1
Welcome to the Transactions Art Submission Guide! Here you can find all of the reference material you need to help with accurate and 
correct image preparation for all IEEE Computer Society Transactions. Please note this guide is only to help with the images portion of 
your manuscript.
Please view the table of contents below to choose your category of interest:
LAYOUT AND STYLE
FIGURE LABELING
AUTHOR PHOTOS
Additional links provided:
View Transactions List
Peer Review Center for Journals
Computer.org
MISC. INFORMATION
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
View our article 2-column layout, 
article styling, and trim size for all 
IEEE CS Transactions articles.
Learn about the differences between 
RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale and how 
your settings can effect the output 
and look of your images.
Learn  about  accepted  file  types, 
figure/table  specifications,  image 
resolution, fonts and more.
Learn about the way we style our 
figure  labeling  for  multi-image 
figures that contain detailed figure 
Guidelines, tips, and file specs for 
submitted author photos.
Pdf link open in new window - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf online
Pdf link open in new window - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf; add a link to a pdf in preview
Quick Facts
2
LAYOUT, STYLE, AND FORMATTING OVERVIEW
Below is an illustrated example of an edited article page showing a 2-column figure, a 2-column table and a 1-column figure containing 
labels. The Quick Facts table gives some of our journal styling information.
To see PDF examples, visit your favorite journal homepage and download our FREE 
Featured Articles available for each latest Transactions issue.
Trim Size: 
7.88 x 10.75 in / 20.02 x 27.31 cm
Text Format:
2-Column
Article Title Style:
Helvetica Medium 24 pt
Author Names Style:
Helvetica Medium 12 pt
Abstract, Index Terms, & Figure 
Captions Style:
Helvetica Medium 8 pt
Section Headers Style:
Helvetica Bold 12 pt (small caps)
Figure Labels Style: 
Helvetica Medium 8 pt (no aliasing)
Body Text Font: 
Palatino 9.5 pt
Algorithms and Inposition Art:
1-column
Figure and Table Sizes:
1-column or 2-column width
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Please note that, there will be a pop-up window "cannot open your file" if your loaded Please click the following link to see more C# PDF imaging project
add link to pdf; adding an email link to a pdf
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
to download image from website link more easily. reImage, "c:/reimage.png", New PNGEncoder()) End powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add url to pdf
3
COLOR GUIDE
This section is designed to give a brief overview of the differences between RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale as well as some guidelines and 
information for preparing your images for the best results on screen and in print. The three color spaces we use are introduced below.
RGB
RGB is the additive primary color model which uses Red, Green, and Blue lights to create color. This is typically used on electronic devices 
or displays such as computer monitors and LCDs.
CMYK
CMYK is the subtractive color model which uses four colors of inks, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key Black, to create color. This method is 
used for color printing from home printers to large presses.
Grayscale
Grayscale is a model that uses black and white and shades of gray through values and intensity to create its images.
RGB
CMYK
GRAYSCALE (100% - 0%)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
[Section Continued on Next Page]
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Open source codes can be added to C# class. String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath
clickable links in pdf from word; add url link to pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
is trying to display a PDF document file inside a browser window. PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\input.pdf"); pdf.ConvertToVectorImages(ContextType.HTML
add links to pdf; add links to pdf online
4
COLOR GUIDE CONTINUED...
Below is an example of the color range available to RGB and CMYK in the visible color gamut. CMYK has a much smaller color space and 
many colors available in RGB are not possible in CMYK. If you are providing images to a journal that prints in color, it is best to preview 
your color images in CMYK to view more accurate results before submission.
The next section will show examples of common color shifts, particularly when converting RGB images to CMYK or grayscale. Follow the 
guidelines on the next page to maintain image quality across your figures.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
[Section Continued on Next Page]
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Draw and Write Text and Graphics on
fileName, New WordDecoder()) 'use WordDecoder open a wordfile Dim Word document function, please link to Word & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add links to pdf document; add a link to a pdf file
C# TIFF: C#.NET TIFF Document Viewer, View & Display TIFF Using C#
TIFF Mobile Viewer in most mobile browsers; Open, load & Free to convert TIFF document to PDF document for management Please link to get more detailed tutorials
add links to pdf acrobat; adding hyperlinks to pdf
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
RGB Graph with thin lines
Redone with the journal’s specs in mind
Converted to Grayscale
5
COLOR GUIDE CONTINUED...
Most of our journals are printed in black and white (Grayscale). 
If possible, create images in grayscale to view the best results. Certain bright colors do not translate well to Grayscale and the colors 
will become very light and hard to see. This typically effects images that have thin lines, dots, or other information that is represented 
graphically.
If images are submitted in RGB, you will see color shifts in your images after we convert them to CMYK or Grayscale during the art 
conversion process for printed journals. See the examples below.
We recommend avoiding bright, light, or 
neon colors for images that will be in print.
Example of a  graph  submitted to a 
journal that prints in Grayscale.
Notice how the color shift and thin lines 
make the graph much harder to see.
Creating the image in Grayscale with good 
contrast and thicker lines tremendously 
improves image quality.
Tip: Create lines with at least a 1 pt stroke 
and use values higher than 30% gray.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
[Section Continued on Next Page]
TAC
TLT
TSC
TVCG
TC
TKDE
TPDS
ToH
TSE
TMC
TDSC
TCBB TPAMI
2011 TRANSACTIONS TITLES
COLOR MODE
RGB
CMYK
GRAYSCALE
Online Only Titles
Color Printed Titles
OnlinePlus Titles
Black & White Only Printed Titles
6
COLOR GUIDE CONTINUED...
Please review the following chart to see the optimal color mode for your images based on journal submission guidelines for 2011.
By request the online PDF version of your article can be in color even if the journal is printed in Grayscale. It is best to submit this 
request to the Transactions Coordinator during the peer review/acceptance process before it reaches art conversion.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
7
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
This section provides information for helping authors create high quality art tailored for their manuscript. You do not have to submit 
individual files with your manuscript. We can convert art from your submitted manuscript PDF.
Accepted and Preferred File Types:
Raster (Bitmap) Images
Resolution dependent art that is made up of pixels. Resizing these types of art files will cause loss in quality. It is best to create the 
images directly to the correct figure dimensions. Typical raster formats are TIF, JPG, PNG, BMP, and GIF. PDF can contain both raster 
and vector elements. More information on resolution is available on the next page.
We prefer the file types listed above for accuracy and efficiency when converting the art for your manuscript. Please avoid submitting 
other file types for your artwork. Do not embed files into Word Documents. (.doc/.docx)
Vector Images
Resolution independent art that is mathematically drawn with paths, points, and shapes. Vector art can be resized to any size with no 
loss in quality. Typical formats are EPS and PDF.
We convert all vector files to EPS and all raster images to TIF with LZW Compression.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
[Section Continued on Next Page]
8
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS CONTINUED...
Resolution (Raster/Bitmap Images Only)
Resolution deals with the amount of pixel density of a raster image. Ideally we want your images to have a minimum resolution of 
300 pixels/inch or 118 pixels/cm for high quality print. If your application does not allow control of the resolution output please use 
the pixel values provided below.
Image Dimensions
Images can have a 1-column or 2-column maximum width and a single maximum height. Figures/tables close to 1-column width 
will also be reduced to fit in the single column space. Image size reduction can also occur to help reduce page count. Images 
larger than the 2-column width will be reduced to fit the page margins.
Figures/tables that exceed the maximum height will be reduced to fit. If you submit a figure or table that is too large for 
reduction, we may split it across two pages but for style purposes it is best that a figure/table fits on a single page. 
Please reference the table below for creating your figure dimensions. It is best to output raster images to their final size within these 
dimensions. Vector art can be any size; however, sizing your art to the correct dimensions helps keep consistency in art conversion.
1-COLUMN MAX WIDTH
UNITS (Resolution)
FIGURE/TABLE DIMENSIONS
1017 px
2070 px
2400 px
3.39 in
6.9 in
8.0 in
8.61 cm
17.53 cm
20.32 cm
PIXELS
INCHES (300 Pixels/Inch)
CENTIMETERS (118 Pixels/CM)
2-COLUMN MAX WIDTH
MAXIMUM HEIGHT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
[Section Continued on Next Page]
9
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS CONTINUED...
Fonts - Text in Vector Images
If you are submitting individual EPS or PDF files to take advantage of vector art for your manuscript, you will want to follow a few simple 
guidelines to ensure any text in your figures stays accurate.
1. Outline fonts. The best method to ensure the highest accuracy of your text and math is to change all fonts into outlines/shapes. 
Below is an example of an equation being changed into outlines.
2. Embed fonts. If you use a nonstandard, non-system or latex font, we cannot gaurantee matching the font. Embedding fonts can 
help transfer the font subset.
3. Use standard fonts. If the first two methods are not available to you, we recommend the following postscript fonts that can be 
available to every system and cover a variety of styles and glyphs: Courier, Helvetica *, Symbol, Times **, and ITC Zapf Dingbats
*Arial can be substituted for Helvetica and **Times New Roman can be substituted for Times.
If none of these methods are available, you can still submit your artwork; however, we may not be able to accurately reproduce your 
text. If files are not usable due to font problems we will change all vector art into raster images or create raster images 
from your original submitted PDF.
Left: Editable Times New Roman font.  Right: Transformed into outlines to preserve accurate appearance.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
[Section Continued on Next Page]
10
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS CONTINUED...
Naming your Figure Files
When submitting individual files, we prefer that files are named using the following naming scheme:
Figures: figure1, figure2, figure3 or fig1, fig2, fig3, etc. Tables: table1, table2, table3, or t1, t2, t3, etc.
Authors: author1, author2, author3, or a1, a2, a3, etc.
Figures with multi-image parts are preferred to be submitted as a single file. If possible please avoid submitting your figures in 
multiple parts such as fig1a, fig1b, fig1c, etc. 
If we cannot use your files due to incorrect file naming, output anomalies, or font problems, we will default to creating raster images 
from the original submitted manuscript PDF.
Left: Figure files submitted as EPS files with LaTeX naming and in multiple pieces. Right: Correctly submitted EPS files using our 
preferred file naming and all figures are single images.
LAYOUTS/STYLE
COLOR GUIDE
IMAGE SPECIFICATIONS
FIGURE LABELS
AUTHOR PHOTOS
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested