pdfsharp table example c# : C# read pdf from url Library software component .net winforms web page mvc UL9-12_WTE_201408219-part401

RC
3
89 
Go on to the next page. 
I2EUCXXXAM01APUA020-AR06BW 
1.  The primary purpose of the passage is to 
(A)  explain the author’s childhood 
interest in biology. 
(B)  describe a discovery that excited the 
author’s interest. 
(C)  compare caddis larvae to other 
cocoon-building insects. 
(D)  provide information about the life 
cycle of caddis larvae. 
I3EUC3000V03BPUA020-2891CW 
2.  In line 4, “minute” most nearly means 
(A)  timely. 
(B)  timorous. 
(C)  tiny. 
(D)  tireless. 
I2EUCXXXAS01BPUA020-AR08CW 
3.  The author caused the larvae to decorate 
their cocoons with stripes by 
(A)  mixing several different materials 
together in the same jar. 
(B)  adding a new material to the jar 
during the cocoon-building process. 
(C)  changing their environment at 
various stages of cocoon 
development. 
(D)  changing the water in the jar 
frequently while they built their 
cocoons. 
I2EUCXXXAS01BPUA020-AR07CW 
4.  In line 8, the author describes the caddis 
larvae as “rather dull” because they 
(A)  were still in the caterpillar stage. 
(B)  were crowded together in one jar. 
(C)  had been living in a stagnant pool.  
(D)  were removed from the pool before 
they finished their cocoons. 
I2EUCXXXAI01IPUA020-AR09BW
5.  In the final sentence (lines 33–36), the 
author suggests that the caddis larvae were 
(A)  energized by all of their hard work. 
(B)  annoyed by the author’s 
experiments. 
(C)  pleased by the attention they 
received. 
(D)  perplexed by the author’s interest in 
them. 
I2EUCXXXAI01IPUA020-AR10BW 
6.  What most probably led the author to 
experiment with caddis larvae? 
(A)  a passage in a book about pond life 
(B)  a conversation with the author’s 
friend 
(C)  a chance meeting with a famous 
naturalist 
(D)  the author’s pastime of collecting 
creatures from ponds and streams  
C# read pdf from url - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add url link to pdf; clickable links in pdf from word
C# read pdf from url - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink to pdf in
RC
Go on to the next page.
90
Questions 7–12
Passage UB02 
Totem poles, the tallest wood carvings in the 
world, are a trademark of the Northwest Coast 
Indians. There are seven Indian nations up and 
down the Northwest Coast, including Alaska, 
and they each have their own style of carving. 
Each pole is different, and each pole tells its 
own story. 
An elder taught the carver about ancestors, 
crests, and symbols of the family before the 
carver began to work. Design was left to the 
10 
carver. After splitting away the wood to give 
11 
form to the figures, the carver finished the final 
12 
details and shaping with curved knives. The 
13 
carver was also responsible for painting the 
14 
pole, although not all poles were painted. The 
15 
parts painted and the choice of colors depended  
16 
on the tradition of the area. In the 1800s, the 
17 
tallest poles were about sixty feet high, and 
18 
sometimes hundreds of people hauled on ropes 
19 
to raise a pole to its upright position. 
20 
The art of the totem pole carving almost 
21 
died out, with totem poles being felled, sold, or 
22 
even cut up for firewood. In the 1950s, the few 
23 
remaining carvers were hired by the University 
24 
of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology 
25 
to reproduce old and decaying Kwakiutl poles. 
26 
This project was largely responsible for bringing 
27 
the Northwest Coast Indian art back from the 
28 
brink of extinction.  
29 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
adding an email link to a pdf; c# read pdf from url
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# HTML5 Viewer: Open a File from a URL.
add url to pdf; pdf link to email
RC
3
91 
Go on to the next page. 
I2EUCXXXCM01APUB020-BR09DW
7.  Which best expresses the main idea of the 
passage? 
(A)  Totem poles are making a comeback. 
(B)  Totem poles are no longer an artistic 
achievement. 
(C)  The art of totem pole carving almost 
died out. 
(D)  Northwest Coast Indians are famous 
for large, beautiful totem poles. 
I2EUCXXXCI01IPUB020-BR07AW
8.  The author implies that totem pole carving 
was 
(A)  abandoned for a long period.  
(B)  not a good way for a carver to make 
a living. 
(C)  not a respected occupation among 
the Indians. 
(D)  stopped because there were very few 
tall red cedars left. 
I2EUC3007O01CPUB020-2892BW
9.  Which best describes the organization of 
lines 8–17? 
(A)  Different designs for totem poles are 
contrasted. 
(B)  A process is described in 
chronological order. 
(C)  An opinion is presented and then 
supported with facts. 
(D)  The history of totem poles is traced 
from past to present. 
I2EUCXXXCS01BPUB020-BR06DW
10.  According to the passage, which is true of 
totem poles? 
(A)  They are nonexistent today. 
(B)  They were once created only by the 
Kwakiutl. 
(C)  They varied predictably from carver 
to carver. 
(D)  They were carved by Northwest 
Coast Indian tribes. 
I2EUCXXXCI01IPUB020-BR10DW 
11.  The author of the passage appears to care 
most deeply about the fact that 
(A)  each pole tells a different story.  
(B)  some poles took over a year to make.  
(C)  carvers painted some totem poles 
and not others. 
(D)  the artistic heritage of Northwest 
Coast Indians was saved. 
I3EUC3007S01BPUB020-2890BW 
12.  According to the passage, a museum 
helped preserve the art of totem pole 
carving by 
(A)  preserving totem poles so that they 
would not decay. 
(B)  commissioning carvers to duplicate 
existing totem poles. 
(C)  selling the museum’s collection of 
Indian art to the public. 
(D)  encouraging carvers to create new 
and innovative designs. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# Demo Codes for PDF Conversions. 2. Add web document viewer into your C# project aspx web page.
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add links to pdf document
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# PDF - View PDF Online with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
pdf link to attached file; add link to pdf file
RC
Go on to the next page.
92
Questions 13–18
UC08 
The following passage was published in 1991. 
The news media seem to be filled with 
alarming editorials about how schools in the 
United States may not be up to the challenge of 
educating the workers needed in tomorrow’s 
world. In the world of tomorrow, according to 
these self-styled pundits, laser technology, 
robotics, and computer-controlled equipment 
will be ubiquitous parts of our lives. Of 
necessity, therefore, more students than ever 
before will need advanced training or even 
10 
college degrees. 
11 
Some researchers, however, would argue 
12 
that these commentators overstate the case. 
13 
Two studies in particular have reached some 
14 
not-very-alarming conclusions about the 
15 
amount of education it will take to do the jobs 
16 
of the future. In the mid-1980s, a study by the 
17 
Hudson Institute concluded that, by the 
18 
beginning of the twenty-first century, 
19 
19 percent of newly created jobs could be 
20 
performed by high school dropouts and only 
21 
26 percent of newly created jobs would require 
22 
a college degree. (To put these projections into 
23 
perspective, approximately 17 percent of 
24 
today’s high school students drop out—
25 
although not necessarily permanently—while 
26 
some 26 percent go on to institutions of higher 
27 
education and obtain bachelor’s degrees. 
28 
Slightly more than 50 percent of students get 
29 
their high school diploma and enter a program 
30 
of postsecondary education but drop out prior 
31 
to obtaining a bachelor’s degree.) A more 
32 
recent study by the National Center on 
33 
Education and the Economy finds a more even 
34 
distribution, with 34 percent of new jobs 
35 
projected as requiring less than a high school 
36 
diploma, 36 percent requiring a high school 
37 
diploma and up to three years of college, and 
38 
30 percent requiring a college degree. 
39 
These studies, obviously, seem to portray a 
40 
future that is directly opposed to the visions 
41 
that more typically are found in the news 
42 
media. One possible explanation for the 
43 
discrepant conclusions coming from the two 
44 
camps lies in the possibility that the media have 
45 
confused rates of growth with actual numbers 
46 
of jobs. It is certainly the case that the 
47 
occupations that are projected to exhibit the 
48 
fastest growth over the next few decades are 
49 
frequently occupations that require advanced 
50 
educational degrees. However, what often goes 
51 
unstated and unrecognized is the reality that 
52 
such jobs are likely to represent no more than 
53 
5 percent of the jobs in the workforce as a 
54 
whole. 
55 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
pdf link; add hyperlinks to pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Best C#.NET PDF text extraction library and component for free download.
adding links to pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf
RC
3
93 
Go on to the next page. 
I2EUCXXXCM01APUC080-CR40AW 
13.  The primary purpose of the passage is to 
(A)  suggest that reports expressing 
concern over the state of educational 
preparedness in the United States 
may be unnecessarily alarming. 
(B)  demonstrate ways in which the 
workers of tomorrow will need far 
more sophisticated knowledge in the 
area of technology if they are to be 
successful. 
(C)  illustrate several ways in which 
technology has altered the current 
job market and to describe the 
implications that such changes have 
for education in this country.  
(D)  lament the growing percentage of 
high school students in the United 
States who drop out prior to 
graduation and are therefore unable 
to secure high-paying careers. 
I2EUCXXXCV03BPUC080-CR37BW 
14.  In line 6, “pundits” most nearly means 
(A)  educators. 
(B)  experts. 
(C)  naysayers. 
(D)  workers. 
I2EUCXXXCO01CPUC080-CR36CW 
15.  The author of the passage does all of the 
following EXCEPT 
(A)  give data. 
(B)  describe research. 
(C)  compare trends in different 
countries. 
(D)  cite commentators from the news 
media. 
I2EUCXXXCS01BPUC080-CR38BW
16.  Which conclusion can best be drawn from 
the two studies summarized in the second 
paragraph (lines 12–39)? 
(A)  By the beginning of the twenty-first 
century, a college degree will be 
virtually required if one hopes for a 
high-paying job. 
(B)  The workforce being prepared by 
our schools today matches fairly 
closely the workforce likely to be 
needed by our society in the near 
future. 
(C)  Our students face an uncertain 
economic future unless educators 
and the public band together to 
reduce the rate at which high school 
students drop out. 
(D)  The majority of jobs at the beginning 
of the twenty-first century will 
require a knowledge of robotics, 
laser technology, or computer-
assisted equipment. 
I3EUC3007F02APUC080-2893BW 
17.  The author’s tone when discussing the 
news media is best described as 
(A)  admiring. 
(B)  critical. 
(C)  humorous. 
(D)  worried. 
I2EUCXXXCO01CPUC080-CR39AW 
18.  The purpose of the last paragraph 
(lines 40–55) is to 
(A)  provide an explanation for the 
differing points of view. 
(B)  express concern for the future 
welfare of the economy. 
(C)  propose additional research needed 
to clarify the issues. 
(D)  criticize the shortcomings of the 
arguments made by both sides. 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit
active links in pdf; pdf reader link
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
pdf hyperlinks; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
RC
Go on to the next page.
94
Questions 19–24
UA03 
Any discussion about domestic life during 
the medieval period in Europe must exclude an 
important group: it cannot refer to most of the 
population, who were poor. Writing about the 
decline of the Middle Ages, a prominent 
historian described a world of sharp contrasts, 
where health, wealth, and good fortune were 
enjoyed as much for their rarity as for their 
advantages. “We, at the present day, can hardly 
understand the keenness with which a warm 
10 
coat, a good fire on the hearth, a soft bed . . . 
11 
were formerly enjoyed.” He also made the 
12 
point that medieval popular art, which we 
13 
appreciate for its simple beauty, was prized by 
14 
its makers even more for its splendor and 
15 
pomp. Its overdecorated sumptuousness was 
16 
needed to make an impression on a public who 
17 
sought escape from the wretched conditions 
18 
under which they lived. The extravagant 
19 
pageants and religious festivals that 
20 
characterized that time can be understood not 
21 
only as celebrations, but also as antidotes to the 
22 
miseries of everyday life. 
23 
The poor were extremely badly housed, 
24 
were without water, and had few possessions. 
25 
Their dwellings were so small that family life 
26 
was compromised; these tiny hovels were little  
27 
more than shelters for sleeping. There was  
28 
room only for the infants—the older children 
29 
were separated from the parents and sent to 
30 
work as apprentices or servants. The result of 
31 
these deprivations was that concepts such as 
32 
“home” and “family” did not exist for these 
33 
souls. 
34 
By way of contrast, many town dwellers 
35 
partook of medieval prosperity. The free town, 
36 
which stood apart from the predominantly 
37 
feudal countryside, was uniquely European. Its 
38 
inhabitants—the francs bourgeois in France, 
39 
the burghers in Germany, the borghese in Italy, 
40 
and the burgesses in England—would create a 
41 
new urban civilization. The word “bourgeois” 
42 
first occurred in France in the early eleventh 
43 
century. It described the merchants and 
44 
tradespeople who lived in walled towns and 
45 
governed themselves through elected councils 
46 
and in most cases owed allegiance directly to 
47 
the king instead of a lord. What places the 
48 
bourgeois in the center of any discussion of 
49 
domestic comfort is that unlike the aristocrat, 
50 
who lived in a fortified castle, or the cleric, 
51 
who lived in a monastery, or the serf, who lived 
52 
in a hovel, the bourgeois lived in a house. Our 
53 
examination of the concept of the home begins 
54 
here. 
55 
RC
3
95 
Go on to the next page. 
I2EUCXXXAM01APUA030-AR11CW 
19.  The passage is primarily concerned with 
(A)  praising the lives of the rich and the 
middle class during the Middle 
Ages. 
(B)  explaining the importance that 
medieval art had for the bourgeois 
and the rich. 
(C)  providing background information 
for a discussion of the medieval 
home and its comforts. 
(D)  describing the differences between 
political views in towns and in the 
country during the Middle Ages. 
I2EUCXXXAI01IPUA030-AR13DW 
20.  According to the passage, medieval 
pageants and festivals for the poor were 
appealing because they 
(A)  were free. 
(B)  had religious importance. 
(C)  provided an excuse for celebration. 
(D)  provided relief from a hard, bleak 
existence. 
I2EUCXXXAI01IPUA030-AR12DW
21.  The author suggests that we do not 
understand the “keenness” (line 10) of 
certain pleasures enjoyed by medieval 
people because we 
(A)  seldom share our pleasures with 
others. 
(B)  lack sufficient knowledge of the 
period. 
(C)  lead lives that are too cluttered and 
busy. 
(D)  enjoy the pleasures mentioned fairly 
frequently. 
I2EUCXXXAS01BPUA030-AR14DW 
22.  In the second paragraph (lines 24–34), the 
author states that the concept of “family” 
did not exist because 
(A)  families had to move fairly 
frequently. 
(B)  several families had to share one 
house. 
(C)  everyone had to work hard in order 
to survive. 
(D)  children were sent away as soon as 
they were old enough to work. 
I2EUCXXXAO01CPUA030-AR15BW 
23.  The author most likely uses similar terms 
from different languages (lines 38–
42) in 
order to 
(A)  inform the reader about the breadth 
of his research. 
(B)  emphasize the widespread nature of 
a similar concept. 
(C)  illustrate the subtle differences 
within a common idea. 
(D)  suggest the common origin of many 
medieval languages. 
I2EUCXXXAO01CPUA030-AR16BW 
24.  The passage suggests that loyalty to a king 
rather than to a lord had which advantage? 
(A)  lower taxes 
(B)  less threat of death in battle 
(C)  more potential for self-government 
(D)  more mobility among social classes 
RC
Go on to the next page.
96
Questions 25–30
UA04 
In the passage below, architect Frank Lloyd Wright describes an incident from his youth that was to 
lead to a business partnership in later life. 
September, long awaited, finally came. 
Over the summer, I learned a lot on my uncle’s 
farm. My fingers were quick, and I could work 
almost as hard as a man. I wasn’t afraid of 
anything—well, maybe a little afraid of storms 
and of people. Buoyantly, I bounded up the 
steps at home and flung my arms around 
Mother. Turning to Jane and Maginel (my 
sister and brother), I exclaimed, “How you’ve 
grown.” 
10 
On the day I approached the forbidding 
11 
Second Ward School, I was less sure of myself. 
12 
Because I’d spent the summer on my uncle’s 
13 
farm, I had no companions with whom to share 
14 
my foray into the unknown. 
15 
On the playground a ruckus had erupted. In 
16 
the center of a circle of taunting boys was a pile 
17 
of leaves from which emerged the brawny 
18 
shoulders of a red-haired boy who spluttered 
19 
angrily. He was not at all intimidated. 
20 
“What happened?” I asked. 
21 
“Some boys decided to bury Robie Lamp in 
22 
leaves,” another boy explained. 
23 
I so admired Robie’s courage and 
24 
resourcefulness that we became friends of the 
25 
heart. Together we invented an ice boat, a 
26 
bobsled with double runners, and fantastic 
27 
kites. On a small printing press in the 
28 
basement, we set type. When a neighbor, 
29 
Charlie Doyon, wanted to join us, we assented 
30 
only after he agreed to inveigle two hundred 
31 
dollars from his father for purchasing a larger 
32 
press and more type. With the new press, we 
33 
set up a firm called Wright, Doyon, and Lamp, 
34 
Publishers and Printers. That was the beginning 
35 
of a relationship that continued into our 
36 
adulthood. 
37 
RC
3
97 
STOP. If there is time, you 
may check your work in this 
section only.
.
I2EUCXXXAM01APUA040-AR17BW  
25.  The primary purpose of the passage is to 
(A)  show how much courage Wright 
had. 
(B)  show how Wright met his business 
partner. 
(C)  criticize those who are reluctant to 
help others. 
(D)  reveal that bullies will back down 
when challenged. 
I2EUCXXXAV03APUA040-AR18CW 
26.  The mood of the first paragraph  
(lines 1–10) can best be described as  
one of 
(A)  overbearing pride. 
(B)  adolescent shyness. 
(C)  youthful enthusiasm. 
(D)  sentimental yearning. 
I2EUCXXXAI01IPUA040-AR21DW 
27.  It can be inferred that Wright and Lamp 
required Charlie Doyon to give them 
money before joining their business 
because they 
(A)  wanted to realize a profit before the 
actual business began. 
(B)  wanted to be sure that Charlie would 
not become a business rival. 
(C)  wanted to test Charlie’s commitment 
to joining the business. 
(D)  thought that the business would 
benefit from a larger model press. 
I2EUCXXXAF02CPUA040-AR19AW 
28.  The phrase “my foray into the unknown” 
(line 15) refers to Wright’s 
(A)  entrance into a new school. 
(B)  first encounter with Robie Lamp. 
(C)  summer experiences on his uncle’s 
farm. 
(D)  unfamiliarity with the business 
world. 
I2EUCXXXAO01CPUA040-AR20CW
29.  The sentence “I so admired Robie’s 
courage and resourcefulness that we 
became friends of the heart” (lines 24–26) 
is included in order to 
(A)  explain why Wright did not torment 
Lamp. 
(B)  show that Lamp was lucky to win 
Wright’s friendship. 
(C)  explain why Wright and Lamp’s 
friendship was a lasting one. 
(D)  show that Wright was willing to 
overlook the fact that Lamp was 
older than Wright. 
I3EUC3007V03BPUA040-2894AW 
30.  In line 31, “inveigle” most nearly means 
(A)  acquire.  
(B)  dismiss. 
(C)  purchase. 
(D)  return. 
98
Mathematics Achievement 
UPPER LEVEL 
Practice Test 
Copyright © 2012 by Educational Records Bureau. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be 
reproduced, redistributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, manual, 
photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior written 
permission of the Educational Records Bureau.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested