c# 2015 pdf : Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks software control project winforms web page .net UWP 383931155-part1911

DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
51
While under certain circumstances UCC platforms may benefit from the exemption, UCC platforms 
could  also  be  held  liable  under  domestic  law  for  facilitating,  inducing  or  authorising  copyright 
infringement (recognising that this form of liability is treated slightly differently among OECD member 
countries). Under the principle of contributory liability, it may be that such online intermediaries are found 
liable  to  induce, cause  or  materially  contribute  to  the  infringing  conduct  of  their  users. This  holds 
particularly  in  cases  where  UCC  platforms  have  knowledge  of  the  infringing  activity  (i.e.  “wilful 
infringement”), when they do not simply host but edit or categorise the content (which is mostly the case), 
when they induce users to post unauthorised content (c.f. the US Supreme Court Ruling vis-à-vis the 
Grokster case
110
), or when they derive revenues (e.g. advertising-related) from unauthorised postings.
111 
In some cases  the take-down  notice procedure may lead to UCC  being taken down  without a 
legitimate reason. UCC platforms receiving notifications from media companies may prefer taking down 
the respective content rather than risking legal pursuit. Courts are not involved in this decision. And there 
have been cases where UCC has been deleted from UCC platforms by error, e.g. when the title of the video 
clip resembles copyrighted content or when in fact, fair use or free speech exceptions may apply.
112
While 
the individual may have the right to counter-notification in some OECD jurisdictions, it is difficult to 
obtain information on whether these counter-notifications succeeded in restoring the non-infringing content 
to the UCC platform.  
Despite these concerns of rights holders, the latter have also increasingly been interested in deriving 
value  from  UCC  platforms,  and  in  implementing  appropriate  business  models  while  leaving  the 
copyrighted material on UCC platforms often also noting the significant promotional value of such content. 
Often relevant IPR challenges will be resolved through appropriate business agreements between rights 
holders, UCC platforms and other associated entities. Upon the request of rightholders and to avoid legal 
actions against them, some UCC platforms have announced or adopted technologies preventing the upload 
of unauthorised content (e.g. acoustic fingerprinting, watermark detection).  
Digital rights management 
The opportunities and  challenges raised by digital rights  management  (DRM)  and the  need  for 
appropriate disclosure have been discussed elsewhere (see for fuller treatment OECD 2005b; 2006c, f).  
DRM technologies can generally affect UCC in two ways: First, DRM can enable digital distribution 
of UCC just as it has for content that is not identified as UCC. Second, DRM may limit access to works for 
creators of derivative works or reproductions that are permitted under certain copyright exceptions and 
limitations, such as “fair use” or other statutory exceptions and limitations. 
DRM technologies have been seen as business enablers for the digital distribution of content and 
drivers for the variety of new business models that consumers may want (OECD, 2005b). DRM may 
facilitate the creation and dissemination of creative works. Content creators and publishers can use DRM 
to protect their work from unauthorised downloading, viewing and from the possible creation of derivative 
works. This potentially encourages the content rightholders to make content available for digitisation and 
subsequent digital sale. DRM also allows the creation of certain new business models. Through their 
ability to create diverse access schemes to content, DRMs may enable content offerings that are more 
tailored to consumer demand (e.g. the right to purchase time-limited access to songs) and that may – if 
prices reflect the level of access – increase consumer choice and satisfaction. 
DRM creates opportunities for those users creating content who want to protect their copyrights 
(e.g. avoid copying or the creation of derivative works) and/or commercialise their content. It can be 
envisaged  that users who  create  very popular  content  may eventually be  interested in entering  into 
commercial agreements with publishers, media companies and various distribution platforms. It may also 
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; add links to pdf online
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
52
be that UCC creators would like to protect their exclusive rights through DRM but not forego their large 
dissemination. This content security and amenability to new business models made possible by DRM then 
acts as a facilitator of the growth of UCC.  
DRMs or technical access limitations more generally are also reported to have negative effects on the 
growth of some legitimate UCC as they can generally prevent access to and modification of files. This 
limits access to works for creators of derivative works or reproductions that are legal under allowable 
exceptions and limitations (see also UK Treasury, 2006).  
The WIPO Internet Treaties require signatory governments to provide “adequate legal protection and 
effective legal remedies against the circumvention” of technological protection measures like DRMs. 
These new legal norms make it illegal to circumvent existing technological protection measures to access 
the content – even if access to that content would in certain cases be covered by exceptions or limitation. 
For example, if a user wanted to make a parody remix of a film or a teacher make an educational video, the 
technological protection measures could restrict or prevent the user from extracting the portions of the 
video to do so, even if using portions of the video were permitted pursuant to copyright exceptions and 
limitations.  Thus  in  some  countries  it  would  effectively  be  illegal  to  “circumvent”  a  technological 
protection measure (e.g. DRM) to access content – even if it falls under fair use or other statutory 
exemptions  described  earlier.  The  question  then  arises  how  technical  protection  measures  can  be 
implemented while preserving the balance between exclusive rights and fair use (see also WIPO, 2006b). 
The Gowers Report in the United Kingdom, for instance, has argued for easier possibilities for users to file 
complaints relating to DRM and to provide more consumer guidance (including through better labelling) 
(UK Treasury, 2006).
113
In some OECD countries, the circumvention of DRMs has recently also been made possible through 
the introduction of certain exceptions. Recently, for instance, the US Copyright Office has created new 
exemptions to the Prohibition on Circumvention of Copyright Protection Systems for Access Control 
Technologies (e.g. when circumvention is for the purpose of making compilations of portions of those 
works for educational use in the classroom by media studies or film professors).  
As technologies continue to develop that allow more and more people to create UCC more easily, 
cheaper, and faster, and as copyright holders continue to explore new business models made available 
through DRM, the potential effects of DRM and the legal protection of circumvention for non-infringing 
uses may need review in order to maintain the balance between exclusive rights and exceptions and 
limitations as well as a balance between creator and user interests. Further evidence of cases where fair use 
has been hampered may be needed as currently little analysis in this field exists (Ginsburg, 2002).  
Freedom of expression 
The Internet can be seen as an open platform enriching the diversity of opinions (including product 
reviews), various political and societal debates, the flow of information and the freedom of expression. 
UCC is in many ways a form of personal expression and speech. Users  are  engaging in a form of 
democracy where they can directly publish and enable access to their opinions and personal knowledge and 
experiences. Preserving this openness and the decentralised nature of the Internet may thus be an important 
policy  objective.  Censorship,  the  filtering  of  information  (including  through  ISPs  or  UCC  sites 
themselves),  depriving  users  of  the  access  to  certain  information  or  tools  for  self-expression  is  in 
contradiction to the above policy principle.
114
As discussed later, a balance between freedom of expression 
and other rights – e.g. the posting of illegal or unauthorised copyrighted content – must be struck.  
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add link to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML
change link in pdf file; add hyperlinks to pdf online
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
53
Information and content quality 
The fact that UCC is produced in a non-professional context outside of the traditional media oversight 
and often without any pecuniary remuneration can have implications for the “quality” of material being 
posted – with the concept of quality being very hard to define (quality having a very subjective and 
contextual component). Content quality problems relate to two different but interrelated matters:  
•  Information quality and accuracy: In the case of blogs, commentary and other UCC forms 
which refer to facts and figures, the accuracy of content and proper acknowledgement of sources 
may not be guaranteed. For example, bloggers do not necessarily have an incentive to check the 
information that they are providing or they may not properly cite sources. The risks associated 
with inaccurate, defamatory and uncheckable information spreading over the web are seen as 
increasingly important. The availability of all amounts of information (some accurate and some 
not) shifts the responsibility to users for correctly assessing information found on UCC sites. 
Especially, younger generations will have to acquire the skill to differentiate between fake and 
correct information. This is an entirely new way of approaching information as compared to the 
previous media setting in which information was generally thought to be correct. This is not to 
say that the information quality on UCC sites is generally flawed – in some instances information 
quality may be high (as demonstrated by recent comparisons of Wikipedia and Britannica finding 
few differences in quality, see Giles 2005). According to a survey mentioned earlier, about 50% 
of Asian users believe content on blogs to be as trustworthy as established media.
115
•  Content quality: Many UCC posts may not have stood the test of a traditional editorial review or 
media selection process (i.e. the comparison between Figures 6 and 5). Content posted on UCC 
platforms may, for instance, suffer from low technological quality (e.g. online videos posted may 
have bad images). Sometimes the quality of the content itself could – objectively or subjectively 
– be judged below standard. Yet, while the accuracy of information can often be verified by 
commonly known and accepted standards, quality of content is hard to define. Content posted by 
users may be of exceptional value to other users, particularly if it has a personal touch and this 
despite suboptimal technical quality and lack of a good plot or newsworthiness. Also, the high 
demand for UCC points to demand for such types of content.  
Furthermore, while the selection process for content of many traditional media outlets may be 
more organised, the latter may not be exempt from quality problems and the inaccurate provision 
of information (e.g. the content diffused over TV channels has also been criticized, or wrong 
information has been diffused). Also, it is important to stress that an large share of UCC which is 
not posted anonymously (e.g. personal blogs) can be of very high quality as creators of that 
information care about their reputation, and have high incentives for accuracy. 
As users are free to choose and often rate content, bad information sources may not draw a lot of 
visits. Ways and means to improve the reliability and the quality of information on sites hosting UCC have 
been invented which may alleviate the problem of lacking accuracy and oversight. Sites hosting UCC, 
aggregators and other mechanisms assessing quality and credibility which often harness the “collective 
intelligence” of users also have a greater ability to rapidly correct misinformation through “collaborative 
filtering”. Later tools could find important business and other applications to structure large amounts of 
information.  
The following forms of governing UCC sites have emerged: Pre-production moderation – Content 
submitted by users is not posted until reviewed by an expert or a person controlling for exactness and 
quality,  Post-production  moderation  –  Content  submitted  by  users  is  accessible  by  everybody 
immediately but moderation may opt to review, make changes or delete the content after it being posted; 
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
add hyperlink pdf document; check links in pdf
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Generating thumbnail for PDF document is an easy work and gives
add hyperlink in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
54
Peer-based moderation  –  Content  submitted  by  users  is available  immediately,  but can  be  edited, 
reviewed or even deleted by certain or all users of the same UCC platform. Due to the fact that a greater 
group of people is involved, peer-based moderation is said to be best to maximise the potential of UCC 
platforms.
116
However,  this  system  of  moderation  also  places  the  greatest  responsibility  with  the 
community  of  users.  New  governance  schemes  have  also  emerged  with  allow  for  rating  and 
recommendation (i.e. social filtration and accreditation).
117
As the importance of reviews, tags and ratings increases, users are tempted to abuse of those systems 
while including wrong or biased reviews (review fraud) or engage in misleading tagging of their content 
(i.e. a member uses popular but irrelevant keywords to describe his/her video or other content in order to 
draw more traffic). This reduces the overall reliability of ratings and the overall searchability of the 
network. UCC sites make an effort to diminish the possibility of such  abuse, and maintain  relevant 
sanctions. But overall, problems of information and content quality and accuracy may remain.  
Mature, inappropriate, and illegal content 
Similarly to the situation of online multiplayer computer games (c.f. OECD, 2005d), few technical 
limits are imposed on users with respect to their thoughts expressed or to their actions. Thus most UCC 
platforms allow for rather free expression.  
This is a very new and previously unknown phenomenon which bears opportunities and challenges. 
As everybody can express themselves rather freely, sites hosting UCC have been sources of explicit 
language and behaviour, mature content, gambling, harassment, and defamatory speech. In the United 
Kingdom and Korea, for instance, various policy-makers have voiced concerns over violent videos on 
video-sharing sites (e.g. students being assaulted and filmed by other students). Newer type video-sharing 
sites which do not filter the content or allow live broadcasts can be a new source of concern. Different 
OECD countries have different rules (especially as regards indecent or mature content) and the degree to 
which rules on freedom of expression would permit such expressions or make their unlawfulness hard to 
establish. All in all, it should be kept in mind that UCC platforms are just one of the many Internet-based 
outlets for dubious content.  
Most UCC platforms make quite clear that they do not police content or that they do not assume 
editorial responsibility for the content created (see Table 10). This is an important point for policy makers 
aiming to enforce laws on illegal content or to reduce the spread of content which may be deemed 
inappropriate or harmful to certain viewers, e.g. minors.
118
Moreover, often UCC platforms and communities have adopted community standards and associated 
rules taken by the service provider to reduce the incidence of inappropriate content and actions (see 
Table 10). These include, for example, rules on tolerance, on harassment, on assault in virtual worlds 
(e.g. shooting, shoving, etc.), on privacy and the prevention of disclosure of information, on indecency, or 
on undesired advertising content. If not respected, the service provider reserves the right to take actions 
against the user (e.g. temporary or permanent suspension of accounts). In general, however, it remains 
difficult for businesses, online communities or governments to monitor all content available while being 
able to clearly determine what content is illegal. In particular, this is a problem for children accessing the 
Internet. UCC platforms often specify age limits in their terms of service (see Table 11), yet these may be 
difficult to police.  
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document cleanup and Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully
add links to pdf document; add links to pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and write, view, render, report and convert word document without need for PDF.
add email link to pdf; add links to pdf file
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
55
Table 11.  Content and conduct provisions in terms of service of UCC sites 
Content 
regulation 
and editorial 
responsibility 
•  Most sites specify that users are solely responsible for the content that they publish or display on 
the website, or transmit to other members. The sites specify that they have no obligation to 
modify or remove any inappropriate member content, and no responsibility for the conduct of the 
member submitting any such content. 
•  The sites reserve the right to review and delete or remove any member content which does not 
correspond to defined standards. 
•  Some sites use age and content ratings or have areas for content which is rated mature. 
Community 
standards 
•  Most sites have community standards on intolerance (derogatory or demeaning language as to 
race, ethnicity, gender, religion, or sexual orientation), harassment, assault, the disclosure of 
information of third parties and other users (e.g. posting conversations), indecency, etc. 
Actions to 
enforce 
standards 
•  Sites specify penalties when users infringe community standards. They range from warnings, to 
suspensions, to banishment from the service. The creation of alternative accounts to circumvent 
these rules is being tracked. 
Source: OECD based on a review of the terms of service of a sample of 15 widely-used English-speaking UCC sites. 
Technological, legal, self-regulatory solutions may help to limit access to such content and reduce the 
negative impacts. Age rating systems or age limits are seen as important to ensure protection of minors. 
These rating systems need to be clear and increasingly internationally recognised and adhered to, in order 
to be meaningful on the Internet (see OECD, 2005d). Filtering software and other parental controls may 
provide solutions.  
Safety on the Internet and awareness raising 
When users create profiles on a particular site there is no verification of the actual identity of the user. 
This can be useful in cases where users may wish to create parody or political pages. A certain degree of 
anonymity  may  also stimulate  creativity.  Yet  it can also  pose a  risk when  users  may  misrepresent 
themselves for illegal purposes. Other sites have greater verification of a user's identify via their school or 
work e-mail address and limit networks to schools or workplaces.
119
Thus it is possible for users to misrepresent their identities, such as pretending to be a different age or 
gender, and succeed in deceiving other users, particularly younger ones. There have been documented 
cases of sexual offenders and other criminals gaining access to users, particularly the young, via social 
networks. It remains to be seen however if these are not isolated cases. As the Internet is an open platform, 
offenders may also be easier to track than in an offline environment, as evidenced by recent successful 
police investigations.  
Implementing proper safety measures, educating parents and children, and trying to minimise the risks 
of such behaviour should be a priority for law enforcement, government officials and SNS (Magid and 
Collier, 2006).  Several initiatives have been  started  to  educate teenagers  and parents in  this respect 
(e.g. SafeTeens.com,  BlogSafety.Com,  SaferOnlineDating.org)  and  technological  solutions  such  as 
monitoring software are available (Software4parents.com). Despite their shortcomings, age limits and 
rating schemes and software technologies may also play an important role. The UCC platforms themselves 
have started  to foster awareness concerning  the  dangers related to exposing private information (see 
Table 11).  
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
56
Table 12. Age limits and warnings in terms of service of UCC sites 
Age limits 
and age 
ratings 
•  Most sites require users either to be 13-14 years old or 18 years. Some put the bar at 16 years. 
Some have special subsites or parts of virtual worlds which are reserved for teenagers.
120
Use of 
those subsites by older users is not permitted.  
Warnings 
on releasing 
information 
•  UCC sites now post warnings not to post contact details or places where one can be found, 
warnings about adding strangers to friends’ lists, warnings about inappropriate content, warnings 
about posting something which could embarrass the user or somebody else, warnings about 
reporting false age, warnings about phishing, i.e. third parties trying to get personal information, 
usernames and passwords. 
Source: OECD based on a review of the terms of service of a sample of 15 widely-used English-speaking UCC sites. 
Privacy and identity theft 
Concerns have been raised about users increasingly posting more information about their identities, 
their lives and those of others (i.e. friends, family). Users post photos and videos, publicly accessible 
profiles on SNS, and online journals with intimate details of their lives on blogs and sites. While such sites 
offer privacy settings to limit the availability of this information to personal contacts or friends, many users 
choose to make their information available publicly. In principle, information which is not displayed 
publicly is protected and not sold to third parties (Table 12). In the case of a merger or acquisition by a 
third party, however, this information is an asset which is part of the transaction and which is handed over 
to the acquirer (Table 12). There may also be cases of data leakages which could be due to the nature of the 
information and pictures prove particularly damaging, although so far little is known about such cases 
which may have occurred in the context of UCC sites. 
Table 13.  Privacy provisions in terms of service of UCC sites 
Privacy 
•  Most of the sites collect personal information relevant to the service stating that this is to provide the user 
with a customised and efficient experience. This information is protected and not sold to third parties. 
•  Yet sometimes personal information uploaded on SNS sites is provided to advertisers (sometimes 
delivered directly) and other parties in a personally identifiable manner and aggregate usage information 
in a non-personally identifiable manner to present to members more targeted advertising. 
•  Most sites reserve the right to transfer personal information in the event of a transfer of ownership or sale 
of assets.  
•  Sites specify that personal information may be released for law enforcement purposes. 
Source: OECD based on a review of the terms of service and the privacy policies of a sample of 15 widely-used English-speaking 
UCC sites. 
Another potential negative consequence of the vast amount of personal information available online 
could be increased occurrences of violations of privacy or identity theft (phishing). SNS sites are reported 
to have been used to phish for users’ personal information through spam campaigns. Individuals have 
utlised UCC platforms to expose content about somebody else (i.e. including posting online videos or other 
content which show persons not consenting to the upload) or creating accounts on behalf of another person 
with false information or content.
121
As a result, these peoples’ ability to live a normal life has been 
compromised in some documented cases (Sang-Hun, 2006). Other examples exist in which employers have 
made use of SNS to screen potential employees. Finally, identity thieves can much more easily track down 
the requisite information to mimic someone else’s identity. Further work on privacy challenges resulting 
from UCC (including users voluntarily making their information public) would be useful.
122
Impacts of intensive Internet use 
The impacts of intensive Internet use (including UCC) are a new source of research. While this 
phenomenon is not particular to UCC, the popularity of these sites has contributed to particularly intensive 
Internet use. The blurring of the real and the virtual world may lead users to spend large amounts of time 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
57
on the Internet and they may fail to devote enough time to other obligations (e.g. school, work, and even 
basic things such as sleeping and eating). Emotional attachment to online friends and activities may lead to 
 deterioration  of  relationships outside  of  the  Internet. Research  also reveals  a  growing  number of 
individuals for whom the medium becomes a consuming habit with potentially negative consequences 
(Aboujaoude et al, 2006).
123
These symptoms are often referred to as “on-line addiction” (Young, 1996; 
Minoura, 1999).
124
Only a few OECD countries, such as Korea, report figures for Internet addiction (see Figure 12).
125
According to these official figures, the number of Korean Internet users with possible addiction stood at 
3.3% of Internet users in 2004 and 2% in 2006 (and 11% with suspected addictions). These are, however, 
related to online gambling in particular.
126
The Korean government has programmes to reduce Internet 
addiction while educating students on “healthy Internet use” (e.g. courses and the designation of Internet-
free days).
127
In sum, it needs to be kept in mind that such forms of intensive use are not particular to user-created 
content. Rather these relate broadly to how people decide to go about their Internet and other media usage 
habits (e.g. Television, BlackBerry).  Users who now engage more  actively on  UCC sites may  have 
previously been watching TV in a passive fashion. Sometimes the relationships created on UCC sites may 
not  be  solely  virtual  as  examples  of  ensuing  offline  relationships  have  emerged.  With  3D  video 
conferencing  and  other  technological  developments  emerging,  virtual  images  and  Internet-based 
communication platforms may facilitate day-to-day interactions.  
Figure 11. 
Internet “addiction” as reported by the Korean government, 2006 
87%
11%
2%
Normal
Suspected addiction
Addiction
Source: Korean Ministry of Information and Communication. 
It is worth stressing that the social impact of the Internet at large and the impact of UCC-related pass-
times and communication forms on society and personal relations are hardly explored. The spectrum of 
predictions ranges from such Internet communications leading to the “breakdown of personal relationships 
and social contact” to such Internet communications “holding great  promises for improving real life 
relationships and tasks”. More recent assessments point to people communicating more than ever but that 
their pattern of communication and interaction has changed (Statistics Canada, 2006
128
). Also, there is 
insufficient  understanding  of  how  media  consumption  generally  affects  brain  processing,  learning, 
attitudes, and behaviour, e.g. the impacts of virtual worlds on behaviour, or on learning / skills (see also 
OECD, 2005d for skills in the context of online games). More research in these fields may be warranted. 
Network security and spam 
Like other information technologies, the participative web is not immune to information security 
risks. Many Internet sites today serve as platforms for creation and sharing of content. One of the key 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
58
factors in the growth of UCC was the ease of use in creating and publishing, including CMS, blogging 
services and wikis. As opposed to webpages of earlier generations, today Internet sites enable the posting 
of content and the modification of sites. This new form of interactivity and uploading of content from a 
large user base can be a new source for security problems (Finjan, 2006, Evers, 2006, Nuttall, 2006). In 
some  cases,  such sites  have  been used  by  hackers  who  uploaded malicious content  (e.g.  viruses) – 
achieving quicker and faster propagation. In other cases, the greater openness of the platforms for external 
contributions can cause problems without somebody actually trying to exploit this weakness on purpose. 
Often, bad implementation of the technology rather the technology itself may be the root of the problem.  
Despite provisions in the terms of services (Table 13), splogs, or spam blogs (“splogs”
129
) exist to 
promote the spammers' site, advertisements or related links, comment spam where a spammer will post 
comments, often hundreds at a time, to a legitimate user's blog, and wiki spam, where spammers will take 
advantage of the capacity to instantly edit a page.
130
Table 14. Spam provisions in terms of service of UCC sites 
Spam 
•  Most sites prohibit illegal and/or unauthorised use of the services, including collecting user names 
and/or  email  addresses  of members  by  electronic  or  other means  for the  purpose of  sending 
unsolicited email. 
Source: OECD based on a review of the terms of service of a sample of 15 widely-used English-speaking UCC sites. 
Technologies may help to reduce spam.
131
For instance, there are tools such as  Akismet within 
blogging software to identify such comment spam. These tools may either automatically delete such 
comments or put them into a queue, whereby the blogger can review them for any possible legitimate 
comments. Search engines have sought to combat link-related spam by the implementation of the “no 
follow” tag attribute.
132
Requiring user registration may also limit spam. 
Virtual worlds, property rights and taxation 
Increasingly virtual worlds and games are seen as a platform for real economic transactions. The latter 
purchase virtual land and properties, create objects and sell them, develop the skills and looks of their 
avatars. Sometimes these commercial transactions take place within the virtual world, sometimes outside 
of it (e.g. selling virtual objects on eBay). Increasingly this phenomenon of virtual economies with real-life 
impacts is also taken seriously by economists (Castranova, 2001, 2005). The question on how to “price” 
virtual land which – in theory – is not scarce is just an example of the new questions raised.  
On a more practical level, commercial exchanges between the hosting site and the user or between the 
users themselves are – as ownership and commercial activity increases – likely to trigger a number of legal 
disputes in the future. As many times the objects created by the user are inextricably tied to the virtual 
world itself, establishing straightforward ownership rights may be difficult. Disputes have already arisen 
when the hosting site terminated a user’s account, thereby deleting his objects and land for actions on the 
UCC platform banned by the terms of service (c.f. last row of Table 8). 
Furthermore, the commercial activity in or around virtual world content is generating increasing 
interest from tax authorities.
133
As virtual assets and virtual capital gains increase which can be translated 
into genuine economic gains later (i.e. when users convert money back to real money or when they sell 
virtual items on consumer-to-consumer exchanges such as eBay), the latter wonder if and how such 
transactions should be taxed.
134
Tax authorities will be dependent on the taxpayer actually declaring such 
sales as income to avoid an electronic version of the “underground” economy. Finally, a number of OECD 
countries levy wealth and inheritance taxes. Interesting questions arise as to how these tax forms would 
apply to “virtual”, intangible wealth and thus unrealised gains. At present, tax authorities’ attention has not 
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
59
been raised on these issues due to a combination of high thresholds for wealth taxes and the relatively low 
value of virtual wealth. But this could become an issue over time.  
In the light of the growing influence of virtual worlds, governments will increasingly be faced with 
associated regulatory questions, be it in the tax or other legal areas, especially when those sites operate in a 
legal vacuum or when it is unclear if and how existing laws apply in such online environments.  
Governments as producers and users of content  
Governments posting content to inform their citizens would fall under e-government policies and do 
not relate directly to user-created content. Nonetheless, governments may incite comments or discussions 
from citizens via discussion platforms at the local (virtual town hall), regional or national level or other 
Internet-based tools. The latter may either inform ongoing debates relating to ongoing or future projects 
(public constructions, schools, etc.) or they may constitute an outlet for citizens to express themselves, 
potentially creating greater social cohesion and identification.  
Conceptualisation, classification and measurement  
In general comparative international data on digital content products and industries is not available.
135
Benchmarking the impacts of digital content policies is complicated by the absence of this data. 
The lack of reliable official data on UCC and more knowledge on changing usage habits are a 
challenge. As a result, it is often hard to accurately assess the statistical, economic, and societal effects of 
UCC. In particular, the social impacts of greater Internet use will deserve greater attention in the future.  
New Internet usage measurement techniques developed by private data services and based on large 
sample  sizes  to  monitor  online  behaviour  (sometimes  for  advertisement-related  purposes)  entail 
opportunities in the sense of more detailed data concerning Internet user behaviour for targeted advertising 
but also challenges as regards the use of that data in the context of the protection of privacy.  
DSTI/ICCP/IE(2006)7/FINAL 
60
ANNEX 
Box 6. Participative web technologies 
• 
Tagging, or the association of particular keywords with related content, such as photo tagging on photo sharing sites or 
link tagging on collaborative news sites. Generally, a user will choose a brief selection of such keywords that best indicate 
the content of a particular piece of audio, video, or text. Tagging has played a significant role in social bookmarking sites 
where users collaboratively store and publish their favourite links.  
• 
Group rating and aggregation occurs on sites where users submit links and descriptions of articles and other content and 
where users have the ability to rate the content. Recommendation engines, particularly popular in the realm of music, are 
technologies enabling users to share tastes and discover new content. An example would be recommendation engines 
based on musical similarities, patterns emerging between users (e.g. those who liked x also liked y), or a combination of 
both.  
• 
Syndication and aggregation of data in RSS/Ajax/Atom and other content management systems (CMS):  
− 
RSS: Really simple syndication is a technology that enables distribution and subscription to content so that users 
may automatically receive new posts and updates. RSS plays an extremely important role in blogging, and it is 
increasingly used for such emerging mediums as videocasting, podcasting, and photo streams. RSS files, also called 
feeds, transmit structured data which typically include headlines, dates, authors, content summaries and links to the 
full versions (Bowman, 2003; Gill, 2005). Users can subscribe to a feed and transform the transmitted data into 
information via a RSS reader. On the one hand, content creators are able to easily syndicate content for RSS 
readers. Often, RSS tools are already integrated in publishing software. On the other hand, readers are able to 
personalise web services: they do not have to check web pages regularly for new entries but are kept informed by 
their RSS readers.  
− 
Atom: The Atom Syndication Format is an XML language used for web feeds. Web feeds allow software programs to 
check for updates published on a web site. To provide a web feed, a site owner may use specialised software (such 
as a content management system) that publishes a list (or “feed”) of recent articles or content in a standardised, 
machine-readable format. The feed can then be downloaded by web sites that syndicate content from the feed, or by 
feed reader programs that allow Internet users to subscribe to feeds and view their content. The development of 
Atom was motivated by the existence of many incompatible versions of the RSS syndication format.  
− 
Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) – one of the so-called Rich Internet Application techniques - is a web 
development technique for interactive web applications which encompasses different technologies. It can be better 
described as a pattern than a technology per se — it identifies and describes a particular design technique 
(McCarthy, 2005). The main advantage of this technique is that “web pages are dynamically updated without a full 
page refresh interrupting the information flow” and allows creating “richer, more dynamic web application user 
interfaces”. This can be achieved by an Ajax engine which is interposed between the user and the server.  
• 
Application Mash-ups and Open Application Programming Interfaces (APIs): Along with audio and video mash-ups, the 
term can also refer to a combination of multiple web applications. Mash-ups are a genre of interactive web applications 
that draw upon content retrieved from external data sources to create entirely new services (Merrill, 2006). This type of 
web-based integration aggregates and combines third-party data. API is the interface that a computer system, library or 
application provides in order to allow requests for services to be made of it by other computer programs, and/or to allow 
data to be exchanged between them (Wikipedia, 2006e). An Open API is when the API is made public to use, free of 
charge. A variety of web applications use open APIs, such as Google maps. This has enabled programmers to create 
combinations, or mash-ups, of Google Maps with other information sources. Examples include a map where all of the 
housing ads from Craig’s List are placed on a Google Map with relevant information, or the plotting of all of a city’s crime 
incidences on a map with the time and date of occurrence. Other genres of web application mash-ups include video and 
photo mash-ups, where designers mash photos or video with other information that can be associated with the attached 
metadata (i.e. tags) (Merrill, 2006). An example includes taking news headlines and displaying photos with photos that 
are tagged with the particular words. News and RSS feed mash-ups such as NetVibes and My Yahoo aggregate various 
feeds and present them on a website, enabling users to create a personalised page. 
• 
Filesharing networks: Peer-to-peer is essentially a communication structure in which individuals interact directly, without 
going through a centralised system or hierarchy. It is an example of network power and commercial exploitation through 
decentralised information exchange as opposed to centralised information control. With peer-to-peer technology, users 
may share information, contribute to shared projects or transfer files (OECD, 2004a). Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks open 
new opportunities for commercial and non-commercial content production and delivery as content, Internet service and 
technology providers are looking increasingly at ways to “monetise” P2P networks (OECD, 2006a; EITO, 2006). This 
involves using P2P networks in legitimate ways rather than for the unauthorised downloading of copyrighted works.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested