United Nations Conference on Trade and Development 
United Nations Environment Programme
CBTF 
UNEP-UNCTAD Capacity Building Task Force 
on Trade, Environment and Development
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
What developing country Governments can do 
to promote the organic agriculture sector
Prepared under the CBTF Project 
“Promoting Production and Trading Opportunities 
for Organic Agricultural Products in East Africa” 
United Nations 
New York and Geneva, 2008 
UNEP
Pdf email link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf email link; add url pdf
Pdf email link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; pdf link
ii
Note 
Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined 
with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations 
document. 
The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication 
do  not  imply  the  expression  of  any  opinion  whatsoever  on  the  part  of  the 
Secretariat  of  the  United  Nations  concerning  the legal  status  of  any  country, 
territory, city or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its 
frontiers or boundaries. 
The views expressed in this volume are those of the authors and do not necessarily 
reflect the views of the UNCTAD and UNEP secretariats. 
Material  in  this  publication  may  be  freely  quoted  or  reprinted,  but 
acknowledgement is requested, together with a reference to the document number. 
A copy of the publication containing the quotation or reprint should be sent to the 
UNCTAD  secretariat  (c/o  Administrative  Secretary,  Division  on  International 
Trade in Goods and Services, and Commodities, Palais des Nations, 1211 Geneva 
10, Switzerland). 
UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION 
Copyright © United Nations, 2008 
All rights reserved 
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
copy and email the secure download link to the assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
adding links to pdf; pdf link open in new window
RasterEdge Product Licensing Discount
s). After confirming the informations provided, we will send you an email that contains price(s) at a discount and the online order link for new licensing.
add links to pdf online; pdf hyperlink
iii
Foreword 
Organic agriculture is a production system based on an agro-ecosystem management approach that 
utilizes both traditional and scientific knowledge. 
Organic agriculture offers developing countries a wide range of economic, environmental, social and 
cultural benefits. Global markets for certified organic products have been growing rapidly over the 
past two decades. In 2006, sales were estimated to have reached some 30 billion euros, a 20% 
increase over  2005, and  are expected to increase  to 52 billion euros by 2012.  While sales  are 
concentrated in North America and Europe, production is global, with developing countries producing 
and exporting ever-increasing shares. Due to expanding markets and price premiums, recent studies in 
Africa, Asia and Latin America indicate that organic farmers generally earn higher incomes than their 
conventional counterparts.  
Modern organic techniques have the potential to maintain and even increase yields over the long term 
while improving soil fertility, biodiversity and other ecosystem services that underpin agriculture. 
Crop rotations in organic farming provide more habitats for biodiversity due to the resulting diversity 
of housing, breeding and nutritional supply. As synthetic agro-chemicals are prohibited in organic 
agriculture, its adoption can help prevent the recurrence of the estimated 3 million cases of acute 
severe pesticide poisoning and 300,000 deaths that result from agrochemical use in conventional 
agriculture every year. Organic systems have 57% lower nitrate leaching rates compared with other 
farming systems,  and zero risk of surface water contamination. In terms of benefits for climate 
change, various studies have shown that organic farming uses 20-to-56% less energy per produced 
unit of crop dry matter than conventional agriculture, and that organic fields sequester three-to-eight 
more tons of carbon per hectare. By way of example, it is estimated that converting the United States’ 
160 million corn and soybean acres to organic production would sequester enough carbon to meet 
73% of that country's Kyoto targets for CO2 reduction.  
Organic production is particularly well suited for smallholder farmers, who comprise the majority of 
the world's poor. It makes resource-poor farmers less dependent on external resources and helps them 
enjoy higher and more stable yields and incomes, which enhances food security. Moreover, organic 
agriculture in developing countries builds on and keeps alive farmers’ rich heritage of traditional 
knowledge and traditional agricultural varieties. Organic farming has also been observed to strengthen 
communities and give youth an incentive to keep farming, thus reducing rural-urban migration.  
This evidence clearly shows that organic agriculture is a promising trade and sustainable development 
opportunity and a powerful tool for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, particularly those 
related to poverty reduction and the environment. 
It was in recognition of this potential of organic agriculture that the United Nations Conference on 
Trade  and  Development  (UNCTAD)  and  the  United Nations  Environment  Programme  (UNEP) 
selected it as a priority issue to be addressed in the framework of the UNEP-UNCTAD Capacity 
Building Task Force on Trade, Environment and Development (CBTF). Since 2004, CBTF efforts 
have focused on promoting production and trading opportunities for organic products in East Africa, 
including  supporting,  in  cooperation  with  the  International  Federation  of  Organic  Agriculture 
Movement (IFOAM), the development and adoption in 2007 of the East African organic products 
standard (EAOPS). The EAOPS is the second regional organic standard after that of the European 
Union and the first ever to be developed through a region-wide public-private-NGO partnership 
process. 
A key question faced by the CBTF is what developing-country policymakers can do to best reap the 
multifaceted benefits of organic agriculture. This study attempts to answer this question. It distils the 
lessons learnt from in-depth analysis of seven country case studies, among other sources, and makes a 
RasterEdge Product Renewal and Update
4. Order email. Our support team will send you the purchase link. HTML5 Viewer for .NET; XDoc.Windows Viewer for .NET; XDoc.Converter for .NET; XDoc.PDF for .NET;
add links to pdf document; add hyperlinks to pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
add links to pdf file; add hyperlinks to pdf
iv
number of clear and actionable recommendations. Among the key challenges are to demonstrate 
compliance with the organic standards (both public and private) of the importing markets in a cost-
effective way; meet the quality and volume requirements of buyers; develop the domestic organic 
market;  and  build  farmers’  capacities  in  organic  production  techniques  and  documentation 
requirements for demonstrating compliance. 
This study recommends that developing-country Governments should generally focus on playing a 
facilitating rather than a controlling role. They should engage in dialogue with their organic sectors to 
identify their most pressing needs and consider conducting an integrated assessment of the sector. 
Integrating organic agriculture into overall agricultural policies and poverty reduction strategies, and 
building organic agriculture supply capacities through education, research, extension services, local 
and regional market development and export facilitation, are key to realizing the benefits that organic 
agriculture offers.  
The CBTF is fully committed to helping developing countries take full advantage of this exciting 
trade and sustainable development opportunity. We hope that the study will be a valuable tool to that 
end. 
Supachai Panitchpakdi 
Achim Steiner 
Secretary-General of UNCTAD 
Executive Director of UNEP 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
pdf edit hyperlink; adding links to pdf in preview
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email.
add hyperlink in pdf; add url to pdf
v
Acknowledgements 
This study was prepared by Gunnar Rundgren of Grolink AB, Sweden, under the oversight of Sophia 
Twarog (UNCTAD) and Asad Naqvi (UNEP/CBTF). National country case studies were prepared by 
the following authors: 
Patricio Parra C., consultant (Chile) 
Felicia Echeverria, Ecologica (Costa Rica) 
Mette Meldgaard, consultant (Denmark) 
M. Yousri Hashem, Center for Organic Agriculture in Egypt (Egypt) 
Ong Kung Wai, Humus Consultancy (Malaysia) 
Raymond Auerbach, Rainman Landcare Foundation (South Africa) 
Vitoon Panyakuul, Green Net (Thailand).  
Comments on  the  study were  received  from  Daniele Giovannucci  (World  Bank),  Abner  Ingosi 
(Ministry of Agriculture, Kenya) and Prabha Mahale (International Federation of Organic Agriculture 
Movements (IFOAM). 
This study was edited by Sophia Twarog (UNCTAD), Asad Naqvi (UNEP/CBTF) and Anna Griggs 
(CBTF). Michael Gibson (UNCTAD) and Ho Huilin did the language editing. Christopher Corbet 
(UNCTAD)  formatted  the  manuscript.  Diego  Oyarzun  (UNCTAD)  designed  the  cover.  Sophia 
Twarog (UNCTAD) oversaw the publication process. 
The CBTF East African Organic Agriculture Initiative was conceived and initiated under the overall 
supervision of Hussein Abaza (UNEP), Ulrich Hoffmann (UNCTAD) and Rene Vossenaar (formerly 
of  UNCTAD). The  project implementation  team  consisted of Sophia  Twarog  (UNCTAD),  Ben 
Simmons (UNEP), Fulai Sheng (UNEP), Asad Naqvi (CBTF) and Anna Griggs (UNCTAD/CBTF). 
Karim Ouahid (UNEP), Desiree Leon (UNEP), Sheila Addy (UNCTAD) and Angela Thompson 
(UNCTAD) provided administrative support. Rafe Dent administrates the CBTF website (www.unep-
unctad.org/cbtf).  
Assistance for the project concept was received from the Governments of Kenya, Uganda, and the 
United  Republic of Tanzania, as well  as  members  of  the  Kenya  Organic  Agriculture Network 
(KOAN),  the  National  Organic  Agricultural  Movement  of  Uganda  (NOGAMU),  the  Tanzania 
Organic  Agriculture  Movement  (TOAM),  other  stakeholders  from  the  three  countries,  Gunnar 
Rundgren (Grolink), Eva Mattsson (Grolink), Nadia Scialabba (Food and Agriculture Organization of 
the United Nations (FAO) and the staff of IFOAM. IFOAM, the national organic movements, the 
Governments of the three countries, the International Trade Centre (UNCTAD/WTO), the Export 
Promotion of Organic Products from Africa (EPOPA) programme and Grolink have all been valuable 
project partners. Project activities were made possible through the generous financial support of the 
European  Union,  the  Swedish  International  Development  Cooperation  Agency  (Sida)  and  the 
Government of Norway. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add link to pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source
active links in pdf; add links to pdf in preview
vi
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class.
clickable links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
application. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. C# source code is provided for .NET WinForms class. Evaluation
add hyperlink to pdf online; add links to pdf
vii
Contents 
Foreword.............................................................................................................................  iii 
Acknowledgements............................................................................................................. 
Acronyms and abbreviations...............................................................................................  ix 
Terms.................................................................................................................................. 
Executive summary.............................................................................................................  xi 
Summary of recommendations...........................................................................................  xii 
I.  Introduction and scope.............................................................................................. 
II.  Organic agriculture................................................................................................... 
  The organic market............................................................................................. 
  Certification........................................................................................................ 
  The policy environment and the development of the organic sector.................. 
III.  Summary of country case studies ............................................................................. 
  Introduction......................................................................................................... 
  Chile.................................................................................................................... 
  Costa Rica........................................................................................................... 
  Denmark.............................................................................................................. 
  Egypt................................................................................................................... 
  Malaysia.............................................................................................................. 
  South Africa........................................................................................................ 
  Thailand.............................................................................................................. 
IV.   Experiences from case studies and from other countries – recommendations .........  11 
  The early development of organic farming.........................................................  11 
  General agriculture policies................................................................................  12 
  Organic policy.....................................................................................................  13 
  Organic regulations, standards and certification.................................................  17 
  Market development...........................................................................................  26 
  Production...........................................................................................................  31 
  Training and education .......................................................................................  34 
  Research..............................................................................................................  34 
  Development programmes..................................................................................  35 
  Regional and international cooperation..............................................................  36 
References...........................................................................................................................  39 
Annexes 
1. Chile................................................................................................................................  43 
  Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  43 
  Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  43 
  Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  45 
  Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  46 
  Lessons learned...................................................................................................  47 
viii
2. Costa Rica.......................................................................................................................  49 
  Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  49 
  Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  49 
  Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  52 
 Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  55 
  Lessons learned...................................................................................................  55 
3. Denmark..........................................................................................................................  57 
 Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  57 
 Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  57 
 Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  60 
 Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  62 
 Lessons learned...................................................................................................  62 
4. Egypt...............................................................................................................................  65 
Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  65 
Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  65 
Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  66 
Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  68 
5. Malaysia..........................................................................................................................  69 
Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  69 
Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  69 
Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  71 
Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  72 
 Lessons learned...................................................................................................  73 
6. South Africa....................................................................................................................  75 
Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  75 
Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  75 
Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  77 
Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  79 
Lessons learned...................................................................................................  79 
7. Thailand..........................................................................................................................  81 
Agriculture conditions ........................................................................................  81 
Organic agriculture.............................................................................................  81 
Agriculture policy...............................................................................................  84 
Opportunities and challenges..............................................................................  85 
Lessons learned...................................................................................................  86 
8. Options for organic market regulations..........................................................................  87 
The components of organic regulations..............................................................  87 
The regulatory options........................................................................................  88 
ix
Acronyms and abbreviations 
APEDA 
Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority 
CAP 
Common Agricultural Policy (EU) 
CBD 
Convention on Biological Diversity 
CBTF 
Capacity Building Task Force on Trade, Environment and Development (a joint 
UNCTAD and UNEP initiative) 
EPOPA 
Export Promotion of Organic Products from Africa 
EU 
European Union 
FAO 
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations 
GDP 
gross domestic product 
GMO 
genetically modified organisms 
IDB 
Inter-American Development Bank 
IFAD 
International Fund for Agricultural Development 
IFOAM 
International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements
1
IOAS 
International Organic Accreditation Service 
ISO 65 
ISO/IEC Guide 65: 1996(E), General requirement for bodies operating product 
certification systems 
ITF 
International  Task  Force  on  Harmonization  and  Equivalence  in  Organic 
Agriculture (UNCTAD/FAO/IFOAM) 
KOAN 
Kenya Organic Agriculture Network 
NGO 
non-governmental organization 
NOGAMU 
National Organic Agricultural Movement of Uganda 
NOP 
National Organic Program (United States) 
OA 
organic agriculture 
OECD 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
Organic-AIMS   Organic Agriculture Information Management System (FAO) 
R&D 
research and development 
TBT 
The agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (part of the WTO agreements) 
TOAM 
(United Republic of) Tanzania Organic Agriculture Movement  
TRIPS 
The agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights 
UNCTAD 
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development 
UNDP-GEF 
United Nations Development Programme Global Environment Facility 
UNEP 
United National Environment Programme 
UNFCC 
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 
USAID 
United States Agency for International Development 
USDA 
United States Department of Agriculture 
1
A sector association with 750 member organizations in 108 countries (www.ifoam.org
).  
x
Terms 
The following terms are used in this report and in the organic sector: 
accreditation: a third-party formal recognition that a body or person is competent to carry out a 
specific conformity assessment task (in the scope of this document, certification) 
certification: a third-party written assurance that a clearly identified process has been methodically 
assessed such that adequate confidence  is  provided that specified products  conform to specified 
requirements 
European Union (EU) regulation: the regulation for marketing of organic products in the European 
Union, Council Regulation (EEC) no. 2092/91, with amendments and additional regulations 
IFOAM accreditation: Accreditation by the International Organic Accreditation Service (IOAS) of a 
certification  body  to  the  IFOAM  norms,  the  status  of  which  is  often  referred  to  as  “IFOAM 
accredited” 
ISO  65  accreditation: accreditation by a certification  body for  compliance  with ISO 65,  often 
referred to as “ISO 65 accredited” 
organic regulation: governmental rules for products marketed as organic (When there is a mandatory 
organic regulation, sales of organic products that do not fulfil the requirements of the regulation are 
unlawful. If the regulation is voluntary, producers can claim adherence to the regulation and therefore 
must  follow  the  regulation,  but  other  organic  producers  are  not  prevented  from  selling  their 
production as organic.) 
NOP accreditation: accreditation of a certification body by the USDA, having met requirements of 
the National Organic Program (NOP), often referred to as “NOP accredited” 
regulation:  the whole regulatory package, i.e. laws, decrees, regulations,  ordinances  and public 
standards, with the recognition that regulatory practices differ 
third country list: non-EU countries that have been recognized as having an equivalent organic 
regulation as the European Union, according to Article 11.1 of the EU Regulations 
Note: The terms “IFOAM accredited”, “NOP accredited” and “ISO 65 accredited” are used throughout this 
report as abbreviated forms of the more complete phrasing, such as “Accredited by the USDA to the NOP”. This 
kind of use is widespread not only in the organic sector, but also in other sectors, for example, “ISO 9001 
certified”. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested