pdfsharp c# example : Change link in pdf file Library application component asp.net html winforms mvc ucm1986500-part303

Guidance for Industry 
Assessment of Abuse Potential 
of Drugs 
DRAFT GUIDANCE  
This guidance document is being distributed for comment purposes only. 
Comments and suggestions regarding this draft document should be submitted within 60 days of 
publication in the 
Federal Register
of the notice announcing the availability of the draft 
guidance. Submit comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and 
Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD  20852. All comments 
should be identified with the docket number listed in the notice of availability that publishes in 
the
Federal Register
For questions regarding this draft document contact Corinne Moody at 301-796-5402. 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
Food and Drug Administration 
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) 
January 2010 
Clinical Medical 
Change link in pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding links to pdf in preview; add links in pdf
Change link in pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding a link to a pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
Guidance for Industry 
Assessment of Abuse Potential 
of Drugs  
Additional copies are available from: 
Office of Communications 
Division of Drug Information 
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research 
Food and Drug Administration 
10903 New Hampshire Avenue 
Bldg. 51, rm. 2201 
Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 
Phone: 301-796-3400; Fax: 301-847-8714 
http://www.fda.gov/cder/guidance/index.htm 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
Food and Drug Administration 
Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) 
January 2010 
Clinical Medical 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
add hyperlink pdf file; change link in pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing 150F; // to change image compression
pdf link; add hyperlinks to pdf online
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
I. 
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 1  
II. 
BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................... 2  
III.  DETERMINING A DRUG'S ABUSE POTENTIAL .................................................... 4  
A. Definitions.......................................................................................................................................4  
B. When Should an Abuse Potential Assessment Be Submitted to FDA?.....................................4  
C. What Should Be Included in an Abuse Potential Submission?..................................................5  
IV.  APPROACHES AND METHODS FOR ABUSE POTENTIAL ASSESSMENTS.... 6  
A. Preclinical Screening .....................................................................................................................6  
B. Chemistry and Manufacturing .....................................................................................................7  
C. Animal Behavioral Pharmacology Studies..................................................................................9  
D. Application of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) .....................................................................12  
E. Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics......................................................................................12  
V. 
HUMAN LABORATORY STUDIES ........................................................................... 12  
A. Human Abuse Potential Study in Recreational Drug Users .................................................... 13  
B. Related Pharmacology Studies ...................................................................................................16  
C. Clinical Trial Data Relative to Abuse Potential Assessments..................................................17  
VI.  POSTMARKET EXPERIENCE/DATA ...................................................................... 18  
VII. LABELING AND DRUG SCHEDULING ................................................................... 19  
ABBREVIATIONS..................................................................................................................... 20  
BIBLIOGRAPHY....................................................................................................................... 21  
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim setting As PasswordSetting = New PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword) ' Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
pdf email link; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
PasswordSetting setting = new PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword); // Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
add a link to a pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft – Not for Implementation 
Guidance for Industry
1  
Assessment of Abuse Potential of Drugs  
This draft guidance, when finalized, will represent the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) current 
thinking on this topic.  It does not create or confer any rights for or on any person and does not operate to 
bind the FDA or the public.  You can use an alternative approach if the approach satisfies the 
requirements of the applicable statutes and regulations.  If you want to discuss an alternative approach, 
10 
contact the FDA staff responsible for implementing this guidance.  If you cannot identify the appropriate 
11 
FDA staff, call the appropriate number listed on the title page of this guidance. 
12 
13 
14 
15 
I. 
INTRODUCTION 
16 
17  This guidance is intended to assist sponsors who are developing drug products with the potential 
18  for abuse that may need to be scheduled under the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 811(b), 
19  811(c)). Examples of products that are addressed in this guidance include new molecular entities 
20  and new dosage forms of drug substances already controlled under the Controlled Substances 
21  Act (21 U.S.C. 812(c)). Drugs with abuse potential generally include drugs that affect the 
22  central nervous system, drugs that are chemically or pharmacologically similar to other drugs 
23  with known abuse potential, and drugs that produce psychoactive effects such as sedation, 
24  euphoria, or mood change.
25 
26  Specifically, the guidance discusses the following: 
27 
28 
The definition of 
abuse potential 
29 
Information on submitting an abuse potential assessment, including a proposal for 
30 
scheduling 
31 
A description of what constitutes an adequate abuse potential assessment  
32 
Information for sponsors performing an assessment, including (1) the design and conduct 
33 
of appropriate studies and investigations and (2) general administrative recommendations 
34 
for submitting a proposal for scheduling 
35 
36  FDA’s guidance documents, including this guidance, do not establish legally enforceable 
37  responsibilities. Instead, guidances describe the Agency’s current thinking on a topic and should 
38  be viewed only as recommendations, unless specific regulatory or statutory requirements are 
39  cited. The use of the word 
should
in Agency guidances means that something is suggested or 
40  recommended, but not required. 
This guidance has been prepared by the Controlled Substance Staff (CSS) in the Center for Drug Evaluation and
 
Research (CDER) at the Food and Drug Administration.
2
Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, H.R. Rep. No. 91-1444, 91st Cong., Sess. 1
 
(1970), reprinted in 1970 U.S.C.C.A.N. 4566, 4603. 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add links to pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
add links to pdf online; add links pdf document
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
41 
42 
43 
II. 
BACKGROUND 
44 
45  The purpose of scheduling substances under the CSA is to minimize abuse and diversion while 
46  affording appropriate therapeutic access. Each schedule under the Controlled Substances Act 
47  includes a set of regulations that are most restrictive for the Schedule I and II substances and are 
48  relatively less restrictive for the Schedule III to V drugs, respectively.  Drugs in Schedule I have 
49  no accepted medical use in the United States.  Depending on the Schedule (II-V), controls may 
50  include manufacturing and production quotas, varying degrees of manufacturing and distribution 
51  site security requirements, dispensing and prescribing limitations, a range of record-keeping and 
52  reporting requirements, and import/export regulations.  Prescribers, dispensers, drug 
53  manufacturers, and distributors are required to register with the Drug Enforcement 
54  Administration (DEA).   
55 
56  Before a drug with a potential for abuse is controlled under the Controlled Substances Act 
57  (CSA), the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), must make a 
58  recommendation for scheduling under the CSA to the DEA.  The regulatory responsibilities for 
59  this process are described in 21 U.S.C. 811 and 812, as well as in 21 CFR parts 1300-1316.   
60 
61  Under 21 U.S.C. 811(b) of the CSA, the Secretary of HHS is required to consider, in a scientific 
62  and medical evaluation, eight factors determinative of control under the CSA.  Following 
63  consideration of the eight factors, the Secretary must make three findings and a recommendation 
64  for scheduling a substance in the CSA. The eight factors are set out in 21 U.S.C. 811(c) as 
65  follows:  
66 
67  1. Its actual or relative potential for abuse  
68 
69  2. Scientific evidence of the drug's pharmacological effects  
70 
71  3. The state of current scientific knowledge regarding the drug or other substance  
72 
73  4. Its history and current pattern of abuse 
74 
75  5. The scope, duration, and significance of abuse  
76 
77  6. What, if any, risk there is to the public health  
78 
79  7. Its psychic or physiological dependence liability 
80 
81  8. Whether the substance is an immediate precursor of a substance already controlled. 
82 
83  The findings relate to a substance's abuse potential, legitimate medical use, and safety or 
84  dependence potential, which are factors considered in scheduling drugs under 21 U.S.C. 812. 
85 
2
 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
clickable pdf links; check links in pdf
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File
add hyperlink pdf; c# read pdf from url
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
86  When a sponsor submits a new drug application (NDA) to the FDA for review, if the drug has a 
87  potential for abuse, the sponsor must submit “a description and analysis of studies or information 
88  related to abuse of the drug, including a 
proposal for scheduling 
(emphasis added) under the 
89  Controlled Substances Act.”  (21 CFR 314.50(d)(5)(vii)).  In addition, a description must be 
90  submitted “of any studies related to overdosage, . . . including information on dialysis, antidotes, 
91  or other treatments, if known” (id.). 
92 
93 
1. The Controlled Substance Staff evaluates the drug’s abuse potential.  The Controlled 
94 
Substance Staff prepares a scientific analysis, including a recommendation for 
95 
scheduling, based on a scientific and medical evaluation of all relevant and available data 
96 
(including the public health risk and the sponsor’s proposal for scheduling), as required 
97 
by the CSA. 
98 
99 
2. FDA provides the analysis to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for review 
100 
and comment, as described in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) of March 8, 
101 
1985 (50 FR 9518-20). 
102 
103 
3. The FDA analysis is reviewed and approved by the Office of Chief Counsel, the Center 
104 
Director, and the FDA Commissioner. 
105 
106 
4. FDA then forwards the FDA proposed scheduling recommendation to the Assistant 
107 
Secretary for Health, who makes the HHS recommendation for scheduling that is 
108 
transmitted to the DEA.   
109 
110 
5. In accepting the HHS recommendation to schedule a drug, DEA publishes a notice of 
111 
proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register wherein DEA proposes scheduling, 
112 
describes the proposal and requests comments from the public.  After the comment period 
113 
(usually of 30 to 60 days) has expired, DEA reviews any comments, objections, and 
114 
requests for a hearing that they have received, and publishes another FR notice, either 
115 
finalizing the scheduling action with an effective date or responding to the objections and 
116 
hearing requests. 
117 
118  If the DEA determines that a drug requires scheduling, the sponsor must follow specific 
119  regulations related to drug labeling, manufacturing, storage, ordering, prescribing and 
120  dispensing. See generally 21 CFR parts 1300-1316. Sponsors are encouraged to contact the 
121  DEA early in the drug development process if they believe their drug may have abuse potential 
122  and may be controlled and to discuss with the DEA issues related to CSA researcher registration 
123  requirements, quotas, and other rules and regulations that concern controlled substances that may 
124  be relevant to their product. 
125 
3
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
126 
III.  DETERMINING A DRUG'S ABUSE POTENTIAL 
127 
128 
A. 
Definitions 
129 
130  The Controlled Substances Act refers to the assessment of “potential for abuse,” “addiction­
131  sustaining liability,” and “dependence” 21 U.S.C. 802(1),(9),(18),(29).  The Controlled 
132  Substances Act does not define these terms.  
Abuse potential
and 
addiction-sustaining,
or 
abuse 
133 
liability,
can be understood to encompass similar concepts and, as such, are often used 
134  interchangeably.
3,4 
135 
136 
Abuse potential
refers to a drug that is used in nonmedical situations, repeatedly or even 
137  sporadically, for the positive psychoactive effects it produces.  These drugs are characterized by 
138  their central nervous system (CNS) activity.  Examples of the psychoactive effects they produced 
139  include sedation, euphoria, perceptual and other cognitive distortions, hallucinations, and mood 
140  changes. Drugs with abuse potential often (but not always) produce psychic or physical 
141  dependence and may lead to the disorder of 
addiction. 
142 
143  The concept of 
abuse potential 
encompasses all the properties of a drug, including, for example, 
144  chemical, pharmacological, and pharmacokinetic characteristics, as well as fads in usage and 
145  diversion history. 
146 
147 
Addiction
is defined as a chronic, neurobiological disorder with genetic, psychosocial, and 
148  environmental aspects, characterized by one or more of the following:  impaired control over 
149  drug use, compulsive use, continued use despite harm, and craving (American Academy of Pain 
150  Medicine, American Pain Society, and American Society of Addiction Medicine consensus 
151  document, 2001).   
152 
153 
B. 
When Should an Abuse Potential Assessment Be Submitted to FDA?  
154 
155  A sponsor must submit in the NDA an assessment of studies and other information related to the 
156  potential abuse of a drug and include a 
proposal for scheduling
if the drug affects the central 
157  nervous system (CNS), is chemically or pharmacologically similar to other drugs with known 
158  abuse potential, or produces psychoactive effects such as sedation, euphoria, and mood changes. 
159  See 21 CFR 314.50(d)(5)(vii). 
160 
161  An assessment of abuse potential may be needed for new drugs, including new molecular entities 
162  (NME). An abuse potential assessment might also be necessary for a marketed drug product that 
163  presents an unexpected adverse event profile that includes events that are related to abuse 
164  potential or that is being re-evaluated for a new route of administration that could affect the 
165  abuse potential of the drug. 
166 
3
See the DEA Web site for the schedules of drugs, contact information, pertinent information regarding the 
Controlled Substances Act, and related topics (http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov). 
“Conference on Abuse Liability Assessment of CNS Drugs,” 
Drug Alcohol and Dependence
, 70:3 Suppl. 2003.
 
4
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
167 
C. 
What Should Be Included in an Abuse Potential Submission? 
168 
169  The abuse potential assessment must be submitted as a section of the NDA or a supplement.  The 
170  section must contain all pertinent preclinical, pharmacological, chemistry, biochemical, human 
171  laboratory, and clinical studies, drug formulation data, and a proposal for scheduling, if 
172  appropriate (21 CFR 314.50(d)(5)(vii)). The abuse potential section should also include 
173  proposed labeling that describes the drug’s abuse potential and dependence liability.   
174 
175  The Controlled Substance Staff evaluates all abuse-related data to help FDA review divisions to 
176  determine the suitability of a drug’s label and labeling and accordingly may make additional 
177  recommendations to the sponsor that relate to the CSS evaluation.  
178 
179  Contents of an abuse potential section include the following:   
180 
181 
For NMEs, the NDA should include an abuse potential section with the following: 
182 
183 
1. A summary, interpretation, and discussion of abuse potential data provided in the NDA 
184 
2. A proposal and rationale for placing (or not placing) a drug into a particular schedule of 
185 
the Controlled Substances Act 
186 
3. All primary data related to the abuse potential characterization of the drug, organized 
187 
under the following subheadings: 
188 
189 
a. Chemistry 
190 
b. Preclinical Pharmacology 
191 
c. Animal Behavioral and Dependence Pharmacology 
192 
d. Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics 
193 
e. Human Abuse Potential Laboratory Studies 
194 
f. Clinical Trial Data Relative to Abuse and Dependence Potential 
195 
g. Integrated Summaries of Safety and Efficacy  
196 
h. Foreign Experience with the Drug (Adverse Events, Abuse Potential, Marketing 
197 
and Labeling) 
198 
199 
4. Electronic submissions 
200 
201 
For an NDA submitted in electronic format, the common technical document (CTD) should 
202 
address points 1, 2, and 3a-h (above) under the appropriate Modules 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.  These 
203 
sections should contain links to the summary of abuse data in Module 2 and the proposal for 
204 
scheduling and product labeling in Module 1. The data and studies supporting sections 3 a-g 
205 
(above) should be placed in the appropriate sections of the CTD:  Chemistry (Module 3), 
206 
preclinical and animal pharmacology (Module 4), pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics 
207 
(Modules 4 and 5), human abuse and clinical studies (Module 5), and integrated summaries 
208 
of safety and efficacy (Module 5). Foreign experience has no specific designated location, 
209 
but would fit most appropriately under Module 5, postmarket experience.   
210 
211 
5. Paper submissions 
212 
5
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
213 
An NDA that will be submitted in paper form should contain the above listed information 
214 
clearly identified as an abuse potential section. 
215 
216  The scientific overview of the drug’s pharmacological activity should include consideration of 
217  the drug’s pharmacology, a description of its chemical structure and class, its profile of 
218  biochemical activity, its pharmacokinetics and metabolism, the production of any active 
219  metabolites (and their pharmacological activity profile), and a description of any adverse 
220  reactions. 
221 
222  Sponsors are encouraged to consult with the Controlled Substance Staff through the appropriate 
223  FDA centers, offices, or divisions responsible for the overall review of the application about the 
224  design of studies and data to be included in an abuse potential section.  Discussions between the 
225  Controlled Substance Staff and sponsors regarding the proposed studies and data can facilitate 
226  adequate data submission and full characterization of the abuse potential of the drug substance or 
227  product. 
228 
229 
230 
IV.  APPROACHES AND METHODS FOR ABUSE POTENTIAL ASSESSMENTS 
231 
232  A variety of approaches that can be used to assess the abuse potential of a drug product are 
233  discussed in the following sections of the guidance. 
234 
235 
A. 
Preclinical Screening 
236 
237  In vitro receptor binding studies are an important part of the preclinical screening of new drugs 
238  with abuse potential because they are very useful in interpreting the results of other animal and 
239  human studies, as well as in the planning of future investigations.   
240 
241  In vitro binding studies should be conducted to determine the pharmacological site of action of 
242  the drug and active metabolites in the brain (e.g., receptor, transporter, ion-gated channel 
243  system).  Novel drug mechanisms of action may be associated with previously unrecognized 
244  abuse potential in humans.   
245 
246  Although a drug may have a single high-affinity site, it is important that direct and indirect 
247  actions and effects of the drug on other neurotransmitter systems associated with abuse potential 
248  be assayed. Examples of neurotransmitter systems of interest include the following: 
249 
250 
Dopamine 
251 
Norepinephrine 
252 
Serotonin 
253 
Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) 
254 
Acetylcholine 
255 
Opioid 
256 
N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) 
257 
Cannabinoid 
258 
6
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
259  The application of general scientific principles, including the use of appropriate regional brain 
260  tissue, positive controls, and internal standards, should be ensured.  High selectivity radioligands 
261  should be used whenever they are available. Binding sites can also be analyzed using 
262  complementary DNA (cDNA), encoding a specific receptor that is expressed in a homogeneous 
263  system.  
264 
265  In vivo binding techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon 
266  emission computed tomography (SPECT), can also provide information about the localized 
267  action of drugs. Studies using these techniques can contribute important information about the 
268  whole body pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the drug in question. 
269 
270  Knowledge of the binding profile may suggest which functional in vitro assays can help 
271  determine whether the drug is an agonist, antagonist, partial agonist, or mixed agonist-antagonist 
272  at specific binding sites. Based on the biochemical pharmacology, behavioral tests relevant to 
273  the specific mechanism of action will be more apparent. 
274 
275  Receptor binding data should be submitted as a part of the pharmacology-toxicology section of 
276  the NDA and should also be included in, or hyperlinked to, the abuse potential assessment 
277  section of the NDA. 
278 
279 
B. 
Chemistry and Manufacturing 
280 
281 
1. 
Consideration of Chemistry Data 
282 
283 
Data from the chemistry, manufacturing, and controls (CMC) section of the NDA that are 
284 
relevant to the abuse potential of the drug under investigation should be submitted as part 
285 
of, or be hyperlinked to, the abuse potential section.  The assessment of abuse potential 
286 
should include information related to the synthesis of the drug, data on the physical and 
287 
chemical properties of the substance and proposed drug product, and data related to 
288 
alternate synthetic pathways and drug characteristics, including yields and impurity 
289 
profiles. 
290 
291 
In addition to the information submitted as part of the CMC section of the NDA, the 
292 
abuse potential assessment should include an evaluation of the physicochemical 
293 
properties of the drug substance and product.  Information on extractability and solubility 
294 
of a drug is relevant to the drug’s abuse potential and should be addressed.   
295 
296 
Assessment of such data is especially relevant when the new drug product is a new 
297 
formulation of a drug substance, such as a 505(b)(2) NDA submission, of recognized 
298 
abuse potential, that presents additional safety concerns.  Examples of drugs with the 
299 
highest relative abuse potentials can be found in Schedule II (see 21 CFR 1308.12 for the 
300 
most current listing).  Additional information on the ease or risk of extraction of the drug 
301 
substance, that is, the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), from the product 
302 
formulation should be obtained.  In particular, sustained- or extended-release 
303 
formulations and transdermal systems (patches or mechanical devices containing drugs) 
304 
that are expected to contain large quantities of a controlled substance should be assessed 
7
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested