pdfsharp table example c# : Add a link to a pdf application Library tool html asp.net web page online UNCTAD_DITC_TED_2007_33-part406

What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
17
Data 
The demand for data about the organic sector is high for marketers, researchers, extension services 
and ultimately Governments. In most countries, including developed countries such as  the United 
States, there is no central collection even of basic data such as the number of farmers and what they 
grow
20
.  A  country with  only one  certification body (e.g.  Denmark  or Norway) will more  or  less 
automatically get a lot of relevant data collected in one place, but it is not always the case that the data 
is made available. Costa Rica collects data for production, but market figures are based on estimates 
from  an  NGO. Export market data is often easier  to collect, especially as the certification  bodies 
normally issue transaction certificates for each lot, and therefore all trade is documented. Egypt and 
Chile can produce fairly accurate data for exports, but not for the domestic market. In unregulated 
markets, or markets where there is no common definition of organic, such as Thailand and Malaysia, 
an additional complication for data collection is the question “Who is really organic?” FAO collects 
data  in  the  Organic  Agriculture  Information  Management  System  (Organic-AIMS)  available  at 
www.fao.org/organicag
, and IFOAM annually publishes the World of Organic Agriculture, both of 
which are dependent on submissions by individuals from the countries. A consortium of institutions is 
attempting  to  develop  a  European  Information  System  for  Organic  Markets.  Ultimately,  any 
Government that wants to develop the sector needs to assure baseline data and a system to monitor the 
development of the sector. Initially, this is likely to be best achieved through the organic movement in 
the country, and Governments should consider supporting them in their data collections. When the 
sector is more developed, measures to include “organic” data in public agriculture statistics should be 
considered. 
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  99..  Data about organic production and markets needs to be 
collected over the years, analysed and made available to the sector and policymakers.  
Organic regulations, standards and certification 
Standards 
There  are  currently  two  international  standards  for  organic  agriculture,  the  Codex  Alimentarius 
Guidelines for the production, processing, labelling and marketing of organically produced foods (GL 
32 – 1999, Rev. 1 – 2001) - CAC/ GL32 
21
- and the IFOAM Basic Standards (published as part of the 
IFOAM Norms, latest revision July 2005
22
). There are perhaps 70 countries with some kind of official 
standards and another 100 private sector standards. Most of the standards are quite similar. Some of 
them clearly reference the mentioned international standards (e.g. the Indian regulation is basically 
identical to the IFOAM standards of 2002, the Brazilian regulation uses the list of inputs from Codex, 
Malaysia’s standards reference both), but a number of them also reference other foreign standards, in 
particular the EU regulation (e.g. South Africa).  
Of the case studies, Costa Rica, Chile and Denmark have mandatory organic standards, i.e. standards 
that have to be followed by anyone who markets organic foods. In Costa Rica, private bodies also 
have their  own  standards. Chile  has  had a voluntary official standard since 1999,  which  became 
mandatory  in  2006.  In  Thailand,  there  are  both  private  standards  and  voluntary  governmental 
standards. In Malaysia there is a voluntary official standard, but most certified products are imported 
and  certified to the  standards  of  the  exporting  country.  There  is  no indication that  the voluntary 
official  standards  are  in  much  use.  At  the  same  time,  the  South  African  standard  for  organic 
agriculture has been drafted since 2001 but was never approved by the Government; nevertheless, the 
standard is actively used in the domestic market in South Africa. In Egypt, products are certified to 
the EU regulation, and to various private sector standards in the European Union – a few also to local 
standards. In all the countries, producers for exports normally follow and are certified for conformity 
to the export market standard. Even in Denmark, producers wanting to export to the United States 
have to follow the NOP rather than the EU regulation. The cases highlight the fact that standards 
20
For United States organic acreage, in February 2006 it was only possible to get data from 1997 and 2003. 
21
Available at http://www.codexalimentarius.net/download/standards/360/CXG_032e.pdf
22
Available at http://www.ifoam.org/about_ifoam/standards/norms.html
Add a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
Add a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf document; pdf edit hyperlink
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
18
development cannot be done in isolation from market realities. A standard that is not demanded in the 
marketplace has no value and can even create confusion and be an impediment to development.  
Whether through mandatory regulation, voluntary public programmes or by the private sector, one 
organic standard that is applied by all organic producers, certified or not, helps to build energy and 
joint activities in the sector. It also facilitates extension and information to producers and consumers 
alike.  It  can  also  form  the  basis  for  a  common  mark,  one  of  the  success  factors  for  market 
development. In order to ensure that the standard is actively used, the full participation of the organic 
sector is needed. Also, there is a need to be clear about the scope of the standard and its intended use: 
is it for the domestic market, the export market or both? How will it apply to imported products? It 
should be recognized that for export markets, the simplest solution is to follow the standards of those 
markets, and that standards in importing countries can be too demanding for the domestic situation. 
For  organic production, it  is widely  recognized  that local conditions vary  too much to have  one 
detailed international standard (UNCTAD-FAO-IFOAM 2005). The use of foreign organic standards 
is convenient for trade, but most of the time definitively not for the producers, and in particular not for 
smallholders. It is, of course, preferable to have a single standard that applies equally for domestic and 
exports,  but  in  reality  it  often  means  that  the  practical  choices  are either  to  adapt  the  domestic 
standard so much to the exports that it is not any more appropriate for the local conditions or that 
export access is made impossible because the standard does not fulfil the requirements of importing 
markets
23
Brazilian organic movement and the internal market 
The Brazilian organic movement is concerned that organic regulation should be adapted to the country’s 
geographic, climate, social, political and economic environment. It should not create internal barriers by 
adopting  international  standards  established  mostly  by  high-income  countries. At  present,  a  Brazilian 
organic  producer  wishing  to export  must follow  the  importing  country’s  regulations.  Consequently,  a 
Brazilian regulation is not necessary for exports. Instead, its purpose should be to develop a strong organic 
internal market (Fonseca 2006). 
Government  can  support  the  development  of  a domestic  (or  regional,  as  is  shown  later)  organic 
standard.  It  is  recommended  that,  initially,  such  a  standard  be  voluntary.  Regardless  if  it  is  a 
governmental standard or a private sector standard, the stakeholders and especially the practitioners 
should be heavily involved in the development of organic standards. If the standards are private, the 
Government should participate as an important stakeholder. It is also recommended that the initial 
standard be developed with local market development in mind, and that it is not too demanding and 
relatively easy to apply by producers and to verify by certification bodies or by other mechanisms. If 
national standards are supposed to also apply for imports, they should reference Codex and IFOAM 
standards as a basis for import acceptance. 
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  1100..  A national or regional standard for organic production should be 
developed, through close cooperation between the private sector and Government. It 
should  be  well  adapted  to  the  conditions  in  the  country  and  mainly  focus  on  the 
domestic market.  
Certification 
Third-party certification has been a very important tool for the development of the organic market. 
Through  certification,  organic  products  are  given  a distinct  credible  image,  which  is  particularly 
useful in marketing situations with a distance between producers and consumers, e.g. sales through 
supermarkets  and  in  international  trade.  However,  there  is  no  direct  evidence  that  third-party 
certification is what the market or the consumers really ask for, and other kinds of quality assurance 
23
It obviously depends heavily on the attitude of the importing country how significant the differences may be 
between the standard of the importing exporting country, and still be considered to be equivalent.  
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C#
add hyperlink in pdf; add links to pdf online
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add link to pdf file; clickable links in pdf files
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
19
mechanisms might also be useful. For international markets, certification can be considered a must as 
all major markets require certification for products marketed as organic. 
There are 70 countries that have a home-based organic certification organization. Most of Africa and 
large  parts  of  Asia  still  lack  local  service  providers.  There  are  only  seven  certification  bodies 
established in Africa: in South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania and Egypt. 
Asia has 117 certification bodies, but 104 of these are based in China, India or Japan. Most Latin 
American countries have domestic certification bodies (see table 1). 
Table 1. Organic certification bodies 
Number of organic certification bodies 
2005 
2004 
2003 
Africa
24
Asia 
117 
91 
83 
Europe 
157 
142 
130 
Latin America and Caribbean 
43 
33 
33 
North America
25
84 
97 
101 
Oceania 
11 
11 
10 
Source: TOS 2005. 
In all seven case studies, there are domestic certification service providers. In all of them, foreign 
bodies  also  offer  certification.  Domestic  bodies  normally  dominate  the  certification  for the  local 
markets, while the foreign ones are oriented towards the export market sector. Certification services 
are  available  globally.  For  export  purposes,  the  simplest  solution  is  to  buy  the  services  from 
international certification bodies. However, there are merits in a domestic certification body. Locally-
based bodies often play a big role in the local development of the sector and for the formulation of 
locally-adapted standards. A branch of a foreign body is rarely engaged in local development in the 
same way, and as the service they offer is mostly for the export market, they have little interest in 
developing the local market. For producers wanting to access the home market, the only certification 
thus available is to foreign standards and at a cost level more adapted to the export sector. In some 
regards,  a  local  body  can  also  exercise  more  efficient  controls;  only  an  organization  with  local 
presence can follow the market on a day-to-day basis and react quickly to important developments – 
such  as  disease  outbreaks,  government  pesticide  distribution  programmes  –  that  can  affect  the 
certification (Rundgren 2005). Government can support capacity development for local certification 
bodies. This has been done e.g. in India, where the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export 
Development Authority (APEDA), organizes training for certification bodies. 
Cost of certification is often quoted as an obstacle, especially for small producers, and sometimes also 
requirements such as documentation. Certification costs often represents somewhere between 1 and 4 
per cent of the  value  of  the  products,  but  can  go  even higher.  Moreover,  they  apply  also  to  the 
conversion  (transition)  period  when producers  cannot yet  sell  their products as organic. In many 
projects  in  developing  countries,  certification  costs  are  paid  for  in  whole  or  subsidized  by 
development projects or in a few cases by exporters or importers. (Damiani 2002, Giovannucci 2005, 
EPOPA  2006).  In  many  EU  countries,  as  well  as  in  the  United  States,  there  are  government 
programmes  to  support  certification  costs.  In  Denmark,  Thailand  and  Malaysia  government 
certification is for free for the farmers and in Tunisia the Government covers up to 70 per cent of 
certification costs (Belkheria and Kheder, 2006). In China, companies that are certified can get up to 
24
The change between the years is only reflecting a difference in classification as regards to what constitutes a 
certification body and what is just a local agent.  
25
When the United States NOP was implemented, the number of certification bodies increased, as a number of 
new  organizations  started  to  offer  the  service.  However,  over  the  years  they  realized  that  the  organic 
certification market was not lucrative, and accreditation requirements were too demanding, so they consequently 
opted out of the certification business. The same pattern can be seen in Japan in 2006.  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding an email link to a pdf; pdf link to specific page
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add link to pdf acrobat
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
20
US$ 4,000 from the state Government
26
. Were premium prices to fall, costs for certification would 
need to be further considered.  
Private or governmental certification? 
In most countries, certification is provided as a private sector service. However, in a number of states 
of the Unites States, and in Malaysia, Thailand, Denmark, Finland and China, there are governmental 
certification services. The experiences and success of such governmental service seem to differ and it 
is  hard  to  make  any  generalized  statement  about  whether  this  service  should  be  private  or 
governmental. There are a number of potential advantages with private certification services such as 
competition, service orientation, better links to the organic sector, etc. However, there are also merits 
in a governmental certification system, mainly its stability and its automatic “acceptance” as being 
independent.  
When Governments supervise and approve private bodies with the purpose of reaching equivalence, 
for example with the European Union, they will have to invest considerable resources. They have to 
train staff and develop systems. In contrast, a direct governmental certification organization will not 
be requested by trade partners to have external approval or accreditation
27
. If the sector is small and 
there is not a market for more than one or two certification bodies, then the resources spent for the 
total quality assurance system will be considerably less with a direct governmental certification than 
with private bodies that are approved by the Government, as the latter creates an additional layer of 
costs.  
It  should  be  noted  that  government  certification  bodies  often  have  problems  when  it  comes  to 
cooperation with private sector bodies in other countries, i.e. it is often difficult, formally but also 
conceptually, for government bodies to enter into e.g. multilateral recognition agreement with private 
entities  in  other  countries  or  to  submit  themselves  to  the  private  sector  IFOAM  Accreditation 
Programme. Some Governments may also have a credibility problem, i.e. that importing countries 
actually have less confidence in a government service than a private sector service, e.g. because of 
fear of corruption. The situations where there is considerable scope for government certification is in 
particular where the Government has a strong agenda for organic, but where the private sector is weak 
and where there is no certification service offered for producers for the local market. Government 
certification would allow the private sector to focus on market development and other pressing issues. 
Governments should be aware that there are greater expectations that certification shall be provided 
for free or for a very low cost (for the farmers) if performed by Government, something that is also 
reflected in the fact that most countries having government certification provide it for free or for a 
subsidized cost.  
Participatory quality assurance and other non-third-party quality assurance systems 
Brazil and Bolivia (Fonseca  2006, TOS 2006) accept so-called “participatory certification” within 
their regulatory systems. This is also under consideration in Costa Rica. It is a system for certification 
that emphasizes the participation of stakeholders, including producers, in contrast with the “objective 
and independent” approach favoured under international norms (IFOAM 2004). IFOAM uses the term 
“Participatory Guarantee System” to make a clearer distinction. They are often specifically designed 
for  small  producers.  The  standards  used  are  often  the  same  as  for  the  third-party  certified 
production
28
. These and other non-third-party quality assurances are now spreading quite rapidly in 
developed and developing countries alike. These systems often address not only the quality assurance 
of  the  product,  but are  linked  to  alternative marketing  approaches (home  deliveries,  community-
supported agriculture groups, farmers’ markets, popular fairs) and help to educate consumers about 
products grown or processed with organic methods. Also from Thailand and South Africa (EPOPA 
26
Wei Hua, personal message Feb 2006. 
27
However, many countries with governmental certification chose to also establish accreditation mechanisms, 
e.g. the United States, Thailand and China. 
28
For the time being, there are no international norms for what constitutes such a participatory guarantee 
system, and the variation in how they operate is high.  
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add links in pdf; add links pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding links to pdf document; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
21
2006c), such alternative systems are reported. It is important that Governments do not, through overly 
rigorous regulations, inhibit this development, as formal certification may not be what is demanded in 
the domestic market.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
1
1
.
.
Governments  should  facilitate  the  access  to  certification 
services, either by stimulating foreign certification bodies to open local offices or by 
supporting the development of local service providers. In some countries, especially 
where  the  private  sector  is  weak,  the  Government  could  consider  establishing  a 
governmental certification service.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  1122..  Compulsory requirements for mandatory third-party 
certification should be avoided as they will not enable other alternatives to emerge. 
Other  conformity  assessment  procedures,  such  as  participatory  guarantee  systems, 
should be explored.  
Organic regulations  
In a few countries and in some states in United States, Governments became involved in the 1980s in 
establishing  a  regulatory  framework  for  the  organic  market  in  order  to  protect  consumers  from 
misleading claims and producers from unfair competition. The European Union established an organic 
regulation in 1991
29
and the United States in 2002
30
. By 2005, 70 countries had organic regulations in 
various stages of implementation (see table 2). The first regulations normally contained some basic 
production  standards and very simple rules for certification, if any. Regulatory objectives such as 
strengthening the competitive position of domestic producers, increasing farm income, and protecting 
the environment, have been added to the initial ones relating to truthful labelling. Most notably, in the 
European Union, the regulation for organic marketing also forms the foundation for directed support 
to organic farmers under the agro-environmental programmes of the Common Agriculture Policy. 
Table 2. Overview of countries with organic regulations 
Region 
Fully implemented  Final not implemented  In draft 
EU-25 
25
Rest of Europe 
6
5
Asia and Pacific 
7
1
Americas and Caribbean 
3
5
Africa 
1
1
Middle East
1
-
Total: 60 
43
12
16 
Source: Commins, 2004 and Kilcher et al. 2006. 
When they start to get interested in organic agriculture, most Governments embark on an “organic 
regulation”. Of the seven cases, Denmark has had a mandatory organic regulation since 1987, Costa 
Rica since 2001. Chile and Egypt are in the process of establishing their regulations, also mandatory. 
In Thailand  and Malaysia, Governments  are  pursuing voluntary regulations while in South Africa 
there is no regulatory activity. These regulations are typically market regulations that try to limit the 
use of a word, ”organic”, to products produced according to standards set by the Government and 
certified by an organization approved by the Government. In OECD countries, these regulations are 
often, but not always, triggered  by  a  concern for  the domestic market, while in  most  developing 
countries, they have been installed mainly, and in some cases apply only, for exports. The main push 
for organic regulations comes from producers or organic certification bodies that want to have fair 
competition; consumers are rarely involved.  
29
Council Regulation (EEC) 2092/91. 
30
National Organic Program (7 CFR Part 205)12. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add url pdf; c# read pdf from url
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
pdf link open in new window; pdf link
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
22
Three main reasons are quoted for why mandatory regulations are considered to be the right policy 
response to develop the organic sector: 
•  giving organic agriculture a more respectable and credible image; 
•  access to export markets; and 
•  development of the local market. 
Giving credibility to the sector 
It is quite obvious  that the introduction of an organic regulation means an official  recognition  of 
organic, that will strengthen the sector, make it visible and credible and remove some biases against 
organic both  in  the public and  privates sectors. Once  the Government  has  acknowledged  organic 
farming through an organic regulation, it is hard to ridicule or ignore organic farming. However, a 
mandatory regulation is not the only way for a Government to accomplish this.  
Export market access 
The European Union, Japan and the United States have implemented systems for import approval of 
organic products. As these are based on mandatory governmental regulations, it can be assumed that 
the easiest way to get access to these markets is to implement similar systems also in the exporting 
country and through equivalence get market access. However, in all three markets very few products
31
enter the markets through an equivalence agreement. Not even between these three markets is there 
any equivalence agreement: Japan has granted limited equivalence to the European Union and the 
United States, while neither the European Union nor the United States has granted any equivalence to 
the others. Some countries have been granted equivalence by the European Union based on export 
regulations, i.e. the use of the claim organic has not been regulated in the domestic market. Australia 
and Argentina are two such countries. To negotiate equivalence is very resource-demanding and time-
consuming (UNCTAD-FAO-IFOAM 2007). Of the countries studied, only Costa Rica
32
has managed 
to  get limited EU approval
33
and Denmark has managed to get  limited recognition by the United 
States
34
.  
The main way for products to get access to the United States and EU markets, is by certification by a 
certification organization that has got acceptance in those markets (Bowen 2004)
35
. The case studies 
also show that exports of organic products are flowing from the countries without regulations, e.g. 
Chile,  Egypt,  Thailand  and  South  Africa.  In  addition,  there  are  promising  markets  for  organic 
products, which do not have mandatory regulations, such as South Africa, New Zealand, the Gulf 
States, Malaysia, Singapore and the Russian Federation. The recent change
36
of the EU regulation on 
organic  will  also  make  it  easier  for  certification  organizations  to  get  direct  recognition  by  the 
European Union regardless if there are regulations in the country of operation or not.  
Regulation  is  seen  as  a  tool  for  assisting  organic  producers  to  access  export  markets  through 
equivalence agreements, but the real need is not obvious. In any case, it is not a quick solution (e.g. 
Chile applied for EU recognition 2000 and this is still pending) and it is very resource consuming. 
Often, the result of national regulation is just another layer of complication for producers, who apart 
from  having to  fulfil the export market  requirements, now  also  must fulfil a  domestic  regulation. 
31
In the EU, the estimate is that less than 20 per cent of the imported products come from approved countries, in 
Japan even less. 
32
Of developing countries, the EU has since 1994 only approved Argentina and Costa Rica, and lately India.  
33
This approval is partial, i.e. not all producers certified in Costa Rica are accepted, only those certified by two 
(of a total of six) named certification bodies.  
34
The Danish authorities have the mandate to certify producers to the NOP, i.e. the Danish system itself is not 
recognized – only the ability of the inspection service to control production to the United States rules.  
35
The details of the import  regulations in  the United States, the EU and Japan are complicated  but well 
explained in other papers and therefore not expanded on here. In addition, the EU and the Japanese systems are 
in a process of change.  
36
Council regulation (EC) no. 1997/2006, of 19 December 2006.  
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
23
Finally, there is no need to make a mandatory regulation if the aim is to support the export sector; it is 
sufficient to make a governmentally-supervised system for export marketing of organics. The key to 
export  market  access  lies  in  competent  and  qualified  certification  organizations  and  efforts  to 
strengthen them should have priority.  
Development of domestic markets 
The  demand  for  a  domestic  organic  regulation  would  arise  from  any  of  these  situations  or  a 
combination of them:  
•  The marketing of many different organic products claiming adherence to different standards 
and thereby creating confusion in the marketplace; 
•  The widespread selling of non-organic products as organic in the marketplace, i.e. fraud or 
consumer deception; 
•  Lack of confidence in the credibility of organic products by consumers; and 
•  Lack of confidence in the credibility of organic products by organic producers, fearing that 
they compete with other organic producers that are not following the same standards.  
Some believe that consumers will not trust organic products unless the Government has set standards 
and a mandatory system of certification; this is also expressed in some of the case studies. However 
there is little empirical evidence for this assumption. Until 2001, the United States market for organic 
products  developed  to  a  US$  7  billion  value  without  a  federal  regulation  in  force  (there  were, 
however, several state regulations). Also, the EU countries had developed quite an organic market in 
the  early  1990s, at  a  time  when  only Denmark  and  France had  national regulations.  Looking  at 
European Union (EU-12) averages for the period 1989–1991 (when there was no regulation), 1992–
1994  (just  after  the  EU  regulation  was  implemented)  and  1995–1997  (when  there  were  ample 
subsidies  allocated  to  organic  farming),  we  see  that  the  total  growth  of  land  under  organic 
management during these three-year periods were as follows: 
•  1989
1991 
107 per cent; 
•  1992
1994 
60 per cent; and 
•  1995
1997 
70 per cent. 
Because of the weakness of the data, it is difficult to draw any far-reaching conclusion, but in any 
case there is little support for the opinion that on an EU-wide level, the introduction of the regulation 
dramatically  changed  the  market  conditions,  or  the  spread  of  organic  farming.  Comparisons  of 
Denmark and France with early regulations (mid 1980s) with Sweden and Italy (with regulations from 
1995 and 1992 respectively) also show no direct positive impact of regulation on the development of 
the sector (Rundgren 2002).  
From the case studies, it is hard to conclude anything about the merits of a mandatory regulation for 
domestic market development. Only Denmark and Costa Rica have mandatory regulations, and there 
is no indication that the domestic market in Costa Rica therefore is more dynamic than the domestic 
markets  in Egypt, Thailand, Malaysia or South Africa. Nevertheless, it sounds plausible that  in a 
situation  with  real  market  confusion  and  widespread  fraud,  in  countries  with  a  general  high 
confidence in Government, that a domestic market regulation might be of some use. Still, also in 
countries with regulations in place for 10 years, there is consumer scepticism about the reliability of 
organic  products  and  there  is  also  fraud.  In  countries  with  a  widespread  scepticism  against 
Government, one might even see some negative reactions on a governmental regulation
37
.  
37
In the United States, there have lately been expressions from some organic activists that the USDA has “sold 
out” organic to big industry, etc.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
24
An  additional  market  development  aspect  regarding  organic  regulations  has  been  that  in  some 
countries other regulations may have impeded on the right to market a product as organic, e.g. the 
wine  classification  system  in  France,  pasta classifications  in  Italy and  meat labelling rules in  the 
United States didn’t allow any further quality claims regarding a product than those defined by law. 
An organic regulation has been important in order to clear those obstacles. Obviously, there are other 
regulatory solutions to this situation than an organic market regulation, e.g. that the regulation causing 
the problem in the first place is amended. 
Alternatives to mandatory organic regulations 
There  are  several  regulatory  options  to  protect  the  consumers  and  organic  producers  from  false 
marketing claims. Most countries already have regulations regarding truthful labelling and prevention 
of consumer deception. Such rules can also be applied to organic claims. Since there are both Codex 
Alimentarius and  IFOAM international  standards  available,  it  is  quite  simple to clarify  (either  as 
amendment to existing regulation or as instructions to the supervising authority) that in order for a 
product  to  be  sold  as  “organic”,  it  has  to  be  produced  according  to  internationally-recognized 
standards. Another option is to use regulation to back a voluntary national standard (private or public). 
Such  a  regulatory  solution  can  either  include  requirements  for  certification  or  other  conformity 
assessment methods, or leave that open. This option is also trade friendly and will allow imports with 
a minimum of official procedure.  
If the country embarks on a mandatory organic regulation, it is of critical importance that such a 
regulation  is  “farmer-friendly” and  “trade-friendly”. In some  countries with mandatory regulation, 
there  are  special  rules  for small  farmers,  e.g.  in the  United  States NOP,  farmers  selling  organic 
products  for  less  than US$ 5,000  annually  are  exempt from  certification,  i.e. they can make  the 
organic  claim, they have  to  follow the  standards  but don’t  have  to be  certified.  A  badly drafted 
organic regulation will most likely do more harm than good. To “import” an organic regulation, for 
example from the European Union, is not likely to be successful as stated in the case study from 
Thailand. In Annex 8, a number of regulatory options are further developed. 
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
3
3
.
.
Mandatory regulations should only be considered when the need 
is clearly established and other simpler options have been ruled out. In the early stage 
of  development,  a  mandatory  organic  regulation  is  not  likely  to  be  a  priority. 
Regulations for domestic markets should be based on local conditions, and not mainly 
on the conditions in export markets.  
Implementation 
There  is  widespread  underestimation  of  the  time  and  resources  needed  to  put  in  place  organic 
regulations. In many countries (e.g. the United States and Brazil), the process from the original act or 
standard until all pieces are put in place has taken 10 years. Many countries have passed mandatory 
regulations on organic, but then failed to implement them. This is worse than having no regulation at 
all, as an unimplemented mandatory regulation puts everything in limbo. If there is a law that requires 
mandatory certification for  organic products, governmental standards and government approval  of 
certification  bodies,  no  organic  marketing  can  take  place  unless  all  these  components  are 
implemented. A domestic certification body can’t develop its business as they are not yet approved, 
producers can’t apply for certification if the standards are not yet defined, and the Government can’t 
approve certification bodies until it has established its supervision and approval system. All these 
things also need budget allocation and trained staff. Lack of implementation is reportedly the main 
factor for  why countries fail  to get approval  as a  third  country by the European Union (Crucefix 
2007).  
Government  should  also  consider  working  with  and  using  existing  institutions,  e.g.  instead  of 
establishing  a  resource  demanding  national  accreditation  system  for  organic,  Governments  may 
choose to work with the International Organic Accreditation Service, an offshoot of IFOAM. This can 
be  for  the  whole  accreditation  service  or  for  the  technical  assessment  parts  of  the  accreditation 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
25
process. Such cooperation with international  organizations can also contribute to  increased export 
market access. 
Imports 
As soon as there is an organic market, there will also be imports of organic products
38
. Governments 
are  encouraged  to  ensure  that  requirements  for  imports  comply  with  the  TBT  agreement.  The 
International Task Force on Harmonization and  Equivalence in  Organic Agriculture  (ITF), a joint 
initiative of UNCTAD, FAO and IFOAM, is in the process of developing useful recommendations for 
how an organic regulation can be developed, based on international standards and being enabling both 
for domestic markets and for international trade. Some of the recommendations are: 
  The organic production standards should be equivalent to a single international “reference” 
standard (such as IFOAM or Codex Alimentarius); 
It should use international requirements (standards) for conformity assessment; 
Mutual recognition between certifiers and accreditors should be recognized in the regulatory 
systems; and 
Redundancy in conformity assessment (certification and accreditation) can be largely reduced 
by one audit/inspection/evaluation leading to multiple approvals.  
The producers of goods that are imported are almost never consulted as stakeholders in the regulatory 
process, and in many cases national producers are outright hostile to imports. Therefore, there is an 
apparent  risk  that  imported  products  will  be  discriminated  against  in  regulations.  Some  national 
regulations  that seem  to  be  developed  primarily  to satisfy export market access can in  their turn 
become  major  hurdles  for  imports.  For  example,  the  Chinese  regulation  for  organic  has  set  the 
standards for production so high that they should comply with the total requirements of the United 
States, the European Union and Japan. However, this will also apply to imports to China, which in 
this case establishes the highest entry barrier of them all (Ong 2006). For imports, instead of setting 
up complicated procedures for approval of imports, certification bodies can be entrusted to assess to 
what extent imports follow requirements equivalent to the domestic ones.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
4
4
.
.
The  recommendations  from  the  International  Task  Force  on 
Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture (ITF) for regulatory solutions, 
in particular those relating to import access, should be considered. 
Assisting producers to comply with requirements 
The ability of farmers to comply with standards and certification requirements is often low. Simple 
“instructions” should be developed by Government or NGOs where the organic “dos and don’ts” are 
presented in a way that is accessible for small-scale, often illiterate, producers, e.g. in pictorial form. 
Ensuring proper understanding and assistance in implementation to low-resourced farmers is likely to 
contribute to a more credible organic market, as many of the violations of organic standards emanate 
from misunderstandings or lack of information.  
Group certification is a concept developed over the last 10 to 15 years to allow producers to organize 
themselves  in  groups  with  an  internal  control  system.  It  is  not  formally  recognized  in  most 
regulations, however through a consultative process by IFOAM, it has reached more or less global de 
facto acceptance, at least for producers in developing countries. With group certification, the role of 
the external certification is mainly to verify that the internal control of the group is working rather 
than inspecting the individual farmers. All cases except Chile and Denmark have systems for group 
certification.  Through  group  certification,  producers  can  get  access  to  and  assistance  in  the 
complicated organic certification. It can also result in substantial savings, e.g. in Costa Rica there can 
be a difference in costs of several hundred dollars for a small farm. However, there are substantial 
38
See in the section on market development about some of the merits of imports of organic products.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
26
demands for qualification and resources at the group level, which pose limitations to its applications. 
IFOAM has developed a guide for the management of internal control systems and training manuals
39
In some places, e.g. in South Africa, these organic internal control systems are merged with other 
quality management systems (e.g. EurepGAP) and training programmes are developed.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
5
5
.
.
Producers,  especially  smallholders,  should  be  supported  to 
comply with standards, certification procedures and regulations. Special considerations 
should  be  taken  for  certification  of  smallholders.  Training  programmes  for  farmer 
groups to set up internal control systems should be supported.  
Market surveillance 
Assuming that the main reason to regulate the organic sector is to reduce fraud in the marketplace and 
the misuse of organic claims by non-organic producers, it is remarkable that most organic regulations 
have their emphasis in regulating the certified organic farmers, and that most of them are not clear 
about the responsibility for market surveillance. Also regarding implementation, in most countries the 
main resources are allocated to check the organic farmers and the certifiers, and very little resources 
to check the marketplace. The market knowledge rests mainly in the sector itself and organic actors 
will in most cases be the first ones to detect a scam or false claims. Therefore, it is recommended that 
Governments work closely with the private sector to develop the market surveillance, regardless of 
which regulatory framework is chosen.  
Setting the objectives – agreeing on the problems 
Before  embarking  on  regulatory  initiatives,  Governments  and  the  private  sector  should carefully 
assess the situation and see what added value a regulation can bring. It is important that that there are 
common objectives agreed upon and that there is a joint analysis of what the main problems to be 
solved are, and to what extent these problems can be solved by regulations, or by other means. For 
example,  and  as mentioned  already, access to export markets is  most  often not  achieved just by 
making a regulation. For another example, there is often the perception that there is a lot of fraud or 
false organic products sold, but the question is if that is really the case or if this perception is rather a 
result of lack of cooperation and transparency in the sector. Further, it is obviously an illusion that 
fraud will disappear just because there is a regulation in place
40
. It is important that the impact of the 
regulation on all organic stakeholders is assessed and not only on the strongest lobby group, and that 
all stakeholders participate in the consultations.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  1166..  Before establishing regulations, Government should clarify the 
objectives. Governments regulating the sector should develop the regulations in close 
consultation  with  the  sector  and  ensure  that  the  regulation  is  enabling  rather  than 
controlling in nature. 
Market development 
While there is, and has been for a long time, an underlying growth of 10 to 30 per cent in most 
countries, some countries, e.g. the United Kingdom, experience periods of rapid increase maybe up to 
50 to 60 per cent for a few years – often linked to a food scare – and then a  couple of years of 
stagnation. People have sometimes unrealistic expectations of the organic market. The organic market 
is a quality market in a way that the lower grades often are impossible to sell as organic (unless for the 
feed  market or industrial use). The very top-end qualities (e.g. the finest wines, coffees, teas and 
cheeses) at the same time, sell on other quality parameters than being organic, and the added value of 
them being certified organic is fairly small.  
Some crops are very easy to convert to organic production; perhaps they are already grown in systems 
close  to  organic,  e.g.  small-holder  coffee  in  most  of  Africa  or  extensive  olive  groves  in  the 
39
Available at www.ifoam.org
40
There are clearly incidences of fraud also in the regulated markets. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested