pdfsharp c# example : Add links in pdf software SDK project winforms .net html UWP ucm1986501-part304

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
305 
to determine the ease of extracting or altering the drug for abuse and diversion.  
306 
Transdermal and transmucosal drug products in which excess unused drug substance 
307 
remains after use are a major concern, and the safe disposal of these products should be 
308 
addressed in the abuse potential assessment. 
309 
310 
Studies should be performed that provide information on the performance of the drug 
311 
product under different conditions, such as application of bandages or heat or multiple 
312 
applications of a transdermal system.  Information should be obtained on how much drug 
313 
substance might be released and any changes that could take place in the rate of release of 
314 
the drug from the drug product if it is misused either intentionally or unintentionally.  The 
315 
effects of pH, temperature, and solvent polarity on disruption or destruction of the drug 
316 
product matrix should be evaluated.  Additional experimental variables may include 
317 
exposure times to the solvent, agitation, varying the surface area (such as from intact to 
318 
being ground, crushed, or cut up into pieces), and ease of crushing tablets or destroying 
319 
the dosage form matrix.  In general, assay procedures for drug content already reported 
320 
under CMC may indicate the best conditions for drug extraction and analysis.   
321 
322 
2. 
Abuse Deterrent Formulations 
323 
324 
Formulations that deter abuse may be useful in ensuring access to drugs for purposes of 
325 
medical treatment while limiting abuse and the consequences of abuse.  For example, a 
326 
combination product might be developed that contains an FDA-approved drug with abuse 
327 
potential and a second FDA-approved drug without abuse potential that causes an adverse 
328 
effect (e.g., sometimes a sponsor may add a substance to limit or reduce abuse of the 
329 
narcotic). Several different types of abuse deterrent formulations have been proposed in 
330 
the scientific literature, including formulations with physical barriers to tampering, 
331 
combinations of an agonist with an antagonist, components that cause adverse events, and 
332 
alternative methods of administration.
5,6 
333 
334 
Currently, the concept of 
abuse deterrence
is viewed as the introduction of some limits or 
335 
impediments to abuse, as opposed to the outright elimination of abuse.  For all dosages of 
336 
such products, extractability and solubility studies should be designed to determine 
337 
whether any of the drugs present in the combination might be differentially solubilized 
338 
and extracted, and thus separated from the API. 
339 
340 
A new formulation that is designed with a possible claim of abuse deterrent qualities 
341 
should be studied for relative abuse potential in human pharmacology studies.  The abuse 
342 
potential of the new formulation should be compared to a previously approved product 
343 
that serves as a positive control. The positive control in these studies may be an 
344 
immediate release product, an extended-release product, and possibly an extract of the 
345 
new formulation that is believed not to be abusable (see section V.A below).  In addition 
346 
to the above assessments, robust assessments of efficacy, safety, biopharmaceutics 
5
N. Katz. “Abuse-Deterrent Opioid Formulations: Are They a Pipe Dream?” 
Curr. Rheumatol. Rep.
10(1): 11-8, 
2008. 
6
N. Katz et al., “Challenges in the Development of Prescription Opioid Abuse-deterrent Formulations,” 
Clin. J. 
Pain
, 23(8), pp 648-60, Oct 2007.  
8
 
Add links in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add url to pdf; add email link to pdf
Add links in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
347 
(including alcohol interaction), and epidemiologic studies should be performed to 
348 
demonstrate that a new formulation is an abuse deterrent.  Long-term epidemiological 
349 
studies may also be necessary to support an abuse deterrent claim. 
350 
351 
C. 
Animal Behavioral Pharmacology Studies 
352 
353  The behavioral assessment of drugs in animals is a continually evolving field that seeks to assess 
354  drugs using the latest scientific advances. The main goal of animal studies is to provide an 
355  indication early in drug development of a drug's abuse potential.  The information gained can 
356  guide the sponsor and FDA in determining what additional studies should be conducted in 
357  animals and humans.  The recommendations in the sections that follow address the conduct of 
358  animal abuse potential studies, recognizing that new methodologies may be developed. 
359 
360 
1. 
Principles in Study Design 
361 
362 
Animal abuse potential studies use 
several species
, usually rodents and primates.  
363 
Sponsors should provide (1) justification for the selection of an animal model and (2) the 
364 
prior drug history of the animals selected.  The 
sample size
in animal studies should be 
365 
adequate to accurately characterize the ability of the drug to induce the particular 
366 
behavior of interest. The number of animals included in a study depends on the 
367 
anticipated effect size and the desired power of the statistical test used. 
368 
369 
Route of administration
can significantly affect behavior because of psychophysiological 
370 
and pharmacodynamic effects.  Given that drugs are commonly abused by more than one 
371 
route, the proposed clinical route of administration as well as other routes should be 
372 
tested when feasible. 
373 
374 
A determination of
plasma levels
of the parent drug and its major metabolites in animals 
375 
over a time course are important when assessing similarities to human plasma levels. 
376 
Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic considerations should guide the selection of 
time 
377 
points for measurements
, including appropriate pretreatment times.  A correlation 
378 
between the pharmacokinetic profile and the appearance and resolution of behavioral 
379 
effects for parent and psychoactive metabolites is often observed in abuse potential 
380 
assessments. 
381 
382 
The experimental design should include appropriate 
negative and positive control groups
383 
with suitable justification provided.  A negative control could include a drug without 
384 
abuse potential that is approved for treatment of the same condition proposed for the new 
385 
drug. The positive control should be in the same pharmacological class as the test drug 
386 
when possible.  Doses for negative and positive controls should be behaviorally 
387 
equivalent to the test drug. For drugs that are new molecular entities or are not 
388 
pharmacologically similar to a known drug of abuse, an appropriate comparator can be a 
389 
drug approved for treatment of the same condition for which the new drug is proposed. 
390 
391 
Generally, studies should explore the behavioral effects of a 
range of doses
, including 
392 
high doses that produce plasma levels that are multiples of the therapeutic dose.  Doses 
9
 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
pdf hyperlink; accessible links in pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process
pdf links; add hyperlink to pdf online
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
393 
should be chosen on the basis of the drug's characteristics as the plasma levels of the drug 
394 
increase. Additional principles of dose selection can be found in the DHHS/Public 
395 
Health System document entitled 
Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory 
396 
Animals
.
7
Information resulting from adverse effects or other safety concerns should be 
397 
used to set dose level limits or indicate that further investigation is appropriate. 
398 
399 
2. 
Types of Animal Abuse Potential Studies 
400 
401 
A variety of approaches exist to study the abuse potential of drugs in animals.  When 
402 
choosing a behavioral test, the chemical and pharmacological properties of the drug, its 
403 
pharmacological class, and existing knowledge about its abuse potential should be 
404 
considered. 
405 
406 
Self-administration
tests assess the rewarding properties of a drug.  If animals actively 
407 
work at a behavioral task to receive a dose of the drug, it is likely that the drug will be 
408 
rewarding in humans.  
409 
410 
Conditioned place preference 
is a method related to self-administration in which animals 
411 
choose to spend time in one of two distinct environments, that is, the site where they 
412 
previously received a drug or where they previously received placebo.  Conditioned place 
413 
preference is not as rigorous a behavioral test as self-administration in determining the 
414 
rewarding properties of a drug. 
415 
416 
A positive result with a drug in self-administration or conditioned place preference tests 
417 
in animals can have some predictive value in identifying drugs that might have abuse 
418 
potential in humans.  However, a negative result does not necessarily mean that the drug 
419 
does not have abuse potential.  This is because certain classes of drugs used by humans 
420 
do not induce self-administration or conditioned place preference in animals.  Examples 
421 
of such drug classes include 5-HT2 agonist hallucinogens, cannabinoids, NMDA 
422 
antagonists, and other drugs that produce effects broadly characterized as “psychedelic.”  
423 
When a drug could produce effects that are similar to these classes of drugs, other 
424 
behavioral tests should be relied on to assess abuse potential.   
425 
426 
Drug discrimination 
is a method in which animals indicate whether a test drug produces 
427 
physical or psychic perceptions similar to those produced by a known drug of abuse.  In 
428 
this test, an animal learns to press one bar when it receives the known drug of abuse and 
429 
another bar when it receives placebo.  A challenge session with the test drug determines 
430 
which of the two bars the animal presses more often, as an indicator of whether the test 
431 
drug is recognized or perceived by the animal as the known drug of abuse. 
432 
433 
Psychomotor tests
assess the effects of the test drug on motor functioning in comparison 
434 
with the effects of well-characterized drugs of abuse. 
435 
7
This document is available on the Internet at http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/olaw/references/phspol.htm. 
10
 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
clickable links in pdf files; adding links to pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add hyperlink pdf file; clickable links in pdf
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
436 
Dependence potential 
of a substance is the propensity of a substance, as a consequence 
437 
of its pharmacological effects on physiological or psychological functions, to give rise to 
438 
a need for repeated doses of the substance.  Physical dependence is often characterized by 
439 
withdrawal symptoms.
8
Psychological or psychic dependence refers to impaired control 
440 
over drug use, such as craving. 
441 
442 
Dependence potential can be determined by measuring the pharmacological properties 
443 
during animal and human drug testing.  Tests for 
tolerance
and 
physical dependence 
444 
examine the responses to repeated administration of a drug.  Repeated doses over a wide 
445 
range are needed to attain the same effects observed at starting doses or, as an alternative, 
446 
to avoid symptoms of 
withdrawal
or “bad feelings.” Studies should start at doses, as 
447 
compared to placebo, showing no behavioral effects, and doses should be increased 
448 
several times to produce a dose-effect curve.  Correlation of results with plasma 
449 
concentration measurements can provide useful insight when interpreting the studies.  An 
450 
assessment of 
tolerance 
or 
physical dependence
should be performed as part of the safety 
451 
assessment of a drug and should be considered in drug scheduling.  The demonstration of 
452 
dependence in animals can influence the human safety and the abuse potential 
453 
evaluations.
454 
455 
3. 
Timing of Studies During Preclinical Development 
456 
457 
Sponsors are encouraged to consult with the Agency early in the development of new 
458 
molecular entities about the need for, and optimal timing of, animal abuse potential 
459 
studies. The consultation will be most useful before the end of phase 2 of the 
460 
development to facilitate planning of late stage clinical trials.  Conducting any necessary 
461 
animal abuse potential studies early in development will provide the sponsor with more 
462 
information for consideration in the overall development of the drug.  However, during 
463 
phase 1, a drug’s clinically effective dose may not be known, and animal abuse potential 
464 
studies that do not use an appropriate dose may not be useful for assessing abuse 
465 
potential or in the design of human abuse potential studies later in development.  See 
466 
section V.A below. 
8
Physical dependence is a state of adaptation manifested by a drug class-specific withdrawal syndrome produced by 
abrupt cessation, rapid dose reduction, decreasing blood level of the drug and/or administration of an antagonist. 
Tolerance is a state of adaptation in which exposure to a drug induces changes that result in a diminution of one or 
more of the drug’s effects over time.  The presence of tolerance does not determine whether a drug has abuse 
potential, in the absence of other abuse indicators such as rewarding properties (American Academy of Pain 
Medicine, American Pain Society and American Society of Addiction Medicine consensus document, 2001).
M3 (R2) Nonclinical Safety Studies for the Conduct of Human Clinical Trials and Marketing Authorization for 
Pharmaceuticals, International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of 
Pharmaceuticals for Human Use, ICH Harmonized Tripartite Guideline, current 
Step 2 
version, July 15, 2008, pp. 
16-17. 
11
 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add link to pdf; change link in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add links pdf document; add a link to a pdf file
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
467 
468 
D. 
Application of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP)  
469 
470  The good laboratory practice (GLP) principles described in the guidance for industry 
S7A Safety 
471 
Pharmacology Studies for Human Pharmaceuticals 
(ICH S7A) and in FDA regulations, 21 CFR 
472  part 58, apply to abuse potential studies in animals.
10
The scope of ICH S7A includes new 
473  chemical entities and biotechnology-derived products for human use.  Sponsors should find ICH 
474  S7A useful in ensuring quality and reliability of animal safety studies.  
475 
476 
E. 
Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics 
477 
478  Characterization of the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of a substance 
479  and product is important for determining the abuse potential of a drug or product.  Measures of 
480  systemic exposure to the drug product from preclinical and clinical studies should be considered 
481  when assessing the abuse potential of the drug.
11
Data should include information on maximum 
482  concentration (C
max
), time to onset, time to maximum concentration (T
max
), area under the curve 
483  (AUC
0-∞
), and the terminal elimination half-life (T
½
) of the parent drug and any psychoactive 
484  metabolites.  In addition, data on bioavailability, distribution volume, and drug clearance should 
485  be included. The PK information relevant to abuse potential and described in the abuse potential 
486  section of the NDA should include or be hyperlinked to data that have also been submitted under 
487  the PK section of the NDA. 
488 
489  Information on PD should also be included if available.  This information will be of value 
490  because it can help to correlate psychoactive drug effects with achieved plasma concentrations. 
491 
492  Information on factors that might change the properties of a product, such as crushing a tablet or 
493  taking the product with alcohol and inducing rapid release and absorption of the active drug, 
494  should be collected not only to characterize the abuse potential of the product, but also to 
495  identify any safety concerns associated with misuse of the product (see section IV.B.1). 
496 
497 
498 
V. 
HUMAN LABORATORY STUDIES 
499 
500  The abuse potential assessment of a new drug should be based on a composite analysis of 
501  chemistry, pharmacology, and clinical data, and the public health risk that the drug presents.  
502  One study alone generally would not be considered sufficient for an adequate abuse potential 
503  assessment.  Data from human abuse potential studies will contribute to the development of 
504  product labeling and drug scheduling recommendations.  If the human abuse potential studies 
505  and the adverse events profile from clinical studies do not show the presence of rewarding 
506  effects or other abuse-related behaviors or similar pharmacology, a recommendation for 
507  scheduling would be unlikely. (General information on conducting clinical studies can be 
10 
We update guidances periodically.  To make sure you have the most recent version of a guidance, check the
 
CDER guidance page at http://www.fda.gov/cder/guidance/index.htm.
11
See FDA’s guidance on 
Format and Content of the Human Pharmacokinetics and Bioavailability Section of an  
Application,
available on the CDER guidance page. 
12
 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add hyperlink pdf; pdf email link
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
more detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add links to pdf acrobat; add email link to pdf
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
508  obtained from the FDA guidance on 
General Considerations for the Clinical Evaluation of 
509 
Drugs
.
12
510 
511 
A. 
Human Abuse Potential Study in Recreational Drug Users 
512 
513  The human abuse potential study consists of pharmacology assessments that provide unique 
514  information relevant to central nervous system-active drugs, especially opioids, stimulants, 
515  depressants, cannabinoids, and hallucinogens (see also section IV.B.2).  The objectives of such 
516  studies are to provide information on the relative abuse potential of a new drug in humans and to 
517  contribute to predicting the likelihood of abuse when the drug becomes available.  The studies 
518  are typically conducted in a population experienced in using drugs recreationally after sufficient 
519  data related to safety and efficacy in a patient population have been acquired.  Sponsors are 
520  encouraged to proactively interact with FDA in planning and conducting such studies, often by 
521  the end of phase 2. Sponsors are encouraged to submit protocols to FDA for review and advice 
522  on design, as well as safety issues, before beginning the study.   
523 
524 
1. 
Subjects 
525 
526 
Human abuse potential studies are usually conducted in experienced, recreational drug 
527 
users who have a recent or current history of using a drug in the pharmaceutical class of 
528 
the test drug. The subjects in the study should have experience with drugs with similar 
529 
psychoactive properties, regardless of the pharmacologic mechanism of action.   
530 
531 
The characteristics of the study population with respect to past and current drug use and 
532 
abuse should be presented in detail with respect to drugs abused, preferred drug(s) of 
533 
abuse, and duration of abuse and abstinence.  Screening for substance abuse during the 
534 
study is often necessary to ensure that subjects are not currently abusing other substances.  
535 
Exclusion criteria should include a current diagnosis of substance dependence, current 
536 
abuse, and current treatment for a substance-related disorder.   
537 
538 
Recently, some abuse potential studies have also been conducted in drug naïve healthy 
539 
subjects and this is an area of needed research.  These two populations may differ in 
540 
important ways, including in their ability to identify subtle differences in drug effects that 
541 
are relevant to abuse assessment.   
542 
543 
For the study to be interpretable, the subjects should be able to reliably report “drug­
544 
liking” and be able to provide ratings of drug experiences related to the drug’s subjective 
545 
effects and similarity to specific classes of known drugs of abuse.  Study subjects should 
546 
be able to distinguish the effects of the test drug and similar drugs and should be able to 
547 
demonstrate that they can discriminate the effects of the positive control from the 
548 
placebo. Some investigators may consider prescreening subjects for their ability to detect 
549 
and report subjective drug effects, and to distinguish the effects of the appropriate 
550 
positive control.  Other factors that influence the significance of study results include 
12
Available on the Internet at 
http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/default.htm
13
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
551 
demographic range with respect to age, sex, and race, drug of choice, frequency of 
552 
participation in drug abuse studies, duration of drug abuse, variety of drugs used, and 
553 
duration of drug abstinence.
13 
554 
555 
2. 
Design 
556 
557 
The design of the study should be based on the study objective and statistical analysis 
558 
model. The human abuse study measures repeated single-dose administrations over a 
559 
period of time, determined by the time course of the drug’s effects.  Doses should range 
560 
from minimally effective to supratherapeutic, if safety is known and precautions are 
561 
taken to deal with safety concerns. 
562 
563 
Human abuse potential studies are usually double blind, double dummy, placebo, and 
564 
positive comparator controlled, and are crossover designs.  The abuse potential of the test 
565 
drug is assessed by comparing responses of the test drug with those of placebo and with 
566 
those of the positive control.  A result of 
no abuse potential
should be validated by 
567 
showing a significant difference in response between the positive control and the placebo.  
568 
All subjects are tested under all drug conditions.  Drug conditions would typically 
569 
involve placebo and multiple doses of the new drug and positive control.  A repeated 
570 
Williams square design is recommended.  Subjects should be randomly assigned to one 
571 
of the sequences in the Williams square.  Thus, the number of replicates of the Williams 
572 
square depends on the desired sample size.  The assessment of abuse potential can 
573 
include co-primary endpoints and some secondary endpoints of interest, if appropriate.  
574 
However, no more than three primary measures should be recommended.  Although the 
575 
use of 12 to 25 subjects has been seen in past studies, in some recent studies as many as 
576 
40 subjects have been used. We don’t recommend a specific number of subjects for a 
577 
study; however, the study should be sufficiently powered such that we can determine the 
578 
statistically significant relationship of the test drug to placebo and positive control to the 
579 
primary and secondary outcome measures.  The investigator and the staff who interact 
580 
with subjects should not know the sequence of substances administered. 
581 
582 
Procedures for managing adverse events should be explicit and appropriate for the drug 
583 
class being tested. The washout period of a crossover designed study should be at least 
584 
five times the maximum t
1/2
of the longest acting drug in the study. 
585 
586 
3. 
Study Site 
587 
588 
Studies should be conducted under controlled laboratory settings, preferably in a closed 
589 
residential unit. The subject population is at risk for abuse of the same type of drugs 
590 
being tested, and subjects with histories of drug abuse may be more likely to dropout or 
591 
miss visits.  Therefore, it is recommended that subjects stay overnight following 
592 
administration of each dosage.  The laboratory setting should provide control over 
593 
variables related to sleep and nutrition that can lead to greater variability in outcome.  
594 
The controlled setting also provides greater safety at the higher than therapeutic doses 
13
“Conference on Abuse Liability Assessment of CNS Drugs,” 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
, 70:3 Suppl., 2003.  
14
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
595 
that are usually administered and can help prevent other forms of drug abuse and possible 
596 
drug carryover effects. 
597 
598 
4. 
Selection of Doses and Controls 
599 
600 
Study protocols should be specific as to proposed dosing and monitoring of subjects.  The 
601 
test drug should be compared to the positive control under identical conditions for assay 
602 
of abuse potential.  The positive control should have measurable abuse potential 
603 
previously established through experimental studies and epidemiological data.  The 
604 
positive control should be a drug of abuse in the same pharmacological class as the test 
605 
drug. Additional useful information can be obtained if the positive control has the same 
606 
medical indication as the test drug.  Limits of sensitivity of the assay to lower doses 
607 
should be determined.  Slopes of the dose effect functions across different measures 
608 
should be determined.  Within a given study, a positive control should have its 
609 
anticipated effects on the parameters of abuse potential that are being studied.  Failure to 
610 
demonstrate the expected effects would invalidate the study.  
611 
612 
A dose run-up pilot study in a drug abuser population can provide an empirical basis for 
613 
dose selection. This preliminary study potentially provides an opportunity to evaluate 
614 
and modify procedures in subsequent dose effect studies.   
615 
616 
5. 
Outcome Measurements 
617 
618 
The primary method for evaluating the subjective effects of drugs is through the use of 
619 
standardized questionnaires. Study participants are asked to rate their response to a drug 
620 
that has been administered to them in a laboratory in terms of whether the drug produces 
621 
sensations such as “good,” “high,” or “spacey.”  The “drug liking” rating can be 
622 
measured on a Visual Analog Scale during a drug session or at the end of the drug 
623 
session. 
624 
625 
Measures most directly related to likelihood of abuse include the following: 
626 
627 
Ratings of liking (“Do you like the drug?”) and other subject-rated effects 
628 
Determining the subjects’ disposition to take the drug again  
629 
Drug identification (that is, subjects are able to categorize the effects of the test drug as 
630 
similar to those of numerous classes of psychoactive drugs) 
631 
632 
Measures of drug effect typical of drug class include the following: 
633 
634 
Subject-rated strength of drug effect  
635 
Behavioral and cognitive performance assessment  
636 
Measurement of relevant physiological effects 
637 
Assessment of mood state changes using Profile of Mood States (POMS) and the 
638 
Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI)  
639 
15
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
640 
6. 
Analysis of Data 
641 
642 
If the study consists of a heterogeneous population of identifiably unique groups, 
643 
analyses of the data subsets corresponding to each group should be conducted.  For 
644 
example, a population of recreational users of central nervous system depressants could 
645 
include individuals who prefer to abuse sedative-hypnotic drugs over alcohol.  In a study 
646 
evaluating a new central nervous system stimulant, the study population could include 
647 
individuals identified as cocaine abusers, for example.  These individuals are often 
648 
polydrug abusers and may prefer to abuse drugs from other pharmacological classes.  The 
649 
differences in preference of each population group to the drug class could yield different 
650 
results. Further research in this area of analysis would help determine under what 
651 
circumstances these subgroup analyses can be performed and are useful.   
652 
653  Information about the subjective effects of drugs in humans can also be obtained through drug 
654  discrimination studies, in which subjects are first trained to recognize the effects of a known drug 
655  of abuse compared to placebo. Subjects then receive a blind challenge with different doses of a 
656  test drug to determine whether they can identify the effects of the test drug as being similar to 
657  those of the known drug of abuse. 
658 
659  Self-administration studies in humans can be a useful method for determining the probability of 
660  abuse potential. In this test, subjects are given the opportunity to request additional doses of a 
661  drug after initial exposure to that drug, often in conjunction with a requirement for a certain 
662  amount of work before the subsequent dose is offered.  The major advantage of self­
663  administration in humans compared to that in animals is that human subjects can communicate 
664  the reasons a drug is desirable to them, and specifics about the full range of sensations that a 
665  drug induces. 
666 
667 
668 
B. 
Related Pharmacology Studies 
669 
670  Other aspects of human pharmacology of the test drug (e.g., cognitive and performance 
671  impairment) should be investigated.   
672 
673  Certain tests that might be conducted during clinical studies to assess the therapeutic potential of 
674  a new drug can give indications of similarities between the new drug and known drugs of abuse.  
675  Psychomotor tests that determine whether the effects of a drug increase or decrease normal 
676  motor functioning can suggest that a drug may be like a known stimulant or depressant.  
677  Similarly, cognitive tests that assess whether memory, perception, attention, language ability, or 
678  consciousness are altered by a drug can indicate the presence of certain effects that drug abusers 
679  might find desirable. 
680 
681  As with animal tests, human investigations with new drugs should assess whether a drug 
682  produces tolerance upon repeated administration, as well as whether a drug produces withdrawal 
683  symptoms following discontinuation of drug administration, which is indicative of physical 
684  dependence. 
685 
16
 
Contains Nonbinding Recommendations 
Draft — Not for Implementation 
686 
C. 
Clinical Trial Data Relative to Abuse Potential Assessments 
687 
688  The evaluation of the adverse events profile of a drug from clinical trials can provide a signal of 
689  abuse potential. The systematic categorization, tabulation, and analysis of safety data for mood 
690  elevation, sedation, and psychotomimetic events can provide useful information.  The incidence 
691  of euphoria-type adverse events (including euphoria, euphoric mood, elevated mood, mood 
692  alteration, feeling drunk, feeling abnormal) and hallucination (visual and auditory) are a few of 
693  the more prominent MedDRA terms that should be considered.  MedDRA 12 terms for 
694  inappropriate affect, which include the following lower level terms:  elation inappropriate, 
695  exhilaration inappropriate, feeling happy inappropriately, inappropriate affect, inappropriate 
696  elation, inappropriate laughter, inappropriate mood elevation, should also be considered.  A 
697  prospective evaluation of withdrawal adverse events after abrupt discontinuation of treatment 
698  can provide information relevant to dependence.  Various quantitative measurements will be 
699  useful in providing objective data to assess dependence (e.g., opioid and benzodiazepine 
700  withdrawal scales and psychiatric rating scales).  Data related to serious psychiatric and 
701  neurological adverse events and the need for hospitalization is relevant to the public health risks 
702  and abuse potential of the drug. 
703 
704  Phase 3 clinical trials evaluate the safety and efficacy of a product for a specific condition in 
705  large multi-center trials involving the intended patient populations.  Phase 3 trials provide 
706  support for therapeutic dose recommendations; dose response data; and data relevant to abuse, 
707  dependence potential, drug diversion, and accountability, as related to study subjects (completers 
708  and dropouts). 
709  Sponsors should make every effort to do the following: 
710 
711 
1.  Set criteria, collect data, and tabulate the abuse, misuse, noncompliance, and diversion 
712 
cases across the studies and study sites with special attention to aberrant drug behaviors 
713 
that may be indicative of drug abuse, misuse and/or diversion.
14,15 
714 
715 
2.  Provide complete information, including case report forms and final outcomes, on all 
716 
instances of addiction, abuse, misuse, overdose, drug diversion/drug accountability, 
717 
discrepancies in amount of the clinical supplies of the study drug, noncompliance, 
718 
protocol violations, lack of efficacy, individuals lost to follow-up, and any other reasons 
719 
why subjects dropped out of the study. 
720 
721 
3.  Provide information on the risks of addiction, abuse, misuse, overdose, and drug 
722 
diversion in the study populations. 
723 
724  Pertinent data can include measurements of drug accountability, tolerance, physical dependence, 
725  or withdrawal symptoms, and the presence of signs or symptoms of drug abuse, misuse, 
14 
S.D. Passik, K.L. Kirsh, K.B. Donaghy, R.K. Portenoy, “Pain and Aberrant Drug-Related Behaviors in Medically 
Ill Patients With and Without Histories of Substance Abuse,” in 
J. Pain
, 2(2):173-81, Feb 2006. 
15
http://sbirt.samhsa.gov/  Screening and brief intervention (SBI) can identify the severity of the “problem” in study 
participant and identify the appropriate level of intervention.  
17
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested