pdfsharp table example c# : Change link in pdf software application dll windows winforms wpf web forms UNCTAD_DITC_TED_2007_35-part408

What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
37
regional trade agreements. They should learn from the experiences of other regulations and try to 
work out simple procedures that do not create unnecessary obstacles for the establishment of local 
bodies, or hinder regional trade. The development of regional standards can form a basis for regional 
trade.  It  is also  more likely that  there will  be greater possibilities to  negotiate equivalence  (with 
importing OECD countries) on the basis of a regional standard than on the basis of a multitude of 
national  standards.  An  East  African  Organic  Standard  was  developed  by  organic  stakeholders, 
including Governments, and was adopted by the East African Community Council of Ministers in 
2007
50
. The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in cooperation with IFOAM is 
supporting similar work in the Pacific Islands. Also, more technical cooperation on the regional level 
is  feasible.  In  Central  America,  there  is  cooperation  between  the  authorities  in  Costa  Rica,  El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and the Dominican Republic concerning organic 
regulations (Alonso 2005). FAO supports a regional project for Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and 
Uruguay, which covers areas of national legislation, harmonization, certification and the development 
of domestic markets.  
R
R
e
e
c
c
o
o
m
m
m
m
e
e
n
n
d
d
a
a
t
t
i
i
o
o
n
n
3
3
5
5
.
.
Regional  cooperation  in  marketing,  standards,  conformity 
assessment, policies and R&D should be promoted. 
50
This was supported by the UNEP-UNCTAD CBTF and IFOAM. 
Change link in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
active links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in
Change link in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; clickable pdf links
38
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
change link in pdf; add links in pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
add hyperlinks to pdf online; clickable links in pdf files
39
References 
Alonso N (2005). “Central American competent authorities establish regional commission for organic 
agriculture”. The Organic Standard, issue 46, February 2005. 
Ben  Kheder  M,  and  Maamer  Belkheria  S  (2006).  In  Trade  and  Environment  Review  2006. 
UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2005/12, Geneva. 
Bowen  D  (2004).  Current  mechanisms  that  enable  international  trade  in  organic  products.  In 
Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture, Volume 1. Background papers on the 
International  Task  Force  on  Harmonization  and  Equivalence  in  Organic  Agriculture. 
UNCTAD-FAO-IFOAM (2005). Available from http://r0.unctad.org/trade_env/itf-organic.htm
Commins K (2004). Overview of current status of standards and conformity assessment systems. In 
Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture, Volume 1. Background papers on the 
International  Task  Force  on  Harmonization  and  Equivalence  in  Organic  Agriculture. 
UNCTAD-FAO-IFOAM (2005). Available from http://r0.unctad.org/trade_env/itf-organic.htm
Crucefix  D  (2005).  Experience  of  equivalence  and  recognition  mechanisms  in  the  regulation  of 
organic agriculture. Paper presented at the ITF meeting 5–7 December in Hammamet, Tunisia. 
Available from http://r0.unctad.org/trade_env/itf-organic.htm
Damiani O (2002). Small farmers and organic agriculture: lessons learned from Latin America and the 
Caribbean. International Fund for Agricultural Development, Rome.  
Dimitri  C  and  Oberholtzer  L,  (2005).  Market–Led  versus  government–facilitated  growth: 
development of the U.S. and EU organic agricultural sectors. WRS-05-05, USDA, Economic 
Research Service. 
Envirocare and Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security (2006). The status of organic agriculture 
production  and  trading  opportunities  in  Tanzania.  Available  from  http://www.unep-
unctad.org/cbtf
EPOPA  (2006a).  Export  promotion  of  organic  products  from  Africa.  Available  from 
http://www.epopa.info
EPOPA (2006b). Organic, non treated and non GMO seed and planting material in Tanzania, Uganda 
and Zambia.  Available from http://www.epopa.info
EPOPA (2006c). South African organic market study.  Available from http://www.epopa.info
FAO (2002). Organic agriculture, environment and food security. Scialabba N and Hattam C, eds. 
Rome. 
Fonseca MF (2006). Meandering consensus building in Brazil. In The Organic Standard, Issue 58, 
February 2006. Available from http://www.organicstandard.com
Forss K and Lundström M (2005). An evaluation of the programme “Export Promotion of Organic 
Products from Africa”. Phase II, Sida. Available from http://www.epopa.info
Giovannucci D (2005).  Organic agriculture and  poverty reduction  in  Asia.  International Fund  for 
Agricultural Development: Rome. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
pdf hyperlink; add links to pdf online
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression mode
add links to pdf in preview; clickable links in pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
40
Giovannucci  D  (2006).  Salient  Trends  in  organic  standards:  the  opportunities  and  challenges  for 
developing countries. In Standards and Trade: Challenges and Opportunities for Developing 
Country Agro-Food Trade. Washington, DC: World Bank Institute–USAID, Trade Standards 
Working Group. 
Hamm U and Michelsen J (2000). Analysis of the organic food markets in Europe. In Proceedings of 
the 13
th
International Scientific Conference, IFOAM & FIBL. Basel, Switzerland, pp. 507–510. 
Hamm U, Gronefeld  F and  Haplin D (2002). Analysis of  the  European market for organic food. 
OMIaRD, Aberystwyth, United Kingdom. 
IFOAM  (2004).  Workshop  on  alternatives  on  certification  for  organic  production.  April  2004. 
Available from http://www.ifoam.org
IFOAM (2005). Press release, Bonn, Germany, 15 December, 2005 from Biofach America Latina. 
Kilcher L, Huber B and  Schmid O  (2006). Standards and certification. In The World of Organic 
Agriculture: Statistics and Emerging Trends. Helga W and Yussefi M (Eds), Bonn: IFOAM. 
Kimemia  C,  Oyare  E  (2006).  The  status  of  organic  agriculture,  production  and  trade  in  Kenya, 
January 2006. Available from http://www.unep-unctad.org/cbtf
KRAV (2005). Press release, 19 Jan 2006, Uppsala. Available from http://www.krav.se
Lampkin N, Gonzalez  V,  Wolfert  J, Schmid  O  (2004).  Overview about national  action plans  for 
organic food and farming. January 2004. 
Ong Kung Wai (2006). Equalising export rules in China. In The Organic Standard, Issue 59, March 
2006. Available from http://www.organicstandard.com
Pretty J, Brett C, Gee D, Hine R, Mason CF, Morison JIL, Raven H, Rayment M and van der Bijl G. 
(2000). An assessment of the total external costs of UK agriculture. In Agricultural Systems 65 
(2), pp. 113–136. 
Pretty J and Dobbs TL (2004). Agri–environmental stewardship schemes and multifunctionality. In 
Review of Agricultural Economics, Volume 26, pp. 220–237. 
Pretty J, Ball AS, Lang, T, and Morison JIL (2005). 
Rundgren G (2002). Is there a need for a regulatory framework? In The Organic Standard, Issue 11 
March. Available from http://www.organicstandard.com
Rundgren G (2005). Certified organic: reducing barriers to developing-country exports of conformity 
assessment services. OECD, Paris.  
Taylor  A (2007).  Overview  of the current state  of organic agriculture in Kenya, Uganda and the 
United  Republic  of  Tanzania  and  the  opportunities  for  regional  harmonization. 
(UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2005/16).  Study  commissioned  by  the  UNEP–UNCTAD  Capacity 
Building  Task  Force  on  Trade,  Environment  and  Development.  United  Nations,  Geneva. 
Available from http://www.unep-unctad.org/cbtf
Tegtmeier EM, Duffy MD, (2004). External costs of agricultural production in the United States. In 
International Journal of agricultural sustainability. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2004. 
TOS (2004). How to get biological controls approved. In The Organic Standard, Issue 43, December 
2004. Available from http://www.organicstandard.com
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
accessible links in pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
add url link to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
41
TOS (2005). The organic certification directory. In The Organic Standard, Issue 52, August 2005, 
Available from http://www.organicstandard.com
.  
TOS (2006) Bolivia sets up organic development. In The Organic Standard, Issue 59, March 2006, 
Available from http://www.organicstandard.com
Tumushabe GW, Naluwairo R, Mugyenyi O (2006). The status of organic agriculture, production and 
trade in Uganda. February 2006. Available from http://www.unep-unctad.org/cbtf
Twarog  S  (2006).  Organic  agriculture:  a  trade  and  sustainable  development  opportunity  for 
developing 
countries. 
In 
Trade 
and 
Environment 
Review 
2006. 
(UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2005/12), Geneva. 
UNCTAD (2006). Trade and Environment Review 2006 (UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2005/12), Geneva. 
UNCTAD (2007a). Food safety and environmental requirements in export markets – friend or foe for 
producers of fruit and vegetables in Asian developing countries? Geneva. 
UNCTAD (2007b). Codes for good agricultural practices: opportunities and challenges for fruit and 
vegetable exports from Latin American developing countries: experiences of Argentina, Brazil 
and Costa Rica. Geneva. 
UNCTAD–FAO–IFOAM (2005). Harmonization and equivalence in organic agriculture, Volume 1. 
Background papers  on  the  International  Task  Force  on  Harmonization  and  Equivalence  in 
Organic Agriculture. Michaud J, Wynen E and Bowen D, eds. Revision March 2005. Bonn, 
UNCTAD,  FAO, 
IFOAM.  (UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2005/4.m) 
Available  from 
http://r0.unctad.org/trade_env/itf-organic.htm
UNCTAD-FAO-IFOAM (2006). Strategy on Solutions for Harmonizing International Regulation of 
Organic  Agriculture.  Volume  2,  Background  papers  of  the  International  Task  Force  on 
Harmonization and Equivalence in Organic Agriculture. New York and Geneva (UNCTAD-
FAO-IFOAM. 
UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2005/15). 
Available 
from 
http://r0.unctad.org/trade_env/itf-organic.htm
UNCTAD–FAO–IFOAM (2007). Harmonization and equivalence in organic agriculture. Volume 3, 
Background  papers  of  the  International  Task  Force  on  Harmonization  and  Equivalence  in 
Organic 
Agriculture. 
New 
York 
and 
Geneva, 
UNCTAD–FAO–IFOAM. 
(UNCTAD/DITC/TED/2007/1). Available from http://r0.unctad.org/trade_env/itf-organic.htm
  
USDA (2005). Philippines organic products. In Organic Market Brief, Washington DC.  
Willer  H and Yussefi  M (2006). The world of organic  agriculture. Statistics and emerging trends 
2006. IFOAM, Bonn and FIBL, Frick 2006. 
World  Bank (2001).  Zambia public expenditure review. World  Bank, Washington  DC, quoted in 
Growth and poverty reduction: the role of Agriculture. DFID, Glasgow, 2005. 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security level; PDF text Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
pdf hyperlinks; pdf links
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
pdf link to email; add link to pdf file
42
43
Annex 1. Chile 
Agriculture conditions 
As Chile stretches from north to south, its landscapes range from arid desert in the north to windswept 
glaciers and fjords in the south. The country can be divided in seven zones from north to south: Great 
North (horticulture, camelid raising); Little North (horticulture, pisco production, goat raising, fruit 
production); Centre (horticulture, fruit production, viniculture and wine production, annual crops); 
Central  South  (annual  crops,  viniculture  and  wine  production,  forestry);  the  Frontier  (cereals, 
livestock: raising and fattening, forestry), South: The Lakes Zone (cattle: milk production, forestry); 
and Extreme South (sheep and cattle, forestry).  
In the last decade, the Chilean economy has experienced an important transformation process in the 
production and trade sectors. Agriculture represents 4.5 per cent of the GDP. In the last eight years, 
Chile has doubled its food exports, reaching more than US$ 7 billion in 2004. In 15 years, the area of 
annual crops has decreased 25 per cent, while the area with fruit trees and vineyards has increased 
40 per cent and the surface for horticulture and flowers increased 79 per cent. The agricultural sector 
still presents two realities, one associated with exports and the other oriented to the domestic market, 
which is generally represented by smallholders.  
Organic agriculture 
There are no official statistics for the organic sector; however, it is possible to get information from 
governmental  institutions,  certification  agencies  and  surveys  made  by  the  Chilean  Organic 
Association. The organic land represents 0.44 per cent of the total arable area of the country (5.1 
million hectares). In 2004, the organic area reached 22,489 hectares, including areas of wild harvest. 
Beekeeping is also an important sector, and there are 18,844 organic beehives.  
Table 3. Evolution of the organic area 
Sector 
1997/98 (ha.)  1999/00 (ha.)  2002/03 (ha.) 
Fruits 
566 
683 
2 311 
Vineyards 
44 
437 
1 914 
Annual crops and vegetables 
132 
139 
1 169 
Medicinal herbs, rosehip  
123 
121 
358 
Others 
55 
SUBTOTAL 
1 813 
1 920 
5 806 
Pastures  
245 
370 
2 016 
Wild harvest area  
1 568 
1 550 
17 968 
TOTAL 
2 678 
3 300 
25 790 
Source: ODEPA 2005. 
Organic markets  
Actors in the organic market are very heterogeneous. While small-scale farmers are associated with 
the domestic market and big farmers with the export market, there are different combinations. The 
domestic market is small and most organic production is export oriented. The domestic market is 
centred on the capital, Santiago. Major obstacles to the development of the domestic market are the 
lack  of information to  consumers  and the difficulties in having a wide range of products offered 
through different channels in a permanent way. The main products in the domestic market are fruits, 
vegetables and wine.  
A few supermarkets have incorporated organic products. However, the diversity and quantity remains 
limited. Specialized shops, of which most are in Santiago, do not sell 100 per cent organic; they also 
sell products considered as natural. Some organic farmers have their own shops. The best known is 
Tierra Viva, a group composed of small organic farmers selling their products through their own shop 
in Santiago. Finally, there are farmers who sell their products directly to consumers, either on the farm 
or through a home delivery system.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
44
Export markets  
The value of  organic exports  in 2004 reached  US$ 12,722,978  (FOB) and  was distributed in the 
following way: fresh products (51.1 per cent), frozen products (28.2 per cent), products with some 
level of  processing  (13.5 per  cent)  and dried products  (7.2  per  cent).  The  main  export  products 
according to the value of export are fresh apples, frozen raspberries, red wine, kiwi, avocados and 
fresh blueberries.  
In 2004, the destinations for Chilean organic exports were:  
• 
United States (58.4 per cent);
• 
Europe (29.4 per cent);
• 
Japan (5.7 per cent);
• 
Canada (4.9 per cent); and
• 
Other markets (1.6 per cent). 
Figure 1. Evolution of Chilean organic exports (1999–2004)  
Source: ProChile, 2005
.  
Supporting structures  
There are general supporting structures to develop agriculture, which the organic sector can use to 
develop  its  own  activities.  The  main  services  the  organic  sector  uses  are  related  to  promotion, 
marketing, organic association support and information sources. Training, education and extension are 
implemented  by  private  and  public  initiatives  through  seminars,  courses,  specific  programmes, 
publication of training materials, study visits in Chile or abroad and participation in fairs. Research is 
done  by  universities  and the National Institute of Agricultural Research.  The  research on  organic 
agriculture is very small compared with research on conventional agricultural issues. 
Sector organization for organic farming 
The Chilean Organic Association (AAOCH)
51
was created in 1999 to promote the organic sector in 
Chile.  Nowadays,  this  organization  has  approximately  90  members  including  farmers,  certifiers, 
traders,  consultants,  students,  professionals  and  others.  Since  its  creation,  AAOCH  has  been 
recognized  as  a  valid  representative  for  the  organic  sector  by  governmental  authorities.  Another 
interesting  initiative  is  the  network  of  small  organic  farmers  created  by  INDAP,  which  is  the 
institution of the Ministry of Agriculture in charge of supporting small farmers.  
Regulations, standards and conformity assessment 
Certification is done by national and foreign certification agencies. There is a governmental control 
system  in  place,  which  is  voluntary  and  only  for  primary  products  that  are  exported.  Exported 
products fulfil standards required by destination markets (NOP, European Union, JAS, etc.).  
51
Web Site: www.agrupacionorganica.cl
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
1000 US$ FOB
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
45
The  Chilean  Organic  Law  was  approved in the  Parliament in  January  2006  and  the  system  will 
change.  The  law  establishes  the  national  system  for  certifying  organic  products;  requires  the 
elaboration  of  specific  regulations;  protects  the  organic,  biological  and  ecological  labelling; 
recognizes a competent  authority;  evaluates  and authorizes certification  agencies  operating  in  the 
country; creates an official seal; and establishes sanctions. Certification agencies operating in Chile 
are: 
•  National bodies: Agroeco, CCO; and 
•  Foreign bodies: Argencert, Letis, Lacon, BCS, CERES, IMO, Biocertificación, Ecocert. 
In Chile, there is no certification of groups. However, access to certification for small farmers is a 
topic under discussion and one of the options can be the certification of small farmers groups as a 
whole. This issue has been considered in the new law.  
Agriculture policy  
In  2001,  the  Ministry  of  Agriculture  published  the  document  “A  State  Policy  for  the  Chilean 
Agriculture, Period 2001–2010”. The document stresses the importance of quality and sustainability 
of  agriculture.  Some  important  aspects  of  this  are:  implementation  of  programmes  of  good 
agricultural practices; modernization of inspection systems (i.e. HACCP); regulation for using GMOs; 
improvement  of the  national  policy of  pesticides; strengthening  traceability mechanisms;  national 
programme for controlling residues; and consolidation of the animal production system under official 
control. In the policy, the ministry also states the establishment of a quality indication system, which 
allows  the  development  of  initiatives  related to  organic  production,  integrated production,  origin 
denomination or other denominations linked to environment-friendly practices, social considerations 
and animal welfare issues. In order to achieve this objective, the policy proposes having a group of 
norms, certification procedures,  accreditation procedures, verification and a system of traceability. 
This policy document has had an important role as a reference for the development of the organic law 
and the establishment of the national system for mandatory certification of organic products. 
Chile  has  taken  precautionary  measures  for  the  use  of  GMOs,  which  are  allowed  only  for  seed 
reproduction for exports and in other crops only for research purposes. It is prohibited to grow GMO 
crops for other reasons.  
Table 4. Overview of organic agriculture policies and programmes 
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
General  Development  of  Organic 
Agriculture and Coordination 
The Ministry of Agriculture has constituted a group, with public 
and private  actors involved in the organic  sector,  to  coordinate 
actions  for  developing  organic  agriculture.  This  is  mainly  an 
instance of discussion and coordination.  
Information  
The  Office  of  Agricultural  Studies  and  Policies  (ODEPA)  has 
information  and  statistics on  organic  agriculture  in  the  country. 
This information is useful to visualize trends, but the data is still 
not  completely accurate in the sense that not all the sources  of 
information are considered.  
Organic  regulations,  standards  and 
certification 
The Ministry of Agriculture has worked together with the private 
sector (AAOCH) to have an organic law in Chile.   
Export market development 
ProChile, an agency under the Ministry of  Foreign Affairs, has 
supported  the  participation  of  Chile  at  BIOFACH  during  many 
years. It also provides market information.  
Inputs  (seeds,  seedlings,  pest  control 
and fertilizers, irrigation) 
The Agriculture and Livestock Service is oriented to help farmers 
recover  fertility  and  productivity  of  soils.  Recently,  it  has 
incorporated  organic  fertilizers  and  practices  recommended  in 
organic standards.  
The Chilean Commission of Irrigation has incorporated a special 
area of work on water quality and sustainable agriculture, including 
organic agriculture. 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
46
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
Research 
The  National  Institute  of  Agricultural  Research  (INIA)  and 
universities  have  few  research  projects.  The  Foundation  for 
Agricultural Innovation finances private sector projects.  
Extension service 
INDAP  established  a  network  of  small  organic  farmers  and 
provides them technical support through extension services.  
Others  
The  Corporation  of  Production  Promotion  (CORFO)  provides 
different institutional support lines related to investment promotion, 
finance, innovation, quality and productivity. There are no specific 
lines for organic production, but organic farmers can use CORFO 
Services.  
Other policy influences, projects and programmes 
There is an agreement between the Governments of Chile and Switzerland to develop a project in two 
regions  of  Chile.  The  aim  of  the  project  is  mainly  oriented  to  obtain  technical  information  and 
validation of organic systems in vineyards and dairy production. There is an FAO regional project 
(Bolivia,  Chile,  Paraguay,  Peru  and  Uruguay),  which  covers  areas  of  national  legislation, 
harmonization,  certification,  commercialization  and  promotion  of  organic  products  in  domestic 
markets.  
The organic policy development process 
NGOs  were  the  first  actors  in  promoting  organic  agriculture  through  different  programmes  of 
sustainable development. These programmes were more oriented to issues such as self-subsistence 
food  security  in  rural  areas.  Organic  agriculture  was  not  considered  by  the  Government  as  an 
important activity and was considered appropriate only for small farmers. Accordingly, no policies 
were implemented to support the organic sector during the 1980s and most of the 1990s. The first 
policies were implemented when the area under organic cultivation and the organic exports increased. 
New stakeholders appeared (medium size farmers and enterprises) and the private sector started to 
organize itself.  
(a)  In 1999, the Chilean Organic Production Norm, NCh 2439, was published. This norm was 
developed by a technical committee with people from the private and public sectors. The 
production norm was updated in 2004. The norm has been a voluntary standard, but with the new 
law will be the basis for the technical requirements of the regulation.  
(b) In 1999, a new committee started to operate in order to write the Chilean norm on requirements 
for certification bodies that certify organic products, NCh 2079. 
(c)  In 1999, the Chilean Organic Association, AAOCH, was created. 
(d) In 2000, the National System for Certification of Primary Organic Products for Export was 
created. During this year, Chile applied to be recognized as a “third country” by the European 
Union (still pending).  
(e)  In 2003, the Ministry of Agriculture started to write the Chilean organic law and the proposal for 
the law was sent to the Congress in 2004.  
(f)  In  2005, the National Commission  of Organic Agriculture was created. This is  a  private  and 
public commission to discuss and coordinate action and policies that support organic farming. 
This is an important step, because it is possible to guide governmental actions through a direct 
channel of communication. Members from the public sector belong to different institutions and 
the  private  sector  is  represented  by  AAOCH.  The  president  of  this  commission  is  the  Vice 
Minster of Agriculture. 
(g) In January 2006, the organic law approved by the Congress was published.  
Opportunities and challenges  
Organic agriculture has a great opportunity to grow in the coming years, because it has demonstrated 
its technical and economical viability. The new organic law will allow the Government to play a key 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested