using pdfsharp in c# : Clickable pdf links control Library system web page .net html console UL9-12_WTE_2014082113-part393

What to Expect on the ISEE 
Understanding the Individual Student Report 
129 
Stanine Analysis
The stanine analysis permits comparisons between a student’s performance on both the ability tests and 
the related achievement tests. Specifically, these comparisons are made between Verbal Reasoning (V) 
and Reading Comprehension (R), and between Quantitative Reasoning (Q) and Mathematics 
Achievement (M). Each letter in the stanine analysis box in the Test Profile is the midpoint of a band 
that extends to either side of the stanine score. The percentile score is an estimate of a student’s ability 
or knowledge. We can be reasonably certain that a student’s “true score” falls within the band reflected 
by a particular stanine. If the stanine is 5, for example, the percentile rank range is 40–59. 
In the example shown in Figure 2, the band for Reading Comprehension (R) is a bit higher than, but still 
overlaps, the band for Verbal Reasoning (V). This indicates that the student’s performance in reading is 
mostly consistent with the estimate of his verbal reasoning ability. To a degree, because the band for 
Reading Comprehension is slightly to the right of the band for Verbal Reasoning, we can infer that the 
student was performing better than expected. Conversely, if the Reading Comprehension band were to 
the left of the Verbal Reasoning band, we could be reasonably certain that the student was working 
below his potential. The same kinds of comparisons can be made between the Mathematics 
Achievement and the Quantitative Reasoning bands. 
Analysis 
In the Analysis portion of the ISR, each section score indicates the number of questions answered 
correctly, the number of questions answered incorrectly, and the number of questions omitted or not 
reached. Each section score is broken down by type of question, providing more specific information 
about a student’s relative strengths and weaknesses. 
Figure 3 shows the Analysis part of the sample ISR in Figure 1.  
Figure 3. Sample Analysis 
Clickable pdf links - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add link to pdf file; adding a link to a pdf
Clickable pdf links - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
What to Expect on the ISEE 
Understanding the Individual Student Report 
130
In the first column, each section is broken down into curricular areas and/or skills. The next two 
columns show the number of questions and the number the student answered correctly for each 
subsection. The symbols in the fourth and final column indicate whether the student answered each 
individual question in the subsection correctly (+), answered the question incorrectly (–), skipped the 
question (S), or did not reach the question (N). Questions coded S are those that appear to have been 
deliberately skipped by the student, since subsequent questions in the subsection were answered. 
Questions coded N are at the end of the section (not necessarily at the end of the subsection) and were 
not answered, perhaps because the student ran out of time. 
For all levels, the left-to-right sequence of symbols in the fourth column reflects the order of the 
questions in the section. In general, questions on each section are ordered by difficulty, with the easier 
questions at the beginning and the harder questions at the end. This is not the case for Reading 
Comprehension, however, as questions in this section are placed in logical order as they relate to the 
associated reading passage. 
Verbal Reasoning 
The Verbal Reasoning section includes 17 synonyms and 18 sentence completions —10 single word 
response and 8 paired word response—for a total of 35 questions. In Figure 3, the student did answer all 
35 Verbal Reasoning questions; he only answered 22 of these correctly, and some of his errors were 
made on relatively easier questions.  
The synonyms assess a student’s vocabulary as well as his or her ability to understand relationships 
among words and subtle differences in meaning. In Figure 3, we can see that this student attempted to 
answer all 17 synonym items, though he answered seven of these incorrectly. Although these seven are 
scattered throughout the subsection, most are clustered toward the middle or end, as these are the more 
difficult items. 
Sentence completion requires the student to integrate successfully information beyond the immediate 
context of the phrase/sentence and incorporate subsuming concepts and ideas presented in the text using 
syntactic and semantic cues. Again, the student profiled in Figure 3 attempted to answer all 18 sentence 
completion questions; he answered 12 of these correctly. His errors on the single word response items 
tended toward the mid-range to more difficult items, while his errors on the paired word response items 
tended to be toward the easier end.   
Quantitative Reasoning 
This section requires the student to show an understanding of concepts by using logical reasoning, 
synthesis, skill, and comprehension. There are 18 word problems and 14 quantitative comparison 
problems in the Quantitative Reasoning section, for a total of 32 items.   
To solve a word problem, the student must invoke a rule and then apply it.  In the fourth column of 
Figure 3, we can see by the absence of Ss and Ns that the student attempted every word problem.  Of the 
18 items, however, he missed eight, and these were scattered throughout the subsection.   
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Standardization (ISO). Clickable links and buttons, form fields and video can be inserted into a PDF file without quality loss. Documents, forms
pdf edit hyperlink; add a link to a pdf in preview
What to Expect on the ISEE 
Understanding the Individual Student Report 
131 
The quantitative comparison items present two quantities and require the student to determine which is 
greater, whether they are equal, or whether the information given is insufficient to make a determination. 
While this student attempted all but three of the quantitative comparison questions, these three being 
items he evidently did not reach, he got a substantial portion of the easier items wrong.  
Reading Comprehension 
The Reading Comprehension section has 30 questions relating to five passages. These include questions 
on main idea, supporting ideas, inference, vocabulary, organization/logic, and tone/style/figurative 
language. Unlike questions on other test sections, which are ordered by difficulty, the Reading 
Comprehension questions are listed in the order they appear on the test within each of the reading 
passage sections. Figure 3 indicates that this student attempted to answer all 30 items; the pattern of 
correct and incorrect answers suggests that his strengths may lie in a grasp of implicit information  
(e.g., main idea and supporting ideas), while he may be somewhat weaker in discerning more concrete 
information (e.g., vocabulary). 
Mathematics Achievement 
There are 42 items on the Mathematics Achievement section, covering five skill areas. In line with a 
traditional notion of mathematics achievement, these items call for the identification of and solutions to 
problems requiring one or more steps in calculation. The student whose performance is depicted in 
Figure 3 seems to have an inconsistent mastery of the mathematical concepts, although given the relative 
location of the Quantitative Reasoning (Q) and Mathematics Achievement (M) bands in the stanine 
analysis (the M band being to the right of the Q band), he performed better than might have been 
expected. 
Conclusion 
Putting the ISEE in Perspective 
It is helpful to remember that students in more than one grade are taking a particular level of the ISEE.  
Therefore it is possible that some of the questions may seem particularly difficult to you because you 
may not have learned some of the concepts in school yet. Your score on the ISEE is compared to only 
students in your grade, and those students are probably learning about the same things that you are. In 
that case, good preparation for the test includes being attentive in school and keeping up with your class 
work and homework. There are no benefits to frantically reviewing materials at the last minute, and in 
fact, you will probably make yourself very anxious if you do this. It is more important to get a good 
night’s sleep the night before and to have a proper breakfast. Remember that your ISEE scores are only 
part of the admission process. Schools also want to know about you as a person and what you can 
contribute to their school community. 
We wish you the best of luck in your school search and hope that this book has been helpful in showing 
you what to expect on the ISEE.  For more information, please visit ERB’s Web site at 
www.erblearn.org. 
132
Copyright © 2012 by Educational Records Bureau. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be 
reproduced, redistributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, manual, 
photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior written 
permission of the Educational Records Bureau.
A
PPENDICES
U
PP ER 
L
EVEL 
What to Expect on the ISEE  
Appendix A 
133 
Appendix A 
ISEE Content and Specifications 
The sample questions and practice tests represent actual questions from previous tests, as well as newly 
developed questions similar to the ones students will find on the current ISEE. As a result, students get 
the best examples of the kinds of questions and the approximate level of difficulty that they will find 
when they take the ISEE. The purpose of this appendix is to provide students and their parents with 
additional information about the ISEE. 
Verbal Reasoning  
Over the past century, academic and behavioral research have identified specific abilities that are 
relevant to academic performance and, therefore, can be used as predictors of academic success. Verbal 
reasoning and quantitative reasoning are among those abilities and are an integral part of the ISEE.  
Verbal reasoning is the ability to reason, infer, and interpret words, sentences, and discourse in order to 
extract meaning and solve problems. The student must recognize relationships, make contrasts and 
comparisons, follow logic, analyze problems, and think critically about what is being asked or 
expressed. Item types that are often used for verbal reasoning include the following: extracting explicit 
information, following directions, inferring word or phrase meaning, determining main idea of text, 
analyzing similar and dissimilar concepts and situations, and evaluating strength and logic of arguments. 
The Verbal Reasoning section of the ISEE is comprised of two kinds of questions: synonyms and 
sentence completions. Both of these kinds of questions test the depth and breadth of the student’s 
vocabulary, and both test reasoning ability in different ways. Synonyms focus more on word recognition 
and the ability to understand the relationships of other words and to discriminate among subtle 
differences in meaning. The reasoning function of synonyms takes place when the student must choose 
the word that is closest in meaning to the prompt word from among two or more related answer choices. 
Sentence completion questions not only test vocabulary, but also measure a student’s knowledge of 
words and their functions. The student must use both syntactic and semantic information within the text 
and identify cues within the given sentence and across sentences. The student will be required to 
successfully integrate information beyond the immediate context of the phrase/sentence and incorporate 
subsuming concepts and ideas presented in the text. In the Upper Level forms of the ISEE, the sentence 
completion answer choices are words or pairs of words that provide a logical completion to the sentence 
fragment in the test item. 
The following table shows the total number of test items in the actual Upper Level Verbal Reasoning 
section. 
VERBAL REASONING SECTION 
Item Type 
Number of Items 
Synonyms 
19 
Sentence Completion (Single Word Response) 
12 
Sentence Completion (Paired Word Response) 
Total Items for Verbal Reasoning Section 
40 
What to Expect on the ISEE  
Appendix A 
134
Of the 40 total items, 35 are scorable items reported on the Individual Student Report (ISR), and 5 are 
unscored items that may be used on future versions of the ISEE. 
Quantitative Reasoning 
The Quantitative Reasoning section has the student show that he or she can do more than recall and 
recognize facts, definitions, and symbols; read a graph and compute using standard algorithms; or 
estimate answers to computation problems. The reasoning section requires the student to show an 
understanding of concepts by using logical reasoning, synthesis, skill, and comprehension. These 
questions ask the student to relate and integrate his or her knowledge of mathematics. They allow the 
student to show that he or she can apply that knowledge by interpreting data, solving application 
problems, estimating, recognizing patterns, and solving non-routine problems. The kinds of questions 
that are in the Quantitative Reasoning section are often called higher-order thinking problems.  
Quantitative reasoning entails the ability to use numbers and numerical concepts in order to solve 
problems. Questions may ask the student to recognize and apply a required numerical operation; 
estimate numerical values; employ logic to determine what a particular problem entails; compare and 
contrast quantities; analyze and interpret data; analyze, compare, predict, draw conclusions, and 
summarize graphs; use reason to calculate the probability of events; understand concepts and 
applications of measurement; and know how to arrive at statistical solutions to given problems. 
Questions require the student to synthesize information, determine what is relevant (and irrelevant), 
select appropriate analysis techniques, and apply them. The emphasis is on the ability to reason and 
solve problems in a quantitative context. Actual calculations may or may not be required.   
The Quantitative Reasoning section on the Upper Level ISEE consists of two types of test items:  
word problems and quantitative comparisons.  
1.  The word problems differ somewhat from traditional mathematics achievement items in that 
some of them require no calculation. To solve a quantitative reasoning word problem, the 
student must invoke a rule and then apply it. The emphasis is on rule generation, hence the 
absence of calculation in some items and the simplicity of calculation in others.  
2.  The quantitative comparison items present two quantities and require the student to 
determine if one quantity is greater, if the quantities are equal, or if the information given is 
insufficient to make a determination.  
The table below shows the total number of items on the actual Upper Level Quantitative Reasoning 
section. 
QUANTITATIVE REASONING SECTION  
Item Type 
Number of Items 
Word Problems 
18–21 
Quantitative Comparisons 
14–17 
Total Items for Quantitative Reasoning Section 
37 
Of the 37 total items, 32 are scorable items reported on the ISR, and 5 are unscored items that may be 
used on future versions of the ISEE. 
What to Expect on the ISEE  
Appendix A 
135 
A key aspect of all quantitative reasoning word problems is that all incorrect responses are based on 
logical errors, not miscalculations or other errors in form. Another feature of these problems is that they 
may contain irrelevant information. The rationale is twofold. First, in a reasoning item, part of the 
problem is to sort the relevant from the irrelevant, just as a mathematician or scientist would do. Second, 
as students take additional tests in the future, such as college admission tests and other tests that include 
quantitative reasoning items, they will see more and more problems with irrelevant information. In one 
sense, the ISEE begins to prepare students for this experience. 
Reading Comprehension 
Texts of various genres are used to assess reading comprehension, e.g., narrative, expository, persuasive, 
or descriptive texts. Each genre presents features particular to it and may require different reading skills 
to be engaged to understand and interpret the text’s meaning. For example, a persuasive passage will 
likely require the reader to follow the logic of a set of arguments, contrast counterpoints, and evaluate 
the opposing points of view. A narrative, on the other hand, may demand attention to detail and the 
sequencing of events. 
Reading comprehension may be affected not only by text type, but also by question type. Questions may 
ask for straightforward comprehension of what is explicitly stated in the passage, or may demand that 
the reader be aware of implicit ideas. The reader may need to infer, interpret, analyze, and/or synthesize 
information in order to arrive at a correct answer to a given question. 
All ISEE Reading Comprehension test items are based on passages of varying lengths. For the Upper 
Level section, passage length varies from 300 to 600 words. The test items that follow each reading 
passage measure a student’s ability relative to Main Idea, Supporting Ideas, Inference, Vocabulary, 
Organization/Logic, and Tone/Style/Figurative Language, as described in the NCTE strands.  
Explanation of Strands in Reading Comprehension Section 
  The Main Idea items assess the student’s ability to look for an overall message, theme, or central 
idea in the passage or section of the passage. 
  The Supporting Ideas items assess the student’s ability to identify explicit ideas that support the 
main idea or another important concept found in the text. 
 Inference items ask the student to draw a conclusion from content not explicitly stated in the text.  
Inference items may ask the student to compare and contrast ideas, interpret or analyze text, 
and/or predict subsequent events or outcomes.  
 Vocabulary items deal with word definitions within the context of the passage, usually in the 
form of “most nearly means.” 
 Organization/Logic items ask students to identify the sequence, pattern, relationship, structure, 
or summary of the passage and to identify the major features of different literary genres, 
including narrative, informational, and instructional. 
 Tone/Style/Figurative Language items assess the student’s understanding of mood, tone, point of 
view, and figurative language such as simile, metaphor, hyperbole, images, irony, and 
personification. 
At the Upper Level, there are six passages in the Reading Comprehension section, each followed by six 
questions that relate to the passage.  
What to Expect on the ISEE  
Appendix A 
136
The following table shows the total number of items in the actual Upper Level Reading Comprehension 
section. 
READING COMPREHENSION SECTION  
ISEE Strand 
Number of Items Per Strand 
Main Idea 
3–7 
Supporting Ideas 
5–11 
Inference 
6
–14 
Vocabulary 
5–9 
Organization/Logic 
3–5 
Tone/Style/Figurative Language 
1–
Total Items on Reading Comprehension Section 
36 
Of the 36 total items, 30 are scorable items reported on the ISR, and 6 are unscored items that may be 
used on future versions of the ISEE. 
Mathematics Achievement 
Mathematics Achievement items conform to the traditional mathematics achievement items that call for 
the identification and solution of a problem requiring one or more steps in calculation. Based on the 
strands of the NCTM, the items require calculations ranging from simple addition and subtraction 
(Lower Level) to second-year algebra (Upper Level). Item formats and rules for generating items are 
summarized below. The standards used for the Upper Level ISEE are NCTM’s standards for grades  
8–11 and may be found at www.nctm.org
  Items measure knowledge of content area and academic skills. 
  Items assess what mathematics the student has been taught and how much the student is able to 
do. 
  Incorrect answer choices are based on process errors (e.g., miscalculations, using wrong 
operations, wrong formulas). 
  Items have the following characteristics: 
They are more concrete than abstract. They require application of standard mathematical 
rules in standard situations. 
They require knowledge of terminology. 
They require knowledge of procedures, as well as concepts. 
The following table shows the skill areas and approximate number of questions testing those skill areas 
for the actual Upper Level Mathematics Achievement section. 
MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT SECTION  
Skill Areas 
Number of Items 
Number Sense 
5–11 
Algebraic Concepts 
13–17 
Geometry 
5–8 
Measurement 
5–8 
Data Analysis and Probability 
8–13 
Total Items on Mathematics Achievement Section 
47 
What to Expect on the ISEE  
Appendix A 
137 
Of the 47 total items, 42 are scorable items reported on the ISR, and 5 are unscored items that may be 
used on future versions of the ISEE. 
The Mathematics Achievement section on the Upper Level ISEE has a direct connection to what the 
student is learning or has learned in mathematics in school. As stated previously, since each level is 
given to students in more than one grade, it is possible that some of the questions may seem difficult 
because the student has not yet learned some of the concepts. This is particularly true of the 
Mathematics Achievement section. But the student’s ISEE score is compared only to students in the 
same grade who are also applying to independent schools, students who are probably learning about the 
same things in school. 
Essay 
The essay prompts on the ISEE were created to be consistent with the prompts on previous editions of 
the ISEE. All prompts are free of bias, global in scope, and representative of a wide variety of topics. 
The prompts for the Upper Level ask students to write an essay that is of interest and relevant to the 
experiences of students at this age. The essay will give further insight into what is important to the 
applicant.  
What to Expect on the ISEE 
Appendix B 
138
Appendix B 
Answer Sheet  
Use the answer sheet and pre-lined pages in this appendix for the Practice Test. You may want to 
photocopy the answer sheet to make it more convenient to use during the Practice Test. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested