuals. However, there are increasing legal actions in the form of take-down notices and 
“cease and desist” letters which are sent to UCC platforms and individuals asking them to take down 
certain potentially unauthorised content and which may not reach courts.
97
Finally, experimentation with new models for the economic use and creation of new digital content is 
ongoing which does not rely on changes of statutory rights and exceptions of copyright regimes, i.e. 
flexible licensing regimes such as the Creative Commons.
98
The idea is to facilitate the release of creative 
works under liberal licence terms that would make works available for sharing and reuse. These may 
address the particularities of content created by amateurs and allow for a parallel coexistence between 
traditional commercial content and free UCC. But their impacts are not clear and merit further study, 
including positive or negative effects on the creation process (OECD, 2006a). Introducing further diversity 
in access and licensing regimes to copyrighted works may also have disadvantages (Elkin-Koren, 2006). In 
sum, the legal meaningfulness of such licences has not yet been fully assessed by research and courts.  
Copyrights and the terms of services of UCC sites  
As shown by the analysis of the terms of service (Table 8), most UCC sites specify that they retain 
IPRs in their respective content (e.g. text, software, graphics, layout, design – especially in cases such as 
Second Life or social networking sites with their own software and content).  
UCC platforms usually grant users who upload content the right to retain copyright in their work. This 
right is enforceable and applicable both online and offline, both for non-profit and commercial ventures. 
According to the terms of services of the sample of UCC platforms, users agree that they have given the 
site a licence to use the content, mostly without payment.
99
Competitors with profit-sharing strategies and 
arrangements have also emerged. At times the sites reserve the right to prepare derivative works of the 
content posted by users and the terms of service require the uploader to waive their moral rights. Some 
sites reserve the right to commercially exploit the works posted by users or to license the content to third 
parties. Some sites require the user to agree that the content will be subject to the Creative Commons 
licence. In some cases, unclear terms and conditions or a failure of users to read the latter may lead the user 
to agree to  granting  additional rights (even after the user has taken down the content and even for 
commercial purposes). Often, however, the licence agreed to by the user terminates at the time the user 
removes such content from the Internet platform site, hence terminating the licence granted to the UCC 
platform. 
A further issue is that some sites reserve the right to modify or terminate the service for any reason 
without notice at any time, and that this may have consequences on content stored or acquired by users. If, 
for instance, a UCC site terminates or modifies the service a user may lose his/her uploaded content, the 
way it was tagged and organised, potentially his/her avatar, and with it many hours of labour and/or money 
invested to create the content.  
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
49
Table 9.   Intellectual property provisions in terms of service of UCC sites 
Content 
created by site 
Most sites specify that they retain IPRs in their respective content (e.g. text, software, graphics, 
layout, design) under copyright. 
Content 
created by 
users 
- Most sites specify that users who post content retain ultimate ownership, but that that they have 
given the site a licence to use content without payment. In other words, by posting the content the 
sites receives a limited irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, fully paid-up, worldwide 
licence (with the right to sublicense) to use, modify, publicly perform, publicly display, reproduce, and 
distribute such content.  
- Most sites specify that this licence does not grant the site the right to sell the content, nor to 
distribute it outside of the respective service. 
- Most sites pledge to mention the identity of the user, the author of the work, and also the title of the 
work, in so far as technical conditions make this possible.  
- Most sites specify that the licence terminates at the time the user removes his/her content. 
- Yet some sites reserve the right to prepare derivative works (modify, edit content posted by users) 
or the right to adapt. At times, it is specified that the site may commercially exploit the works posted 
by users.  
- Some sites however specify that users lose their IPRs and forfeit payment in perpetuity (even when 
the content is removed). Sometimes the sites also ask the user to admit “moral rights” (meaning that 
the site does not have to give the author credit). 
- Some sites require the user to agree that the content will be subject to the Creative Commons 
licence.  
- Some sites reserve the right of reproduction, i.e. the right to reproduce, without limitation, on any 
known or unknown medium, current or future, especially optical, digital, paper, disc, network, 
diskette, electronic, DVD, etc. 
- Some sites reserve the right to distribute the work or to sublicense rights to third parties. Mostly, it 
is proposed that revenue from these activities be shared between the user and the site.  
- Some sites reserve the right to use the name and content of users for advertising and promotional 
purposes (promotional licence) 
Reservation to 
terminate the 
service  
Most sites reserve the right to modify or terminate the service for any reason, without notice, at any 
time, which may have consequences on content stored or acquired by users.  
Source: OECD based on review of the terms of service of a sample of 15 widely-used English-speaking UCC sites. 
Copyrights and the liability of UCC platforms  
As discussed above, the growth of UCC is accompanied by the emergence of many sites and online 
intermediaries hosting the content which users upload. In some ways their existence drives the growth and 
access to UCC (and vice versa). From a copyright perspective, however, the question emerges in which 
way online intermediaries are liable for copyright matters.  
For example, copyright issues arise when users post unaltered third party content on UCC platforms 
without authorisation (e.g. uploading parts of popular TV series without the explicit consent of the content 
owner). This activity is outside the scope of UCC as defined in this study, but it is still a key concern of 
rightholders,  who  may  seek  to  hold  the  UCC  platforms  directly  or  indirectly  liable  for  copyright 
infringement. Additionally, posting UCC that is created through the adaptation of pre-existing work may 
also  raise copyright issues  for  UCC  platforms,  e.g. whether  the particular  use is  permissible under 
exceptions and limitations such as fair use, and if not permissible, whether the UCC platform is liable for 
direct  or  indirect  copyright  infringement  as  a  result  or  otherwise  exempted  from  liability  for  the 
infringement.  
Rightholders are beginning to engage in relevant actions against potential infringement on UCC 
platforms.  Associations  representing  content  owners  have  sent  take-down  notices  and  have  asserted 
potential lawsuits against UCC platforms.
100
An example of interactions between rightholders and a UCC 
site is the recent legal case between YouTube and the Japanese Society for Rights of Authors, Composers 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
50
and Publishers (JASRAC) which complains about music videos  being uploaded to YouTube without 
rightholders’ permission. Major media companies have also requested online video sites to remove their 
content. 
Some UCC platforms have defended the posting of  unaltered third party and  alleged infringing 
derivative UCC content on their platforms by arguing that they are similar to Internet Service Providers 
(ISPs) who can, under certain circumstances, be exempt from liability for content uploaded by their users 
(see  Litman, 2000).  The essential  question  is  whether online  intermediaries be  treated as electronic 
publishers, and thus liable for content on their servers (Koelman and Hugenholtz, 2003; WIPO, 2005). As 
shown in Box 5, national legislatures have dealt with the liability of online intermediaries in different 
ways, which raises issues for internationally operating online intermediaries. 
Box 5. Copyright liability of online intermediaries 
In their copyright or e-commerce laws many OECD countries have addressed the liability of ISPs and other 
information intermediaries who merely deliver content by creating liability exceptions (“safe harbour” under the US 
Digital Millennium Copyright Act
101
) for these entities. This is an exemption from secondary liability but requires the 
online service providers to remove infringing materials upon notice. In the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act, for 
instance, following the “notice and take down procedures”, ISPs are responsible for taking down unauthorised 
copyrighted material when a legitimate claim of a rights holder is presented to them.
102
They are also responsible for 
terminating access by repeat infringers. Similar principles on the liability of online intermediaries also exist in Australian 
copyright law
103
, i.e. providers are not obliged to actively self-monitor for infringing activity.  
The  EU  Electronic  Commerce  Directive  2000/31/EC  also  establishes  an  exemption  from  liability  for 
intermediaries where they play a passive role as a “mere conduit” of information from third parties and limits service 
providers’ liability for other “intermediary” activities such as the storage of information.
104
No general monitoring 
obligation  can  be  imposed  on  the service  provider.
105
Activities  which involve the  modification  of transmitted 
information, for instance, do not qualify for this exemption. This EU Directive also encourages hosting services 
providers to act expeditiously to remove or to disable access to the information concerned upon obtaining actual 
knowledge or awareness of illegal activities.
106
Such mechanisms are to be developed on the basis of voluntary 
agreements and codes of conduct between all parties concerned.
107
In addition, in EU Member States such as Italy 
and France but also on the EU level, public-private partnerships emerged regrouping ISP, rightholders and the 
government to promote the development of legal online content (OECD, 2005b). Some of the resulting codes of 
conduct imply that upon notice ISPs should – while respecting privacy laws - contact users uploading infringing 
material and potentially terminate their accounts.
108
Whether UCC platforms can be treated as a “mere conduit” under exceptions for online intermediaries 
is an ongoing question. As depicted in Table 9, most UCC sites specify that users who post content are 
responsible for it. They must own all rights to it or have express permissions from the copyright owners to 
copy and use images. They may not violate or infringe upon the rights of others. Moreover, the terms of 
service of UCC sites specify that  when valid notifications are received, the service provider usually 
pledges to respond by taking down the unauthorised content.
109
Then the owner of the removed content is 
contacted so that a counter-notification may be filed. 
Table 10.  Intellectual property provisions in terms of service of UCC sites 
Users are 
responsible for 
uploaded 
content 
Most sites specify that users who post content are responsible for it. Uploaders must own all rights to 
it or have express permissions from the copyright owners to copy and use images. They may not 
violate or infringe upon the copyrights of others. 
Take down 
notice 
procedure 
When valid notifications are received, the service provider usually pledges to respond by taking 
down the offending content. Under some legal regimes, it is specified that the owner of the removed 
content is contacted allowing him/her to file a counter-notification.  
Source: OECD based on review of the terms of service of a sample of 15 widely-used English-speaking UCC sites.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested