xi
Executive summary 
The goal of this report is to give guidance to the development of appropriate policies for the organic 
sector. Its focus is mainly developing countries, particularly in East Africa, but much of it is also 
applicable  for  developed  countries.  The  report  gives  some  general  background  about  organic 
agriculture and the reasons to support the development of organic agriculture. These are among 
others:  
•  Protection of natural resources (e.g. water) and biodiversity; 
•  Improved quality of soils and thereby a long-term high productivity; 
•  Improved market access; 
•  Improved profitability in farming; and 
•  Improved health or reduced health risks for farmers, farm-workers and consumers. 
The report relates experiences from the cases of seven countries: Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Egypt, 
Malaysia, Thailand and South Africa, as well as from other parts of the world. It shows that organic 
agriculture is developing strongly in all the seven countries, despite quite different conditions and 
very different levels and kinds of government involvement. Most organic production is for export 
purposes but countries like Egypt, Malaysia and South Africa have developed substantial domestic 
markets. Malaysia is even a net importer of organic food.  
In almost all countries with an organic sector, the early drivers are non-governmental organizations 
(NGOs) and the private sector; Governments have rarely played any role in the early stages. Countries 
with a unified organic movement develop the sector quicker. Those factors should be considered 
when Governments start to engage in the sector and Governments are advised to work in close 
cooperation with the stakeholders and their organization when developing organic policies.  
Any organic policy and action plans should be linked to the overarching objectives of the country’s 
agriculture  policies  in  order  to  make  them  mutually  supportive.  The  contribution  of  organic 
agriculture to these objectives needs to be highlighted. Similarly,  the current policies should be 
assessed to understand their impact on organic agriculture ideally leading to that all obstacles and 
biases against organic agriculture be removed.  
A starting point for government engagement is to give recognition and encouragement to the organic 
sector. This also includes the recognition of the relevance of organic sector organizations and the 
close  cooperation  between  them  and  Governments.  Governments  should  take  an  enabling  and 
facilitating role rather than a controlling one. In particular, Governments should not embark on pre-
mature domestic organic market regulations which may stifle the development instead of stimulating 
it.  
 policy  process  needs  to  be  participatory  and  be  based  on  clear  objectives.  Action  plans, 
programmes and projects should develop from the overall policy. Critical for the development is that 
bottlenecks be identified and that all the various aspects of development – production, marketing, 
supply chain, training, research etc. – are considered. Training both civil servants and private sector 
actors should have high priority. Most developing  countries have limited resources and have to 
balance their resources against the needs. Therefore, priorities are called for. The adaptation of policy 
measures to the conditions in the country and the stage of development and the proper sequencing of 
measures are vital for a successful development of organic agriculture.  
The report gives a number of recommendations, listed below, divided in recommendations for:  
•  General Policy; 
•  Standards and regulation; 
•  Markets; 
Pdf reader link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding links to pdf in preview; clickable pdf links
Pdf reader link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add a link to a pdf file; check links in pdf
xii
•  Production; and 
•  Other, including training, education and research. 
In addition to the highlighted recommendations, there are many other recommendations given in the 
report. 
Summary of recommendations 
 
General policy 
1.  
AA  ccoouunnttrryy   wwaannttiinngg   ttoo   ddeevveelloopp   iittss   oorrggaanniicc   sseeccttoorr   nneeeeddss   ttoo   ppeerrffoorrmm   aann  iinn--ddeepptthh   iinntteeggrraatteedd  
aasssseessssmmeenntt  ooff  iittss  ggeenneerraall  aaggrriiccuullttuurree  ppoolliicciieess,,  pprrooggrraammmmeess  aanndd  ppllaannss,,  ttoo  uunnddeerrssttaanndd  hhooww  tthheeyy  aaffffeecctt  
tthhee  ccoommppeettiittiivveenneessss  aanndd  tthhee  ccoonnddiittiioonnss  ooff  tthhee  oorrggaanniicc  sseeccttoorr..  
2.
T
T
h
h
e
e
o
o
b
b
j
j
e
e
c
c
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
s
s
f
f
o
o
r
r
g
g
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
i
i
n
n
v
v
o
o
l
l
v
v
e
e
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
f
f
o
o
r
r
t
t
h
h
e
e
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
o
o
f
f
t
t
h
h
e
e
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
n
n
e
e
e
e
d
d
t
t
o
o
b
b
e
e
c
c
l
l
a
a
r
r
i
i
f
f
i
i
e
e
d
d
b
b
e
e
f
f
o
o
r
r
e
e
a
a
c
c
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
a
a
r
r
e
e
u
u
n
n
d
d
e
e
r
r
t
t
a
a
k
k
e
e
n
n
.
.
A
A
l
l
l
l
s
s
t
t
a
a
k
k
e
e
h
h
o
o
l
l
d
d
e
e
r
r
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
i
i
n
n
v
v
o
o
l
l
v
v
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
t
t
h
h
e
e
p
p
o
o
l
l
i
i
c
c
y
y
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
o
o
f
f
p
p
l
l
a
a
n
n
s
s
a
a
n
n
d
d
p
p
r
r
o
o
g
g
r
r
a
a
m
m
m
m
e
e
s
s
.
.
3.
G
G
e
e
n
n
e
e
r
r
a
a
l
l
a
a
n
n
d
d
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
a
a
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
p
p
o
o
l
l
i
i
c
c
i
i
e
e
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
s
s
u
u
p
p
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
e
e
a
a
c
c
h
h
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
t
t
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
g
g
r
r
e
e
a
a
t
t
e
e
s
s
t
t
e
e
x
x
t
t
e
e
n
n
t
t
p
p
o
o
s
s
s
s
i
i
b
b
l
l
e
e
t
t
o
o
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
e
e
e
e
f
f
f
f
e
e
c
c
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
p
p
o
o
l
l
i
i
c
c
y
y
c
c
o
o
h
h
e
e
r
r
e
e
n
n
c
c
e
e
,
,
e
e
s
s
p
p
e
e
c
c
i
i
a
a
l
l
l
l
y
y
i
i
f
f
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
a
a
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
i
i
s
s
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
e
e
d
d
a
a
s
s
a
a
mmaaiinnssttrreeaamm  ssoolluuttiioonn..  
4.  
AAnn  aaccttiioonn  ppllaann  ffoorr  tthhee  oorrggaanniicc  sseeccttoorr  sshhoouulldd  bbee  ddeevveellooppeedd  bbaasseedd  oonn  aannaallyyssiiss  ooff  tthhee  ssttaattee  ooff  tthhee  
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
,
,
p
p
a
a
r
r
t
t
i
i
c
c
i
i
p
p
a
a
t
t
o
o
r
r
y
y
c
c
o
o
n
n
s
s
u
u
l
l
t
t
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
,
,
a
a
n
n
e
e
e
e
d
d
s
s
a
a
s
s
s
s
e
e
s
s
s
s
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
p
p
r
r
o
o
p
p
e
e
r
r
s
s
e
e
q
q
u
u
e
e
n
n
c
c
i
i
n
n
g
g
o
o
f
f
a
a
c
c
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
.
.
T
T
h
h
e
e
a
a
c
c
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
p
p
l
l
a
a
n
n
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
s
s
t
t
a
a
t
t
e
e
m
m
e
e
a
a
s
s
u
u
r
r
a
a
b
b
l
l
e
e
t
t
a
a
r
r
g
g
e
e
t
t
s
s
f
f
o
o
r
r
t
t
h
h
e
e
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
t
t
o
o
h
h
e
e
l
l
p
p
a
a
g
g
e
e
n
n
c
c
i
i
e
e
s
s
a
a
n
n
d
d
s
s
t
t
a
a
k
k
e
e
h
h
o
o
l
l
d
d
e
e
r
r
s
s
f
f
o
o
c
c
u
u
s
s
t
t
h
h
e
e
i
i
r
r
e
e
f
f
f
f
o
o
r
r
t
t
s
s
.
.
5.
O
O
n
n
e
e
g
g
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
m
m
i
i
n
n
i
i
s
s
t
t
r
r
y
y
o
o
r
r
a
a
g
g
e
e
n
n
c
c
y
y
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
a
a
s
s
s
s
i
i
g
g
n
n
e
e
d
d
a
a
l
l
e
e
a
a
d
d
i
i
n
n
g
g
r
r
o
o
l
l
e
e
a
a
n
n
d
d
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
d
d
e
e
s
s
k
k
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
r
r
e
e
l
l
e
e
v
v
a
a
n
n
t
t
m
m
i
i
n
n
i
i
s
s
t
t
r
r
i
i
e
e
s
s
a
a
n
n
d
d
a
a
g
g
e
e
n
n
c
c
i
i
e
e
s
s
.
.
6.  
GGoovveerrnnmmeennttss   sshhoouulldd   rreeccooggnniizzee   tthhee   ddiivveerrssee   iinntteerreessttss   rreepprreesseenntteedd   iinn   tthhee   oorrggaanniicc   sseeccttoorr   aanndd  
eennssuurree  tthhaatt  aallll  ooff  tthheemm  aarree  ccoonnssiiddeerreedd  pprrooppeerrllyy  aass  wweellll  aass  ddiirreecctt  ssppeecciiaall  aatttteennttiioonn  ttoo  ddiissaaddvvaannttaaggeedd  
ggrroouuppss..  
7.
A
A
p
p
e
e
r
r
m
m
a
a
n
n
e
e
n
n
t
t
b
b
o
o
d
d
y
y
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
e
e
d
d
f
f
o
o
r
r
t
t
h
h
e
e
c
c
o
o
n
n
s
s
u
u
l
l
t
t
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
b
b
e
e
t
t
w
w
e
e
e
e
n
n
t
t
h
h
e
e
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
t
t
h
h
e
e
p
p
r
r
i
i
v
v
a
a
t
t
e
e
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
.
.
8.
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
a
a
c
c
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
l
l
y
y
c
c
o
o
n
n
t
t
r
r
i
i
b
b
u
u
t
t
e
e
t
t
o
o
a
a
w
w
a
a
r
r
e
e
n
n
e
e
s
s
s
s
r
r
a
a
i
i
s
s
i
i
n
n
g
g
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
a
a
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
l
l
l
l
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
s
s
.
.
9.  
DDaattaa  aabboouutt  oorrggaanniicc  pprroodduuccttiioonn  aanndd  mmaarrkkeettss  nneeeedd  ttoo  bbee  ccoolllleecctteedd  oovveerr  tthhee  yyeeaarrss,,  aannaallyysseedd  aanndd  
mmaaddee  aavvaaiillaabbllee  ttoo  tthhee  sseeccttoorr  aanndd  ppoolliiccyymmaakkeerrss..  
Standards and regulation 
10.
A
A
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
o
o
r
r
r
r
e
e
g
g
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
s
s
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
a
a
r
r
d
d
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
e
e
d
d
,
,
t
t
h
h
r
r
o
o
u
u
g
g
h
h
c
c
l
l
o
o
s
s
e
e
c
c
o
o
o
o
p
p
e
e
r
r
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
b
b
e
e
t
t
w
w
e
e
e
e
n
n
t
t
h
h
e
e
p
p
r
r
i
i
v
v
a
a
t
t
e
e
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
a
a
n
n
d
d
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
.
.
I
I
t
t
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
w
w
e
e
l
l
l
l
a
a
d
d
a
a
p
p
t
t
e
e
d
d
t
t
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
c
c
o
o
n
n
d
d
i
i
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
i
i
n
n
t
t
h
h
e
e
c
c
o
o
u
u
n
n
t
t
r
r
y
y
a
a
n
n
d
d
m
m
a
a
i
i
n
n
l
l
y
y
f
f
o
o
c
c
u
u
s
s
t
t
h
h
e
e
d
d
o
o
m
m
e
e
s
s
t
t
i
i
c
c
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
.
.
11.
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
f
f
a
a
c
c
i
i
l
l
i
i
t
t
a
a
t
t
e
e
t
t
h
h
e
e
a
a
c
c
c
c
e
e
s
s
s
s
t
t
o
o
c
c
e
e
r
r
t
t
i
i
f
f
i
i
c
c
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
e
e
r
r
v
v
i
i
c
c
e
e
s
s
,
,
e
e
i
i
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
b
b
y
y
s
s
t
t
i
i
m
m
u
u
l
l
a
a
t
t
i
i
n
n
g
g
f
f
o
o
r
r
e
e
i
i
g
g
n
n
cceerrttiiffiiccaattiioonn  bbooddiieess  ttoo  ooppeenn  llooccaall  ooffffiicceess  oorr  bbyy  ssuuppppoorrttiinngg  tthhee  ddeevveellooppmmeenntt  ooff  llooccaall  sseerrvviiccee  pprroovviiddeerrss..  
IInn   ssoommee   ccoouunnttrriieess,,   eessppeecciiaallllyy   wwhheerree   tthhee   pprriivvaattee   sseeccttoorr   iiss   wweeaakk,,   tthhee   GGoovveerrnnmmeenntt   ccoouulldd   ccoonnssiiddeerr  
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
i
i
n
n
g
g
a
a
g
g
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
a
a
l
l
c
c
e
e
r
r
t
t
i
i
f
f
i
i
c
c
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
e
e
r
r
v
v
i
i
c
c
e
e
.
.
12.
C
C
o
o
m
m
p
p
u
u
l
l
s
s
o
o
r
r
y
y
r
r
e
e
q
q
u
u
i
i
r
r
e
e
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
f
f
o
o
r
r
m
m
a
a
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
o
o
r
r
y
y
t
t
h
h
i
i
r
r
d
d
-
-
p
p
a
a
r
r
t
t
y
y
c
c
e
e
r
r
t
t
i
i
f
f
i
i
c
c
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
a
a
v
v
o
o
i
i
d
d
e
e
d
d
a
a
s
s
t
t
h
h
e
e
y
y
w
w
i
i
l
l
l
l
n
n
o
o
t
t
e
e
n
n
a
a
b
b
l
l
e
e
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
a
a
l
l
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
s
s
t
t
o
o
e
e
m
m
e
e
r
r
g
g
e
e
.
.
O
O
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
c
c
o
o
n
n
f
f
o
o
r
r
m
m
i
i
t
t
y
y
a
a
s
s
s
s
e
e
s
s
s
s
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
p
p
r
r
o
o
c
c
e
e
d
d
u
u
r
r
e
e
s
s
,
,
s
s
u
u
c
c
h
h
a
a
s
s
p
p
a
a
r
r
t
t
i
i
c
c
i
i
p
p
a
a
t
t
o
o
r
r
y
y
g
g
u
u
a
a
r
r
a
a
n
n
t
t
e
e
e
e
s
s
y
y
s
s
t
t
e
e
m
m
s
s
,
,
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
x
x
p
p
l
l
o
o
r
r
e
e
d
d
.
.
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator.
clickable links in pdf from word; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
accessible links in pdf; add url to pdf
xiii
13.  MMaannddaattoorryy  rreegguullaattiioonnss  sshhoouulldd  oonnllyy  bbee  ccoonnssiiddeerreedd  wwhheenn  tthhee  nneeeedd  iiss  cclleeaarrllyy  eessttaabblliisshheedd  aanndd  
ootthheerr  ssiimmpplleerr  ooppttiioonnss  hhaavvee  bbeeeenn  rruulleedd  oouutt..  IInn  tthhee  eeaarrllyy  ssttaaggee  ooff  ddeevveellooppmmeenntt,,  aa  mmaannddaattoorryy  oorrggaanniicc  
rreegguullaattiioonn  iiss  nnoott  lliikkeellyy  ttoo  bbee  aa  pprriioorriittyy..  RReegguullaattiioonnss  ffoorr  ddoommeessttiicc  mmaarrkkeettss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  bbaasseedd  oonn  llooccaall  
c
c
o
o
n
n
d
d
i
i
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
,
,
a
a
n
n
d
d
n
n
o
o
t
t
m
m
a
a
i
i
n
n
l
l
y
y
o
o
n
n
t
t
h
h
e
e
c
c
o
o
n
n
d
d
i
i
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
i
i
n
n
e
e
x
x
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
s
s
.
.
14.
T
T
h
h
e
e
r
r
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
f
f
r
r
o
o
m
m
t
t
h
h
e
e
I
I
n
n
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
T
T
a
a
s
s
k
k
F
F
o
o
r
r
c
c
e
e
o
o
n
n
H
H
a
a
r
r
m
m
o
o
n
n
i
i
z
z
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
n
n
d
d
E
E
q
q
u
u
i
i
v
v
a
a
l
l
e
e
n
n
c
c
e
e
i
i
n
n
O
O
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
A
A
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
(
(
I
I
T
T
F
F
)
)
f
f
o
o
r
r
r
r
e
e
g
g
u
u
l
l
a
a
t
t
o
o
r
r
y
y
s
s
o
o
l
l
u
u
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
,
,
i
i
n
n
p
p
a
a
r
r
t
t
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
a
a
r
r
t
t
h
h
o
o
s
s
e
e
r
r
e
e
l
l
a
a
t
t
i
i
n
n
g
g
t
t
o
o
i
i
m
m
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
a
a
c
c
c
c
e
e
s
s
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
c
c
o
o
n
n
s
s
i
i
d
d
e
e
r
r
e
e
d
d
.
.
15.
P
P
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
e
e
r
r
s
s
,
,
e
e
s
s
p
p
e
e
c
c
i
i
a
a
l
l
l
l
y
y
s
s
m
m
a
a
l
l
l
l
h
h
o
o
l
l
d
d
e
e
r
r
s
s
,
,
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
s
s
u
u
p
p
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
e
e
d
d
t
t
o
o
c
c
o
o
m
m
p
p
l
l
y
y
w
w
i
i
t
t
h
h
s
s
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
a
a
r
r
d
d
s
s
,
,
c
c
e
e
r
r
t
t
i
i
f
f
i
i
c
c
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
pprroocceedduurreess  aanndd  rreegguullaattiioonnss..  SSppeecciiaall  ccoonnssiiddeerraattiioonnss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  ttaakkeenn  ffoorr  cceerrttiiffiiccaattiioonn  ooff  ssmmaallllhhoollddeerrss..  
TTrraaiinniinngg  pprrooggrraammmmeess  ffoorr  ffaarrmmeerr  ggrroouuppss  ttoo  sseett  uupp  iinntteerrnnaall  ccoonnttrrooll  ssyysstteemmss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  ssuuppppoorrtteedd..  
16.
B
B
e
e
f
f
o
o
r
r
e
e
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
i
i
n
n
g
g
r
r
e
e
g
g
u
u
l
l
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
,
,
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
c
c
l
l
a
a
r
r
i
i
f
f
y
y
t
t
h
h
e
e
o
o
b
b
j
j
e
e
c
c
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
s
s
.
.
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
r
r
e
e
g
g
u
u
l
l
a
a
t
t
i
i
n
n
g
g
t
t
h
h
e
e
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
e
e
g
g
u
u
l
l
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
i
i
n
n
c
c
l
l
o
o
s
s
e
e
c
c
o
o
n
n
s
s
u
u
l
l
t
t
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
w
w
i
i
t
t
h
h
t
t
h
h
e
e
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
a
a
n
n
d
d
e
e
n
n
s
s
u
u
r
r
e
e
t
t
h
h
a
a
t
t
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
e
e
g
g
u
u
l
l
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
i
i
s
s
e
e
n
n
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
n
n
g
g
r
r
a
a
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
t
t
h
h
a
a
n
n
c
c
o
o
n
n
t
t
r
r
o
o
l
l
l
l
i
i
n
n
g
g
i
i
n
n
n
n
a
a
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
.
.
Markets 
17.  PPuubblliicc  pprrooccuurreemmeenntt  ooff  oorrggaanniicc  pprroodduuccttss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  eennccoouurraaggeedd,,  iinncclluuddiinngg  ffeeaattuurriinngg  oorrggaanniicc  
ffoooodd  iinn  iimmppoorrttaanntt  ppuubblliicc  eevveennttss..  
18.  CCoonnssuummeerr  eedduuccaattiioonn  aanndd  aawwaarreenneessss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  aaccttiivveellyy  pprroommootteedd..  
19.
A
A
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
o
o
n
n
(
(
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
,
,
r
r
e
e
g
g
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
o
o
r
r
i
i
n
n
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
)
)
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
t
t
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
e
e
d
d
a
a
n
n
d
d
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
e
e
d
d
.
.
20.
D
D
o
o
m
m
e
e
s
s
t
t
i
i
c
c
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
t
t
r
r
a
a
t
t
e
e
g
g
i
i
e
e
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
i
i
n
n
c
c
l
l
u
u
d
d
e
e
m
m
e
e
a
a
s
s
u
u
r
r
e
e
s
s
f
f
o
o
r
r
b
b
o
o
t
t
h
h
t
t
h
h
e
e
s
s
u
u
p
p
p
p
l
l
y
y
a
a
n
n
d
d
d
d
e
e
m
m
a
a
n
n
d
d
s
s
i
i
d
d
e
e
,
,
i
i
n
n
c
c
l
l
u
u
d
d
i
i
n
n
g
g
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
o
o
l
l
e
e
o
o
f
f
i
i
m
m
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
s
s
.
.
21.
T
T
h
h
e
e
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
z
z
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
o
o
f
f
f
f
a
a
r
r
m
m
e
e
r
r
s
s
i
i
n
n
r
r
e
e
g
g
a
a
r
r
d
d
s
s
t
t
o
o
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
i
i
n
n
g
g
,
,
j
j
o
o
i
i
n
n
t
t
d
d
i
i
s
s
t
t
r
r
i
i
b
b
u
u
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
n
n
d
d
s
s
t
t
o
o
r
r
a
a
g
g
e
e
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
ssuuppppoorrtteedd..  
22.  MMaarrkkeett  iinnffoorrmmaattiioonn  ssyysstteemmss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  eessttaabblliisshheedd..  
23.
E
E
x
x
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
c
c
t
t
i
i
v
v
i
i
t
t
i
i
e
e
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
s
s
u
u
p
p
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
e
e
d
d
,
,
r
r
e
e
c
c
o
o
g
g
n
n
i
i
s
s
i
i
n
n
g
g
t
t
h
h
e
e
s
s
p
p
e
e
c
c
i
i
a
a
l
l
n
n
a
a
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
o
o
f
f
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
s
s
.
.
O
O
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
e
e
x
x
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
e
e
r
r
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
n
n
c
c
o
o
u
u
r
r
a
a
g
g
e
e
d
d
t
t
o
o
j
j
o
o
i
i
n
n
f
f
o
o
r
r
c
c
e
e
s
s
t
t
o
o
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
e
e
a
a
n
n
d
d
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
t
t
h
h
e
e
i
i
r
r
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
t
t
s
s
.
.
24.
O
O
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
t
t
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
x
x
c
c
l
l
u
u
d
d
e
e
d
d
f
f
r
r
o
o
m
m
a
a
n
n
y
y
m
m
a
a
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
o
o
r
r
y
y
p
p
h
h
y
y
t
t
o
o
s
s
a
a
n
n
i
i
t
t
a
a
r
r
y
y
t
t
r
r
e
e
a
a
t
t
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
t
t
h
h
a
a
t
t
a
a
r
r
e
e
n
n
o
o
t
t
p
p
e
e
r
r
m
m
i
i
t
t
t
t
e
e
d
d
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
t
t
s
s
.
.
A
A
l
l
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
s
s
f
f
o
o
r
r
f
f
u
u
m
m
i
i
g
g
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
s
s
u
u
p
p
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
e
e
d
d
.
.
Production 
25.  DDiirreecctt  ssuuppppoorrtt  mmeeaassuurreess  ttoo  pprroodduucceerrss  nneeeedd  ttoo  bbee  aaddaapptteedd  ttoo  ssmmaallll  ffaarrmmeerrss  aass  wweellll  aass  ttoo  
ccoommmmeerrcciiaall  ooppeerraattiioonnss..  
26.
O
O
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
e
e
x
x
t
t
e
e
n
n
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
e
e
r
r
v
v
i
i
c
c
e
e
s
s
n
n
e
e
e
e
d
d
t
t
o
o
b
b
e
e
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
e
e
d
d
a
a
n
n
d
d
t
t
h
h
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
f
f
f
f
t
t
r
r
a
a
i
i
n
n
e
e
d
d
.
.
O
O
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
e
e
x
x
t
t
e
e
n
n
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
e
e
d
d
a
a
n
n
d
d
i
i
m
m
p
p
l
l
e
e
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
a
a
p
p
a
a
r
r
t
t
i
i
c
c
i
i
p
p
a
a
t
t
o
o
r
r
y
y
m
m
a
a
n
n
n
n
e
e
r
r
a
a
n
n
d
d
h
h
a
a
v
v
e
e
t
t
h
h
e
e
f
f
a
a
r
r
m
m
a
a
n
n
d
d
t
t
h
h
e
e
f
f
a
a
r
r
m
m
e
e
r
r
a
a
s
s
t
t
h
h
e
e
c
c
e
e
n
n
t
t
r
r
e
e
o
o
f
f
a
a
t
t
t
t
e
e
n
n
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
.
.
27.
T
T
r
r
a
a
d
d
i
i
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
k
k
n
n
o
o
w
w
l
l
e
e
d
d
g
g
e
e
a
a
b
b
o
o
u
u
t
t
p
p
e
e
s
s
t
t
c
c
o
o
n
n
t
t
r
r
o
o
l
l
t
t
r
r
e
e
a
a
t
t
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
e
e
t
t
a
a
l
l
.
.
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
s
s
u
u
r
r
v
v
e
e
y
y
e
e
d
d
a
a
n
n
d
d
b
b
r
r
o
o
u
u
g
g
h
h
t
t
i
i
n
n
t
t
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
e
e
x
x
t
t
e
e
n
n
s
s
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
e
e
r
r
v
v
i
i
c
c
e
e
a
a
n
n
d
d
d
d
i
i
s
s
s
s
e
e
m
m
i
i
n
n
a
a
t
t
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
r
r
w
w
a
a
y
y
s
s
.
.
28.  RReeccyycclliinngg  ooff  aaggrriiccuullttuurree  aanndd  ffoooodd  wwaassttee  iinnttoo  oorrggaanniicc  ffaarrmmiinngg  ssyysstteemmss  sshhoouulldd  bbee  pprroommootteedd..
29.  GGoovveerrnnmmeenntt  ((oorr  ootthheerrss))  sshhoouulldd  eessttaabblliisshh  bbaassiicc  ccoonnttrroollss  ooff  bbiioollooggiiccaall  iinnppuuttss  ssuucchh  aass  ppeesstt  ccoonnttrrooll  
a
a
g
g
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
a
a
n
n
d
d
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
f
f
e
e
r
r
t
t
i
i
l
l
i
i
z
z
e
e
r
r
s
s
.
.
30.
S
S
e
e
e
e
d
d
b
b
r
r
e
e
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
g
g
a
a
n
n
d
d
s
s
e
e
e
e
d
d
t
t
e
e
s
s
t
t
i
i
n
n
g
g
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
o
o
r
r
i
i
e
e
n
n
t
t
e
e
d
d
t
t
o
o
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
.
.
C
C
o
o
m
m
p
p
u
u
l
l
s
s
o
o
r
r
y
y
s
s
e
e
e
e
d
d
t
t
r
r
e
e
a
a
t
t
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
w
w
a
a
i
i
v
v
e
e
d
d
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
f
f
a
a
r
r
m
m
e
e
r
r
s
s
a
a
n
n
d
d
u
u
n
n
t
t
r
r
e
e
a
a
t
t
e
e
d
d
s
s
e
e
e
e
d
d
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
m
m
a
a
d
d
e
e
a
a
v
v
a
a
i
i
l
l
a
a
b
b
l
l
e
e
.
.
A
A
l
l
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
v
v
e
e
s
s
e
e
e
e
d
d
t
t
r
r
e
e
a
a
t
t
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
e
e
d
d
a
a
n
n
d
d
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
e
e
d
d
.
.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlinks pdf file; add links to pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
pdf link to attached file; pdf link to email
xiv
31.  PPoolliicciieess  ffoorr  ggeenneettiiccaallllyy  mmooddiiffiieedd  oorrggaanniissmmss  ((GGMMOOss))  nneeeedd  ttoo  eennssuurree  tthhaatt  GGMMOO  sseeeeddss  aarree  nnoott  
ddiissttrriibbuutteedd  oorr  uusseedd  iinn  aa  wwaayy  tthhaatt  ccaann  ccaauussee  ccoonnttaammiinnaattiioonn  ooff  sseeeeddss..  
Other 
32.
O
O
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
a
a
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
i
i
n
n
t
t
e
e
g
g
r
r
a
a
t
t
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
t
t
o
o
t
t
h
h
e
e
c
c
u
u
r
r
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
u
u
m
m
f
f
o
o
r
r
p
p
r
r
i
i
m
m
a
a
r
r
y
y
a
a
n
n
d
d
s
s
e
e
c
c
o
o
n
n
d
d
a
a
r
r
y
y
s
s
c
c
h
h
o
o
o
o
l
l
s
s
.
.
S
S
p
p
e
e
c
c
i
i
a
a
l
l
i
i
z
z
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
s
s
t
t
i
i
t
t
u
u
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
s
s
i
i
n
n
v
v
o
o
l
l
v
v
e
e
d
d
i
i
n
n
t
t
r
r
a
a
i
i
n
n
i
i
n
n
g
g
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
a
a
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
s
s
u
u
p
p
p
p
o
o
r
r
t
t
e
e
d
d
.
.
H
H
i
i
g
g
h
h
e
e
r
r
e
e
d
d
u
u
c
c
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
i
i
n
n
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
a
a
g
g
r
r
i
i
c
c
u
u
l
l
t
t
u
u
r
r
e
e
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
d
d
e
e
v
v
e
e
l
l
o
o
p
p
e
e
d
d
.
.
33.
S
S
p
p
e
e
c
c
i
i
a
a
l
l
r
r
e
e
s
s
e
e
a
a
r
r
c
c
h
h
p
p
r
r
o
o
g
g
r
r
a
a
m
m
m
m
e
e
s
s
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
e
e
s
s
t
t
a
a
b
b
l
l
i
i
s
s
h
h
e
e
d
d
f
f
o
o
r
r
o
o
r
r
g
g
a
a
n
n
i
i
c
c
r
r
e
e
s
s
e
e
a
a
r
r
c
c
h
h
,
,
a
a
n
n
d
d
t
t
h
h
e
e
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
bbee  iinnvvoollvveedd  iinn  pprriioorriittyy  sseettttiinngg..  RReesseeaarrcchh  aanndd  ddeevveellooppmmeenntt  ((RR&&DD))  iinn  oorrggaanniicc  aaggrriiccuullttuurree  sshhoouulldd  bbee  
ppaarrttiicciippaattoorryy,,  bbuuiilldd  oonn  aanndd  iinntteeggrraattee  ttrraaddiittiioonnaall  kknnoowwlleeddggee  ((wwhheerree  rreelleevvaanntt))  aanndd  bbee  bbaasseedd  oonn  tthhee  nneeeeddss  
o
o
f
f
t
t
h
h
e
e
p
p
r
r
o
o
d
d
u
u
c
c
e
e
r
r
s
s
.
.
34.
G
G
o
o
v
v
e
e
r
r
n
n
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
s
s
a
a
n
n
d
d
t
t
h
h
e
e
p
p
r
r
i
i
v
v
a
a
t
t
e
e
s
s
e
e
c
c
t
t
o
o
r
r
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
p
p
a
a
r
r
t
t
i
i
c
c
i
i
p
p
a
a
t
t
e
e
i
i
n
n
r
r
e
e
l
l
e
e
v
v
a
a
n
n
t
t
i
i
n
n
t
t
e
e
r
r
n
n
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
f
f
o
o
r
r
u
u
m
m
s
s
s
s
u
u
c
c
h
h
a
a
s
s
t
t
h
h
e
e
C
C
o
o
d
d
e
e
x
x
A
A
l
l
i
i
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
a
a
r
r
i
i
u
u
s
s
,
,
I
I
F
F
O
O
A
A
M
M
a
a
n
n
d
d
t
t
h
h
e
e
I
I
T
T
F
F
.
.
35.
R
R
e
e
g
g
i
i
o
o
n
n
a
a
l
l
c
c
o
o
o
o
p
p
e
e
r
r
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
i
i
n
n
m
m
a
a
r
r
k
k
e
e
t
t
i
i
n
n
g
g
,
,
s
s
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
a
a
r
r
d
d
s
s
,
,
c
c
o
o
n
n
f
f
o
o
r
r
m
m
i
i
t
t
y
y
a
a
s
s
s
s
e
e
s
s
s
s
m
m
e
e
n
n
t
t
a
a
n
n
d
d
R
R
&
&
D
D
s
s
h
h
o
o
u
u
l
l
d
d
b
b
e
e
p
p
r
r
o
o
m
m
o
o
t
t
e
e
d
d
.
.
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
create PDF document viewer & reader in ASP.NET web application using C# code. Related C# PDF Imaging Project Tutorials! Please click the following link to see
add link to pdf; pdf reader link
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; change link in pdf file
I. Introduction and scope  
This paper identifies best practices and lessons learned in countries around the world, regarding 
effective and efficient government policies and actions to promote production and export of organic 
agriculture products. The primary use of the report is as input to the CBTF project “Promoting 
Production and Trading Opportunities for Organic Agricultural Products in East Africa”. Within that 
framework,  national  policy recommendations for  organic  agriculture  are  developed  for  possible 
adoption by the Governments of Kenya, Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania respectively. 
Recommendations made may also be relevant for other countries.  
The scope of this report is organic farming and products thereof, thus it does not directly address 
issues related  to organic wild collection
2
, aquaculture and other  branches of  the organic sector. 
Nevertheless, many of the recommendations and observations have relevance for these other areas. 
Countries  are  different  and  have different  priorities,  and  their  policy choices  will  therefore  be 
different. Nevertheless, there are common elements in a good policy as well as in a bad policy. It is 
perhaps easier in some cases to recommend what not to do than what to do. Recommendations are 
made based on the assumption that Governments have identified that they should indeed promote the 
organic sector, i.e. the report is not intended to convince Governments that they should support 
organic agriculture. However, after this introduction there is an overview of organic agriculture and 
indications of reasons for Governments to support organic policy. This is followed by the introduction 
of case studies from Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Egypt, Malaysia, South Africa and Thailand. Other 
experiences  and  literature  form  the  basis  for  the  analysis  and  the  following  recommendations 
structured around main policy areas.  
Naturally, the willingness to invest in organic agriculture is also linked to the general interest in the 
agriculture sector by Governments and development partners, which is fuelled by increasing market 
demand. In many countries, and in development cooperation, the agriculture sector has been neglected 
in terms of appropriate investments, policies, private sector involvement, etc., despite the fact that 
agriculture accounts for the main employment in most developing countries. There are some positive 
signs that policymakers are once again realizing the enormous potential of agriculture for poverty 
reduction  in developing  countries. In particular for the least developed countries, all experience 
suggests that agriculture must play a leading role for development and growth. The African Union 
leaders agreed in Maputo in 2003 to “adopt sound policies for agricultural and rural development, and 
commit  ourselves  to  allocating  at  least  10  per  cent  of  national  budgetary  resources  for  their 
implementation within five years”. It is recommended that some of that is used to promote the further 
development of the organic agriculture sector. 
2
Organic wild collection is a rather important activity in a number of countries. For more information, please 
refer to the proceedings of the first IFOAM Conference for Organic Wild Production, Bosnia and Herzegovina 
4–5 May 2006, available at www.ifoam.org
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add hyperlink to pdf in; pdf links
3
II. Organic agriculture 
Organic agriculture aims at a sustainable production system based on natural processes. Key characteristics 
are that organic agriculture:  
•  Relies primarily on local, renewable resources;  
•  Makes efficient use of solar energy and the production potential of biological systems;  
•  Maintains and improves the fertility of the soil;  
•  Maximizes recirculation of plant nutrients and organic matter;  
•  Does not use organisms or substances foreign to nature (e.g. GMOs, chemical fertilizers or 
pesticides); 
•  Maintains diversity in the production system as well as the agricultural landscape; and 
•  Gives farm animals life conditions that correspond to their ecological role and allow them a 
natural behaviour.  
Organic farming is well defined in two sets of international standards, one by the Codex Alimentarius
3
and 
the other by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements, IFOAM. Organic agriculture 
has grown tremendously over the last few decades, both as a market-driven commercial production and as 
an environmentally benign production method. A number of European countries have seen a considerable 
increase in their organically farmed areas. More than 10 per cent of Switzerland’s farmland is organic, 
Sweden reached 19 per cent in the year 2005, and about 13 per cent of Austria’s farms are organic. A 
number of developing countries are showing significant rates of adoption. In Uganda there are now about 
35,000 certified organic farmers; in Mexico, nearly 120,000 small farmers produce certified organic 
coffee, cacao, fruit, vegetables, spices and staple foods (Giovanucci 2006). Uruguay has 5.1 per cent of its 
farmland under organic management (Willer and Yuseffi 2006) and Costa Rica has 2.4 per cent of its 
farmland organically managed.  
Organic agriculture is a sustainable and environmentally friendly production method, which has particular 
advantages for small-scale farmers in developing countries. Practical experiences, a large number of 
reports, and outcomes of many intergovernmental meetings have highlighted the trade and sustainable 
development opportunities offered by organic agriculture for developing country farmers, particularly 
smallholders
4
. Organic agriculture contributes to poverty alleviation and food security with a combination 
of many features, most notably by:  
•  increasing yields in low-input areas over time;  
•  conserving biodiversity and nature resources on the farm and in the surrounding area;  
•  increasing net income and/or reducing costs of externally purchased inputs; 
•  producing safe and varied food; and 
•  being sustainable in the long term.  
Most of this applies regardless of whether the production is sold as organic or not. Therefore, organic 
agriculture is promoted by  many organizations  and NGOs as appropriate for farmers producing for 
themselves or for the local market. Organic agriculture acknowledges the experiences of the farming 
communities and can build on and integrate indigenous or traditional knowledge, and thereby shows 
respect for the farmers as shapers of their future, rather than implementers of an agriculture production 
system imposed from above or from the outside.  
3
The joint FAO/WHO commission for food standards.  
4
See, for example, the UNCTAD Trade and Environment Review 2006 (UNCTAD 2006); Organic agriculture, 
environment and food security (FAO 2002); the outcomes of the UNCTAD Commission on Trade in Goods and 
Services, and Commodities in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007; the World Summit on Sustainable 
Development (2002); and the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries (2001). 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
4
In addition, if the production targets the special market for certified organic products, there are premium 
prices to earn. A recent evaluation (Forss and Lundström 2005) of the EPOPA
5
programme, as well as the 
evaluations by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) (Giovannucci 2005), show 
that the income of participating farmers can increase substantially. Certified production gives access to a 
premium market, or simply better market access. Most of the certified production in developing countries 
is intended for the export market. 
The organic market 
The market for organic products has grown rapidly since 1990 and global sales were estimated to be 
around US$ 30 billion in 2005 and US$40 billion in 2006 (Sahota 2007). The biggest market is the United 
States, followed by Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Japan and Italy. The share of organic products 
in total food sales exceeds 4 per cent in Denmark, Sweden, Austria and Switzerland, while in the larger 
markets it is about 2 to 3 per cent.
6
In developing countries, organic markets are still small, but growing, 
especially in upper-income developing countries.  
The first organic markets developed in specialized health food shops and in other non-mainstream outlets. 
This has changed over the last 15 years, and normal supermarkets, as well as “organic supermarkets” (e.g. 
Whole  Foods  in  the  United  States,  Basic  and  Alnatura  in  Germany)  in  most  countries  from  the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), sell organic products. Almost all 
major retailers and food companies in OECD countries are involved in the organic sector. In most cases, 
organic producers have  to  meet the  same  competitive parameters as their conventional  counterparts 
regarding prices, logistics and packaging. Because of the stringent organic standards, organic producers 
often have fewer problems adapting themselves to other demanding standards such as EurepGAP. For 
example, traceability has already been part of the organic certification process for decades and is not 
perceived as a major obstacle to organic producers; the fact that no pesticides are used makes it easy to 
fulfil increasing demands that no pesticides be detected in products
7
. Nevertheless, especially for small 
producers the demand for documentation and procedures in both organic and other systems can prove to be 
too demanding. In developed countries, there has lately been a move for more direct sales by small 
producers, something that has been supported by increased interest  for local and regional food  and 
discussions about “food miles”
8
.  
Organic is often promoted as a solution particular to small farmers. It is true that small farmers often have 
a production system that is closer to organic and therefore are often early adopters of organic production 
methods. However, as markets develop and the policy environment changes, large producers will also 
enter the market simultaneously with large food industries and multiple retailers. With them, the same 
pressures of competition will also be exerted on organic small farms as on their conventional counterparts. 
Organic farms in Europe, originally small farms in marginal areas, are today more or less the same size as 
conventional farms (in some countries a little smaller, in others a little bigger than average). Therefore, 
organic should not be promoted mainly as a strategy for incorporating marginalized farmers in remote 
areas in the global markets. Having said that, there are some aspects of organic farming that makes it 
particularly suited for small farms, such as low use of inputs, diversity in production system, etc. 
5
Export Promotion of Organic Production from Africa, www.epopa.info
6
The market statistics for organic products are still fairly unreliable in most countries. 
7
UNCTAD has carried out considerable research on environmental and health requirements and market access 
for developing countries. See, for example, the Trade and Environment Review 2006 (UNCTAD 2006), Food 
Safety and Environmental Requirements in Export Markets – Friend or Foe for Producers of  Fruit and 
Vegetables  in  Asian  Developing  Countries?  (UNCTAD  2007),  Codes  for  good  agricultural  practices: 
opportunities  and  challenges for fruit  and vegetable  exports  from  Latin  American  developing countries: 
Experiences of Argentina, Brazil and Costa Rica (UNCTAD 2007). 
8
“Food miles” concerns the transportation of food in the global food system, and the growing distance between 
consumers and producers. It is driven by a mixture of environmental concerns, i.e. energy consumption and 
pollution from transports, concerns for the survival of small producers also in developed countries, and the 
widening gap between consumers and producers. 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
5
Certification 
Consumers want assurance that products labelled “organic” are indeed produced according to organic 
production methods, and producers want to know that other producers also claiming to produce organic 
products are competing fairly. The “organicness” of a product cannot be established by looking at the 
harvested product or by testing it. Rather, it is ascertained through documentation and inspection of the 
whole production process. Organic certification systems were developed in the early 1970s and by the 
1980s there were organic certification bodies in most OECD countries. Today, there are 70 countries that 
have a domestic certification organization, and a dozen internationally active organizations offer organic 
certification services in virtually all countries in the world (TOS 2005).  
The policy environment and the development of the organic sector 
Organic agriculture is relevant both as a certified production method aiming at a separate marketing, as 
well as non-certified production for consumption by the farmers themselves and the local communities. In 
OECD countries, farming is assessed to cause external costs
9
ranging from US$ 30 to US$ 350 per hectare 
per year, by pollution of water and air, disease, loss of biodiversity, soil erosion, health costs, etc. (Pretty et 
al. 2000, Tegtmeier 2004). These external costs of modern farming are not incorporated into individual 
farmer decision-making, or in the prices for food. Artificially high prices for particular commodities, such 
as key cereals
10
, have discouraged mixed farming practices, replacing them with monoculture. Resource-
degrading farmers do not bear the costs of damage to the environment or economy, nor are the costs 
included in the price of food. In contrast, organic agriculture produces fewer negative externalities, and can 
restore ecosystems and deliver ecosystem services (Pretty et al. 2005). 
Farmers are, by and large, responding rationally to the conditions they work under, including the policy 
environment. Most of the policy measures used to support agriculture discourage sustainable and organic 
farming. In the short term, this means that farmers switching from high-input to resource-conserving 
technologies cannot do so without incurring some transition costs. To some extent, one can claim that the 
premium-priced organic market lets the consumers carry the burden of failures in policy. Whilst the 
organic market has been instrumental for driving the development, it is questionable in the longer term if 
consumers are willing to, or if they should, compensate for policy failures by paying higher prices for 
organic products.  
Summing up, there are a number of reasons for why a Government should support the development of a 
domestic organic sector: 
• improved health, or reduced health risks for farmers, farm-workers and consumers; 
• protection of natural resources (e.g. water) and biodiversity; 
• improved quality of soils and thereby long-term high productivity; 
• improved market access; and 
• improved profitability in farming. 
Each of these alone could also be accomplished by means other than organic farming. The strength of 
organic agriculture is that it combines and integrates solutions to so many of the pressing problems of 
agriculture. Nevertheless, for organic farming the general framework also needs to be right. If farmers lack 
access to resources such as land, organic agriculture has little to offer; if farming is unreasonably taxed, 
there is not much relief to get from organic farming; if women are discriminated against by legislation or 
customs, they are likely to be discriminated against in an organic system as well. Organic agriculture can 
therefore not be seen as a silver bullet that solves all problems in the agriculture sector.  
9
Costs that are caused by the production, but are not included in the final product price.  
10
Prices are kept high through a combination of subsidies, tariffs, export-subsidies, direct payments etc.  
6
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested