100
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-2
4
2.5
3
3
2
4
3
1.5
4
1.5
2.5
2
Pdf email link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding an email link to a pdf; pdf link open in new window
Pdf email link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf in acrobat; add hyperlink pdf document
101
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-3
11.3  As an alternative to the cancellation bar, a 
separate temporary black on yellow sign may be 
provided indicating the change in route number. 
This can be mounted either on its own or beneath 
a permanent advance direction sign. An example 
is illustrated in figure 11-3. This sign must not be 
retained for more than two years (see para 14.2).
DIVERSION ROUTE SYMBOLS
11.4  Schedule 13 Part VII of the Regulations shows 
the symbols that may be added to permanent 
directional informatory signs to indicate a route to be 
followed when a motorway or high standard 
all-purpose road is closed during an emergency or 
during major maintenance or construction works. The 
design of these symbols is shown on working 
drawing S 56. Figures 11-4 and 11-5 show how the 
symbols are added to the destination blocks on the 
permanent signs. It should be noted that the symbol 
is always on a yellow patch whatever the background 
colour of the main sign. The symbol should always be 
associated with the route number of the road to be 
followed until the road or motorway to which the 
road user is returning is shown on the signs. The 
symbol should then be associated with this route 
number. The symbol may be shown on a destination 
panel, but never on a green or blue route number 
patch. The symbol should be placed to the right of or 
below the appropriate route number.
11.5  Where separate signs to diagrams 2703 and 
2704 are used to indicate symbolic diversion routes, 
reference should be made to the working drawings 
for design details.
1
2.5
7.5
3
2.5
2.5
1
1.5
2.5
Figure 11-4
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
copy and email the secure download link to the assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
clickable links in pdf from word; adding links to pdf
RasterEdge Product Licensing Discount
s). After confirming the informations provided, we will send you an email that contains price(s) at a discount and the online order link for new licensing.
add links to pdf in preview; pdf link to email
102
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-5
3
1.5
4
1
*
*
*
These dimensions
are reduced by
0.5 sw when
there is no
descender above
the symbol patch
min
2.5
2.5
0.5
(1 sw when
route no is
bracketed)
3
2.5
2.5
min
2.5
3.5
2.5
RasterEdge Product Renewal and Update
4. Order email. Our support team will send you the purchase link. HTML5 Viewer for .NET; XDoc.Windows Viewer for .NET; XDoc.Converter for .NET; XDoc.PDF for .NET;
pdf link; clickable links in pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
add hyperlinks to pdf; add url pdf
103
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-5 (continued)
2.5
2.5
min
2
2.5
6
C
L
2.5
ALTERATIONS TO EXISTING SIGNS
11.6  Existing signs sometimes need to be altered to 
take account of the opening to traffic of a new road, 
or other changes to the highway network such as 
reclassification. These alterations can take the form of 
new or deleted destinations, changes to route 
numbers etc. To save the cost of providing a 
completely new replacement sign, it is often possible 
to modify an existing sign by the application of cover 
plates. In no circumstances may smaller x-heights 
or sub-standard spacings be used to 
accommodate alterations.
11.7  Care should be taken to ensure that the sign 
face materials used to manufacture a cover plate 
match as far as is possible the materials used for 
the manufacture of the original sign. Problems that 
are likely to occur are mis-matched colours and 
mis-matched retroreflective properties. It is not 
uncommon to recognise a plated sign at night by 
a highly reflective “panel” on what is otherwise a 
relatively dark sign. Such methods of sign 
modification should be avoided, as they give 
unwarranted emphasis to a particular section of the 
sign. Where the intention is to remove the plates at a 
future date, they should be affixed to the sign in a 
manner that does not cause damage to the original 
sign face (other than the drilling of holes). 
11.8  Where future changes are anticipated, it may 
be possible to design a sign with these changes in 
mind. However, the initial design of the sign should 
follow the design rules detailed in this chapter.
11.9  Where a sign is altered by the application of 
plates, and the sign had not previously been  
designed to take account of the specific changes, 
care must be taken to ensure that the modified sign 
still accords with the design rules, particularly with 
respect to block spacing. On map type signs it is 
important that the minimum space for unrelated 
blocks is maintained. Where a place name is removed 
from a list of destinations, a single line cover plate 
should not be used if this produces an artificial gap in 
the list. In this case a complete cover plate containing 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
pdf reader link; add hyperlink pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email.
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to pdf
104
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-6
Existing sign
Incorrect plating
Correct plating
Correct plating
New sign
Existing sign
Incorrect plating
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
add links to pdf acrobat; add links to pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source
add hyperlink in pdf; change link in pdf
Sign 1A 
Sign 1B 
Sign 1C 
Sign 1D 
Sign 1E 
Figure 11-7
the retained place names should be provided for the 
entire destination block. Where additional place 
names are added, it may be necessary to use 
abbreviations (see para 2.11). Examples of the correct 
and incorrect use of cover plates are shown in 
figure 11-6, which also illustrates, for comparison 
purposes, the alternative solution of providing a 
complete new sign.
11.10  Where a satisfactory sign cannot be produced 
by modifying the existing sign, and where the 
provision of a new replacement sign is ruled out on 
the grounds of cost, consideration should be given to 
the provision of a separately mounted supplementary 
sign showing the new information. Minor 
modifications may still need to be made to the 
existing sign. A new sign, replacing both the existing 
and supplementary signs, can be provided at a future 
date when funds permit or as part of a maintenance 
programme. Where there is likely to be a series of 
changes to a particular sign brought about by the 
progressive opening of a new road, consideration 
should be given to the provision of supplementary 
signs and minor modifications to the existing sign, 
with a view to providing a new sign once all the 
changes have taken place. 
GENERAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
11.11  By following the design rules for directional 
informatory signs covered in sections 3 to 11, it is 
possible to produce different layouts for the same 
sign. Figures 11-7 to 11-13 show some examples, 
described below in more detail.
11.12  Figure 11-7 is a stack type sign showing a 
simple crossroads where the side roads enter at an 
angle. Only one destination and route number is 
shown for each direction. Sign 1A is the smallest of 
the group, but is a little cluttered as there are two 
lines for each directional panel. The panels are 
stacked in the conventional order, that is left turn 
above right turn. Sign 1B differs only in that the right 
turn is shown above the left turn. This sign is easier to 
understand, as the pattern of the arrows emphasizes 
the junction layout. Sign 1C improves the clarity of 
the sign further by placing the route numbers 
alongside the place names. The arrows now 
determine the height of each directional panel, 
creating additional space between the legends and 
the panel dividers
/
sign borders. This extra space 
makes the sign easier to read. This sign, being wider 
than sign 1B, may be more suited to footway 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class.
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add email link to pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
application. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. C# source code is provided for .NET WinForms class. Evaluation
add hyperlink to pdf online; add a link to a pdf file
106
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-8
Sign 2A 
Sign 2B 
Sign 2C 
Sign 2D 
mounting where sufficient width is required between 
the posts to allow the passage of pedestrians with 
wheelchairs or prams. As the ahead destination 
determines the width of the sign, by placing this on 
two lines (sign 1D), the sign width can be reduced 
slightly where verge or footway width is limited. This 
modification of the design is at the expense of a taller 
and larger sign. Finally, sign 1E demonstrates a poor 
design. This is the largest sign in the group and the 
arrangement of route numbers does nothing to 
improve the appearance of the sign.
11.13  Figure 11-8 is a map type sign showing the 
same junction as figure 11-7, except that the A11 has 
primary route status in this example. The sign 
therefore demonstrates the use of coloured panels. 
Sign 2A shows the conventional layout. The 
“Dorfield” panel has the route number ranged right 
to allow the route arm to tuck into the destination 
block. The vertical separation of the two side 
destinations (“Axtley” and “Dorfield”) helps to 
emphasize the junction layout. Sign 2B has about the 
same area as sign 2A. The panel positions in sign 2B 
emphasize the crossroads even further. There is no 
doubt that “Axtley” is to the left and “Dorfield” to 
the right. With this arrangement it is not possible to 
tuck the right turn route arm into the “Dorfield” 
panel and therefore the route number is ranged left. 
If the height of the sign were increased, the right turn 
in sign 2B could be designed as for sign 2A. This 
would reduce the width of the sign, but the left and 
right destination panels would be out of balance 
(“Dorfield” being closer to the vertical route arm  
than “Axtley”). Sign 2C reduces the sign area to a 
minimum. However, the short approach arm and the 
position of the side destination panels do not 
adequately illustrate the junction layout. Although a 
space saver, this sign design is not recommended. 
Sign 2D is similar to sign 2A except that the right turn 
destination panel is positioned below the route arm. 
Because the route arm is angled upwards, it tends to 
dissociate itself from the destination panel. However, 
the design does work, and because the right turn 
panel is higher than the left turn panel the nature of 
107
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Sign 3A
Area 5% larger than Sign 3B
Sign 3B
Figure 11-9
the crossroads is still clear. Had the left turn been at 
90°, the “Axtley” panel in sign 2D would have been 
higher on the sign and the junction layout would be 
much clearer with the “Dorfield” panel positioned as 
in sign 2A.  Destination blocks should not generally 
be placed beneath a route arm that angles upwards 
by more than 30° to the horizontal.
11.14  Figure 11-9 shows a roundabout with two 
upward pointing side arms. Sign 3A shows the 
conventional design. Sign 3B allows the right turn 
arm to tuck into the destination block, resulting in a 
slight reduction of the overall sign area. It should be 
noted that the sign height has been increased to 
maintain the correct vertical block spacing between 
the forward destination and the “Dorfield” panel.
Figure 11-10
Sign 4D
Area 7% larger than Sign 4C
Sign 4B
Sign 4C
Sign 4A
108
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
11.15  Figure 11-10 shows a final advance direction 
sign on a motorway. Sign 4A is the conventional 
design with the junction number in the bottom left 
hand corner. By moving the junction number to the 
top left hand corner, as shown on sign 4B, and 
lowering the side destination block, the height of the 
sign (and hence overall area) can be substantially 
reduced. However, this was only possible because the 
horizontal length of the forward destination was very 
short. Signs 4C and 4D demonstrate that with a 
longer length of forward destination, the smaller sign 
is the one with the junction number at the bottom. 
Another consideration is the length of the bottom 
line of the side destination. Although this can be 
positioned close to the bottom border, as shown on 
sign 4B, this may not be possible when the  distance 
to the junction is added. Also, as one mile and 
1
mile 
advance direction signs do not normally show a 
forward destination, there would be no saving on the 
height of the sign by placing the junction number at 
the top.
11.16  The design rules in previous sections show 
how triangular warning signs and regulatory roundel 
signs are added to direction and advance direction 
signs. The more complex the information given within 
the triangle or roundel, the larger it needs to be, 
relative to the main sign, to ensure that it is still 
legible to drivers (see Appendix D for sizes). Where 
this results in very large signs with significant 
amounts of blank space, consideration should be 
given to placing the warning
/
regulatory information 
on separate signs, and not integrating it into the 
main direction and advance direction signs. Where an 
advance direction sign incorporates two triangles or 
roundels, care must be taken to minimise wasted 
space. Figure 11-11 shows a sign for a three-way 
junction where the ahead route has a level crossing 
with electrified overhead cables. The design of sign 
5A assumes that the left hand triangle should be 
placed on the vertical route arm. However, this results 
in an overlarge sign. By placing the right hand 
triangle on the vertical arm, as shown in sign 5B, a 
more efficient design is achieved. Depending on the 
number of destinations shown, and the length of the 
place name blocks, it may be possible to reduce the 
area of the sign face further by using a stack type 
sign as shown in sign 5C.
Sign 5A
Sign 5B
Sign 5C
Figure 11-11
109
DIRECTIONAL INFORMATORY SIGNS - MISCELLANEOUS
Figure 11-12
Sign 6C
AREA = 100%
AREA = 88%
AREA = 88%
(100% without Elmsford)
(76% without Elmsford)
(88% without Elmsford)
Sign 6A
Sign 6B
Sign 6D
11.17  Place names with two or more words lend 
themselves to alternative layouts. Figure 11-12 shows 
an example of a map type roundabout sign with the 
destination “Middle Walborough” indicated along  
an unnumbered non-primary route. On sign 6A 
“Middle Walborough” is on a single line; this results 
in a very large sign which is wasteful of space. In the 
example, the destination to the right has a relatively 
short name (Barford) and, with the extremely long left 
turn arm, the complete map type route symbol looks 
out of balance. The total area of the sign can be 
reduced by 12% by abbreviating “Middle 
Walborough” to “M. Walborough” as shown on  
sign 6B. One problem here is that should there be 
another destination with a similar name, such as 
“Market Walborough”, not too far away and not 
indicated on the sign, confusion could arise. It is 
generally better to avoid using abbreviations, and to 
place the name on two lines as shown on sign 6C. 
The width of the sign is reduced further, although the 
height is increased, resulting in a sign that has the 
same area as sign 6B. However, in addition to 
showing the place name in full, sign 6C has a more 
balanced route symbol layout, and the reduced width 
will help to overcome any siting difficulties. As this is 
a roundabout junction, “Walborough”, being on the 
second line, tucks under the route symbol. This is a 
contributory factor to the reduction in sign width. If 
“Middle Walborough” was the only destination to  
be signed to the left, the omission of “Elmsford” 
would not affect the size of signs 6A and 6B, as the 
height is determined by the minimum length of the 
approach arm (see para 5.39). However, the height of 
sign 6C would be the same as 6A and 6B, resulting in 
a total sign area equal to 76% of that for sign 6A. 
The difference between signs 6C and 6D is in the 
length of the left turn route arm. On sign 6C the 
two-thirds rule (see para 5.6) is applied to the longest 
part of the block (i.e. “Walborough”). This results in 
the arm almost passing the first part of the name 
(“Middle”). The passing effect would be further 
exaggerated had the place name been “Old 
Walborough” on two lines. On sign 6D, the 
appearance of the route arm is improved by applying 
the two-thirds rule to “Middle” rather than to 
“Walborough”. There may be other situations where 
applying the two-thirds rule to the line of legend 
immediately below the route arm improves the 
appearance of the sign.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested