best c# pdf library : Add links to pdf file Library SDK API .net asp.net winforms sharepoint transgender1-part214

Peterson-Badaali, & Zucker, 2008Steensma, , McGuire,
Kreukels, Beekman,&Cohen-Kettenis, 2013;Wallien&
Cohen-Kettenis,2008).However,severalresearchstudies
categorized30%to62%ofyouthwhodidnotreturntothe
clinicformedicalinterventionafterinitialassessment,and
whosegenderidentitymaybeunknown,as“desisters”who
nolongeridentifiedwithagenderdifferent thansexas-
signedatbirth(Steensmaetal., 2013;Wallien&Cohen-
Kettenis, 2008;Zucker,2008a).Asaresult,thisresearch
runsastrongriskofinflatingestimatesofthenumberof
youthwhodonotpersistwithaTGNCidentity.Research
has suggestedthatchildren n who identifymore intensely
withagenderdifferentthansexassignedatbirtharemore
likelytopersistinthis genderidentificationinto o adoles-
cence(Steensmaetal.,2013),andthatwhengenderdys-
phoriapersiststhroughchildhoodandintensifiesintoado-
lescence,thelikelihoodoflong-termTGNCidentification
increases(A.L.deVries,Steensma,Doreleijers,&Cohen-
Kettenis, 2011;Steensmaetal.,2013;Wallien&Cohen-
Kettenis, 2008;Zucker,2008b). Gender-questioningchil-
drenwhodonotpersistmaybemorelikelytolateridentify
as gay y or lesbian than non-gender-questioning g children
(Bailey&Zucker,1995;Drescher, 2014;Wallien&Co-
hen-Kettenis,2008).
AcleardistinctionbetweencareofTGNCandgender-
questioningchildrenandadolescentsexistsintheliterature.
DuetotheevidencethatnotallchildrenpersistinaTGNC
identity into o adolescence or adulthood, , and because e no
approachtoworkingwithTGNCchildrenhas beenade-
quately, empirically y validated, , consensus does not exist
regardingbestpracticewithprepubertalchildren.Lackof
consensusaboutthepreferredapproachtotreatmentmay
bedueinparttodivergentideasregardingwhatconstitutes
optimaltreatmentoutcomes forTGNC andgender-ques-
tioning youth h (Hembree et al., 2009). . Two distinct ap-
proachesexisttoaddressgenderidentityconcernsinchil-
dren(Hill,Menvielle,Sica,&Johnson,2010;Wallace&
Russell,2013), withsomeauthorssubdividingoneofthe
approachestosuggestthree(Byneetal.,2012;Drescher,
2014;Stein,2012).
Oneapproach encourages s anaffirmationandaccep-
tance of children’s expressed gender identity. This may
includeassistingchildrentosociallytransitionandtobegin
medicaltransition whentheirbodies s have physicallyde-
veloped, or allowinga a child’s s genderidentity to unfold
withoutexpectationofaspecificoutcome(A.L.deVries
&Cohen-Kettenis,2012;Edwards-Leeper&Spack,2012;
Ehrensaft, 2012Hidalgoet al., 2013Tishelman et al.,
2015).Cliniciansusingthisapproachbelievethatanopen
explorationandaffirmationwillassistchildrentodevelop
copingstrategiesandemotionaltoolstointegrateapositive
TGNC identity should gender r questioning g persist t (Ed-
wards-Leeper&Spack,2012).
In the second approach, , childrenareencouraged d to
embracetheirgivenbodiesandtoalignwiththeirassigned
genderroles. This includes endorsingandsupportingbe-
haviors and attitudes s that align n withthe child’s sex as-
signedatbirthpriortotheonsetofpuberty(Zucker,2008a;
Zucker,Wood,Singh,&Bradley,2012).Cliniciansusing
this approach believe that undergoing multiple medical
interventionsandlivingasaTGNCpersoninaworldthat
stigmatizesgendernonconformityisalessdesirableout-
comethanoneinwhichchildrenmaybeassistedtohappily
alignwiththeirsexassignedatbirth(Zuckeretal.,2012).
Consensusdoesnotexistregardingwhetherthisapproach
mayprovidebenefit(Zucker,2008a;Zuckeretal.,2012)or
maycauseharmorleadtopsychosocialadversities(Hillet
al., 2010Pyne, 2014Travers et al., 2012Wallace &
Russell, 2013). When n addressingpsychologicalinterven-
tionsforchildrenandadolescents,theWorldProfessional
Association for r Transgender Health h Standards s of Care
identifyinterventions “aimedattryingtochange gender
identityandexpressiontobecomemorecongruentwithsex
assigned at birth” asunethical(Colemanetal., 2012, p.
175). Itishopedthatfutureresearchwillofferimproved
guidanceinthisareaofpractice(Adelson&AACAPCQI,
2012;Malpas,2011).
Muchgreaterconsensusexistsregardingpracticewith
adolescents. Adolescents s presentingwith h genderidentity
concerns bringtheir r own setof unique challenges. . This
mayincludehavingalate-onset(i.e.,postpubertal)presen-
tationofgendernonconformingidentification,withnohis-
toryofgenderrolenonconformityorgenderquestioningin
childhood(Edwards-Leeper&Spack,2012).Complicating
theirclinical presentation, , manygender-questioningado-
lescentsalsopresentwithco-occurringpsychologicalcon-
cerns, such as s suicidal ideation, , self-injurious s behaviors
(Liu&Mustanski,2012;Mustanski,Garofalo,&Emerson,
2010), drugand d alcoholuse (Garofaloetal., 2006), and
autismspectrumdisorders(A.L.deVries,Noens,Cohen-
Kettenis, van n Berckelaer-Onnes, & & Doreleijers, 2010;
Jonesetal.,2012).Additionally,adolescentscanbecome
intenselyfocusedontheirimmediatedesires,resultingin
outwarddisplaysoffrustrationandresentmentwhenfaced
with any delayin receiving the medical treatment from
whichtheyfeeltheywouldbenefitandtowhichtheyfeel
entitled(Angello,2013;Edwards-Leeper&Spack,2012).
Thisintense focus onimmediate needs maycreatechal-
lenges in n assuring g that t adolescents are cognitively and
emotionallyabletomakelife-alteringdecisionstochange
their name or gender r marker, , begin n hormone e therapy
(whichmayaffectfertility),orpursuesurgery.
Nonetheless,thereisgreaterconsensusthattreatment
approachesforadolescents affirmanadolescents’gender
identity (Coleman et t al., , 2012). Treatment t options s for
adolescents extend beyond social l approaches s to include
medicalapproaches. One e particularmedical intervention
involves the use of puberty-suppressing g medication or
“blockers”(GnRHanalogue),whichisareversiblemedical
intervention used to o delay puberty for r appropriately
screenedadolescents withgenderdysphoria(Colemanet
al.,2012;A.L.C.deVriesetal.,2014;Edwards-Leeper,
&Spack,2012).Becauseoftheirage,othermedicalinter-
ventions mayalso o become availableto adolescents, and
psychologistsarefrequentlyconsultedtoprovideanassess-
ment of whether such h procedures would d be advisable
(Colemanetal.,2012).
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
842
December2015
American Psychologist
Add links to pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; add links to pdf in acrobat
Add links to pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Application.
Psychologists working with TGNC
and gender-questioning youth are encouraged to regularly
review the most current literature in this area, recognizing
the limited available research regarding the potential ben-
efits and risks of different treatment approaches for chil-
dren and for adolescents. Psychologists are encouraged to
offer parents and guardians clear information about avail-
able treatment approaches, regardless of the specific ap-
proach chosen by the psychologist. Psychologists are en-
couraged to provide psychological service to TGNC and
gender-questioning children and adolescents that draws
from empirically validated literature when available, rec-
ognizing the influence psychologists’ values and beliefs
may have on the treatment approaches they select (Ehrbar
& Gorton, 2010). Psychologists are e also encouraged d to
remain aware that what one youth and/or parent may be
seeking in a therapeutic relationship may not coincide with
aclinician’s approach (Brill&Pepper,2008). In cases in
which a youth and/or parent identify different preferred
treatment outcomes than a clinician, it may not be clinically
appropriate for the clinician to continue working with the
youth and family, and alternative options, including refer-
ral, might be considered. Psychologists may also find them-
selves navigating family systems in which youth and their
caregivers are seeking different treatment outcomes (Ed-
wards-Leeper & Spack, 2012).Psychologists areencour-
aged to carefully reflect on their personal values and beliefs
about gender identity development in conjunction with the
available research, and to keep the best interest of the child
or adolescent at the forefront of their clinical decisions at
all times.
Because gender nonconformity may be transient for
younger children in particular, the psychologist’s role may
be to help support children and their families through the
process of exploration and self-identification (Ehrensaft,
2012). Additionally, psychologists s may y provide e parents
with information about possible long-term trajectories chil-
dren may take in regard to their gender identity, along with
the available medical interventions for adolescents whose
TGNC identification persists (Edwards-Leeper &Spack,
2012).
When working with adolescents, psychologists are
encouraged to recognize that some TGNC adolescents will
not have a strong history of childhood gender role noncon-
formity or gender dysphoria either by self-report or family
observation (Edwards-Leeper & Spack, 2012). Some of
these adolescents may have withheld their feelings of gen-
der nonconformity out of a fear of rejection, confusion,
conflating gender identity and sexual orientation, or a lack
of awareness of the option to identify as TGNC. Parents of
these adolescents may need additional assistance in under-
standing and supporting their youth, given that late-onset
gender dysphoria and TGNC identification may come as a
significant surprise. Moving more slowly and cautiously in
these cases is often advisable (Edwards-Leeper&Spack,
2012).Giventhepossibilityofadolescents’intensefocus
on immediate desires and strong reactions to perceived
delays or barriers, psychologists are encouraged to validate
these concerns and the desire to move through the process
quickly while also remaining thoughtful and deliberate in
treatment. Adolescents and their families may need support
in tolerating ambiguity and uncertainty with regard to gen-
der identity and its development (Brill&Pepper,2008). It
is encouraged that care should be taken not to foreclose this
process.
For adolescents who exhibit a long history of gender
nonconformity, psychologists may inform parents that the
adolescent’s self-affirmed gender identity is most likely
stable (A. L.deVriesetal.,2011). The clinical needs of
these adolescents may be different than those who are in
the initial phases of exploring or questioning their gender
identity. Psychologists are encouraged to complete a com-
prehensive evaluation and ensure the adolescent’s and fam-
ily’s readiness to progress while also avoiding unnecessary
delay for those who are ready to move forward.
Psychologists working with TGNC and gender-ques-
tioning youth are encouraged to become familiar with
medical treatment options for adolescents (e.g., puberty-
suppressing medication, hormone therapy) and work col-
laboratively with medical providers to provide appropriate
care to clients. Because the ongoing involvement of a
knowledgeable mental health provider is encouraged due to
the psychosocial implications, and is often also a required
part of the medical treatment regimen that may be offered
to TGNC adolescents (Colemanetal.,2012;Hembreeet
al., 2009), psychologists often play y an n essential role e in
assisting in this process.
Psychologists may encourage parents and caregivers
to involve youth in developmentally appropriate decision
making about their education, health care, and peer net-
works, as these relate to children’s and adolescents’ gender
identity and gender expression (Ryan, Russell, Huebner,
Diaz, & Sanchez, 2010).Psychologistsarealsoencouraged
to educate themselves about the advantages and disadvan-
tages of social transition during childhood and adolescence,
and to discuss these factors with both their young clients
and clients’ parents. Emphasizing to parents the importance
of allowing their child the freedom to return to a gender
identity that aligns with sex assigned at birth or another
gender identity at any point cannot be overstated, par-
ticularly given the research that suggests that not all
young gender nonconforming children will ultimately
express a gender identity different from that assigned at
birth (Wallien,&Cohen-Kettenis,2008;Zucker&Brad-
ley, 1995). Psychologists are encouraged to o acknowl-
edge and explore the fear and burden of responsibility
that parents and caregivers may feel as they make deci-
sions about the health of their child or adolescent
(Grossman,D’Augelli,Howell,&Hubbard,2006). Par-
ents and caregivers may benefit from a supportive envi-
ronment to discuss feelings of isolation, explore loss and
grief they may experience, vent anger and frustration at
systems that disrespect or discriminate against them and
their youth, and learn how to communicate with others
about their child’s or adolescent’s gender identity or
gender expression (Brill&Pepper,2008).
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
843
December 2015
American Psychologist
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
pdf link to email; add hyperlink pdf file
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; change link in pdf
Guideline 9. Psychologists strive to
understand both the particular challenges
that TGNC elders experience and the
resilience they can develop.
Rationale.
Little research has been conducted
about TGNC elders, leaving much to be discovered about
this life stage for TGNC people (Auldridge,Tamar-Mattis,
Kennedy, Ames, & Tobin, 2012).Socializationintogender
role behaviors and expectations based on sex assigned at
birth, as well as the extent to which TGNC people adhere
to these societal standards, is influenced by the chronolog-
ical age at which a person self-identifies as TGNC, the age
at which a person comes out or socially and/or medically
transitions (Birren&Schaie,2006;Bockting&Coleman,
2007; Cavanaugh & Blanchard-Fields, 2010; Nuttbrock et
al., 2010; Wahl, Iwarsson, & Oswald, 2012),andaperson’s
generational cohort (e.g., 1950 vs. 2010;Fredriksen-Gold-
sen et al., 2011).
Even decades after a medical or social transition,
TGNC elders may still subscribe to the predominant gender
role expectations that existed at the time of their transition
(Knochel,Croghan,Moore,&Quam, 2011). Prior to the
1980s, TGNC people who transitioned were strongly en-
couraged by providers to pass in society as cisgender and
heterosexual and to avoid associating with other TGNC
people (Benjamin,1966; R.Green&Money,1969;Hast-
ings, 1974; Hastings & Markland, 1978). Even n TGNC
elders who were comfortable telling others about their
TGNC identity when they were younger may choose not to
reveal their identity at a later stage of life (Ekins&King,
2005; Ippolito & Witten, 2014). Elders’unwillingness to
disclose their TGNC identity can result from feelings of
physical vulnerability or increased reliance on others who
may discriminate against them or treat them poorly as a
result of their gender identity (Bockting&Coleman,2007),
especially if the elder resides in an institutionalized setting
(i.e., nursing home, assisted living facility) and relies on
others for many daily needs (Auldridge et al., , 2012).
TGNC elders are also at a heightened risk for depression,
suicidal ideation, and loneliness compared with LGB elders
(Auldridgeetal.,2012;Fredriksen-Goldsenetal.,2011).
ATransgender Law Center survey found that TGNC
and LGB elders had less financial well-being than their
younger cohorts, despite having a higher than average
educational level for their age group compared with the
general population (Hartzell, Frazer, , Wertz, & Davis,
2009).SurveyresearchhasalsorevealedthatTGNCelders
experience underemployment and gaps in employment,
often due to discrimination (Auldridgeetal.,2012;Bee-
myn & Rankin, 2011; Factor & Rothblum, 2007).Inthe
past, some TGNC people with established careers may
have been encouraged by service providers to find new
careers or jobs to avoid undergoing a gender transition at
work or being identified as TGNC, potentially leading to a
significant loss of income and occupational identity (Cook-
Daniels, 2006).Obstaclestoemploymentcanincreaseeco-
nomic disparities that result in increased needs for support-
ive housing and other social services (NationalCenterfor
Transgender Equality, 2012; Services and Advocacy for
GLBT Elders & National Center for Transgender Equality,
2012).
TGNC elders may face obstacles to seeking or access-
ing resources that support their physical, financial, or emo-
tional well-being. For instance, they may be concerned
about applying for social security benefits, fearing that their
TGNC identity may become known (Hartzelletal.,2009).
A TGNC elder may avoid medical care, increasing the
likelihood of later needing a higher level of medical care
(e.g., home-based care, assisted living, or nursing home)
than their same-age cisgender peers (Hartzelletal.,2009;
Ippolito & Witten, 2014; Mikalson et al., 2012).Nursing
homes and assisted living facilities are rarely sensitive to
the unique medical needs of TGNC elders (NationalSenior
Citizens Law Center, 2011).SomeTGNCindividualswho
enter congregate housing, assisted living, or long-term care
settings may feel the need to reverse their transition to align
with sex assigned at birth to avoid discrimination and
persecution by other residents and staff (Ippolito&Witten,
2014).
Older age may both facilitate and complicate medical
treatment related to gender transition. TGNC people who
begin hormone therapy later in life may have a smoother
transition due to waning hormone levels that are a natural
part of aging (Witten&Eyler,2012). Age may also influ-
ence the decisions TGNC elders make regarding sex-affir-
mation surgeries, especially if physical conditions exist that
could significantly increase risks associated with surgery or
recovery.
Much has been written about the resilience of elders
who have endured trauma (Fuhrmann&Shevlowitz,2006;
Hardy, Concato, & Gill, 2004; Mlinac, Sheeran, Blissmer,
Lees, & Martins, 2011; Rodin & Stewart, 2012).Although
some TGNC elders have experienced significant psycho-
logical trauma related to their gender identity, some also
have developed resilience and effective ways of coping
with adversity (Fruhauf&Orel,2015). Despite the limited
availability of LGBTQ-affirmative religious organizations
in many local communities, TGNC elders make greater use
of these resources than their cisgender peers (Porteretal.,
2013).
Application.
Psychologists are encouraged to
seek information about the biopsychosocial needs of
TGNC elders to inform case conceptualization and treat-
ment planning to address psychological, social, and medi-
cal concerns. Many TGNC elders are socially isolated.
Isolation can occur as a result of a loss of social networks
through death or through disclosure of a TGNC identity.
Psychologists may assist TGNC elders in establishing new
social networks that support and value their TGNC iden-
tity, while also working to strengthen existing family and
friend networks after a TGNC identity has been disclosed.
TGNC elders may find special value in relationships with
others in their generational cohort or those who may have
similar coming-out experiences. Psychologists may en-
courage TGNC elders to identify ways they can mentor and
improve the resilience of younger TGNC generations, cre-
ating a sense of generativity (Erikson,1968) and contribu-
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
844
December 2015
American Psychologist
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Add necessary references: This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page
add links to pdf in preview; clickable links in pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically.
pdf hyperlinks; add links in pdf
tion while building new supportive relationships. Psychol-
ogists working with TGNC elders may help them recognize
the sources of their resilience and encourage them to con-
nect with and be active in their communities (Fuhrmann&
Craffey, 2014).
For TGNC elders who have chosen not to disclose
their gender identity, psychologists may provide support to
address shame, guilt, or internalized antitrans prejudice,
and validate each person’s freedom to choose their pattern
of disclosure. Clinicians may also provide validation and
empathy when TGNC elders have chosen a model of tran-
sition that avoids any disclosure of gender identity and is
heavily focused on passing as cisgender.
TGNC elders who choose to undergo a medical or
social transition in older adulthood may experience anti-
trans prejudice from people who question the value of
transition at an older age or who believe that these elders
are not truly invested in their transition or in a TGNC
identity given the length of time they have waited (Aul-
dridge et al., 2012). SomeTGNCeldersmayalsogrieve
lost time and missed opportunities. Psychologists may val-
idate elders’ choices to come out, transition, or evolve their
gender identity or gender expression at any age, recogniz-
ing that such choices may have been much less accessible
or viable at earlier stages of TGNC elders’ lives.
Psychologists may assist congregate housing, assisted
living, or long-term care settings to best meet TGNC el-
ders’ needs through respectful communication and affirma-
tion of each person’s gender identity and gender expres-
sion. Psychologists may work with TGNC people in
hospice care systems to develop an end-of-life plan that
respects the person’s wishes about disclosure of gender
identity during and after death.
Assessment, Therapy, and
Intervention
Guideline 10. Psychologists strive to
understand how mental health concerns may
or may not be related to a TGNC person’s
gender identity and the psychological effects
of minority stress.
Rationale.
TGNC people may seek assistance
from psychologists in addressing gender-related concerns,
other mental health issues, or both. Mental health problems
experienced by a TGNC person may or may not be related
to that person’s gender identity and/or may complicate
assessment and intervention of gender-related concerns. In
some cases, there may not be a relationship between a
person’s gender identity and a co-occurring condition (e.g.,
depression, PTSD, substance abuse). In other cases, having
aTGNC identity may lead or contribute to a co-occurring
mental health condition, either directly by way of gender
dysphoria, or indirectly by way of minority stress and
oppression (Hendricks&Testa,2012; I. H.Meyer,1995,
2003). Inextremelyrare cases, a co-occurring g condition
can mimic gender dysphoria (i.e., a psychotic process that
distorts the perception of one’s gender; Baltieri & & De
Andrade, 2009; Hepp, Kraemer, Schnyder, Miller, & Del-
signore, 2004).
Regardless of the presence or absence of an etiological
link, gender identity may affect how a TGNC person ex-
periences a co-occurring mental health condition, and/or a
co-occurring mental health condition may complicate the
person’s gender expression or gender identity. For exam-
ple, an eating disorder may be influenced by a TGNC
person’s gender expression (e.g., rigid eating patterns used
to manage body shape or menstruation may be related to
gender identity or gender dysphoria;
Å
lgars, Alanko, Sant-
tila, & Sandnabba, 2012; Murray, Boon, & Touyz, 2013).
In addition, the presence of autism spectrum disorder may
complicate a TGNC person’s articulation and exploration
of gender identity (Jones etal., 2012 ). In cases in which
gender dysphoria is contributing to other mental health
concerns, treatment of gender dysphoria may be helpful in
alleviating those concerns as well (Keo-Meieretal.,2015).
Arelationship also exists between mental health con-
ditions and the psychological sequelae of minority stress
that TGNC people can experience. Given that TGNC peo-
ple experience physical and sexual violence (Clements-
Nolle et al., 2006; Kenagy & Bostwick, 2005; Lombardi,
Wilchins, Priesing, & Malouf, 2001; Xavier et al., 2005),
general harassment and discrimination (Beemyn&Rankin,
2011; Factor & Rothblum, 2007), and employment and
housing discrimination (Bradford et al., 2007), they are
likely to experience significant levels of minority stress.
Studies have demonstrated the disproportionately high lev-
els of negative psychological sequelae related to minority
stress, including suicidal ideation and suicide attempts
(CenterforSubstanceAbuseTreatment,2012;Clements-
Nolle et al., 2006; Cochran & Cauce, 2006; Nuttbrock et
al., 2010; Xavier et al., 2005) and completed suicides
(Dhejneetal.,2011;vanKesteren,Asscheman,Megens,&
Gooren, 1997).Recentstudieshavebeguntodemonstrate
an association between sources of external stress and psy-
chological distress (Bocktingetal.,2013;Nuttbrocketal.,
2010), includingsuicidalideation n and attemptsandself-
injurious behavior (dickey, Reisner, & & Juntunen, , 2015;
Goldblum et al., 2012; Testa et al., 2012).
The minority stress model accounts for both the neg-
ative mental health effects of stigma-related stress and the
processes by which members of the minority group may
develop resilience and resistance to the negative effects of
stress (I. H. Meyer, 19952003). Although the minority
stress model was developed as a theory of the relationship
between sexual orientation and mental disorders, the model
has been adapted to TGNC populations (Hendricks &
Testa, 2012).
Application.
Because of the increased risk of
stress-related mental health conditions, psychologists are
encouraged to conduct a careful diagnostic assessment,
including a differential diagnosis, when working with
TGNC people (Colemanetal.,2012). Taking into account
the intricate interplay between the effects of mental health
symptoms and gender identity and gender expression, psy-
chologists are encouraged to neither ignore mental health
problems a TGNC person is experiencing, nor erroneously
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
845
December 2015
American Psychologist
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). Add necessary references This is a C# programming example for converting PDF to Word
add links to pdf acrobat; clickable links in pdf from word
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add hyperlinks to pdf online; pdf link open in new window
assume that those mental health problems are a result of the
person’s gender identity or gender expression. Psycholo-
gists are strongly encouraged to be cautious before deter-
mining that gender nonconformity or dysphoria is due to an
underlying psychotic process, as this type of causal rela-
tionship is rare.
When TGNC people seek to access transition-related
health care, a psychosocial assessment is often part of this
process (Colemanetal.,2012). A comprehensive and bal-
anced assessment typically includes not only information
about a person’s past experiences of antitrans prejudice or
discrimination, internalized messages related to these ex-
periences, and anticipation of future victimization or rejec-
tion (Coolhart, Provancher, Hager, , & & Wang, , 2008), but
also coping strategies and sources of resilience (Hendricks
&Testa, 2012; Singh et al., 2011).Gatheringinformation
about negative life events directly related to a TGNC
person’s gender identity and gender expression may assist
psychologists in understanding the sequelae of stress and
discrimination, distinguishing them from concurrent and
potentially unrelated mental health problems. Similarly,
when a TGNC person has a primary presenting concern
that is not gender focused, a comprehensive assessment
takes into account that person’s experience relative to gen-
der identity and gender expression, including any discrim-
ination, just as it would include assessing other potential
trauma history, medical concerns, previous experience with
helping professionals, important future goals, and impor-
tant aspects of identity. Strategies a TGNC person uses to
navigate antitrans discrimination could be sources of
strength to deal with life challenges or sources of distress
that increase challenges and barriers.
Psychologists are encouraged to help TGNC people
understand the pervasive influence of minority stress and
discrimination that may exist in their lives, potentially
including internalized negative attitudes about themselves
and their TGNC identity (Hendricks&Testa,2012). With
this support, clients can better understand the origins of
their mental health symptoms and normalize their reactions
when faced with TGNC-related inequities and discrimina-
tion. Minority stress models also identify potentially im-
portant sources of resilience. TGNC people can develop
resilience when they connect with other TGNC people who
provide information on how to navigate antitrans prejudice
and increase access to necessary care and resources (Singh
et al., 2011). TGNC C people e may y need help p developing
social support systems to nurture their resilience and bol-
ster their ability to cope with the adverse effects of antitrans
prejudice and/or discrimination (Singh & McKleroy,
2011).
Feminizing or masculinizing hormone therapy can
positively or negatively affect existing mood disorders
(Colemanetal.,2012). Psychologists may also help TGNC
people who are in the initial stages of hormone therapy
adjust to normal changes in how they experience emotions.
For example, trans women who begin estrogens and anti-
androgens may experience a broader range of emotions
than they are accustomed to, or trans men beginning tes-
tosterone might be faced with adjusting to a higher libido
and feeling more emotionally reactive in stressful situa-
tions. These changes can be normalized as similar to the
emotional adjustments that cisgender women and men ex-
perience during puberty. Some TGNC people will be able
to adapt existing coping strategies, whereas others may
need help developing additional skills (e.g., emotional reg-
ulation or assertiveness). Readers are encouraged to refer to
the World Professional Association for Transgender Health
Standards of Care for discussion of the possible effects of
hormone therapy on a TGNC person’s mood, affect, and
behavior (Colemanetal.,2012).
Guideline 11. Psychologists recognize that
TGNC people are more likely to experience
positive life outcomes when they receive
social support or trans-affirmative care.
Rationale.
Research has primarily shown positive
treatment outcomes when TGNC adults and adolescents
receive TGNC-affirmative medical and psychological ser-
vices (i.e., psychotherapy, hormones, surgery;Byneetal.,
2012;R. Carroll, 1999; Cohen-Kettenis, Delemarre-van de
Waal, & Gooren, 2008; Davis & Meier, 2014; De Cuypere
et al., 2006; Gooren, Giltay, & Bunck, 2008; Kuhn et al.,
2009),althoughsamplesizesarefrequentlysmallwithno
population-based studies. In a meta-analysis of the hor-
mone therapy treatment literature with TGNC adults and
adolescents, researchers reported that 80% of participants
receiving trans-affirmative care experienced an improved
quality of life, decreased gender dysphoria, and a reduction
in negative psychological symptoms (Muradetal.,2010).
In addition, TGNC people who receive social support
about their gender identity and gender expression have
improved outcomes and quality of life (Brill & Pepper,
2008; Pinto, Melendez, & Spector, 2008).Severalstudies
indicate that family acceptance of TGNC adolescents and
adults is associated with decreased rates of negative out-
comes, such as depression, suicide, and HIV risk behaviors
and infection (Bocktingetal.,2013;Dhejneetal., 2011;
Grant et al., 2011; Liu & Mustanski, 2012; Ryan, 2009).
Family support is also a strong protective factor for TGNC
adults and adolescents (Bocktinget al.,2013;Moody &
Smith, 2013; Ryan et al., 2010).TGNCpeople,however,
frequently experience blatant or subtle antitrans prejudice,
discrimination, and even violence within their families
(Bradfordetal.,2007). Such family rejection is associated
with higher rates of HIV infection, suicide, incarceration,
and homelessness for TGNC adults and adolescents (Grant
et al., 2011; Liu & Mustanski, 2012).Familyrejectionand
lower levels of social support are significantly correlated
with depression (Clements-Nolleetal.,2006;Ryan,2009).
Many TGNC people seek support through peer relation-
ships, chosen families, and communities in which they may
be more likely to experience acceptance (Gonzalez&Mc-
Nulty, 2010; Nuttbrock et al., 2009). Peersupport t from
other TGNC people has been found to be a moderator
between antitrans discrimination and mental health, with
higher levels of peer support associated with better mental
health (Bockting et al., 2013). For some TGNC people,
support from religious and spiritual communities provides
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
846
December 2015
American Psychologist
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
pdf hyperlink; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Add necessary references class programming, you can use specific APIs to create PDF file.
add links to pdf file; add links pdf document
an important source of resilience (Glaser,2008;Kidd &
Witten, 2008; Porter et al., 2013).
Application.
Given the strong evidence for the
positive influence of affirmative care, psychologists are
encouraged to facilitate access to and provide trans-affir-
mative care to TGNC people. Whether through the provi-
sion of assessment and psychotherapy, or through assisting
clients to access hormone therapy or surgery, psychologists
may play a critical role in empowering and validating
TGNC adults’ and adolescents’ experiences and increasing
TGNC people’s positive life outcomes (Bess & Stabb,
2009; Rachlin, 2002).
Psychologists are also encouraged to be aware of the
importance of affirmative social support and assist TGNC
adults and adolescents in building social support networks
in which their gender identity is accepted and affirmed.
Psychologists may assist TGNC people in negotiating fam-
ily dynamics that may arise in the course of exploring and
establishing gender identity. Depending on the context of
psychological practice, these issues might be addressed in
individual work with TGNC clients, conjoint sessions in-
cluding members of their support system, family therapy,
or group therapy. Psychologists may help TGNC people
decide how and when to reveal their gender identity at
work or school, in religious communities, and to friends
and contacts in other settings. TGNC people who decide
not to come out in all aspects of their lives can still benefit
from TGNC-affirmative in-person or online peer support
groups.
Clients may ask psychologists to assist family mem-
bers in exploring feelings about their loved one’s gender
identity and gender expression. Published models of family
adjustment (Emerson&Rosenfeld,1996) may be useful to
help normalize family members’ reactions upon learning
that they have a TGNC family member, and to reduce
feelings of isolation. When working with family members
or significant others, it may be helpful to normalize feelings
of loss or fear of what may happen to current relationships
as TGNC people disclose their gender identity and expres-
sion to others. Psychologists may help significant others
adjust to changing relationships and consider how to talk to
extended family, friends, and other community members
about TGNC loved ones. Providing significant others with
referrals to TGNC-affirmative providers, educational re-
sources, and support groups can have a profound impact on
their understanding of gender identity and their communi-
cation with TGNC loved ones. Psychologists working with
couples and families may also help TGNC people identify
ways to include significant others in their social or medical
transition.
Psychologists working with TGNC people in rural
settings may provide clients with resources to connect with
other TGNC people online or provide information about
in-person support groups in which they can explore the
unique challenges of being TGNC in these geographic
areas (Walinsky&Whitcomb,2010). Psychologists serv-
ing TGNC military and veteran populations are encouraged
to be sensitive to the barriers these individuals face, espe-
cially for people who are on active duty in the U.S. military
(OutServe-ServicemembersLegalDefenseNetwork,n.d.).
Psychologists may help TGNC military members and vet-
erans establish specific systems of support that create a safe
and affirming space to reduce isolation and to create a
network of peers with a shared military experience. Psy-
chologists who work with veterans are encouraged to ed-
ucate themselves on recent changes to VA policy that
support equal access to VA medical and mental health
services (DepartmentofVeteransAffairs,Veterans’Health
Administration, 2013).
Guideline 12. Psychologists strive to
understand the effects that changes in
gender identity and gender expression have
on the romantic and sexual relationships of
TGNC people.
Rationale.
Relationships involving TGNC people
can be healthy and successful (Kins, Hoebeke, Heylens,
Rubens, & De Cuyprere, 2008; Meier, Sharp, Michonski,
Babcock, & Fitzgerald, 2013) as well as challenging
(Brown, 2007Iantaffi & & Bockting, 2011). A study of
successful relationships between TGNC men and cisgender
women found that these couples attributed the success of
their relationship to respect, honesty, trust, love, under-
standing, and open communication (Kinsetal.,2008). Just
as relationships between cisgender people can involve
abuse, so can relationships between TGNC people and their
partners (Brown,2007), with some violent partners threat-
ening to disclose a TGNC person’s identity to exact control
in the relationship (FORGE,n.d.).
In the early decades of medical and social transition
for TGNC people, only those whose sexual orientations
would be heterosexual posttransition (e.g., trans woman
with a cisgender man) were deemed eligible for medical
and social transition (Meyerowitz, 2002). This restriction
prescribed only certain relationship partners (American
Psychiatric Association, 1980; Benjamin, 1966; Chivers &
Bailey, 2000), denied d access to surgery for trans s men
identifying as gay or bisexual (Coleman & & Bockting,
1988),ortranswomenidentifyingaslesbianorbisexual,
and even required that TGNC people’s existing legal mar-
riages be dissolved before they could gain access to tran-
sition care (Lev,2004).
Disclosure of a TGNC identity can have an important
impact on the relationship between TGNC people and their
partners. Disclosure of TGNC status earlier in the relation-
ship tends to be associated with better relationship out-
comes, whereas disclosure of TGNC status many years into
an existing relationship may be perceived as a betrayal
(Erhardt, 2007). When a TGNC person comes out in the
context of an existing relationship, it can also be helpful if
both partners are involved in decision making about the use
of shared resources (i.e., how to balance the financial costs
of transition with other family needs) and how to share this
news with shared supports (i.e., friends and family). Some-
times relationship roles are renegotiated in the context of a
TGNC person coming out to their partner (Samons,2008).
Assumptions about what it means to be a “husband” or a
“wife” can shift if the gender identity of one’s spouse shifts
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
847
December 2015
American Psychologist
(Erhardt, 2007). Depending on when gender issues are
disclosed and how much of a change this creates in the
relationship, partners may grieve the loss of aspects of their
partner and the way the relationship used to be (Lev,2004).
Although increasing alignment between gender iden-
tity and gender expression, whether it be through dress,
behavior, or through medical interventions (i.e., hormones,
surgery), does not necessarily affect to whom a TGNC
person is attracted (Colemanetal.,1993), TGNC people
may become more open to exploring their sexual orienta-
tion, may redefine sexual orientation as they move through
transition, or both (Daskalos,1998; H.Devor,1993;Schle-
ifer, 2006).Throughincreasedcomfortwiththeirbodyand
gender identity, TGNC people may explore aspects of their
sexual orientation that were previously hidden or that felt
discordant with their sex assigned at birth. Following a
medical and/or social transition, a TGNC person’s sexual
orientation may remain constant or shift, either temporarily
or permanently (e.g., renewed exploration of sexual orien-
tation in the context of TGNC identity, shift in attraction or
choice of sexual partners, widened spectrum of attraction,
shift in sexual orientation identity; Meier, Sharp et t al.,
2013; Samons, 2008).Forexample,atransmanpreviously
identified as a lesbian may later be attracted to men (Cole-
man et al., 1993; dickey, Burnes, & Singh, 2012), anda
trans woman attracted to women pretransition may remain
attracted to women posttransition (Lev,2004).
Some TGNC people and their partners may fear the
loss of mutual sexual attraction and other potential effects
of shifting gender identities in the relationship. Lesbian-
identified partners of trans men may struggle with the idea
that being in a relationship with a man may cause others to
perceive them as a heterosexual couple (Califia, 1997).
Similarly, women in heterosexual relationships who later
learn that their partners are trans women may be unfamiliar
with navigating stigma associated with sexual minority
status when viewed as a lesbian couple (Erhardt, 2007).
Additionally, partners may find they are not attracted to a
partner after transition. As an example, a lesbian whose
partner transitions to a male identity may find that she is no
longer attracted to this person because she is not sexually
attracted to men. Partners of TGNC people may also ex-
perience grief and loss as their partners engage in social
and/or medical transitions.
Application.
Psychologists may help foster resil-
ience in relationships by addressing issues specific to part-
ners of TGNC people. Psychologists may provide support
to partners of TGNC people who are having difficulty with
their partner’s evolving gender identity or transition, or are
experiencing others having difficulty with the partner’s
transition. Partner peer support groups may be especially
helpful in navigating internalized antitrans prejudice,
shame, resentment, and relationship concerns related to a
partner’s gender transition. Meeting or knowing other
TGNC people, other partners of TGNC people, and couples
who have successfully navigated transition may also help
TGNC people and their partners and serve as a protective
factor (Brown, 2007). When TGNC status is disclosed
during an existing relationship, psychologists may help
couples explore which relationship dynamics they want to
preserve and which they might like to change.
In working with psychologists, TGNC people may
explore a range of issues in their relationships and sexuality
(dickeyetal.,2012), including when and how to come out
to current or potential romantic and sexual partners, com-
municating their sexual desires, renegotiating intimacy that
may be lost during the TGNC partner’s transition, adapting
to bodily changes caused by hormone use or surgery, and
exploring boundaries regarding touch, affection, and safer
sex practices (Iantaffi&Bockting,2011;Sevelius,2009).
TGNC people may experience increased sexual self-effi-
cacy through transition. Although psychologists may aid
partners in understanding a TGNC person’s transition de-
cisions, TGNC people may also benefit from help in cul-
tivating awareness of the ways in which these decisions
influence the lives of loved ones.
Guideline 13. Psychologists seek to
understand how parenting and family
formation among TGNC people take a
variety of forms.
Rationale.
Psychologists work with TGNC peo-
ple across the life span to address parenting and family
issues (Kenagy & Hsieh, , 2005). There is evidence that
many TGNC people have and want children (Wierckxet
al., 2012).SomeTGNCpeopleconceive achildthrough
sexual intercourse, whereas others may foster, adopt, pur-
sue surrogacy, or employ assisted reproductive technolo-
gies, such as sperm or egg donation, to build or expand a
family (DeSutter, Kira, Verschoor, &Hotimsky, 2002).
Based on a small body of research to date, there is no
indication that children of TGNC parents suffer long-term
negative impacts directly related to parental gender change
(R. Green, 19781988White & Ettner, 2004). TGNC
people may find it both challenging to find medical pro-
viders who are willing to offer them reproductive treatment
and to afford the cost (Colemanetal., 2012). Similarly,
adoption can be quite costly, and some TGNC people may
find it challenging to find foster care or adoption agencies
that will work with them in a nondiscriminatory manner.
Current or past use of hormone therapy may limit fertility
and restrict a TGNC person’s reproductive options
(Darnery,2008;Wierckxetal.,2012). Other TGNC people
may have children or families before coming out as TGNC
or beginning a gender transition.
TGNC people may present with a range of parenting
and family-building concerns. Some will seek support to
address issues within preexisting family systems, some will
explore the creation or expansion of a family, and some
will need to make decisions regarding potential fertility
issues related to hormone therapy, pubertal suppression, or
surgical transition. The medical and/or social transition of
aTGNC parent may shift family dynamics, creating chal-
lenges and opportunities for partners, children, and other
family members. One study of therapists’ reflections on
their experiences with TGNC clients suggested that family
constellation and the parental relationship was more sig-
nificant for children than the parent’s social and/or medical
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
848
December 2015
American Psychologist
transition itself (White&Ettner,2004). Although research
has not documented that the transitions of TGNC people
have an effect on their parenting abilities, preexisting part-
nerships or marriages may not survive the disclosure of a
TGNC identity or a subsequent transition (dickeyet al.,
2012).Thismayresultindivorceorseparation,whichmay
affect the children in the family. A positive relationship
between parents, regardless of marital status, has been
suggested to be an important protective factor for children
(Amato,2001;White&Ettner,2007). This seems to be the
case especially when children are reminded of the parent’s
love and assured of the parent’s continued presence in their
life (White & & Ettner, 2007). Based on a small body of
literature available, it is generally the case that younger
children are best able to incorporate the transition of a
parent, followed by adult children, with adolescents gen-
erally having the most difficulty (White&Ettner,2007). If
separated or divorced from their partners or spouses,
TGNC parents may be at risk for loss of custody or visi-
tation rights because some courts presume that there is a
nexus between their gender identity or gender expression
and parental fitness (Flynn,2006). This type of prejudice is
especially common for TGNC people of color (Grantetal.,
2011).
Application.
Psychologists are encouraged to at-
tend to the parenting and family-building concerns of
TGNC people. When working with TGNC people who
have previous parenting experience, psychologists may
help TGNC people identify how being a parent may influ-
ence decisions to come out as TGNC or to begin a transi-
tion (Freeman, Tasker, & & Di Ceglie, , 2002Grantet al.,
2011; Wierckx et al., 2012). Some TGNC people may
choose to delay disclosure until their children have grown
and left home (Bethea&McCollum,2013). Clinical guide-
lines jointly developed by a Vancouver, British Columbia,
TGNC community organization and a health care provider
organization encourage psychologists and other mental
health providers working with TGNC people to plan for
disclosure to a partner, previous partner, or children, and to
pay particular attention to resources that assist TGNC peo-
ple to discuss their identity with children of various ages in
developmentally appropriate ways (Bocktingetal.,2006).
Lev (2004)usesadevelopmentalstageframeworkforthe
process that family members are likely to go through in
coming to terms with a TGNC family member’s identity
that some psychologists may find helpful. Awareness of
peer support networks for spouses and children of TGNC
people can also be helpful (e.g., PFLAG, TransYouth Fam-
ily Allies). Psychologists may provide family counseling to
assist a family in managing disclosure, improve family
functioning, and maintain family involvement of the
TGNC person, as well as aiding the TGNC person in
attending to the ways that their transition process has
affected their family members (Samons, 2008). Helping
parents to continue to work together to focus on the needs
of their children and to maintain family bonds is likely to
lead to the best results for the children (White &Ettner,
2007).
For TGNC people with existing families, psycholo-
gists may support TGNC people in seeking legal counsel
regarding parental rights in adoption or custody. Depend-
ing on the situation, this may be desirable even if the
TGNC parent is biologically related to the child (Minter&
Wald, 2012).AlthoughbeingTGNCisnotalegalimped-
iment to adoption in the United States, there is the potential
for overt and covert discrimination and barriers, given the
widespread prejudice against TGNC people. The question
of whether to disclose TGNC status on an adoption appli-
cation is a personal one, and a prospective TGNC parent
would benefit from consulting a lawyer for legal advice,
including what the laws in their jurisdiction say about
disclosure. Given the extensive background investigation
frequently conducted, it may be difficult to avoid disclo-
sure. Many lawyers favor disclosure to avoid any potential
legal challenges during the adoption process (Minter &
Wald, 2012).
In discussing family-building options with TGNC
people, psychologists are encouraged to remain aware that
some of these options require medical intervention and are
not available everywhere, in addition to being quite costly
(Colemanetal.,2012). Psychologists may work with cli-
ents to manage feelings of loss, grief, anger, and resent-
ment that may arise if TGNC people are unable to access or
afford the services they need for building a family (Bock-
ting et al., 2006; De Sutter et al., 2002).
When TGNC people consider beginning hormone
therapy, psychologists may engage them in a conversation
about the possibly permanent effects on fertility to better
prepare TGNC people to make a fully informed decision.
This may be of special importance with TGNC adolescents
and young adults who often feel that family planning or
loss of fertility is not a significant concern in their current
daily lives, and therefore disregard the long-term reproduc-
tive implications of hormone therapy or surgery (Coleman
et al., 2012).Psychologistsareencouragedtodiscusscon-
traception and safer sex practices with TGNC people, given
that they may still have the ability to conceive even when
undergoing hormone therapy (Bockting, Robinson, &
Rosser, 1998). Psychologists s may play a a critical role in
educating TGNC adolescents and young adults and their
parents about the long-term effects of medical interventions
on fertility and assist them in offering informed consent
prior to pursuing such interventions. Although hormone
therapy may limit fertility (Colemanetal.,2012), psychol-
ogists may encourage TGNC people to refrain from relying
on hormone therapy as the sole means of birth control, even
when a person has amenorrhea (Gorton&Grubb, 2014).
Education on safer sex practices may also be important, as
some segments of the TGNC community (e.g., trans
women and people of color) are especially vulnerable to
sexually transmitted infections and have been shown to
have high prevalence and incidence rates of HIV infection
(Kellogg, Clements-Nolle, Dilley, , Katz, , & & McFarland,
2001; Nemoto, Operario, Keatley, Han, & Soma, 2004).
Depending on the timing and type of options selected,
psychologists may explore the physical, social, and emo-
tional implications should TGNC people choose to delay or
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
849
December 2015
American Psychologist
stop hormone therapy, undergo fertility treatment, or be-
come pregnant. Psychological effects of stopping hormone
therapy may include depression, mood swings, and reac-
tions to the loss of physical masculinization or feminization
facilitated by hormone therapy (Coleman et t al., , 2012).
TGNC people who choose to halt hormone therapy during
attempts to conceive or during a pregnancy may need
additional psychological support. For example, TGNC peo-
ple and their families may need help in managing the
additional antitrans prejudice and scrutiny that may result
when a TGNC person with stereotypically masculine fea-
tures becomes visibly pregnant. Psychologists may also
assist TGNC people in addressing their loss when they
cannot engage in reproductive activities that are consistent
with their gender identity, or when they encounter barriers
to conceiving, adopting, or fostering children not typically
faced by other people (Vanderburgh,2007). Psychologists
are encouraged to assess the degree to which reproductive
health services are TGNC-affirmative prior to referring
TGNC people to them. Psychologists are also encouraged
to provide TGNC-affirmative information to reproductive
health service personnel when there is a lack of trans-
affirmative knowledge.
Guideline 14. Psychologists recognize the
potential benefits of an interdisciplinary
approach when providing care to TGNC
people and strive to work collaboratively
with other providers.
Rationale.
Collaboration across disciplines can
be crucial when working with TGNC people because of the
potential interplay of biological, psychological, and social
factors in diagnosis and treatment (Hendricks & Testa,
2012).Thechallengesoflivingwithastigmatizedidentity
and the need of many TGNC people to transition, socially
and/or medically, may call for the involvement of health
professionals from various disciplines, including psychol-
ogists, psychiatrists, social workers, primary health care
providers, endocrinologists, nurses, pharmacists, surgeons,
gynecologists, urologists, electrologists, speech therapists,
physical therapists, pastoral counselors and chaplains, and
career or educational counselors. Communication, cooper-
ation, and collaboration will ensure optimal coordination
and quality of care. Just as psychologists often refer TGNC
people to medical providers for assessment and treatment
of medical issues, medical providers may rely on psychol-
ogists to assess readiness and assist TGNC clients to pre-
pare for the psychological and social aspects of transition
before, during, and after medical interventions (Colemanet
al., 2012; Hembree et al., 2009; Lev, 2009). Outcome
research to date supports the value and effectiveness of an
interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to TGNC-specific
care (seeColemanetal.,2012 for a review).
Application.
Psychologists’ collaboration with
colleagues in medical and associated health disciplines
involved in TGNC clients’ care (e.g., hormonal and surgi-
cal treatment, primary health care;Colemanetal., 2012;
Lev, 2009)maytakemanyforms andshouldoccurina
timely manner that does not complicate access to needed
services (e.g., considerations of wait time). For example, a
psychologist working with a trans man who has a diagnosis
of bipolar disorder may need to coordinate with his primary
care provider and psychiatrist to adjust his hormone levels
and psychiatric medications, given that testosterone can
have an activating effect, in addition to treating gender
dysphoria. At a basic level, collaboration may entail the
creation of required documentation that TGNC people
present to surgeons or medical providers to access gender-
affirming medical interventions (e.g., surgery, hormone
therapy; Coleman etal., 2012). Psychologists may offer
support, information, and education to interdisciplinary
colleagues who are unfamiliar with issues of gender iden-
tity and gender expression to assist TGNC people in ob-
taining TGNC-affirmative care (Holman & & Goldberg,
2006; Lev, 2009). For example, a psychologist who is
assisting a trans woman with obtaining gender-affirming
surgery may, with her consent, contact her new gynecolo-
gist in preparation for her first medical visit. This contact
could include sharing general information about her gender
history and discussing how both providers could most
affirmatively support appropriate health checks to ensure
her best physical health (Holman&Goldberg,2006).
Psychologists in interdisciplinary settings could also
collaborate with medical professionals prescribing hor-
mone therapy by educating TGNC people and ensuring
TGNC people are able to make fully informed decisions
prior to starting hormone treatment (Colemanetal.,2012;
Deutsch, 2012; Lev, 2009). Psychologists s working g with
children and adolescents play a particularly important role
on the interdisciplinary team due to considerations of cog-
nitive and social development, family dynamics, and de-
gree of parental support. This role is especially crucial
when providing psychological evaluation to determine the
appropriateness and timeliness of a medical intervention.
When psychologists are not part of an interdisciplinary
setting, especially in isolated or rural communities, they
can identify interdisciplinary colleagues with whom they
may collaborate and/or refer (Walinsky & & Whitcomb,
2010).Forexample,aruralpsychologistcouldidentifya
trans-affirmative pediatrician in a surrounding area and
collaborate with the pediatrician to work with parents rais-
ing concerns about their TGNC and questioning children
and adolescents.
In addition to working collaboratively with other pro-
viders, psychologists who obtain additional training to spe-
cialize in work with TGNC people may also serve as
consultants in the field (e.g., providing additional support
to providers working with TGNC people or assisting school
and workplaces with diversity training). Psychologists who
have expertise in working with TGNC people may play a
consultative role with providers in inpatient settings seek-
ing to provide affirmative care to TGNC clients. Psychol-
ogists may also collaborate with social service colleagues
to provide TGNC people with affirmative referrals related
to housing, financial support, vocational/educational coun-
seling and training, TGNC-affirming religious or spiritual
communities, peer support, and other community resources
(Gehi&Arkles, 2007). This collaboration might also in-
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
850
December 2015
American Psychologist
clude assuring that TGNC people who are minors in the
care of the state have access to culturally appropriate care.
Research, Education, and Training
Guideline 15. Psychologists respect the
welfare and rights of TGNC participants in
research and strive to represent results
accurately and avoid misuse or
misrepresentation of findings.
Rationale.
Historically, in a set of demographic
questions, psychological research has included one item on
either sex or gender, with two response options—male and
female. This approach wastes an opportunity to increase
knowledge about TGNC people for whom neither option
may fit their identity, and runs the risk of alienating TGNC
research participants (IOM, 2011 ). For example, there is
little knowledge about HIV prevalence, risks, and preven-
tion needs of TGNC people because most of the research
on HIV has not included demographic questions to identify
TGNC participants within their samples. Instead, TGNC
people have been historically subsumed within larger de-
mographic categories (e.g., men who have sex with men,
women of color), rendering the impact of the HIV epidemic
on the TGNC population invisible (Herbst etal., 2008).
Scholars have noted that this invisibility fails to draw
attention to the needs of TGNC populations that experience
the greatest health disparities, including TGNC people who
are of color, immigrants, low income, homeless, veterans,
incarcerated, live in rural areas, or have disabilities (Bauer
et al., 2009; Hanssmann, Morrison, Russian, Shiu-Thorn-
ton, & Bowen, 2010; Shipherd et al., 2012; Walinsky &
Whitcomb, 2010).
There is a great need for more research to inform
practice, including affirmative treatment approaches with
TGNC people. Although sufficient evidence exists to sup-
port current standards of care (Byneetal.,2012;Coleman
et al., 2012),muchisyettobelearnedtooptimizequality
of care and outcome for TGNC clients, especially as it
relates to the treatment of children (IOM,2011 ;Mikalson
et al., 2012).Inaddition,someresearchwithTGNCpop-
ulations has been misused and misinterpreted, negatively
affecting TGNC people’s access to health services to ad-
dress issues of gender identity and gender expression (Na-
maste, 2000).Thishasresultedinjustifiableskepticismand
suspicion in the TGNC community when invited to partic-
ipate in research initiatives. In accordance with the APA
ethics code (APA, 2010), psychologists conduct research
and distribute research findings with integrity and respect
for their research participants. As TGNC research in-
creases, some TGNC communities may experience being
oversampled in particular geographic areas and/or TGNC
people of color may not be well-represented in TGNC
studies (Hwahng&Lin,2009;Namaste,2000).
Application.
All psychologists conducting re-
search, even when not specific to TGNC populations, are
encouraged to provide a range of options for capturing
demographic information about TGNC people so that
TGNC people may be included and accurately represented
(Conronetal.,2008;Deutschetal.,2013). One group of
experts has recommended that population research, and
especially government-sponsored surveillance research,
use a two-step method, first asking for sex assigned at birth,
and then following with a question about gender identity
(GenIUSS,2013). For research focused on TGNC people,
including questions that assess both sex assigned at birth
and current gender identity allows the disaggregation of
subgroups within the TGNC population and has the poten-
tial to increase knowledge of differences within the popu-
lation. In addition, findings about one subgroup of TGNC
people may not apply to other subgroups. For example,
results from a study of trans women of color with a history
of sex work who live in urban areas (Nemoto,Operario,
Keatley, & Villegas, 2004)maynotgeneralizetoallTGNC
women of color or to the larger TGNC population (Bauer,
Travers, Scanlon, & Coleman, 2012; Operario et al., 2008).
In conducting research with TGNC people, psychol-
ogists will confront the challenges associated with studying
arelatively small, geographically dispersed, diverse, stig-
matized, hidden, and hard-to-reach population (IOM,
2011).BecauseTGNCindividualsareoftenhardtoreach
(IOM,2011 ) and TGNC research is rapidly evolving, it is
important to consider the strengths and limitations of the
methods that have been or may be used to study the TGNC
population, and to interpret and represent findings accord-
ingly. Some researchers have strongly recommended col-
laborative research models (e.g., participatory action re-
search) in which TGNC community members are integrally
involved in these research activities (Clements-Nolle &
Bachrach, 2003; Singh, Richmond, & Burnes, 2013).Psy-
chologists who seek to educate the public by communicat-
ing research findings in the popular media will also con-
front challenges, because most journalists have limited
knowledge about the scientific method and there is poten-
tial for the media to misinterpret, exploit, or sensationalize
findings (Garber,1992;Namaste,2000).
Guideline 16. Psychologists Seek to Prepare
Trainees in Psychology to Work Competently
With TGNC People.
Rationale.
The Ethical Principles of Psycholo-
gists and Code of Conduct(APA, 2010) include gender
identity as one factor for which psychologists may need to
obtain training, experience, consultation, or supervision in
order to ensure their competence (APA,2010). In addition,
when APA-accredited programs are required to demon-
strate a commitment to cultural and individual diversity,
gender identity is specifically included (APA,2015). Yet
surveys of TGNC people suggest that many mental health
care providers lack even basic knowledge and skills re-
quired to offer trans-affirmative care (Bradfordetal.,2007;
O’Hara, Dispenza, Brack, & Blood, 2013; Xavier et al.,
2005).The APA Task Force on Gender Identity and Gen-
der Variance (2009) projected that many, if f not t most,
psychologists and graduate psychology students will at
some point encounter TGNC people among their clients,
colleagues, and trainees. Yet professional education and
training in psychology includes little or no preparation for
T
h
i
s
d
o
c
u
m
e
n
t
i
s
c
o
p
y
r
i
g
h
t
e
d
b
y
t
h
e
A
m
e
r
i
c
a
n
P
s
y
c
h
o
l
o
g
i
c
a
l
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
t
i
o
n
o
r
o
n
e
o
f
i
t
s
a
l
l
i
e
d
p
u
b
l
i
s
h
e
r
s
.
T
h
i
s
a
r
t
i
c
l
e
i
s
i
n
t
e
n
d
e
d
s
o
l
e
l
y
f
o
r
t
h
e
p
e
r
s
o
n
a
l
u
s
e
o
f
t
h
e
i
n
d
i
v
i
d
u
a
l
u
s
e
r
a
n
d
i
s
n
o
t
t
o
b
e
d
i
s
s
e
m
i
n
a
t
e
d
b
r
o
a
d
l
y
.
851
December 2015
American Psychologist
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested