windows form application in c# with database pdf : Add url to pdf Library application component .net html windows mvc traffic-signs-manual-chapter-071-part195

10
DESIGN RULES COMMON TO ALL RECTANGULAR SIGNS
Figure 2-2
2.5
2.5
1
1
0.5 sw spacing
1 sw spacing
1.5 sw spacing
2.5 sw spacing
2.5
2.5
1.5
Normal horizontal spacing rules
Border
Arrow
Arrow /
Border
Legend  /  Symbol  /
Panel  /  P atch
Legend  /  Symbol  /
Panel  /  P atch
Arrow  /
Border
2.5
2.5
Border
Arrow
2.5
2.5
2.5
(see para 2.10)
Add url to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink in pdf; adding links to pdf
Add url to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf in preview; add url pdf
11
DESIGN RULES COMMON TO ALL RECTANGULAR SIGNS
Figure 2-3
1.5
2.5
2.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
Special spacing which applies when an
apostrophe is followed by lower case letters
“b”, “h”, “k”, or “l”
0.5
the horizontal spacing is generally 2.5
sw (as for 
words). However, for certain symbols the horizontal 
spacing is increased to 4
sw. Further guidance on 
symbol spacing is given in section 14.
ABBREVIATIONS
2.11  In some cases it may be desirable to abbreviate 
place names.  An apostrophe is normally used to 
indicate where letters have been omitted. Generally, 
an abbreviated word should not use more than one 
apostrophe. Where the lower case letter “b”, “h”, 
“k” or “l” follows an apostrophe there should be a 
space of 0.5
sw between the apostrophe and that   
letter. Certain abbreviations, such as “Mkt” for 
“Market” do not use apostrophes. Where a word is 
expressed as a single letter it is followed by a full stop 
(this is to ensure that it is linked to the next part of 
the name without the two capital letters, such as M 
and K in M. Keynes, being too close together). 
Where the single letter is the last character of a name 
which is not followed by a route number or mileage 
on the same line (e.g. Stoke-on-T or Tunbridge W) 
the full stop can be omitted. For other abbreviations 
full stops are generally not used. Examples of 
abbreviated place names, together with appropriate 
horizontal spacings, are shown in figure 2-3. Certain 
names are hyphenated (e.g. Ross-on-Wye) and the 
correct horizontal spacing for these is also shown.
BASIC SIGN DESIGN
2.12  The basic unit of measurement is the stroke 
width (sw), which is equal to one quarter of the 
x-height of the letters. As a general rule, the x-height 
on any one sign should be the same for all legends. 
However, there are some designs where more than 
one x-height is used and in such cases the dimensions 
given in stroke widths will be based on the main 
x-height unless stated otherwise.
2.13  Dimensions are measured to the tile outlines 
and not to the actual letter. This also applies to any 
symbol shown with an outline tile or grid.
2.14  The simplest sign is the supplementary plate as 
illustrated in figure 2-4. Where the legend is on two 
lines, the letter tiles are butted together vertically as 
shown. There may be some designs where it is 
necessary to insert a vertical space between the tiles. 
Figure 2-5 illustrates diagram 502 where a 2
sw gap 
has been introduced between “STOP” and  
“100
yds”. This is because the legend is considered to 
have two distinct messages. The first, “STOP”, gives 
an instruction and the second “100
yds” tells the 
driver when to carry out that instruction. The 2
sw 
vertical space helps to separate the two parts of the 
message and make the sign easier to read. Correct 
vertical spacing is important; it is the sign designer’s 
equivalent of punctuation.
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
clickable links in pdf files; add hyperlinks to pdf online
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
pdf email link; adding links to pdf document
12
DESIGN RULES COMMON TO ALL RECTANGULAR SIGNS
Figure 2-4 (diagram 543.1)
2.5
1.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
1.5
1.5r
Figure 2-5 (diagram 502)
2
1.5
2.15  A standard border width of 1.5
sw is used for 
most prescribed signs. Where a different border 
width is used the inside corner radius of the main 
sign will generally be equal to that border width. 
2.16  Where the legend is in lower case letters, only 
the first word of each message will commence with 
a capital letter. Capital letters are used at the 
beginning of each word only where the words form 
a proper name. Examples are shown in figure 2-6.
2.17  Figure 2-7 shows the design of diagram 865 
where all letters are in block capitals. The appearance  
of the sign is improved by centring the legend 
vertically on the sign and this is achieved by adopting 
the dimensions shown.
2.18  Where the legend is on two or more lines each 
line is centred horizontally on the sign. Special rules 
apply to directional signs; these are covered in 
section 3.
diagram 575
Figure 2-6
diagram 661.3A
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add link to pdf acrobat; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
clickable links in pdf; pdf reader link
13
DESIGN RULES COMMON TO ALL RECTANGULAR SIGNS
Figure 2-7 (diagram 865)
3.2
3.2
2.8
1.2
2.5
Letters
Tiles
2.19  Some signs are divided into more than one 
panel, such as diagram 618.3 illustrated in figure 2-8. 
The dividing border between each panel has the 
same width and corner radii as the main sign border. 
The exception to this is the stack type direction sign 
which has special design rules (see section 4). The 
decision to provide more than one panel is based on 
the need to separate distinct parcels of information.
Figure 2-8 (diagram 618.3)
Equal
Equal
Equal
Equal
2.20  The overall size of a sign is determined by the 
chosen x-height. This will depend on the type of sign 
and, in most cases, the 85 percentile speed of 
vehicles using the road. There is a range of standard 
x-heights from 15
mm (for some waiting restriction 
time plates not intended to be read from moving 
vehicles) to 400
mm (for motorway signs). Some signs 
have specific x-heights prescribed by the Regulations. 
However, many signs, particularly directional 
informatory signs, have only minimum and maximum 
sizes given. In theory any intermediate value could be 
used, but it is recommended that the main x-height 
should be to the nearest 5
mm. The table of x-heights 
for directional signs in Appendix A of Local Transport 
Note 1
/
94 lists the standard sizes of 50, 60, 75, 100, 
125, 150, 200, 250, 300 and 400
mm. Intermediate 
x-heights may be used where this would have siting 
advantages (e.g. spanning a footway) without 
compromising the target value and legibility of the 
sign.
ROUNDING OF SIGN SIZES
2.21  With the use of computers in the design and 
manufacture of traffic sign faces it is not always 
necessary to round the overall size of a particular sign 
to “convenient” dimensions. However, where it is 
considered advantageous to round the size of a sign 
the following guidelines should be used.
2.22  The amount of rounding is based on the main 
x-height of the sign. The overall size of the sign shall 
be rounded up to the nearest Z
mm where Z is 
calculated by taking 5% of the x-height and then 
rounding up to the nearest 5
mm. Thus for a sign 
with 150
mm x-height, Z would equal 5% of 150
mm 
which is 7.5
mm and this would be rounded up to 
10
mm. The overall size of the sign, in this case, 
would be rounded up to the nearest 10
mm. The 
table in figure 2-9 gives the value of Z for each 
standard x-height. 
x-height mm
<100 100 125 150 200 250 300 400
Z mm
5
5
10
10
10
15
15
20
Figure 2-9 : Rounding of Sign Sizes
2.23  The rounding described in para 2.22 is applied 
by increasing the space between the sign border and 
the elements that make up the sign by equal 
amounts top and bottom, and both sides. Where a 
sign comprises more than one panel (see para 2.19) 
the rounding of the vertical dimension may be split 
equally between each panel or applied to the top and 
bottom borders only, as for other signs.
2.24  In some cases it may be desirable to round 
either the vertical or horizontal overall dimension by 
varying the x-height (see variable x-heights in para 
2.20). This method would be appropriate where the 
sign is being manufactured by computer methods.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf link
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
adding an email link to a pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
14
 DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - GENERAL PRINCIPLES
TYPES OF DIRECTIONAL SIGNS
3.1  Directional informatory signs can be categorised 
as follows:
(a) Advance Direction Signs - those signs giving route 
information in respect of a junction ahead.
(b) Direction Signs - those signs placed at a junction 
and pointing along specific routes.
(c) Route Confirmatory Signs - those signs placed 
after a junction giving confirmation as to the route 
being followed and, in most cases, destinations that 
can be reached, together with the appropriate 
distances.
3.2  Advance direction signs can be either post 
mounted or gantry mounted. They are sited on the 
approach to the junctions indicated to give drivers 
adequate advance warning. There are three types of 
post mounted signs: map type, stack type and 
dedicated lane signs. An example of each is  
illustrated in figure 3-1. Gantry mounted signs are 
generally used for grade separated junctions. There 
are two distinctive designs; one for junctions without 
lane drops and one for junctions with lane drops. It is 
vitally important that the correct design is used 
for the two different types of junction. An 
example of each design is illustrated in figure 3-2.
Figure 3-1
Map-type Sign
Stack-type Sign
Dedicated Lane Sign
Advance Direction Sign for Junction without Lane Drop
Advance Direction Sign for Junction with Lane Drop
(also used as a Route Confirmatory Sign)
Figure 3-2
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add hyperlink pdf; adding links to pdf in preview
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add url pdf; c# read pdf from url
3.3  Direction signs must not be confused with 
advance direction signs. Direction signs are placed 
at the junction and point along the route shown 
on the sign. The most common type of direction 
sign is the flag type sign with the chevron end. An 
example is illustrated in figure 3-3. Where the exit 
from a junction is at an acute angle, a flag type sign 
may not be suitable. In such cases a rectangular sign 
with an inclined arrow may be used. This should not 
be confused with the stack type advance direction 
sign which it resembles. One common use of the 
rectangular sign is on the nose of an exit slip road at 
a grade separated junction. Examples of rectangular 
direction signs are illustrated in figure 3-4. A third 
type of direction sign is the modern version of the 
traditional fingerpost (diagram 2141). This should be  
used only on minor rural roads where traffic speeds 
are low. The Directions do not permit this type of 
sign, an example of which is illustrated in figure 3-5, 
to be erected on trunk, principal (“A” numbered) or 
classified “B” numbered roads. 
Figure 3-3
Figure 3-4
Figure 3-5
3.4  Route confirmatory signs are generally placed 
after junctions where the advance direction signs do 
not give distances to the various destinations. A route 
confirmatory sign will normally show the route 
number, destinations reached and the distances to 
those destinations. In some cases it is appropriate to 
give information relating to another route that can be 
reached at a junction ahead. At grade separated 
junctions with gantry mounted signs, overhead signs 
may be provided beyond the nose of the exit slip 
road. Although they will not include distances, they 
are referred to as route confirmatory signs (see figure 
3-2). Examples of the various types of post mounted 
route confirmatory signs are illustrated in figure 3-6.
Figure 3-6
15
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - GENERAL PRINCIPLES
BASIC PRINCIPLES OF COLOUR CODING
3.5  Colour coding is one of the most important 
aspects of directional sign design. Since 1964 blue 
backgrounds have been used on motorway signs, 
green backgrounds on primary routes and white 
backgrounds on other roads (non-primary routes). 
The Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 
1994 extended this colour coding to panels and 
patches which indicate the status of routes reached 
directly or indirectly from a junction ahead.
3.6  The layout in figure 3-7 shows a typical highway 
network comprising primary and non-primary routes. 
The signing of the network using the colour coding 
rules is illustrated by the five advance direction signs 
(labelled A to E inclusive).
3.7  Sign A is placed on the primary route and 
therefore has a green background with a white 
border. Although Longchurch is reached by travelling 
along a non-primary route (B1144), it is shown 
directly on the green background of sign A. This is 
because at this location the route to Longchurch 
continues along the primary route. Note that the 
route number (B1144) is not shown on a white patch. 
Route number patches are used only to indicate 
routes of a higher status (i.e. blue motorway 
patches on white and green background signs, and 
green patches on white background signs). As the 
A123 is a non-primary route, the place names and 
route numbers are shown on white panels. Had the 
B1255 been a primary route then the bracketed route 
number would be on a green patch on the white 
panel. It should be noted that the white panel 
indicates the status of the route and not that of 
the destination. Dorfield, for example, could be a 
primary destination.
3.8  Sign B shows the same junction as viewed from 
the non-primary route. The green panel indicating  
the primary route to Lampton also includes 
Longchurch. The same principle applies as for sign A. 
It is not appropriate to place Longchurch (B1144) on 
the main white background of the sign outside the 
green panel. There is no significance in the fact that a 
stack type sign is illustrated here, whereas sign A on 
the primary route is a map type sign. The type of sign 
used will be the most suitable for the approach to the 
junction. Note that all white background directional 
signs (other than MoD signs) have black borders. The 
use of blue borders on local signs was discontinued in 
1994. Existing blue-bordered signs must be  
removed by 31st December 2014. 
3.9  Sign C shows the sign at the previous junction 
on the A123. As this is a junction between two 
non-primary routes the use of green panels is not 
appropriate. However the sign does indicate that the 
primary route A11 can be reached at a junction 
further ahead and therefore the route number is 
shown on a green patch. This is similar to the current 
practice of signing routes to motorways by using blue 
motorway number patches. Had the A123 been a 
primary route from its junction with the A11 to 
Hopford then the route number A123 (unbracketed) 
would also be shown on a green patch. Longchurch 
is not indicated at this junction, but if it were the 
route number would not be on a green patch since 
the B1144 is not a primary route (see Dorfield on 
sign E). Green patches are used only to indicate those 
routes that have primary status. Although the B1144 
is reached by travelling along the primary route  
(A11), it is itself a non-primary route and therefore a 
green patch is not appropriate.
3.10  Sign D shows that some situations can arise 
where all destinations are shown on panels. In the 
same way that Longchurch is shown on a green panel 
on sign B, Dorfield is also shown on a green panel 
although the A123 is a non-primary route. A green 
panel shows all destinations that can be reached by 
turning directly onto a primary route.  As explained in 
para 3.7, white patches are not used and therefore it 
is not appropriate to use white patches on green 
panels.
3.11  Sign E indicating a junction between two 
non-primary routes demonstrates that other 
non-primary routes ahead (in this case A123) do not 
have their route numbers on green patches even 
though they are reached by travelling along a length 
of primary route. Sign E also demonstrates the use of 
a route number (B1144) not directly associated with a 
place name.
3.12  The background colour of direction signs 
(e.g. flag type signs) at a junction will be appropriate 
to the route indicated. Green or white panels are not 
used except where two directions are indicated on 
rectangular signs at junctions (see diagram 2127). 
Route number patches are used in the same manner 
as on advance direction signs. Where a rectangular 
direction sign, showing a route number only, is used 
to indicate an exit slip road leading directly to a 
non-primary route from a primary route, the 
background colour should be white, not green 
with a white route number panel or patch.
16
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - GENERAL PRINCIPLES
Figure 3-7
Dorfield
Biggleswick
Longchurch
Axtley
Lampton
Hopford
B1145
Maplebeck
Sign D
Sign E
Sign A
Sign C
Sign B
B1144
A
1
1
B
12
5
5
A11
Background colours
Primary Route
Non-Primary Route ('A' road)
Non-Primary Route ('B' road)
A123
A123
17
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - GENERAL PRINCIPLES
3.13  Local Transport Note 1
/
94: The Design and Use 
of Directional Informatory Signs (to be superseded by 
Chapter 2) gives more detailed information on the 
principles of directional signing (see para 1.2).
DESIGN OF PANELS AND PATCHES
3.14  Panels are designed in a similar manner to the 
basic sign described in section 2 in that the space 
between tiles and the inside border or edge is the 
same. Borders, which are always white, are used 
when a dark coloured panel is placed on a dark 
coloured background (e.g. a blue motorway panel on 
a green primary route sign). Where a border is 
applied this will be 0.5
sw wide with an internal 
corner radius of 1
sw (note that the radius is not 
equal to the border width). When a border is not 
required the corner radius of the panel is 1
sw. 
Panels are not placed on other panels (e.g. a 
brown tourist panel is not placed on a green or white 
destination panel). Two separate panels would be 
placed one above the other.
3.15  The Ministry of Defence (MoD) panel differs 
from the others as it has a 1
sw border which is 
coloured red. This border is always applied to the 
panel, which has a white background. When the 
panel is placed on a dark background, a 0.5
sw white 
edge (equivalent to the border on other panels) is 
added to the outside of the red border.
3.16  On map type signs it is sometimes possible to 
tuck the route symbol into the legend block, in order 
to reduce the overall size of the sign. This can be 
accommodated by providing a cut-out in one of the 
corners of the panel. When a cut-out is provided this 
should be sufficient to accommodate the route 
symbol. It should not be extended to provide the 
minimum 2.5
sw horizontal gap to the letter tiles of 
the lower line, unless this is necessary to provide 
space for the route symbol. In most cases the cut-out 
will be in the bottom right hand corner, as shown in 
figure 3-8 (see also para 5.11).
3.17  Patches are similar to panels but have reduced 
space between the tiles and the inside border or 
edge. The corner radii remain the same as for panels. 
A patch may contain more than one route number on 
the same line. A second line should not be used and 
therefore it is not appropriate to provide a cut-out as 
for panels. A white border is provided when a dark 
coloured patch is placed on a dark coloured 
background. Patches may be placed on panels.
3.18  Figure 3-8 shows in detail the design of patches 
and panels.
Figure 3-8
Route Number Patch
(without border)
1r
1.5
1
1
1
Route Number Patch (with border)
1
1
1
1.5r external
1r internal
1.5
0.5
Tile
height
18
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - GENERAL PRINCIPLES
Figure 3-8 (continued)
2.5
2.5
2.5
1.5
0.5
1r
1
1.5
1.5r external
1r internal
1r inside edge
0.5r outside edge
All Panels other than MoD
(with and without border)
Bordered Panel with Cut-out
Borderless Panel with Cut-out
1.5
1r
MoD Panel (main border red)
(with and without white edge)
1
2.5
0.5
2.5
2.5r external
1.5
1r
1r
19
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - GENERAL PRINCIPLES
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested