7
III. Summary of country case studies 
Introduction 
The organic policy development in seven countries was studied. The countries were selected to reflect 
a variety of conditions and stages of development and various levels of government involvement in 
the sector, from almost none (South Africa) to deep engagement (Costa Rica and Denmark). The 
cases are first briefly introduced and thereafter the experiences from them and from other countries 
are elaborated and grouped by themes. The full cases are available in Annexes 1 to 7. References to 
data in the cases are also in the annexes.  
Chile 
In Chile, organic farmland in 2004  amounted to 22,000 hectares, representing less than  half  of 
1 per cent of total farmland. Main crops produced are grapes for winemaking and fruits, olives and 
berries. Exports started in the 1990s and by 2004 had reached US$ 12 million, with the United States 
as the main export market followed by the European Union. The domestic market is not as well 
developed and is concentrated in the capital, Santiago. Organic products are sold in specialized shops, 
in supermarkets and by direct sales. There are not many direct government initiatives for organic, but 
most general programmes and institutions cater also to organic producers. A government-sponsored 
programme,  ProChile, supports export  market development for  organic products.  There are  two 
domestic certification bodies and eight foreign bodies active in Chile. Currently there is a structure for 
voluntary control of the organic exports. A governmental Chilean standard for organic production was 
established  in  1999  and an  organic mandatory regulation in 2006.  A  National  Commission  for 
Organic Agriculture has been operating since 2005 and includes participation from the private sector. 
There  is  one  Chilean  organic  sector  body  that  unifies  most  relevant  private  sector  actors. 
Collaboration between the sector and the Government is fairly developed.  
Costa Rica  
One of the developing countries with the highest proportion of organic farming, 2.4 per cent certified, 
Costa Rica has a well-developed organic sector. As in most other countries, small farmers and NGOs 
were the first to get involved in organic agriculture. Local certification bodies and academics have 
also  supported  its  development.  In  2004,  there  were  3,500  farmers  cultivating  10,800  hectares 
organically. Most certified organic production is for the export market, which is estimated to be worth 
US$  10  million.  Main  export  crops  include  coffee,  banana,  cocoa,  orange  juice,  blackberries, 
pineapple, cane sugar, aloe and other medicinal plants. In the domestic market, there is now a supply 
of most products, certified and uncertified. The domestic sales are estimated to be US$ 1.5 million. 
Lack of produce is a limiting factor for further market development. Various government programmes 
and  institutions  support  most  aspects  of  the  sector,  including  domestic  and  export  market 
development,  food  processing, credits  and  extension  service.  The  National  Organic  Agriculture 
Programme was established in 1999 and, together with the sector, the agency developed a national 
strategy for organic production based on participatory consultations. Since 2001, there has been a 
mandatory organic regulation in place and Costa Rica is the only developing country, other than 
Argentina and India, which has acquired recognition for exports of organic products to the European 
Union. There is also a governmental seal available for all certified producers; however, it is not yet 
widely recognized. There are two domestic certification organizations and four foreign ones active in 
Costa Rica, with the domestic ones having the most clients. The sector is organized through one 
organization and collaboration between the sector and the Government is very well developed.  
Denmark  
In Denmark, organic farming dates back more than 50 years. In the 1970s, the development of the 
sector gained speed and during the 1990s it increased from 500 farmers to 3,000 farmers cultivating 
150,000 hectares, or almost six per cent of the farmland. During the last five years, development has 
slowed and in 2004, 3,166 farmers cultivated 160,000 hectares. The Danish organic market is perhaps 
Pdf edit hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; add links to pdf acrobat
Pdf edit hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf email link; add hyperlink to pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
8
the most developed in the world, reaching a market share of five per cent. The domestic market has 
played an important role; however, by 2003, exports had reached around US$ 39 million (compared to 
a domestic market worth around US$ 300 million). Sales in supermarkets started in 1982 and they are 
now the main outlet for organic products. There are also substantial sales in one large box scheme
11
Denmark was one of the countries that first regulated its organic sector, in 1987, and since 1992 the 
EU regulation 2092/91 has applied. The inspection system is organized by the Government and is 
today integrated in the normal food inspection services. It is free for farmers. A public mark for 
organic products, launched in 1990, has been backed by the sector and is now widely recognized by 
consumers. Organic farming was recognized early by the Government and the rationale for support 
measures has been found in a range of agriculture policies, as well as in plans to protect the aquatic 
environment and to reduce the use of pesticides. Since 1987, there have been various forms of direct 
support for organic production, such as area payments, but there have also been substantial resources 
allocated for market development measures ranging from consumer education to support for the 
procurement of organic food by school canteens, and export promotion. The organic sector itself is 
well organized by Organic Denmark. The organic sector is mainstreamed in the sense that all the 
commercial actors involved in organics are also involved in organizations in the agriculture sector. 
The collaboration between the sector and the Government has been intensive and the sector has 
implemented many  government-supported  programmes.  Through  the Organic Food  Council,  the 
policy dialogue between the sector and the Government has been institutionalized.  
Egypt  
Organic farming in Egypt started as early as 1976 on the SEKEM farm
12
to produce organic herbs and 
essential oils for exports. In the late 1980s, the interest grew considerably. Today there are 25,000 
hectares of organic farmland in Egypt, representing 0.8 per cent of the total farmland. Most organic 
products are exported, in total more than 15,000 metric tons in 2004/05, but approximately 40 per cent 
is sold on the local market. There are two domestic bodies certifying the majority of producers and a 
handful of NGOs that are actively involved in organic farming. Seven foreign certification bodies are 
also active in Egypt. There is no organic regulation in place (a draft is being prepared). The level of 
government involvement in the sector has been fairly low, with a central laboratory for organic 
agriculture as the main institution. General policies support the reduction of the use of pesticides and 
in  five  areas  the  use  of  pesticides  is  totally  banned.  Cooperation  between  the  sector  and  the 
Government is not yet well developed.  
Malaysia 
Organic farming in Malaysia has been promoted by NGOs since the mid 1990s, and imports of 
organic products into the country occurred from before that date. The first domestic production was 
sold  through a subscription scheme that reached more than 500  families.  Today, sales  channels 
include specialized shops and supermarket chains. The turnover of organic products, mainly imports, 
was estimated at US$ 20 million in 2004 and the production at 900 hectares, mainly in fruit and 
vegetables. A large proportion of organic products are imported, whilst a small amount is exported to 
Singapore. The market is trust-based and most domestic producers are not certified. Although there is 
an official voluntary national standard for organic agriculture and the Department of Agriculture 
operates a certification system for free, no producers are yet certified. The Third National Agriculture 
Policy identified organic as a niche market opportunity, particularly for small-scale producers. The 
Government projects that the organic industry will be worth US$ 300 million and comprise 20,000 
hectares by 2010. Cooperation between the sector and the Government is not well developed. 
11
A box scheme is a marketing system where consumers order (often weekly) boxes of produce delivered to 
their homes. 
12
Recipient of the Right Livelihood Award 2004. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
pdf hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlinks to pdf online; adding a link to a pdf in preview
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
9
South Africa  
The  South  African  organic  sector  has  a  long  history.  In  1970,  organic  farmers  and  organic 
associations already existed in South Africa, and the South African Bio-dynamic Association was one 
of the five founders of IFOAM 1972. In 1990, the number of farms had reached 50 and in 1993, the 
first organic farms were certified for the export market. In 2002, the number of certified producers 
was 291 producing on 25,000 hectares. Lately, organic farming has expanded from its initial white 
background to also be seen as relevant by black South Africans. The value of the organic produce in 
South Africa is estimated to be between US$ 30 million and US$ 60 million, less than half of which is 
certified. Most of the products are exported, with Rooibos tea, organic wine and fruits as main 
products. The domestic market has developed rapidly the past five years and several supermarkets are 
actively promoting organic products. There was an attempt some years ago to create a regulatory 
framework, but that has been put on the back burner, and there is little support from the Government 
for the sector. Many NGOs and other organizations provide training and other kinds of support to the 
farmers. The sector has been divided for a long time but has lately been able to establish a unified 
sector body. Collaboration between the sector and the Government is not well developed.  
Thailand  
In  the  early  1980s,  the  Alternative  Agriculture  Network  was  founded  to  promote  organic  and 
sustainable agriculture. Certified organic farming has taken place since the early 1990s, driven by a 
combination of efforts by the private sector and NGOs. In the mid 1990s, a domestic certification 
body  was  established  by  the  private  sector.  There  are  almost  14,000  hectares  under  organic 
management, representing less than 0.1 per cent of the total agricultural land and 2,500 farms are 
certified. Rice  is the  dominant  crop, followed by  fruits and  vegetables. Most organic  produce, 
especially rice, is exported, mainly to Europe. Most of the vegetables are sold locally. In 2004, many 
organic  brands  were  available  in  small  shops  and  in  mainstream  supermarkets,  particularly  in 
Bangkok, where there is a wide range available, both domestically produced and imported. The 
domestic market for certified organic products is estimated to be just below US$ 1 million and the 
non-certified and health food market is estimated to be US$ 75 million. Apart from the initial private-
sector certification body, the Department of Agriculture also offers free certification through an 
agency. Half  of the producers are certified by  foreign certification bodies. There is a voluntary 
government standard for organic production and a governmental programme for accreditation of 
certification  bodies.  The  central  Government  has  recently  adopted  a  programme  for  organic 
development, including massive investments in the production of biofertilizers. The royal family has 
promoted self-sufficient sustainable agriculture and the Royal Project has recently started organic 
production. One province has embarked on a large-scale organic project. The sector has a number of 
organizations but not one uniting body. Collaboration between the sector and the Government is still 
weak. 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers
add hyperlink pdf; pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package
add links to pdf in acrobat; adding links to pdf
10
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
add url link to pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
add email link to pdf; change link in pdf
11
IV. Experiences from case studies and from other countries – 
recommendations 
In this chapter, the experiences from the case countries and other countries
13
are discussed and some 
conclusions are drawn. Recommendations for policy are formulated when applicable. It should be 
kept  in  mind  that  a  viable  organic  sector  will  not  necessarily  emerge  just  because  the  policy 
environment is the right one, but that good policies will provide a good foundation for the organic 
sector to grow. Each country is unique and therefore policy measures cannot be copied from one 
country to another. The recommendations try to balance the need for guidance with the need to 
maintain flexibility. When developing most policy, the process itself is important, both to get the 
policies right, and to get the energy and the support for the chosen policies. The recommendations are 
intended to focus Government and other authorities’ actions, but many of them will have to be carried 
out in concert with the stakeholders to be effective. In addition, international, foreign or domestic 
development agencies and their programmes greatly influence agriculture development and many of 
the recommendations are also applicable to them.  
The early development of organic farming 
In all cases presented, as well as in almost all countries, the early development of organic farming has 
been  initiated  by  either  NGOs  or  by  private  companies,  sometimes  both.  In  many  developing 
countries, organic agriculture has been promoted by NGOs as an appropriate technology for small-
scale farmers, emphasizing its low use of inputs, its independence from agro-business and its care for 
natural resources rather than market potential. Lately, many NGOs have also initiated marketing 
initiatives, presumably to include economic sustainability in their strategies. In a few countries, e.g. in 
Eastern Europe, the drive to develop organic agriculture has emanated from universities and similar 
institutions, while in most countries the  research establishment has been  firmly  against  organic 
production, which is seen as (and sometimes is) a challenge to the research establishment
14
The first organic markets in developed countries were developed by farmers’ cooperatives and small 
pioneer companies. In some cases, e.g. in Denmark, France, Japan and the United States, there was 
also very close collaboration with consumer cooperatives. The private companies getting involved in 
organic markets in developing countries represent a mix of small pioneer organic companies and 
larger, often multinational companies. In Thailand, the first commercial production of organic was 
initiated by the country’s biggest rice exporter. In many markets, transnational retail chains are the 
first ones to sell organic on a large scale, often in the form of imports from their “home” market. In 
most OECD countries, the domestic market has played an important role, while the commercial drive 
in most developing countries has come from export markets, with Malaysia as an exception.  
With increasing urban migration of males from many communities, agriculture is experiencing an 
increased “feminization” (Giovanucci 2005). From many farm households, it has been reported that 
the woman has initiated the process for conversion to organic, often because of health concerns over 
pesticide use. All over the world, women are taking a leading role in the development of organic, as 
farmers, as consumers or in the organization of the organic sector, e.g. in Thailand and Malaysia, 
many of the pioneer traders have been female.  
Government has played very little or no role in the early development process. In some cases, 
governmental policies were clearly detrimental to the sector (which often challenged these policies); 
in other cases, the sector was just neglected. In some countries, the Government took a relatively early 
interest in the sector, e.g. in Denmark by the mid 1980s, or in Cuba
15
from early 1990s, while in 
13
In particular Uganda, Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania, the countries in focus of the CBTF project 
for which this report was produced.  
14
Proponents of organic farming question the research oriented to the use of chemical fertilizers, GMOs and 
pesticides, which often constitute a considerable part of agricultural research.  
15
When supplies of cheap synthetic inputs from the Soviet block dried up (combined with the United States 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Signatures. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark
add a link to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
adding hyperlinks to pdf; adding a link to a pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
12
others, e.g. in  South  Africa,  there  is  still  very little  government  involvement.  In  some  OECD 
countries, mainly in Europe, “environmental payments” in various forms, mainly as area payments, 
have become an important factor for the growth of the sector. This has in particular had a large impact 
in areas where agriculture is extensive. Many countries have developed a substantial organic sector 
even if organic has been disregarded by the Government. This appears to be more articulated in 
countries with more “liberalized” farm sectors, as the organic development is not as dependent on 
active government endorsement as it is in countries where Government is a strong actor. For example, 
Uganda has the largest organic sector in Africa, with an estimated growth of 60 per cent per annum, in 
spite of an “apparent policy vacuum” (Tumushabe et al. 2006), and in Kenya the environment of free 
enterprise since the early 1990s created favourable conditions for development (Kimemia and Oyare 
2006).  
General agriculture policies 
Most countries have approached organic as an interesting market niche (e.g. Malaysia), and have not 
considered that it could play a role for overall agriculture development. The same country that is 
promoting GMOs, e.g. the United States or Argentina, can at the same time allocate substantial 
resources to organic
16
. This is perhaps a reasonable approach for a country with limited ambitions for 
organic. However, if the purpose is to promote large-scale adoption of organic agriculture, then the 
general agriculture policies need to be assessed to what extent they are encouraging, are neutral or are 
biased against organic agriculture.  
Governments often subsidize input distribution systems and grant tax exemptions for conventional 
inputs, which represent a bias against organic methods
17
. E.g. in Zambia, the Government spends 0.7 
per cent of the gross domestic product (GDP) on fertilizer subsidies, 70 per cent of which is used by 
the country’s commercial farmers, who could afford to pay full market price (World Bank 2001). 
Some countries, e.g. South Africa, promote the introduction of GMOs; research and extension are 
oriented to conventional production; prominent representatives of Government encourage farmers to 
use more inputs or to ”modernize” their production. All these work against organic agriculture and the 
introduction  of  other  environmentally  benign  methods.  In  other  cases,  market  regulations  and 
monopolies, such as the Kenya Coffee Board (Kimemia and Oyare 2006), make marketing of organic 
products difficult.  
Also, in more indirect forms, organic is influenced by issues such as land tenure and splitting of 
holdings. Organic farming represents a major investment in a piece of land, and it is not likely to be of 
interest for farmers that are squatting or otherwise have less secure tenure, something reported from 
Malaysia. In this context, the situation for women farmers also needs to be considered. The national 
implementation of the agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), 
the biosafety protocol, the recognition of the value of traditional knowledge and other policies also 
have implications for organic, positive or negative. This report does not go into detail over those 
aspects. 
In few countries has there been any systematic adaptation of the overall agriculture policies to cater to 
the development of the organic sectors. On the contrary, most countries appear to go on with their 
general policies in ways  not  supportive  of organic. Several countries have general policies  that 
address issues of relevance for organic, i.e. reduction of pesticides (Denmark, Egypt), protection of 
soil  and  biodiversity,  developing  small-scale  farms  (Costa  Rica,  South  Africa),  and  decreasing 
dependency on imported fertilizers (Thailand). When organic is clearly linked to such general goals, it 
blockade), Cuba was faced with a situation of food shortages, and embarked on an ambitious programme to 
promote and develop organic production.  
16
The Argentinean Government has supported organic agriculture since the early 1990s, in particular various 
export initiatives. It was also one of the first countries to negotiate an equivalence agreement with the EU for its 
organic products.  
17
Strong lobbies currently try to reintroduce large-scale fertilizer subsidies in Sub-Saharan Africa, claiming they 
are necessary to accomplish the Millennium Development Goals.  
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
13
appears to be easier to get direct policy support, which has been documented in the cases from Chile, 
Costa Rica, South Africa and Denmark. 
Even if the Government is not embarking on an ambitious agenda for organic, the knowledge of how 
organic is affected by the overall policies will assist the design of appropriate measures for organic. 
For example, in the European Union the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP), through price support 
and support  for quantities, has clearly favoured  conventional farming over organic. The special 
support measures for organic merely compensated organic farmers from the discrimination by the 
CAP
18
. Some Governments are heavily promoting other quality schemes, both towards farmers and 
consumers, e.g. Green Food is promoted in China, and pesticide-free farming in Thailand. While there 
are good intentions behind those efforts, in reality they often work against organic in the marketplace 
(competing with  the attention  of consumers  and shelf space) as  well as in  the competition  for 
government resource allocations.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
.
.
 country  wanting  to  develop  its  organic  sector  needs  to 
perform  an  in-depth  integrated  assessment  of  its  general  agriculture  policies, 
programmes and plans, to understand how they affect the competitiveness and the 
conditions of the organic sector.  
Organic policy 
Objectives for organic agriculture 
The reasons why Governments support organic vary. In some cases, e.g. Chile, it is clearly income 
generation through exports that is seen as the main point; in Malaysia, it is rather the development of a 
profitable domestic market niche and substitution of imports. In Denmark, Costa Rica and South 
Africa, the key objectives are to protect the environment and promote rural development through 
organic farming. In a number of countries, the reasons to support organic and the objectives of policy 
measures are not so well spelled out, which can lead to misunderstanding and frustration among those 
responsible and in the sector itself. It is worthwhile to clarify explicitly what an organic policy is 
supposed to achieve – both for the private sector and for the Government itself. Is it to boost export 
markets? Is it to protect the environment? Is it to develop the local market? Obviously, the appropriate 
policy measures will be different for these different goals. Different stakeholders will have different 
objectives and it is important to reconcile these as much as possible.  
The case studies, e.g. from Denmark, Costa Rica, South Africa and Thailand, show that it is important 
to link the organic development to general objectives for agriculture in the country. These can be 
issues such as: 
•  Increased income to the agriculture sector; 
•  Protection of environment, e.g. water; 
•  Protection of biodiversity; 
•  Strengthening the competitiveness of small-holders; 
•  Protection of human health; 
•  Increased exports; and 
•  Promoting quality over quantity as a market strategy. 
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
.
.
The objectives for government involvement for the development 
of  the  organic  sector  need  to  be  clarified  before  actions  are  undertaken.  All 
stakeholders should be involved in policy development and development of plans and 
programmes.  
18
The CAP has slowly been reformed in a way that this discrimination is reduced, most recently by the 
Mid-Term Review.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
14
Mainstreaming organic 
The  most  conducive  policy  framework  is  obtained  when  organic agriculture  is recognized  and 
integrated in  main policies of  the country,  e.g. the agriculture policy,  food and health policies, 
environmental policies and poverty eradication policies. Through that organic is mainstreamed and 
will  be  considered  in  main  programmes  and  in  budget  allocations.  However,  even  when  such 
integration is accomplished, there are merits to formulate one consistent organic policy, to ensure that 
all the needs of the sector are properly addressed.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
3
3
.
.
General and organic agriculture policies should support each 
other to the greatest extent possible to promote effective policy coherence, especially if 
organic agriculture is promoted as a mainstream solution.  
Organic action plans  
Following an overall policy direction with clear objectives, the implementation of an organic action 
plan is a logical step
19
. The scope of the plans varies, but they typically include aspects of standard 
and regulations, market development, production issues, capacity-building and research. As important 
as the plan itself, the process to develop the plans is critical. An organic action plan should be based 
on a proper assessment of the existing state of the sector and identified bottlenecks, and be formed 
with  intensive  participation  from  the  sector,  such  as  in  Costa  Rica.  Also,  various  government 
departments or agencies need to be involved, from agriculture, trade, and environment, etc.  
National or regional action plans for organic food and farming have been developed in most EU 
member  states  (e.g.  Austria,  the  Czech  Republic,  Denmark,  Finland,  France,  Germany,  the 
Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and regions of Ireland, Italy, Spain (Andalusia) and the 
United Kingdom), with plans also under development in Slovenia and for the whole of Spain. These 
action plans normally include targets for adoption and a combination of specific measures, including 
direct income support through the agro-environment/rural development programmes; marketing and 
processing support;  certification  support; producer  information  initiatives (research, training  and 
advice); consumer education; and infrastructure support. The more detailed plans contain evaluations 
of the current situation and problems faced by the sector and specific recommendations to address the 
issues  identified,  including  measures  to  ameliorate  potential  conflicts  between  different  policy 
measures. (Lampkin, Gonzalvez, Wolfert and Schmid 2004).  
Danish action plans 
Denmark has the longest history of policy support for organic farming, with the first measures introduced in 
1987. The first Danish Action Plan of 1995 covered the period until 1999. Its target of 7 per cent by 2000 was 
almost achieved, with 6 per cent of agricultural land in Denmark certified in 2000. Action Plan II (Danish 
Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries, 1999) aimed for an increase of 150,000 hectares, to around 
12 per cent  of agricultural land, by 2003. The plan was drawn up by the Danish Council for Organic 
Agriculture, a partnership between Government, organic producer organizations, conventional farming groups, 
trade unions, and consumer and environmental groups. It is characterized by an in-depth analysis of the 
situation in Denmark and represents the best-developed example of the action plan approach, containing 
85 recommendations targeting demand and supply, consumption and sales, primary production, quality and 
health, export opportunities, as well as institutional and commercial catering. The plan has a specific focus on 
public goods and policy issues, with recommendations aimed at further improving the performance of organic 
agriculture with respect to environmental and  animal health and welfare  goals, including research  and 
development initiatives, administrative streamlining and policy development. However, the targets set for 2003 
were not accomplished, and the organic land area has stabilized at around 6 per cent. (Lampkin, Gonzalvez, 
Wolfert and Schmid 2004). 
19
It is a matter of governance style and tradition if the policies themselves will include detailed actions or if the 
policy is more general and concrete actions are formulated in an action plan. It also relates to the decision-
making processes involved. If the policies are set in the parliament, it is likely to be better to have the action 
plan separate and approved by the relevant Ministry or the Government. 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
15
Targets 
Of the seven country cases, only Denmark and Malaysia have formulated clear targets for their 
organic sectors. A number of other countries have set area targets, e.g. Sweden decided 1995 that by 
the year 2000, 10 per cent of its farm land should be organic and when that was accomplished set a 
new target of 20 per cent for 2005, which was almost accomplished. Germany has set the official 
target that 20 per cent of its land shall be organic by 2010. The state of Sikkim in India has set a target 
that 100 per cent of its agriculture should be organic. Setting clear targets will focus the responsible 
agencies on their tasks, and bring energy into the sector. Targets and how they are set can sometimes 
give side effects that are less desirable. For example, area targets focus on the conversion of land and 
not on market development or production. Combined with subsidies per hectare, they are likely to 
result in high conversion rates by farmers in low-productive areas having a production system very 
close to organic in the first place and little conversion by intensive producers, those producing most 
products and the ones likely to cause environmental problems.  
Brazilian Government sets sights high for organic agriculture 
Brazilian Minister of Agriculture Roberto Rodrigues announced in his keynote speech at Biofach America 
Latina in 2005 the establishment of a government seal guaranteeing the origin and quality of organic 
agricultural products, placing Brazil in a competitive position to access international markets. Rodrigues said 
that the seal will help to facilitate the identification of organic products that currently are certified by private 
standards. According to the Minister, organic agriculture in Brazil represents less than 3 per cent of total 
agricultural production in the country. “There is enormous room for growth (in the organic sector), and we 
intend to achieve 20 per cent organic in next the five to six years, stimulated mainly by small producers,” 
Rodrigues affirmed (IFOAM 2005). 
Sequencing measures 
One  policy  measure  may  be  excellent  at  a  certain  stage  in  development  and  useless  or  even 
counterproductive in another. This is shown most clearly in relation to regulations regarding standards 
and conformity assessment infrastructure. To install an organic regulation such as the EU regulation 
in a country where there are no domestic certification organizations, or where most organic producers 
cannot afford certification, or where the Government does not have the resources to execute the 
necessary supervision to approve certification bodies, local market development becomes impossible 
instead of enabled. Similarly, initiating consumer education campaigns about the benefit of organic 
food, if not available in the marketplace, is likely to cause frustration rather than development. Also, 
efforts  to enhance supply can be detrimental if  there is no demand.  Commercial  production  of 
biofertilizers will not be meaningful if there are no farmers to buy them, or no need for the products. 
In  the  initial  stages,  efforts  should  focus  on  basic  production  issues,  extension  service  and 
organization of producers.  
Implementation 
As  important as having  proper  objectives, policies  and plans  is making  sure  they  are properly 
implemented. Most countries have very limited resources available to support the organic sector and 
most of the time  it is not highest  on  Governments’ lists  of priorities. Also, in some countries, 
implementation of many agricultural programmes is delegated to regional levels. In such cases, it is 
important that these levels are engaged and motivated. To assign one agency, normally within the 
ministry of agriculture, to take the lead and have responsible desk officers in other relevant ministries 
and agencies gives a good administrative frame for further development of the sector. 
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  44..  An action plan for the organic sector should be developed based 
on analysis of the state of the sector, participatory consultations, a needs assessment 
and proper sequencing of actions. The action plan should state measurable targets for 
the organic sector to help agencies and stakeholders focus their efforts.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
16
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  55..  One Government ministry or agency should be assigned a 
leading role and organic desks should be established in other relevant ministries and 
agencies.  
Involving and organizing the stakeholders 
The countries that have developed their organic sector the most have had a participatory policy 
development with close interaction between the Government and the sector. In both Denmark and 
Costa Rica, the Government has actively supported the sector’s organization and its participation in 
the policy formation process. In several of the other cases, there appears to be little collaboration, 
which often also leads to failure of policies. For example, the voluntary official standards for organic 
in Chile, Thailand and Malaysia do not seem to have been in any direct use.  
The organic sector develops by the actions of individuals and entrepreneurs. Initially, they often 
challenge official policy. Once there is openness and an interest from Government to support organic 
farming, it is essential that this support is developed in close dialogue with the organic sector. Not all 
countries have a unified organic sector  or movement,  and in  some countries  there are apparent 
conflicts  between  organic  groups.  This  reduces  the  sector’s  own  ability  to  work  towards  joint 
objectives, and it also makes it difficult for the Government to consult with the private sector. Chile, 
Costa Rica and Denmark report one organic sector body which in the case of Denmark and Costa Rica 
has gotten substantial support from the Government. To get the sector well organized and unified is of 
course  mainly its  own  responsibility,  but Governments  can  stimulate this and  in particular  not 
stimulate the opposite (by favouritism or just ignorance).  
A government policy process should ensure that all aspects of organic farming are addressed, and are 
inclusive. Consideration should also be taken for the different abilities of stakeholders to participate in 
consultations, e.g. distance to the capital, economic resources to travel and participate in meetings, 
and limits in communication infrastructure. Gender aspect and the situation of indigenous people 
should also be considered.  
In  some  of  the  countries,  e.g.  Denmark,  the  organic  sector  implements  many  of  the  public 
programmes, strengthening cooperation. In some countries, e.g. Chile, Denmark and Costa Rica, 
permanent structures for the consultations between Government and stakeholders are established. 
They have proven to be very useful. 
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
6
6
.
.
Governments should recognize the diverse interests represented 
in the organic sector and ensure that all of them are considered properly as well as 
direct special attention to disadvantaged groups.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
7
7
.
.
A permanent body should be established for the consultations 
between the Government and the private sector. 
Awareness raising 
Apart from regulations, plans and programmes, Government and especially its highest representatives 
play a big role in forming public opinion and in raising awareness of organic farming on all levels. In 
Costa Rica and Denmark, substantial efforts have been undertaken by Government and the private 
sector in cooperation to promote organic farming to farmers, consumers and the trade. When the 
minister of agriculture, environment or trade speaks up in favour of organic farming, this sends a 
strong message which will encourage those who want to move the organic agenda ahead, within and 
outside the Government. These kinds of statements are also the normal precursors to a real policy 
development.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  88..  Governments should actively contribute to awareness raising for 
organic agriculture on all levels.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested