pdfsharp table example c# : Adding a link to a pdf SDK control API .net azure asp.net sharepoint theology_mission_20062-part42

21
that mom
e
nt, a
s
"a 
g
rain of mu
s
tard 
see
d, whi
c
h,
at fir
s
t, i
s
th
e
l
e
a
s
t of all 
see
d
s
," but aft
e
rward
s
put
s
forth lar
ge
bran
c
h
es
, and b
ec
om
es
g
r
e
at tr
ee;
till,
in anoth
e
r in
s
tant, th
e
h
e
art i
s
c
l
e
an
se
d from all
s
in, and fill
e
d with pur
e
lov
e
to God and man.  But
e
v
e
n that lov
e
in
c
r
e
a
ses
mor
e
and mor
e
, till w
e
"
g
row up in all thin
gs
into Him that i
s
our h
e
ad
;
"
till w
e
attain "th
e
m
e
a
s
ur
e
of th
e
s
tatur
e
of th
e
fulln
ess
of Chri
s
t."    -
J
ohn W
es
l
e
y, S
e
rmon 75, "On
Workin
g
Out Our Own Salvation," II.1.
W
e
may l
e
arn from h
e
n
ce
, in th
e
Third pla
ce
,
what i
s
th
e
prop
e
r natur
e
of r
e
li
g
ion, of th
e
r
e
li
g
ion
of 
Jes
u
s
Chri
s
t.  It i
s
q
e
rap
e
ia yu
c
hvá [th
e
rapy of
s
oul], God'
s
m
e
thod of h
e
alin
g
s
oul whi
c
h i
s
thu
s
di
se
a
se
d.  H
e
r
e
by th
e
g
r
e
at Phy
s
i
c
ian of 
s
oul
s
appli
es
m
e
di
c
in
es
to h
e
al thi
s
s
i
c
kn
ess
, to r
es
tor
e
human
natur
e
, totally 
c
orrupt
e
d in all it
s
fa
c
ulti
es
 God
h
e
al
s
all our Ath
e
i
s
m by th
e
knowl
e
d
ge
of Him
se
lf,
and of 
Jes
u
s
Chri
s
t whom h
e
hath 
se
nt
;
by 
g
ivin
g
u
s
faith, a divin
e
e
vid
e
n
ce
and 
c
onvi
c
tion of God, and
of  th
e
thin
gs
of  God.  -  in  parti
c
ular,  of  thi
s
important  truth,  "Chri
s
t  lov
e
d  m
e
,  and 
g
av
e
him
se
lf for m
e
."  By r
e
p
e
ntan
ce
and lowlin
ess
of
h
e
art, th
e
d
e
adly di
se
a
se
of prid
e
i
s
h
e
al
e
d
;
that of
se
lf-will  by  r
es
i
g
nation,  a  m
ee
k  and  thankful
s
ubmi
ss
ion to th
e
will of God
;
and for th
e
lov
e
of
th
e
world in all it
s
bran
c
h
es
, th
e
lov
e
of God i
s
th
e
s
ov
e
r
e
i
g
n r
e
m
e
dy.  Now, thi
s
i
s
prop
e
rly r
e
li
g
ion,
"faith"  thu
s
"workin
g
by  lov
e;
"  workin
g
th
e
ge
nuin
e
m
ee
k  humility, 
e
ntir
e
d
e
adn
ess
to  th
e
world, with a lovin
g
, thankful a
c
qui
esce
n
ce
in, and
c
onformity to, th
e
whol
e
will and word of God.
-
J
ohn W
es
l
e
y, S
e
rmon 44, "Ori
g
inal Sin," III.3.
This reflection on a Wesleyan theology of mission
assumes several basic things:  That God calls the church
into mission; that the church is essentially missionary, or
missional; that the gospel of Jesus Christ is powerful to
reach  across cultural barriers  and  to  draw  people to
himself despite human sinfulness.  It assumes also that
any  sound  theology  of  mission,  including  any
purportedly Wesleyan one, must be thoroughly biblical;
that  biblical  authority  takes  precedence  over  the
authority of Wesley or any church tradition.
It is also my conviction, however, that John Wesley
had an unusually insightful grasp of the gospel and its
mission.  The Wesleyan perspective is highly relevant to
the mission of the Free Methodist Church today.  Much
of this relevance comes from the fact that Wesley was
constantly engaged in the practice of mission-preaching
the gospel to the poor and all who would hear; forming
Methodist classes and societies; writing letters, sermons,
and pamphlets; counseling and sending out preachers;
and constantly reflecting theologically on what he was
doing.  Wesley was amazingly well informed about what
was going on in his day intellectually, philosophically,
and scientifically, as well as in the church and in the lives
of the Methodist people who were his special concern.
Wesley
'
s missionary focus, of course, was primarily
Great Britain and the American colonies.  He believed in
establishing a vital base and then moving out gradually
from that base, and thus extended the Methodist witness
throughout England  and into  Scotland, Ireland,  and
America.  The real father of global Methodist missions
was his younger prot‚g‚ Thomas Coke (1747-1814), who
is worth studying in his own right.  Wesley and Coke had
different strategies,  though  the  same overall mission.
Wesley said wryly of Coke
'
s globe-trotting missionary
ventures, "Dr. Coke and I are like the French and the
Dutch.  The French have been compared to a flea, the
Dutch to a louse.  I creep like a louse, and the ground I
get  I keep;  but  the  Doctor  leaps  like  a flea  and is
sometimes obliged to leap back again."
Through  the influence  of  Wesley and  Coke  and
others,  an  amazing  Methodist  missionary  enterprise
developed in the 1800s.  It was double-pronged, reaching
in  separate  branches  from  British  and  American
Methodism.  In the United States, Methodist missions
began with missions to the American Indians, the slaves,
and to the west coast.  American Methodist missions
were expanding rapidly at the time B. T. Roberts was
beginning  his  ministry,  which  is  part  of  the  reason
Roberts briefly considered missionary service in Bulgaria
or in the Oregon Territory.
John Wesley
'
s own life and theology, however, are the
fountainhead  of the Methodist  missionary enterprise.
And they provide highly significant learnings that can
and should instruct Free Methodist missions.
THE DISTINCTIVENESS OF WESLEY'S 
THEOLOGICAL ORIENTATION
We  need  first  to  understand  the  distinctiveness  of
Wesley
'
s  theological  orientation.    Wesley  had  a
remarkable capacity to step outside his own tradition
when doing theology -unlike, for example, Luther or
Calvin.  This was due in part to his personality and
temperament and the nature of his intellect; in part to
the hybrid Anglican tradition with its via media and its
"Anglican triad" of Scripture, reason, and tradition; and
in part to the revival in patristic studies at Oxford during
Wesley
'
s student days.  Perhaps it owed something also to
Wesley
'
s willingness to step outside his own social class to
minister to and with the poor.
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
Adding a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
Adding a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf; add links in pdf
22
I believe God used these dynamics to create what is
increasingly coming to be recognized as one of the great
theological minds of the Christian tradition-as well as a
great  evangelist,  church  leader,  and  man  of  mature
Christian character.
The two points of distinctiveness I would highlight
in Wesley
'
s theology are, first, his broad, conjunctive
approach ("both/and" rather than "either/or," but with
no compromise on issues of truth and error); and his
integration of multiple sources of truth (but with no
compromise on biblical authority).
1.  W
es
l
e
y'
s
broad approa
c
h to th
e
olo
g
y. Unlike most of his
theological  contemporaries  and  forebears,  Wesley
drew  from  other  traditions  besides  Reformed
Protestantism.  Most importantly for the whole cast
of his theology, he reached back prior to Augustine
(whose theology heavily shaped Calvin and Luther)
and  drew  from  the  early  sources  of  Eastern
Orthodoxy.  Central here is Wesley
'
s view of grace, of
human  nature,  and  of  the  nature  and  scope  of
salvation.  Wesley had a key theological intuition that
affirmations  which  appeared  contradictory  or
paradoxical  might  simply  testify  to  a  deeper,
integrating truth that needed to be discerned.
1
2.  Th
e
W
es
l
e
yan P
e
ntalat
e
ral. Much has been written
about  the  so-called  Wesleyan  Quadrilateral  of
Scripture, reason, tradition, and experience - which,
however,  might  better  be  termed  the  Wesleyan
Pentalateral of Scripture, creation, reason, tradition,
and experience.  It is clear that for Wesley, God
'
s
creation was a source of revelation, truth, and insight.
Wesley integrated all these elements into his theology.
The construct probably is best viewed as a sphere or
circle, or a structure like that of  the atom, with
Scripture at the center and creation, reason, tradition,
and  experience  orbiting  around  this  center-all
"energized" and made dynamic by the Holy Spirit.2
These  interrelated  dynamics-Wesley
'
s  broad  but
biblically-based theology and his holistic integration
of multiple sources-give rise to several theological
themes of importance for Christian mission.  I have
chosen to highlight four that I think are very basic in
Wesley and are especially relevant today.
FOUR KEY THEMES IN WESLEY
Wesley emphasized four biblical themes that together
constitute a dynamic theology of mission.  These are the
image of God in humankind (and to a lesser degree in all
creation),  God
'
s  preceding  (or  prevenient)  grace,
salvation  as  healing,  and  the  perfecting  of  Christian
character (Christian perfection).  Though these themes
interweave, they have a certain logical and to some extent
chronological order in the sequence I present them.
1.  Th
e
Ima
ge
of God
Man and woman are created in God
'
s image.  For Wesley,
this was more than an affirmation about human worth or
dignity (as it is often taken today).  It had key redemptive
implications.  Since human beings bear God
'
s image,
even  though  marred  by  sin,  they  can  be  redeemed,
healed, restored.  Created in the divine image, men and
women are "capable of God."  That is, they have an
inherent  capacity  for  deep  communion  and
companionship with God if the effects of sin can be
overcome.
Among other implications, this means that the first word
in evangelistic witness is not bad news but good news:
Not, "
Y
ou are a sinner," but "
Y
ou bear God
'
s image."
Evangelism starts with good news.  But Wesley does not
lose his balance here, as some contemporary theology
does; there is no compromise with the sinfulness of sin
and the alienation, guilt, and judgment that result from
sin.  "All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God"
(Rom. 3:23).  For Wesley, that is neither the last nor the
first word.  Sin is the defacing, but not the total loss, of
the image of God.  In every person there is something
worth saving and something that can be restored.
In a more remote sense, the whole created order bears
God
'
s stamp and image.  Here Wesley
'
s worldview is
more Hebraic and biblical than Greek or Platonic; more
ecological, "both/and," than is most Reformed theology.
In his mature theology, especially, Wesley did not make a
sharp break between the physical and the spiritual realms.
It was no theological embarrassment to him to see the
interpenetration of the material and the spiritual worlds,
and  to  affirm  the  working of God
'
s  Spirit  in  both,
interactively.  This provides (in part) the theological basis
for recognizing that salvation has to do not only with
human experience but also with the restoration of the
whole created order (another key theme in Wesley).
2.  Pr
ece
din
g
Gra
ce
In Wesley
'
s view, all creation is infused or suffused with
God
'
s  grace  as  an  unconditional  benefit  of  Christ
'
s
atonement.  There is nowhere one can go where God
'
s
grace  is  not  found,  though  people  (and  people
corporately, as cultures and societies) can, and do, close
their hearts and minds to God
'
s grace.
3
Based on  the  Latin praevenire  ("to  come before,
anticipate, get the start of"), Wesley called this gracious
dynamic  "preventing  grace"-because  that
'
s  what
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# program. APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
add a link to a pdf in preview; clickable pdf links
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; pdf reader link
23
"prevent" still meant in his day.  Since "prevent" has
almost the opposite meaning and connotation today, the
more common term has become "prevenient grace."  We
might  more  accurately  call  it  preceding  grace-that
gracious, loving, drawing action or influence of God that
is always at work seeking to bring people and cultures to
God.
4
Several implications of God
'
s preceding grace might
profitably be explored, and we may want to discuss them.
The first and most basic meaning is that in Christ by the
Holy Spirit God has gone ahead of us (ahead of every
person), preceding us, counteracting the effects of sin to
the extent that people can respond to God
'
s grace.  God
'
s
preceding grace is not in itself saving grace; its function is
to draw us to salvation in Christ.
5
Wesley spoke of preventing (preceding), justifying
(or converting) and sanctifying grace.
6
These are not, of
course,  three  different  "kinds"  or  qualities  of  grace.
Grace is one; it is the gracious, loving self-giving activity
and influence of God.  The threefold distinction refers
not so much to the nature of grace itself but to the way
people  experience  that grace.   By  God
'
s  prior grace
people are drawn to God (or they resist that grace).
Responding  in  faith,  grace  becomes  justifying  grace,
leading directly into sanctifying grace if people continue
to open their lives to the work of God
'
s Spirit.  Or, put
differently, the loving grace of God precedes us, draws us
to Christ, converts us, and progressively sanctifies us,
leading finally to "glorification" in the new creation.
One missiological implication of preceding grace is
that God
'
s Spirit is the missionary.  God is already active
in all persons, cultures, societies, and to some in many
(not all) religions.
7
God works for good, limiting the
effects of evil, and seeking to bring people to himself.
While some people, responding to preceding grace, may
find  their  way  to  God,  the  role  of  the  church  and
Christian mission is essential that more people may know
and respond to Christ and be saved from their sins, and
that vital, outreaching churches may be formed in all
societies.    The  work  of  Christian  mission  is  so  to
cooperate with God
'
s preceding grace that people may
experience God
'
s convicting, justifying, and sanctifying
grace.
An emphasis on preceding or prevenient grace can be
pressed too far, of course, so that the distinction between
preceding and justifying grace is lost.  The danger would
be to lose Wesley
'
s balance; to so emphasize that we are
saved  by  grace,  not  by  works,  that  the necessity  of
knowing and responding to God
'
s grace in Jesus Christ
in faith and obedience is eclipsed.  The whole point of
prevenient grace is that it precedes in order that there
might be response of repentance, faith, love, and good
works.
3.  Salvation a
s
H
e
alin
g
A  third  key  element  in  Wesley
'
s  theology  is  his
conception of salvation as healing from the disease of sin.
While people are guilty because of their acts of sin, the
deeper problem is a moral disease which alienates people
from God, from themselves and each other, and from the
physical environment.  So Charles Wesley prayed,
The seed of sin
'
s disease
Spirit of health, remove,
Spirit of finished holiness,
Spirit of perfect love.
8
Reformed theology has tended to use primarily (or
exclusively) juridical models of salvation, with strong
emphasis on the Book of Romans.  Jesus
'
atonement
cancels the penalty for sin so that we may be forgiven,
justified.  Wesley affirmed this, of course.  But for Wesley
the deeper issue was the moral disease of sin that needed
healing by God
'
s grace.
Randy  Maddox  speaks  of  Wesley
'
s  "distinctive
integration"  of  Eastern  and  Western  conceptions  of
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. How To Tutorials.
add url link to pdf; pdf link to specific page
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
adding an email link to a pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
24
God
'
s grace at this point.  "Given their juridical focus,
Western  theologians  have  identified  God
'
s  grace
predominately as pardon, or the unmerited forgiveness of
our  guilt  through  Christ.    By  contrast,  Eastern
theologians construe grace  primarily in  terms of  the
power to heal our infirm nature that comes through
participation in God."  Wesley combines the two.  A
study of Wesley
'
s preaching shows that (in contrast, for
instance, to Calvin), Wesley combined in almost equal
measure the accents of pardon and power in preaching
God
'
s grace.
9
Wesley wrote in his sermon "The Witness of Our
Spirit," "As soon as ever the grace of God (in the former
sense, his pardoning love) is manifested to our soul, the
grace of God (in the latter sense, the power of his Spirit)
takes place therein.  And now we can perform through
God, what to [ourselves] was impossible . . . a recovery of
the image of God, a renewal of soul after His likeness."
10
Maddox helpfully summarizes:
Wesley
'
s integration of the two dimensions of grace
was not merely a conjunctive one.  The emphasis on
pardon  was  incorporated  into  the  larger  theme  of
empowerment for healing.  Thereby, God
'
s unmerited
forgiveness became instrumental to the healing of our
corrupt nature, in keeping with Wesley
'
s deep sympathy
with a therapeutic emphasis like that characteristic of
Eastern  Christianity.    At  the  same  time,  the
Christological basis of grace was made more evident than
is typical in the East, integrating the legitimate concern
emphasized by the West.
11
Today  "therapeutic"  models  of  salvation  are
anathema to many Evangelicals because they are thought
to undercut the biblical emphasis on the guilt of sin and
justification by grace alone.  To use healing language for
salvation  is  seen  as  caving  in  to  popular humanistic
psychology, an over-emphasis on "feeling," and today
'
s
moral relativism.  But we are not faced with an either/or
choice here.  Pardon for sin through the atoning death of
Jesus  Christ  is  essential.    But  the  point  of  Christ
'
s
atonement is that human beings, and by extension their
societies, cultures, and  environments,  may be  healed
from the disease and alienation of sin.
This has many implications for Christian mission.
The  healing  model  underscores  the  personal  and
relational nature of salvation.  It has the potential for
"healing" the divisions between our understandings of
spiritual, physical, social-relational, environmental, and
cosmic  health.    God
'
s  salvation  intends  and  entails
healing in all dimensions.  Salvation-as-healing makes it
clear that God is intimately concerned with every aspect
of our lives; yet, biblically understood, it also makes clear
that the healing we most fundamentally need is spiritual:
Our relationship to God.
12
Biblically grounded (and as
Wesley understood it), the salvation-as-healing motif is
no concession to pop psychology; it is an affirmation of
who God is, what it means to be created in God
'
s image,
and what it takes for that image to be restored in Jesus
Christ by the power of the Holy Spirit.
The healing paradigm is often especially relevant in
mission contexts.  As Philip Jenkins notes in The Next
Christendom:    The  Coming  of  Global  Christianity,
many African and other independent churches "stress
Jesus
'
role as prophet and healer, as Great Physician.
Although this approach is not so familiar in the modern
West,  this  is  one  of  many  areas  in  which  the
independents  are  very  much  in  tune  with  the
Mediterranean Christianity of the earliest centuries."
13
4.  Th
e
P
e
rf
ec
tin
g
of Chri
s
tian Chara
c
t
e
r
Insofar as salvation concerns our relation to God and
other people, the goal is Christian perfection, or the
maturing and perfecting of Christian character.
Unfortunately,  the  word  "perfection"  is  easily
misunderstood to mean a completed absolute rectitude,
even flawlessness, rather than the process of perfecting
(though the word can mean both).  It is actually closer to
Wesley
'
s meaning to speak of "Christian perfecting" or
"the perfecting of Christian character" than to speak of
"Christian  perfection."
14
Wesley,  of  course,  was
attempting to be biblical in his terminology.  It is clear
from his writings that by Christian perfection Wesley
meant the Spirit-given ability to love God with all our
heart, soul, strength, and mind and our neighbors as
ourselves.  The central issue is the work of the Spirit in
transforming  us  (personally  and  communally,  as  the
church) into the image of Christ; of forming in us the
character of Christ, which is equivalent to the fruit of the
Spirit.  Christian perfection is having and living out "the
fullness of Christ" or "the fullness of the Spirit."
15
We are called to holiness, which means (as Wesley
often said) having the mind that was in Christ Jesus,
being conformed to his image, and walking as he walked.
This is where the salvation-healing leads, if we walk in
the Spirit.  This healing makes the church a sign and
agent of the larger, broader healing that God is bringing
in Christ through the Spirit.  
Wesley  sometimes  called  this  experience  of  the
perfecting of character "social holiness."  We should be
clear  that  by  "social  holiness"  Wesley  meant  the
experience and demonstration of the character of Jesus
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
pdf hyperlinks; pdf links
C# Image: C# Image Text Annotation Drawing & Inserting Tutorial
Q 2: I want to add a text annotation to my PDF document and I want the Q 3: Can RasterEdge C#.NET Image Text Annotation Library support adding a link to the
accessible links in pdf; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
25
Christ in Christian community, the church.  In Wesley,
"social holiness" does not mean social justice or the social
witness of the church.  That witness grows out of the
"social holiness" that is the character of the church itself
and  might  better  be  called  "kingdom  witness"  or
something similar.  Wesley was making a very specific
and essential (and often neglected) point in using the
term "social holiness":  Holiness (the character of Christ)
is not solitary or lone or individualistic sanctity but a
social  (i.e.,  relational)  experience  based  on  our
relationship  with  God  the  Trinity  and  experienced,
refined, and lived out jointly in Christian community.
Wesley was very clear on this, and it is a disservice to
Wesleyan theology to use the term "social holiness" as
equivalent  to  "social  witness"  without  at  least
acknowledging that we mean something different than
Wesley did.
16
It  seems  to  me  that  the  Wesleyan  emphasis  on
Christian perfecting has two fundamental aspects that are
key for the church
'
s effective witness:  First, we must
emphasize (and incarnate) the fact that the goal (the
telos) is  always  growing  up  into  the  fullness  of  the
character of Jesus Christ as the corporate experience of
the church and the experience of each member of the
body.  This seems to be the central import of Ephesians
4:7-16 and related passages which speak of the church as
the body of Christ, animated by and filled with the
Spirit.
Second,  we  must  stress  (and  help  Christians
experience) the fullness of the Spirit- being filled with
and walking in the Holy Spirit.  Normally, as Wesley
taught, this deeper work of the Spirit comes as a distinct
experience subsequent to conversion, though (as Wesley
acknowledged) it may be experienced more gradually or
less perceptibly and thus, no doubt, through multiple
fresh fillings (or  deeper workings)  of  the Spirit.   In
today
'
s  stress  on  character,  moral  development,  and
growth we must not lose the essential crisis and process
link.  I agree for the most part with the critique that the
19th-Century holiness movement overemphasized crisis
and underplayed process in the work of sanctification.
But today we probably are in danger of the opposite
extreme, partly in reaction to Pentecostal/ Charismatic
emphases and partly in reaction to our own history.  It
would be un-Wesleyan as well as unbiblical to lose the
crisis/process nexus.
As a practical matter of preaching, discipleship, and
growth, we need to help believers understand the deeper
life of the Spirit that is available to them in Christ.  We
should give believers opportunities to enter into that
deeper  life-to confront  the  dividedness  of  their own
hearts  and  enter  into  that  fullness,  wholeness,  and
integration  in  Christian  community  that  is  our
inheritance  in  Jesus  Christ  and  a  foretaste  of  that
communion we will enjoy in the heavenly kingdom.
This was Wesley
'
s concern, and it should be ours.
In sum:  key Wesleyan themes for Christian mission
today are the image of God, preceding grace, salvation as
healing,  and  the  perfecting  of  Christian  character.
Clearly all these themes are missional.  That is, they all
clarify  the  mission  of  the  church  and by  the  Spirit
empower  and  impel  the  church  into  mission,  into
kingdom witness.
WESLEYAN THEOLOGY AND 
CHURCH GROWTH
The implications of these themes can be drawn out in
several directions.  They not only suggest a basic theology
of mission but also give direction for issues of strategy
and methods. Clearly there are social justice implications
in all these themes, though I have not addressed them
directly.
An area where Wesleyan theology and Wesley
'
s own
ministry  provide  important  perspectives  is  church
growth, and I will address this briefly.
17
Wesley understood that the growth of the church was
connected with issues of character, discipline, and shared
Christian  experience.    A  couple  of  examples  from
Wesley
'
s Journal for 1747 are instructive.  In one place he
noted that "the [Methodist] society, which the first year
consisted of above 800 members, is now reduced to 400.
But, according to the old proverb, the half is more than
the whole."
18
On another occasion Wesley learned that
the  little  society  at  Tetney  was  giving  substantial
contributions to the poor.  The leader told Wesley, "All of
us who are single persons have agreed together, to give
both ourselves and all we have to God:  and we do it
gladly;  whereby  we  are  able  from  time  to  time,  to
entertain all the strangers that come to Tetney; who often
have no food to eat, nor any friend to give them a
lodging."
19
These accounts reveal something not only
about discipline but also about structure.  For Wesley,
growth was a function of a deeper issue:  The vitality and
character of the Christian community.
Wesley and early Methodism demonstrate a number
of dynamics which today might be called "church growth
principles."  Some examples:  (I) effectively taking the
gospel to the masses, especially the poor; (2) using and
multiplying  unordained itinerant preachers and other
indigenous leaders; (3) providing useful structures for
koinonia and discipleship through the network of class
meetings,  bands,  and  other  groups;  (4)  maintaining
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
add hyperlink pdf file; check links in pdf
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
pdf link to attached file; add links pdf document
26
accountability of designated leaders; and (5) adapting
methods and structures to the cultural patterns of the
people one is working with.
Wesley
'
s theology and practice also says something
about issues of diversity versus  homogeneity  and so-
called "homogeneous unit" thinking.  Although Wesley
did not deal with the issue directly, it seems clear both
from Wesley
'
s theology and from Scripture that faithful
churches must reject the notion that the church should
be made up of "homogeneous units" so as to speed
church growth.  The four themes discussed above could
be explored for insights in this area.  Certainly the form
of the church must not contradict the image of God in
believers and societies.  One key implication of that
teaching, as well as of God
'
s work in nature and cultures,
is the vital importance of combining, not segregating,
diversity and oneness.  As B. T. Roberts noted, the New
Testament  stresses  diversity  in  the  body  of  Christ.
"Man
'
s work is uniform.  In God
'
s work there is unity in
variety.  
Y
ou can make two buttons alike, but you cannot
find two leaves exactly alike."
20
The church affirms
diversity not as a problem but as a witness.
Wesley
'
s stress on preceding grace and on the power
of the Holy Spirit to perfect Christian character suggests
an optimism of  grace that should infuse our church
planting and discipling.  If God can transform people
into  the  likeness  of  Jesus  Christ,  he  can  build
communities  that  transcend  racial,  ethnic,
socioeconomic,  and  cultural  differences.    Wesley
'
s
conviction  that  salvation  is  healing  suggests  potent
possibilities  for  building  reconciled  and  reconciling
communities that are a foretaste of the "great multitude"
pictured in the Book of Revelation.  A hopeful sign today
is  the  growing  number  of  congregations  that  are
demonstrating  that  diverse, multiethnic  churches  can
grow healthily and reproduce themselves, just as in the
days of the early church.
21 
The New Testament gospel calls the church to be a
community of visible reconciliation.  As Rene Padilla
notes, the early apostles "sought to build communities in
which Jew and Gentile, slave and free, poor and rich
would worship together and learn the meaning of their
unity in Christ right from the start, although they often
had to deal with difficulties arising out of the differences
in background or  social status among the converts."
Clearly the apostles "never contemplated the possibility
of forming homogeneous unit churches that would then
express their unity in terms of interchurch relationships.
Each church was meant to portray the oneness of its
members regardless of their  racial,  cultural,  or social
differences."
22
Based on a study of the New Testament,
Padilla concludes:
The  breaking  down  of  the  barriers  that  separate
people in the world was regarded as an essential aspect of
the gospel, not merely as a result of it.  Evangelism
therefore involved a call to be incorporated into a new
humanity that included all kinds of people.  Conversion
was never a merely religious experience; it was also a
means of becoming a member of a community in which
people would find their identify in Christ rather than in
race, social status, or sex.  The apostles would have agreed
with [Edmund] Clowney
'
s dictum that "the point at
which human barriers are surmounted is the point at
which a believer is joined to Christ and his people."
23
For this reason the "homogeneous unit" theory of church
growth is unacceptable as intentional strategy, however
helpful  it may be in  understanding the  dynamics of
church growth in some contexts and in reminding us to
take seriously the important role of ethnicity, language,
and other cultural dynamics.
24
All  communities  by  definition  must  have  some
degree of homogeneity in order to exist. The gospel in
fact has its own principle of homogeneity, and it is called
reconciliation in Christ.  Within the church, the degree
of both homogeneity and diversity will of course vary
from place to place, depending on the cultural context, as
we see in the New Testament.
25
But the key point of
commonality, the glue that holds the church together (if
it is true to the gospel), is reconciliation through Jesus
Christ.  Based on that reconciliation, diverse persons of
diverse social situations are made one community, one
body.  This diversity-in-oneness is a key, unique feature
of the community of the King.
26
In this sense, a church
'
s
homogeneity  should  be  its  diversity.    The  key
"homogeneous principle" that unites diverse Christians is
their oneness in Christ, and a key mark of a faithful
church in most contexts is its diversity.
CONCLUSION
The themes elaborated here do not, of course, exhaust
Wesley
'
s theology and its implications for mission.  In a
holistic theology of mission more would need to be said
about  the  Trinity,  the  doctrine  of  the  church
(ecclesiology), particularly with regard to spiritual gifts
and the priesthood of believers, and the kingdom of God.
In  fact,  however,  these  themes  remained  relatively
underdeveloped in Wesley
'
s theology.
Still, there is a coherence and wholeness to Wesley
'
s
essential theology.  Mildred Wynkoop was right that his
theology is like a rotunda with many points of entry-but
all of them lead to the center, which is the love of God.
To use another image:  One can imagine a different
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
and editing functions, you can link to VB TIFF Pages Modifier. Opposite to page adding & inserting in powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding a link to a pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
27
sort  of  Wesleyan  Pentalateral,  one  that  locates  the
uniqueness and promise of Wesleyan theology on the
larger map of the various Christian traditions.  The four
outer points might be labeled Roman Catholic, Eastern
Orthodox, 
Evangelical 
Protestant, 
and
Pentecostal/Charismatic.    In  the  center  is  Wesleyan
theology, overlapping all the others and combining the
valid accents of each in a dynamic way.  And, no doubt,
having something to learn from each.
This is merely a hint, not a thesis.  I recognize that
Wesleyan theology has its own limits, both inherently
and in its various historical manifestations.  Still, I believe
there are essential biblical notes in Wesleyan theology
that the church and the world desperately need to hear
and experience.  I have lifted up the ones that seem to me
most relevant for the Free Methodist Church today.
FOOTNOTES
 I summarize this as "The Wesleyan Synthesis," chap. 11 of The
Radical Wesley and Patterns for Church Renewal (Downers
Grove, IL:  InterVarsity, 1980; Eugene, OR:  Wipf & Stock,
1996).
 Lu
¡
s Wesley de Souza, "
'
The Wisdom of God in Creation
'
:
Mission and the Wesleyan Pentalateral," in Howard A. Snyder,
ed., Global Good News:  Mission in a New Context (Nashville,
TN:  Abingdon, 2001), 138-152; Howard A. Snyder, "Is all
Truth God
'
s Truth
?
" Spring Arbor University Journal 25:3 (Fall
2001), 4-6.
 "For allowing that all the souls of men are dead in sin by nature,
this excuses none, seeing there is no man that is in a state of
mere nature; there is no man, unless he has quenched the Spirit,
that is wholly void of the grace of God. No man living is
entirely destitute of what is vulgarly called natural conscience.
But this is not natural: It is more properly termed, preventing
grace."  Wesley, Sermon 75, "On Working Out Our Own
Salvation," III.4.
 Often in Wesley one can use the terms "grace" and "love"
interchangeably, with no essential difference of meaning.  This
says much, of course, about his fundamental conception of
God.
 There is a sense in which preceding grace may become salvific,
Wesley taught, in the case of individuals who have never had
opportunity hear of Jesus but who respond in obedience to the
(preceding) grace they have received.  Thus Cornelius before
Peter
'
s preaching, though "in the Christian sense . . . then an
unbeliever," was not outside God
'
s favor.  "[W]hat is not exactly
according to the divine rule must stand in need of divine favour
and indulgence."  Wesley, Explanatory Notes Upon the NT,
Acts 10:4.  Anyone thus saved, however, is saved by Christ
'
s
atonement, even though they are unaware of it.  In these cases,
then, preceding grace becomes (in effect) saving grace.  See
Randy L. Maddox, Responsible Grace:  John Wesley
'
s Practical
Theology (Nashville, TN:  Abingdon Kingswood, 1994), 32-
34.
6
"By 
'
means of grace
'
I understand outward signs, words, or
actions, ordained of God, and appointed for this end, to be the
ordinary  channels  whereby  he  might  convey  to  men,
preventing, justifying, or sanctifying grace."  Wesley, Sermon
16, "The Means of Grace," II.1.
 Non-Christian religions are not in themselves means of grace,
but God
'
s grace to some degree works in them-if in no other
way, at least to restrain evil.  Presumably most religions are a
mixture of good and evil (as Christianity itself can be when it
becomes religion).  A pagan religion, like an individual person
or a culture, may become totally corrupt, but even there God
'
s
grace is at work, to some degree restraining evil, or finally
bringing judgment.
 Charles Wesley, "Glorious Liberty," Hymn 442 in The Hymn
Book of the Free Methodist Church, 1883.
 Maddox, Responsible Grace, 84f.  Maddox cites the dissertation
of Robert Hillman which found that in 463 references to grace
in 140 of Wesley
'
s sermons, 147 construe grace as pardon
(mercy) and 176 as power, and 140 references combine the two
dimensions.    As  Maddox  notes,  this  "two-dimensional
understanding  of grace" is  found  also  in Charles Wesley
'
s
hymns.  Maddox, Responsible Grace, 297.
10  Wesley, Sermon 12, "The Witness of Our Spirit," 15.
11  Maddox, Responsible Grace, 85.
12  See for example Luke 5:20-26, where Jesus both heals and
forgives the paralytic.
13  Philip Jenkins, The Next Christendom:  The Coming of Global
Christianity (New 
Y
ork, N
Y
:  Oxford University Press, 2002),
116.    Jenkins  documents  the  prominence  of  the  healing
emphasis in much of emerging global Christianity.
14  It seems clear to me that the terms "Christian perfection,"
"entire sanctification," and even "holiness" have always been
problematic in our tradition, even for many who  wish to
maintain, with no dilution or compromise, what Wesley taught.
15  Key passages are Eph. 3:19, 4:13, Col. 2:10, among others, and
those that speak of being filled with the Spirit, such as Eph.
5:18.
16  "Christianity is essentially a social religion; and that to turn it
into a solitary religion, is indeed to destroy it. . . . it cannot
subsist at all, without society, - without living and conversing
with other men."  Wesley, Sermon 24, "Upon Our Lord
'
s
Sermon on the Mount, Discourse IV," I.1.
17  See Howard A. Snyder, "A Wesleyan Perspective on Church
Growth
?
" Asbury Seminarian  33 (Oct. 1978), 6-10; George G.
Hunter III, To Spread the Power:  Church Growth in the
Wesleyan Spirit (Nashville, TN:  Abingdon, 1987).
18  John Wesley, Journal, Mar. 12, 1747.
19  Wesley, Journal, Feb. 24, 1747.
20  B. T. Roberts, "Officers of the Church," The Earnest Christian
29:6 (June 1875), 167.
21  See for example Manuel Ortiz, One New People:  Models for
Developing  a  Multiethnic  Church  (Downers  Grove,  IL:
InterVarsity, 1996); Stephen A. Rhodes, Where the Nations
Meet:  The Church in a Multicultural World (Downers Grove,
IL:  InterVarsity, 1998).
22  C. Rene Padilla, Mission Between the Times (Grand Rapids,
MI:  Eerdmans, 1985), 160, 167.
23  Padilla, Mission Between the Times, 166f.
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
28
24  Some church growth theorists, particularly Donald McGavran
and Peter Wagner, have advocated the so-called "homogeneous
unity principle" as a strategy in church growth.  In fact there
seems to be no such "principle" in Scripture, so this approach
might better be called the "homogeneous unit theory."
25  Note the description of the church in Antioch in Acts 11 and
13.  The church in Antioch was much more diverse than the
early Jerusalem church, yet "a great number of people believed
and turned to the Lord" and Paul and Barnabas discipled "great
numbers."   In large measure because of its diversity, now
including Gentiles as well as Jews, "The disciples were called
Christians first at Antioch" (Acts 11:21-26).
26  Diversity is as much a "mark" of the church as is unity, though
of course the precise demographic and sociological contours of
that diversity will vary greatly according to the cultural context.
(See Howard A. Snyder with Daniel V. Runyon, Decoding the
Church:  Mapping the DNA of Christ
'
s Body [Baker, 2002],
chapter 1.)  Minimally the diversity of the church will normally
include differences of age, gender, personality, and spiritual
gifts, and usually much more.  The greater the range of social
heterogeneity united and reconciled in the church, the greater
the visible social demonstration of the power of the gospel that
raised Jesus Christ from the dead.  (Thus the Antioch church
more fully demonstrated, visibly, the reconciling power of the
gospel than did the early Jerusalem church.)  It would be a
distortion of the gospel, however, to define acceptable diversity
so broadly as to include behaviors that are incompatible with
Jesus
'
teachings.
WHAT'S UNIQUE ABOUT A WESLEYAN THEOLOGY OF MISSION?A WESLEYAN PERSPECTIVE ON FREE METHODIST MISSIONS
29
M
y first reaction to the word "encounter" was
that it was too harsh and conflict-oriented. I
thought "meeting" might be better, dialogue
with, or witness to, more appropriate. But on reflection,
as I mulled over the unreached people groups and why
we should be concerned with them, as I struggled with
the whole question of the resistance to the Gospel I have
experienced from Muslims and Hindus, I became fully
conscious  that  when  we  work  with  people  of  other
religions we are dealing with a clash of worlds.  
However, sensitively,  patiently,  gently,  wisely,  and
lovingly we interact with people influenced by another
religion, unless our conversation is marked by inaccuracy
and misunderstanding, worlds will clash. We need not
espouse a confrontational strategy, we need not stage
encounters for our engagement to become an encounter-
-for there to be a clash of worlds. In fact it is our job to
work for the Christian transformation of the worlds of
religious people so that their ultimate allegiance is to God
in Christ and so that they consistently look to God in
Christ for coping with the intimate and vital issues of
their lives. But first to the clash of worlds.
1
Any adequate analysis of the religions we are likely to
encounter  in  our  mission  to  reach  unreached  and
resistant  people  with  the  gospel  must  begin  with
religion
'
s world constructing function. Religions such as
Buddhism,  Hinduism,  and  Islam  represent  not  only
confident and global interpretations of reality, but also
ways of life and not just components of life. Let
'
s look
first at a fruitful definition of religion.  
A DEFINITION OF RELIGION 
The definition I consider most adequate for religion as
we are using the word in this consultation comes from
Clifford  Geertz,  an  anthropologist  sympathetic  with
religion and experienced with Islamic societies in Asia
and Africa. I am going to read it all first and then look at
it by components to explain how it relates to our task of
reaching unreached and resistant people groups. Geertz
says religions is  a system of symbols which acts to
establish  powerful, pervasive,  and long-lasting moods
and  motivations  in  men  [people]  by  formulating
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS: 
AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
by Mathias Zahniser
30
conceptions of a general order of existence and clothing
these conceptions with such an aura of factuality that the
moods and motivations seem uniquely realistic.
2
This  definition tells  us  what category religion in
human experience across cultures fits into. It is a system
of symbols. It tells us what function sets religion apart
from other symbol systems such as art, science, ideology,
and  common  sense.
3
Religion  establishes  "powerful,
pervasive, and long-lasting moods and motivations in"
people. Geertz also tells how religion characteristically
does this. It  characteristically does this by giving  its
people a clear picture "of a general order of existence"
and it makes this "general order of existence" "seem
uniquely realistic." It creates around this vision of the
way things are "an aura of factuality."  
In other words, religion typically brings all of life
together in order to establish and reinforce a view of the
world and a way of life. It does so by such things as
symbols and such orchestrations of symbols as sacred
stories, rites of passage, festivals, pilgrimages, art, music,
commerce,  family  life,  courtship  traditions,  kinship
systems, and other features of cultural life. The result of
all these features that religion brings into play is that the
truth and way of life of a people is encompassed by "an
aura of factuality." Religion keeps the truth and the way
of life appropriate so they seem obviously true and truer
than other alternatives. So let
'
s look at these components
of Geertz
'
definition in relation to reaching unreached
and resistant peoples most of whom will be inhabiting a
world given them by their religious tradition-a world that
clashes with that of the biblical worldview. We turn now
to examining the features of Geertz
'
definition.  
A SYSTEM OF SYMBOLS
Religion is a system of symbols. Symbols with religious
significance are signs that participate in what they point
to. They are not arbitrary. The triangular shape of a yield
sign is arbitrary. But a cross participates in the death of
Jesus. And, like  other religious symbols, it  points to
something powerful, namely Jesus
'
death, in the power of
that to which it points:
4
The symbol points to the death
of Jesus or to my conversion in the power of Christ
'
s
cosmic  act  of  redemption,  or  in  the  power  of  my
transformation after a Greenville College revival in 1956.
Symbols represent both models of reality, and models for
how  people  should  respond. The  cross  models  how
deeply God loves the world. It also models how deeply I
should be committed to God.  
Symbols  include  actions  and  gestures,  such  as
kneeling  or  taking  communion;  colors  such  as  the
liturgical colors of the church year: purple, red, white,
and green; sounds, such as the recitation of the Qur
'
an
over a Cairo radio station or the chanting of the sacred
word Om by a devotee in a Hindu ashram; objects, such
as the cross, a statue of the meditating Buddha, or the
tree of life with healing leaves; events and times, such as
the  Jewish  Sabbath  and  communion  Sunday;  even
spaces, such as the Temple Mount and the Dome of the
Rock. Just about anything in God
'
s creation can serve as
a symbol: the sea participates in the immensity of the
eternal; sky speaks of the sovereignty of the Creator; fire,
water,  earth,  flowers,  leaves,  floods,  animals,  birds,
insects,  reptiles--anything--the  leather  cover  and  the
India  paper  of  your  Bible,  a  relationship  such  as  a
shepherd and her sheep. The Pulpit, the altar in your
church. A mother
'
s love. 
Y
our favorite picture of Christ.
5
Notice
:  a religion  consists  of  a system of  such
symbols  working  together  to  create  moods  and
motivations  in  people.  Religious  symbols  occur
everywhere in traditional religious societies such as those
we envision reaching with the gospel. Egyptians cover
their  Commercial  trucks  with  Qur
'
anic  and  Islamic
calligraphy. Festivals orchestrate religious symbols. Even
sports relate to the system of symbols for traditional
religious peoples. Rites of passage such as from childhood
to adulthood, from the single estate to the married state,
or from being a living human to being an ancestor on the
other side of the grave. These events that happen for the
whole society and everyone in it, make up a system of
symbols.  Obviously  any  team  wishing  to  establish
communities of  faith  in  Christ  among  resistant  and
unreached people groups needs to discern the meaning
and function of symbols among these people for symbols
are the building blocks of religious worlds.  
Furthermore,  the  people  we  seek  to  reach  must
perceive that we are sharing something of sacred and
transcendent  significance,  as  well  as  something  of
intimate and contemporary relevance. For example, one
of  my students  found that Hindus  did not perceive
Christian churches as places of worship because they
appeared to be houses for societies where membership is
restricted.
6
Moods and Motivations 
Religious systems of symbols create "powerful, pervasive,
and  long-lasting  moods  and  motivations"  in  people.
Moods are short-term feelings and attitudes created by
circumstances,  such  as  occur  at  a  singspiration.
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested