pdfsharp table example c# : Add links to pdf online software application dll windows winforms wpf web forms UNCTAD_DITC_TED_2007_34-part407

What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
27
Mediterranean. In those cases, the supply can increase rapidly and the demand doesn’t keep pace. 
However, after a while, prices might go down or new or bigger actors join the market and a new 
balance is reached. Some markets, such as the organic cotton market, were flat for almost 10 years but 
recently picked up.
41
All in all, organic markets should not be taken for granted and sufficient research 
should be conducted, and marketing activities planned, before major initiatives are taken to increase 
supply.  
Domestic markets 
All  of  the  countries  studied  except  Denmark  have  a  market  share  for  organic  that  is  far  below 
1 per cent. In developing countries, one should have realistic expectations about the domestic market 
for organic foods or for any other foods that command a premium prices. Nevertheless, it is clearly a 
myth that all consumers in developing countries are optimizing their food expenditure to get as much 
energy and nutrients as possible per money unit. A look at the sales of sodas, beer, coffee, sugar and 
other luxury products, or at the health food sector, clearly shows that there are, even in the poorest 
countries,  enough people who can afford to spend something extra on their food, to cater for the 
development of a premium organic market.  
Experience show that the initial market for organic products will be found mainly in the upper end of 
the market. Does this mean that organic products should be reserved for an affluent minority? The 
price of organic products is high mainly as a result of very limited supply and inefficient distribution 
rather than high costs of production. When supply grows, prices to consumers will fall. Also, as was 
pointed out in the introduction, pricing is influenced by the agriculture policies, in essence subsidizing 
conventional  products.  Organic  production  is  not  necessarily  more  expensive  than  conventional 
production.  If  one takes  into account the normally  higher  nutritional value and higher  dry-matter 
content of organic food, organic products may be more affordable. Therefore, organic foods should 
not be seen as food for the rich, even if the starting point in the marketing often is to supply the upper 
end of the market. 
In Denmark, 5 per cent of the food sales are organic, while in Chile, the domestic sales are very small. 
In Costa Rica the domestic sales were worth US$ 1.3 million 2003 and in Egypt 40 per cent of the 
production  is  sold  in  the  country.  Organic  imports  are  reported  from  Malaysia,  Thailand  and 
Denmark. Specialized shops and farm-gate sales are often the first ways to sell organic. Supermarkets 
were instrumental in the development of organic markets, especially in Northern Europe, and also in 
most developing countries supermarkets are picking up organic products. This is also reported from 
East Africa, China and many developing countries. Domestic markets are developing in all countries 
where organic production is established, often with a similar divide regarding products and producers 
as in conventional production, e.g. larger farms with specialized production are for exports, smaller 
farms with diverse production are for the local markets. The case studies show a similar pattern in 
developing countries to the early European organic market, with the difference that supermarkets play 
a bigger role now than they did in Europe 20 years ago. In Kenya, organic products can now be found 
in 11 outlets and there is one organic restaurant in the capital Nairobi. The tourism sector, including 
but not limited to ecotourism, is also a key target for marketing in many developing countries.  
Research in Europe has established six critical conditions for the development of organic markets 
42
(Hamm and Michelsen 2000):  
•  Strong consumer demand; 
•  High degree of involvement by food companies; 
•  Sales through conventional supermarkets; 
•  Moderate (less than 50 per cent) organic price premiums; 
•  One dominating label; and 
41
The organic production of cotton in 2004 was more or less the same as it was in the mid 1990s. 
42
Based on the conditions in Europe mid 1990s. There may be other critical factors in the early stages which 
have not been identified in this research as certain things have been taken for granted.  
Add links to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
chrome pdf from link; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Add links to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add page number to pdf hyperlink; pdf reader link
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
28
•  Nationwide professional promotion. 
A common mark (label) that is actively promoted has much more impact than a common standard or a 
government regulation (but they can obviously be mutually supportive), as most consumers can easily 
recognize a mark, while they normally have little knowledge or even little interest in the standards and 
regulations. Such an organic mark can have many forms. It can be a governmental label accessible for 
producers certified by an approved body (USDA, JAS or Denmark), it can be a mark of the organic 
association available for its members, it can be a mark owned by the trade, or it can be the mark of a 
certification body (e.g. BioSuisse or Demeter). In Denmark, 92 per cent of consumers recognize the 
governmental label for organic products; in Sweden, 96 per cent of consumers recognize the private 
KRAV mark (KRAV 2005). Initially, the ownership or the underlying construction around a mark is 
not very important. More important is that it is widely used on all organic products. Therefore, an 
accessible  “marketing  mark”  is likely to  be most successful
43
. By public ownership  or  collective 
ownership (e.g. by an organic sector business association or organization), the future policies for its 
use can be adapted to the various stages of development.  
In Europe, some countries have applied a push strategy for the expansion of the organic markets, and 
others a pull strategy. A push strategy focuses on measures to enlarge production, assuming that once 
there is more supply, market demand will be created. The pull strategy has market demand as the 
driving force. The push strategy is based on generous payments to organic farms, something that is 
out of reach for most developing countries. Also, the push strategy has the potential to seriously harm 
a small and volatile organic market, at least in the short term. On the other hand, too forceful efforts in 
marketing  can  fail  if there  are  no products  to  sell. A combination  of market supply  and demand 
measures is more promising (Hamm, Groenfeld and Halpin 2002). From East Africa (Taylor 2007), 
Thailand, Costa Rica and Malaysia, lack of supply is mentioned as a factor limiting domestic market 
development.  It is apparent that policies seeking to influence  the market need careful design  and 
adaptation.  
Pricing  of organic  products  is,  as  shown  above,  a relevant  factor.  Also  in  developing countries, 
sometimes very high premium prices are quoted for organic products, often up to double the price 
compared to conventional, and in the case of Malaysia up to 400 per cent – much higher than the 
premiums in OECD markets. On the other hand, there are also a number of examples where there is 
no particular premium charged for organic products (Rundgren 2007). To a large extent, the premium 
prices in organic are a result of inefficient distribution of small quantities rather than high farm-gate 
prices.  Most  important  for  a  decent  pricing  level  is  probably  to  organize  the  supply  and  the 
distribution, which requires collaboration by the actors. With growing volumes, distribution can be 
more efficient and retail prices are likely to go down, not necessarily putting pressure on farm-gate 
prices. Distributing organic products through mainstream channels such as supermarkets will help in 
this, but supermarkets are also very demanding clients and an emerging organic sector may not be 
able to fulfil their stringent quality and just-in-time delivery demands. The need for better market 
information is highlighted in several of the case studies.  
Supply chain management and processing 
Producer organizations are often under-resourced and the lack of proper distribution infrastructure can 
be fatal both for export and local markets. This is not particular for organic, but as a “new” sector, one 
can  assume  that  there  will  be  more  obstacles  for  organic  producers  than  for  their  conventional 
colleagues, especially as organic standards require proper separation of organic products and organic 
markets are generally more demanding. Training can be of value, as can direct government support 
(grants or credits) for joint efforts by the producers, such as establishing proper packing facilities, 
joint shipments and labelling, and purchasing of certain machinery for grading or sorting.  
43
See more under the section of regulation and certification 
Organic farming in KwaZulu-Natal 
In South Africa, organic producer groups have started to work together, and the first group of Zulu farmers was 
certified in 2001. This group has grown from 27 farmers to more than 200 currently in the group. Several other 
groups, all in KwaZulu-Natal, have been established since then, and are in the process of organizing themselves as 
primary cooperatives, while establishing Zulu Organics as a secondary cooperative to set up a quality management 
system, coordinate logistics and packaging, and assist with marketing (South African case study).  
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
add url to pdf; pdf email link
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically.
pdf edit hyperlink; add a link to a pdf in preview
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
29
There are many technical hurdles for emerging organic food processors. Some are technological, e.g. 
organic processing may need other technological solutions than conventional. Others are related to 
inputs in mixed processed products. For example, it is common that there is a domestic production of 
fruits, but there is no organic sugar available for making preserves such as marmalade. Trade channels 
are not at all developed to import organic sugar to developing countries, and sometimes there are 
quotas, tariffs or other obstacles  for imports. Therefore, any organic processing standards need to 
recognize and be adapted to the stage of development.  
Imports of organic products, as shown in Malaysia and other countries, developed and developing 
alike, can play a role for the development of the domestic organic markets. Imports can provide high-
quality exposure to organics for domestic consumers, can be necessary raw material for processing 
organics, and can have a demonstration effect (processed foods) or set benchmarks for the domestic 
industry. An organic shop in Kenya reports that only 1 per cent of products sold are of domestic origin 
(Kimemia and Oyare 2006). In the Philippines, the domestic organic industry is about US$ 2.5 million 
and imports of processed organic food products are estimated at another US$ 3 million (USDA 2002).  
In the initial stage, the domestic supply is often small, qualities doubtful and the level of processing 
very low. In that scenario, the whole organic sector can get a boost from imported products – more 
products will make both retailers and consumers more interested. As modern consumers are used to 
year-round availability of most products, imports of off-season products can also stimulate the market. 
This opportunity is often lost when the early organic market is moved by producer organizations and 
NGOs, which rarely have imports on their priority list and sometimes outright reject imports as being 
competition to local producers. There is also scope for the development of regional organic trade. 
Imports of organic products to developing countries are to a very large extent from OECD countries 
rather  than  from  other  developing  countries.  Even  products  that  are  produced  in  a  neighbouring 
country may very well be exported to Europe, processed or packaged and then imported
44
. In addition, 
there are imports of raw material for processing, e.g. to both the United Republic of Tanzania and 
Uganda organic sugar is imported from Europe (in turn imported from Latin America) to be used in 
fruit processing for exports.  
Certified, not certified and alternative guarantee systems 
A number of the case studies (Malaysia, Thailand and South Africa) report considerable sales of non-
certified organic products. In some cases this is seen as a major problem, in other cases it is of no 
great concern. There are also a number, probably increasing, of organic producers in markets with 
mandatory regulations, that market organic food, but as a result of the regulation they are prevented 
from making the organic claim. This is also reported from Costa Rica: “Thus, many farmers chose to 
sell their products within the community, where they obtain better prices from direct sales to final 
consumers and do not necessarily have certification expenditures”. If organic producers are prevented 
from  selling  their products as organic,  the  result will  be that  they  introduce  other  terms  in  their 
marketplace, which may add to consumer confusion and weaken the organic market. In addition, there 
are products sold with alternative guarantee systems (see Participatory Guarantee Systems above). 
Whilst certification is likely to remain a very important mechanism for the development of the organic 
market,  these  other  approaches  should  not  be  overlooked  and  in  particular  it  might  be 
counterproductive to make them unlawful by legislation.  
Role of Government 
The Government is normally not, and should probably not, get too involved in domestic markets, 
apart from setting the general regulatory framework. However, when it comes to consumer education, 
it is quite common that Governments promote the consumption of particular foods, for commercial or 
health reasons. Consumer education for a healthy diet can also include the promotion of organic food. 
General promotional activities have been supported in Costa Rica and Denmark and in many other 
44
Observations  from a number of  countries, last reconfirmed  in training with participants  from 10  Asian 
countries in Thailand in February 2006. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
check links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add a link to a pdf file; add links pdf document
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
30
countries. Local Governments can also promote organic foods by allocating space in open markets 
and in trade fairs. The most important factors in an early market stage, where Governments can play a 
role,  are  availability  of  products,  proper  presentation  and  distribution,  and  clear  consumer 
communication.  Producer  organizations  can  be  supported  to  organize  a  common  supply,  nice 
packaging  and  an  efficient  distribution.  Government  can take  the  initiative  to  bring  together  the 
parties of the supply chains. Finally, proper market information systems can be useful for all parties, 
and in particular for producers. Such systems should include a directory of suppliers and buyers, price 
and  quantity reporting,  and can also  include prognosis  for  future production.  It  is important  that 
market information reaches out to the farmers, e.g. by radio programmes.  
Integrating  organics  into  public  procurement  stimulates  market  demand  and  improves  the  public 
information  and  consumer  exposure  to  organics.  In  Denmark  and  other  European  countries,  the 
Government has stimulated public procurement of organic products to schools and hospitals. For the 
Government to select organic foods for high-level events will send a strong signal to the domestic 
markets and contribute tremendously to the acceptance of organic production.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
7
7
.
.
Public procurement of organic products should be encouraged, 
including featuring organic food in important public events.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  1188..  Consumer education and awareness should be actively 
promoted.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
1
1
9
9
.
.
A common (national, regional or international) mark for organic 
products should be established and promoted. 
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
0
0
.
.
Domestic  market  development  strategies  should  include 
measures for both the supply and demand side, including the role of imports.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
1
1
.
.
The  organization  of  farmers  in  regards  to  marketing,  joint 
distribution and storage should be supported.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  2222..  Market information systems should be established.  
Export 
Export markets have played a dominating role for five of the six developing country cases, especially 
in the initial development of organic production. Most initial exports were developed without any 
significant government involvement. Government involvement has mainly been on two levels: export 
promotion activities (e.g. Chile, Costa Rica and Thailand), and the efforts to get recognition according 
to the importing countries’ regulations, successfully accomplished in the case of Costa Rica for the 
European Union. Only Argentina, Costa Rica and India have recognition by the European Union, and 
India has limited recognition by the United States. Organic export promotion activities by producers 
in  developing  countries  have  also  been  supported  by  development  agencies  (e.g.  GTZ,  USAID, 
SIPPO, Sida, and CBI). The Brazilian Export Promotion Agency has invested over US$ 800,000 in 
the Brazil Organics project, in part to increase the participation of Brazilian organic companies at 
BioFach  organic  trade  fairs  in  Germany,  the  United  States  and  Japan,  and  to  link  buyers  and 
journalists to organic projects in Brazil by supporting their participation at BioFach America Latina 
(IFOAM 2005). 
When designing export promotion programmes, the special nature of the organic markets need to be 
understood: the outlets or programmes designed for conventional products may not be the right ones 
for organic; exporters used to selling bulk commodities are often less inclined to understand the more 
demanding  and  quality-conscious  organic  markets;  handling  practices  and  treatments  need  to  be 
adopted.  Personal  contacts  between  seller  and  buyer,  important  in  all  business,  are  even  more 
important  for  organic  exports.  Organic  exporters  need  to  cooperate  in  their  export  marketing 
activities. Through joint promotion, supported by the Government, they can give the country a good 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add links to pdf in acrobat; adding links to pdf in preview
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
more detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
c# read pdf from url; add url pdf
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
31
image as a quality supplier of organic products. Organic technical solutions to deal with problems 
should be developed. For example, many export crops are regularly fumigated with chemicals that are 
not allowed in organic farming; however, there are alternative treatments such as carbon dioxide or 
freezing. The Government can support the establishment of joint facilities for such treatments in a 
central location or in export harbours.  
Export marketing of organic products also puts high demands on the certification bodies. They need 
to service the exports with certificates, forward inspection reports to other certification organizations, 
and respond to queries from importers, authorities or certification bodies in importing countries. They 
may also have to seek direct accreditation for export markets, e.g. NOP accreditation and IFOAM 
accreditation.  International  certification  bodies  have  routines  for  this.  Domestic  bodies  will  need 
support to train staff and get their procedures in place to be an efficient service provider. They will 
most likely also need financial support for accreditation.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
3
3
.
.
Export  promotion  activities  should  be  supported,  recognizing 
the special nature of organic markets. Organic exporters should be encouraged to join 
forces to promote and market their products. 
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  2244..  Organic products should be excluded from any mandatory 
phytosanitary treatments that are not permitted for organic products. Alternatives for 
fumigation should be supported. 
Production 
The production conditions for organic farming are important for the development of the sector. Most 
of  the success  or  failure of an  organic  farm is  the result of  the farmer’s  activity rather  than  the 
Government’s. However,  Governments are  influencing  the production directly in many cases  and 
indirectly  through  supporting  services  such  as  education,  extension  and  research.  It  should  be 
recognized that there has been very little research directed to organic farming, and there are good 
reasons to believe that if more resources were allocated, a leap in productivity in organic farms could 
be accomplished.  
In this context, it is worth pointing to the potential of integration of organic farming and traditional 
knowledge, both in extension and research. The interface between modern organic agriculture (OA) 
techniques and  farmers’ traditional  agricultural knowledge  and landraces offers fertile  ground  for 
innovation and improvements in local agricultural productivity. Traditional knowledge can enhance 
the successful implementation of organic farming, while OA techniques can enhance the productivity 
of  traditional  farming  systems  (Twarog  2006). Simultaneously,  there  is also  a  great  potential  for 
modern bioscience and technologies to make contributions to organic farming
45
.  
Direct support to production 
An  important  means  of  promoting  organic  production  is  to  eliminate  existing  disincentives  for 
organic, such as distorting subsidies for chemical fertilizers. Direct government support for organic 
farming has been in place in the European Union since 1994, and some countries, e.g. Denmark, 
Sweden  and  Germany,  supported  organic  farmers  before  that.  This  should  be  seen  against  the 
backdrop of the fact that only a small fraction of the population in the European Union is involved in 
the agriculture sector. This means that few people get the support from many. In most developing 
countries, the situation is the opposite; the farm households represent the majority of the population, 
and there are few possibilities to have any subsidy system like the European. One should also take 
into account that special organic support programmes in the European Union in most cases merely 
compensate organic farmers from disadvantages in the general agriculture policies (Pretty and Dobbs 
2004).  
45
Apart  from  the  use  of  GMOs,  there  is  nothing  in  the  organic  concepts  or  rules  that  resist  modern 
biotechnologies.  
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add links to pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
pdf link to attached file; add links to pdf acrobat
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
32
Also in some developing countries, there are examples of direct support to organic producers mainly 
as investment support, e.g. in Tunisia (Twarog 2006) and Malaysia; or support for certification costs, 
e.g. in China and India; free certification, e.g. in Thailand and Malaysia; or credit incentives, e.g. in 
Costa Rica. Credit and investment support are often not easily available for small farms or to women 
farmers,  maybe because they  lack information  or because  they are not able to  make  the required 
contribution for investments, or they are not credit-worthy because of lack of land title or because of 
general poverty. If that is the case, credit or investment support schemes may amount to de facto 
discrimination of already disadvantaged producers. Special support measures should be designed for 
the small-farm sector, perhaps organized through their organizations.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  2255..  Direct support measures to producers need to be adapted to 
small farmers as well as to commercial operations.  
Extension service 
Extension  services  often  concentrate  on  conventional  farming,  sometimes  for  reasons  of  policy, 
sometimes because of lack of knowledge of organic farming. Moreover, they are permanently under-
resourced in most developing  countries. In many  instances,  they get posters, brochures and  other 
materials from  suppliers of agro-chemicals. Finally, their training  methodology is often weak and 
based on a top-down approach, where farmers are instructed to use certain inputs or do certain things. 
This is hardly efficient for conventional farming, and is even less efficient for the organic farming 
system, which is based on continuous learning by the farmer and by the extension worker alike. In 
most cases, farmer-to-farmer exchange, participatory learning, farmer field schools and similar are 
well suited for organic producers.  
To a large extent, extension can build on traditional or indigenous knowledge. This is underlined in 
the studies from Costa Rica, Thailand and Egypt. A challenge for the organic extension is to retrain 
extension workers both in the topic and in the way of working. NGOs often have a long experience in 
working with participatory extension in organic farming and Governments could consider supporting 
that. Another option is to support organic extension integrated in commercial activities by a producer 
organization or private companies. In Chile, Costa Rica and Egypt, Governments have established 
special  programmes  for  organic  extension.  In  Denmark  there  is  a  specialized  organic  extension 
service, but organic is also integrated in general extension services.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
6
6
.
.
Organic extension services need to be established and the staff 
trained.  Organic  extension should  be developed  and implemented in a participatory 
manner and have the farm and the farmer as the centre of attention.  
Inputs (seeds, seedlings, pest control and fertilizers) 
For many, organic is about the substitution of agro-chemicals for natural products, e.g. instead of 
using a chemical pesticide, a plant extract is used; instead of chemical fertilizers, manures or compost 
are  used.  With  that  perspective,  ensuring  that  there  are  appropriate  inputs  available  for  organic 
farmers or even supplying them to the farmers seem like good ways to promote organic farming. 
Thailand and India plan large-scale establishment of organic  fertilizer factories. However, organic 
farming to a large extent uses site-specific, on-farm resources. In most cases, a chemical pesticide is 
not replaced with an organic pesticide, but with crop rotation, companion cropping or the use of a 
resistant variety. Similarly, the need for external fertilizers is often not great for farmers having a 
diverse system with good crop rotations, the use of green manures, etc. Furthermore, smallholders 
have little capacity to purchase either organic or chemical inputs. Therefore, an input substitution 
approach to organic is not an appropriate starting point for government intervention.  
Nevertheless, there are a number of organic production systems that are quite dependent on external 
inputs, especially in the horticultural sector. The integration of livestock and plant production that is a 
fundamental aspect of European organic farming is not the rule in most tropical production systems. 
Also, a number of pests pose real threats for organic farmers, and it can be a good “insurance” to have 
relevant inputs available. It should be recognized that there is a lot of traditional knowledge about the 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
33
use of plants and other natural substances in pest control. This traditional knowledge has often been 
discredited and overlooked by the agronomic establishment. Supporting the dissemination and further 
development of traditional knowledge can play an important role.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
7
7
.
.
Traditional  knowledge  about  pest  control  treatments  et  al. 
should be surveyed and brought into the extension service and disseminated in other 
ways.  
There are many leftover materials from the processing industry that are useful as fertilizers or soil 
improvement, e.g. coffee hulls and rice husks. Governments can survey these resources and make 
recommendation for the proper process to get them back to the agriculture systems. The appropriate 
recycling of organic matter, e.g. leftovers or waste from marketplaces and households, to the farm 
sector is important. This has the additional benefit of contributing to sanitation and environmental 
protection. Finally, the appropriate handling of human waste and its integration into the production 
system can provide much-needed nutrients to farms
46
.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
2
2
8
8
.
.
Recycling of agriculture and food  waste into organic  farming 
systems should be promoted. 
Industrial production of agriculture inputs, whether they are organic or conventional, should not be 
subsidized in the long term
47
, unless it also provides additional services; e.g. the establishment of a 
composting  facility  in  a  city may  play  the  double role  of being an  efficient  and  hygienic  waste-
handling  facility  and  a  provider  of  quality  compost  to  periurban  farmers.  The  Government  can 
perhaps stimulate the emergence of the production of needed inputs through targeted interventions, 
e.g. support to the introduction of new technology in processing and support to a farmers group in 
establishing  a  composting  facility.  Governments  should  support  the  development  of  (including 
research  and  field-testing)  useful  inputs,  e.g.  biological  controls.  Farmers  are  easily  tricked  by 
marketers of various inputs and Government could support proper field testing of the products or 
other quality control measures,  e.g. that the  nutrient content of a sold fertilizer  is  indeed what is 
declared, or that they don’t contain dangerous levels of harmful substances such as heavy metals. Care 
must be taken though that such controls are not becoming overly complicated or expensive, as that 
would defeat their purpose. Another complication is that many countries handle organic inputs under 
an identical regulatory framework as their synthetic counterparts, e.g. biological pest control products 
have to be registered as pesticides with the same requirements and fees as for synthetic pesticides 
(TOS 2004, Envirocare 2006).  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  2299..  Government (or others) should establish basic controls of 
biological inputs such as pest control agents and organic fertilizers. 
Regulations in importing countries are increasingly demanding  that organic products be produced 
with organic seeds, even if there are some exceptions. A recent study in three African countries
48
shows that organic seeds are basically nonexistent in the formal sector. In the informal seed systems 
they are available, but then even if they are organic they are not certified as such. The study concludes 
that it is not at all realistic to demand the use of organic seeds in these countries at present (EPOPA 
2006b).  The use  of  treated seeds  poses  another  obstacle.  In  many  countries,  seed  treatments  are 
prescribed by authorities or they are just used as a general measure. Treated seeds are only accepted in 
organic farming under exceptional conditions and the lack of untreated seeds can pose insurmountable 
problems for producers. There are many alternative seed treatments under development, e.g. warm 
46
Some organic standards reject or severely limit the re-circulation of human waste, and in some cultures there 
is a strong resistance to their use.  
47
Subsidies of inputs may lead to suboptimal outcomes (e.g. overuse of a certain input) and an economically 
unsustainable use.  
48
United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia and Uganda.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
34
water,  use  of  microorganisms,  but  most  of  them  are  not  available  or  not  known  in  developing 
countries.  
RReeccoommmmeennddaattiioonn  3300..  Seed breeding and seed testing should be oriented to organic 
production.  Compulsory  seed  treatments should be  waived  for  organic farmers  and 
untreated  seeds  should  be  made  available.  Alternative  seed  treatments  should  be 
developed and promoted. 
Another pressing issue is the availability of varieties that are well adapted to organic farming. Seed 
breeding  hasn’t  been  made  to  take  consideration  of  the  conditions  for  organic  farmers,  and  the 
varieties  available  might  not  work  so  well  under  organic  management.  Finally,  the  potential  of 
contamination of seeds with GMOs is an apparent risk that can seriously affect organic farmers. In 
Costa Rica, a seed network of farmers is supported to assist farmers to deal with the challenges of 
seeds for organic agriculture. Organizing the informal seed sector for organic production may be a 
way forward.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
3
3
1
1
.
.
Policies  for  genetically  modified  organisms  (GMOs)  need  to 
ensure  that  GMO  seeds  are  not  distributed  or  used  in  a  way  that  can  cause 
contamination of seeds.  
Training and education 
Education on all levels plays a big role in shaping the future. In many developing countries, the only 
education  children  from  farming  communities  will  have  is  primary  school.  Does  this  education 
address farming practices, and if so how? What image does it convey? In Costa Rica, a programme 
for  inclusion  of  organic  agriculture  and  the  establishment  of  organic  gardens  in  schools  was 
introduced in 2002. There are no indications that other countries have introduced organic farming in 
any systemic way in primary or secondary schools.  
Denmark established a dedicated organic college in 1981. The National Institute of Training in Costa 
Rica has an organic training centre. In most countries, organic training is conducted by NGOs. In 
South Africa, the Government is involved in accreditation of institutions and curricula. In the United 
Republic of Tanzania, the Government provides training institutions with a curriculum for organic 
and the course performance certificates (Envirocare 2006). A few training institutions in Africa have 
been engaged  in  organic for  a  long  time,  e.g., the  Kenya  Institute of  Organic  Farming  has  been 
training  farmers  and  extension workers in  organic  production  since  1986,  and  there  are  now  35 
training institutions involved in organic (Kimemia and Oyare 2006). In Egypt, two universities have 
departments  for  organic  agriculture  and  offer  courses  for  graduation.  In  Uganda,  the  Martyrs 
University has courses in organic agriculture and the Sokoine University of Agriculture in the United 
Republic  of  Tanzania  is planning to do  the same.  In  Costa  Rica,  two  universities  offer master’s 
degrees  in  organic  agriculture  or  agro-ecology.  In  Thailand,  courses  for  master’s  and  bachelor’s 
degrees are in the making. Training programmes for government employees and other relevant staff 
need to be developed. Regional institutes can also be an effective way to develop and convey organic 
knowledge while sharing cost between nations with similar conditions; for example, the Institute for 
Mediterranean Agriculture covers the Middle East, Southern Europe and North Africa.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
3
3
2
2
.
.
Organic agriculture should be integrated into the curriculum for 
primary and secondary schools. Specialized institutions involved in training for organic 
agriculture should be  supported. Higher  education  in  organic  agriculture  should  be 
developed.  
Research 
Public expenditures on agriculture research in low-income countries generally total less than 0.5 per 
cent of their agricultural gross domestic product. By comparison, higher-income developing countries 
spend about 1 per cent, and industrialized countries spend 2 to 5 per cent. It is not only necessary to 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
35
spend more, but also to re-direct research. Today, most research money is spent on application of 
agrochemicals and gene technologies, but little is spent on areas useful for organic and sustainable 
agriculture. A complication is that when the private sector is expected to fund research, this normally 
means that input suppliers are the main funders, and it is not in their interest to support research that 
supports  a  farming  methodology  that  emphasizes  self-reliance  and  use  of  fewer  inputs.  Another 
complication is that the holistic nature of organic farming calls for more systems research rather than 
research  on  isolated  issues, such  as  the  control  of a  certain pest, or  the  function of  a biological 
fertilizer.  
As organic agriculture is knowledge-intensive, one could believe that research would have played a 
major role in the establishment of organic agriculture, but it is hard to find any indication that research 
has been important for the early organic development. Nevertheless, it is obvious that the organic 
sector is depending on investments in research for its future development, to allow it to reach higher 
levels of productivity, to cope with certain pest problems, etc.  
There is a strong inertia and sometimes outright resistance from the research establishment against 
organic research. Therefore, dedicated funds and programmes for organic research are often needed to 
ensure that sufficient attention is given to organic. This has been the strategy in most EU countries, 
and even after 10 to15 years of organic research, Governments continue to allocate special research 
funds to organic programmes. Danish research in organic farming has been deliberately decentralized 
into all agricultural research institutes since 1995, and is coordinated by DARCOF, a research centre 
collaborating across the institutes. There have been three major organic research programmes with a 
total budget of more than US$ 80 million. Similar approaches are reported also from Costa Rica and 
Egypt. In  addition, there  is a need that  production-oriented research  is tuned to  the needs of  the 
producers. Research priorities should therefore be developed in close consultation with the sector.  
Public funding of organic-related research and programmes is increasing in both the European Union 
and  the  United  States,  although  European  Governments  are  financing  more  programmes  with  a 
broader range. European funding supports innovation in production techniques, food processing, food 
marketing, and food retailing, and is estimated at €70 million to €80 million annually from 2003 to 
2005. Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Denmark accounted for 60 per cent of this. In fiscal 
year 2005, the United States Government made approximately US$ 4.7 million available exclusively 
for an organic research grant programme. This amount is supplemented by other programmes that 
benefit organic producers, including funding for organic research and technical assistance by federal, 
state  and  local  agencies  that  focus  on  organic  agriculture  (Dimitri  and  Oberholtzer  2005).  From 
Denmark comes so-called grassroots research, a participatory collaboration between researchers and 
farmers,  which  has  been  generously  funded.  Also  in  Costa  Rica,  the  Government  supports 
participatory research. The case study from Egypt makes a strong call to include smallholders and 
traditional knowledge in research.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
3
3
3
3
.
.
Special research programmes should be established for organic 
research,  and  the  sector  should  be  involved  in  priority  setting.  R&D  in  organic 
agriculture should be participatory, build on and integrate traditional knowledge (where 
relevant) and be based on the needs of the producers.  
Development programmes 
In  many  developing  countries,  foreign  development  assistance  plays  a  rather  important  role  in 
forming  the  agriculture  sector,  either  through  budget  support  or  through  special  projects  and 
programmes. Most of the recommendations here are also applicable for their efforts. Egypt reports 
five such projects. In Uganda, the Export Promotion of Organic Products from Africa programme has 
worked with more than 30,000 small-holders over eight years (EPOPA 2006). FAO gives technical 
assistance to Governments, e.g. in Tunisia. IFOAM’s I-Go programme has organized training and 
capacity-building in many countries. The interventions by foreign development assistance often cover 
issues such as subsidizing costs of certification, technical advice to farmers or extension workers, 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
36
export  promotion  activities  and  support  to  the  development  of  farmers’  organizations  or  local 
certification agencies. Lately, there is greater interest in policy dialogue, e.g. the UNEP-UNCTAD 
CBTF project in East Africa. In many developing countries, development assistance has supported the 
development of a regulatory framework for organic agriculture. Many development programmes work 
with  the  private  sector  or  NGOs  as  partners.  From  Uganda  it  is  reported  that  “the  government 
initiatives which receive funding from the national budget and the civil society efforts which receive 
funding from  donors seem  to be  largely  disjointed”  (Tumushabe  2006).  Donors need  to  identify 
existing initiatives and specify in project design that there be linkages or direct interactions between 
them to ensure more effective organic development and avoid unnecessary competitive friction or 
projects reinventing the wheel.  
Regional and international cooperation 
There are many fields where regional or international cooperation could be meaningful:  
  Research; 
  Regional trade; 
  Harmonization of standards; 
  Regional and international trade agreements; 
Policies to support the development of the organic sector; 
Biosafety; and 
Traditional knowledge. 
By participation in the Codex Alimentarius committee for labelling, Governments can contribute to 
the development of a basis to establish equivalence. They can also ensure that international standards 
take due consideration of the conditions in their countries and the expectations of domestic producers 
and consumers. Governments can also consider participating in the work of IFOAM, and supporting 
the participation of their private sectors in IFOAM’s work. There are also other international treaties 
and  processes that  directly or  indirectly  influence the  organic sectors, such as TRIPS, CBD, and 
UNFCC. A Government that has mainstreaming organic as its target needs to assess how all these 
influence organic.  
FAO, UNCTAD and IFOAM have embarked on an ambitious effort to reduce barriers to trade in 
organic  products. In  the International  Task  Force  for  Harmonization and  Equivalency  in  Organic 
Agriculture  (ITF),  the  three  organizations  invited  Governments,  private-sector  bodies  and 
international  organizations  (e.g.  OECD,  the  United  Nations  Economic  Commission  for  Europe 
(UNECE) and the World Trade Organization (WTO)) to  analyse the current situation (the review 
phase) and seek solutions (the proposal phase). The ITF was initiated in 2002, and has conducted a 
number of studies and meetings. It is premature to assess what concrete agreements might spring 
directly out of the ITF
49
, but it is already evident that it has created a dialogue that is influencing both 
private-sector  actors  and  regulatory  authorities.  Currently  the  ITF  is  developing  two  tools:  1)  a 
common set of International Requirements for Organic Certification Bodies (IROCB) to serve as a 
benchmark for equivalence, a catalyst for convergence of requirements and direct accreditation as 
possible  and  2)  the  ITF  Guidelines  for  Equivalency.  Governments  and  the  private  sector  should 
consider participating in this process and utilize ITF results and tools. (UNCTAD-FAO-IFOAM 2006 
and 2007).  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
3
3
4
4
.
.
Governments  and  the  private  sector  should  participate  in 
relevant international forums such as the Codex Alimentarius, IFOAM and the ITF. 
Failing any  grand international  agreement on organic  standards and certification, Governments in 
developing countries could consider including organic standards and organic certification services in 
49
The agreements in the ITF are not binding for the participating organizations, but can be seen as negotiated 
proposals.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested