What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
47
role in the control of certification agencies. It will improve transparency and the domestic market will 
be regulated, resulting in more clarity. However, Chile still has many challenges: running the new 
control  system  with  a  governmental  institution  as  competent  authority;  developing  the  internal 
market; improving consumer information, research and technical assistance; getting accurate statistics 
in the organic sector; increasing the organic area and getting more involvement of small scale farmers. 
From the policy side, it is necessary to have more specific instruments to support organic farmers.  
Lessons learned 
The main lesson learned during the process was the importance of the organization within the private 
sector so that  it can  express clear needs and consensual proposals. Also, it is important to  create 
platforms  for  discussion  in  order  to  establish  a  common  agenda  between  private  and  public 
stakeholders. Small sectors don’t get as much political support as bigger ones. One way to attract the 
interest of policymakers is to link organic agriculture to the main agriculture agenda and to issues 
such as the environment, sustainable agriculture and food quality.  
Pdf hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding links to pdf document; add hyperlink pdf file
Pdf hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding an email link to a pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
48
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width). Turn PDF form data to HTML form. Export PDF images to HTML images. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links.
pdf link to specific page; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Available zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
49
Annex 2. Costa Rica 
Agriculture conditions 
Costa Rica has a territory of 51,100 km
2
. Of this territory, 25.2 per cent (1,288,565 ha), is dedicated to 
environmentally protected areas or ecological reserves and 25.6 per cent (1,308,160 ha) to farming. 
Costa Rica is a country well known for its enormous biodiversity (around 4 per cent of the world’s 
total), which  makes it possible to produce a wide variety of crops, from grains to vegetables  and 
fruits, most of which are produced by small farmers for the domestic market.  
In 2003, farming directly represented 10.2 per cent of the GDP, and 32.5 per cent when considering 
the real contribution
52
. In that year, export crops represented 76 per cent of the total agricultural value. 
The main export products were bananas,  pineapples, coffee,  food preparations, ornamental plants, 
melons, palm oil, seafood, bovine meat and sugar. Both large holdings and small farmers (usually 
organized in associations) are involved in export crop production, but the exporting activity is mainly 
controlled by the large holdings. 
Organic agriculture 
With regards to organic agriculture, in 2004 there were 10,800 ha, belonging to some 3,495 farmers, 
certified and registered as organic at the official registry of the Organic Agriculture Accreditation and 
Registry Office of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock (MAG). This area represented 2.42 per 
cent of the total cropland. During the past five years, the proportion has been continuously growing.  
Table 5. Organic certified cropland in Costa Rica, in  
relation to conventional cropland, 2000–2004 
Year 
Certified  
organic ha 
Total  
cropland 
Organic share 
of total 
2000 
8 606 
448 453   
1.92% 
2001 
8 870 
440 435 
2.01% 
2002 
9 003 
435 514 
2.06% 
2003 
9 100 
438 967 
2.07% 
2004 
10 800 
444 783 
2.42% 
Source: PNAO-MAG, 2005. 
In Costa Rica, commercial organic agriculture has been slowly growing since the late 1980s. Around 
85 per cent of the certified and probably 100 per cent of the non-certified organic farmers are small 
and medium  size holdings  (on average 2–3  ha per farmer),  most  of whom,  assisted  by  NGOs  or 
organized in farmers associations or cooperatives, control the whole production chain (from farm to 
market), with some exceptions in the export markets. Many small organic farmers work under the 
“integral  farming” approach, with  a strong emphasis on family food security  and self-sufficiency, 
usually  selling  their  surplus  production  at  the  closest  farmers’  markets.  There  are  currently  no 
certified organic animal products.  
52
IICA, 2003. La Real Contribución de la Agricultura a la Economía. In this study, a social accounting matrix 
was used to determine both direct and indirect effects of the agricultural activity on other sectors of the national 
economy.  
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Able to replace all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Professional VB.NET
add links to pdf file; adding hyperlinks to pdf
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document cleanup and image processing options provided; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support
change link in pdf file; adding a link to a pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
50
Figure 2. Distribution of organically certified production in Costa Rica (in ha) 
Banana, 1973
Sugar Cane, 270
Citrus, 957
Others, 232
Cocoa & 
Banana, 4439
Cocoa, 240
Coffee, 1972
Blackberry, 700
Organic markets 
The first organic products were vegetables for the local market and organic banana puree exported to 
Germany. Apart from vegetables, tubers, rice and medicinal plants, which in 2004 represented less 
than 1 per cent of total certified products, most certified production is for the export markets. The 
main organic products currently being exported include coffee, bananas (mashed for baby food and 
dried),  cacao,  orange  juice  and  concentrate,  blackberries,  pineapples,  raw  sugar,  aloe  and  other 
medicinal plants. In addition to the above-mentioned products, it is possible to find almost anything 
that the regular consumer needs at the national market, including animal products, although many of 
these are not certified but are backed by NGOs or sold at the community level. As the regulation for 
organic marketing requires mandatory certification, these products are not advertised or labelled as 
organic. Most of them are sold in direct marketing situations.  
The main export markets are the United States, Europe and Japan. There are no official data on the 
size of the organic export market, but one of the main certification bodies (EcoLogica) calculated the 
exports to the United States and Europe, in 2003, to be worth US$ 10 million. Actors in the export 
market are both small-scale farmers, organized in farmers associations or cooperatives, and larger 
holdings or even transnational corporations (in the case of pineapples, orange juice and part of the 
banana, sugar and cocoa exports). The large holdings that export organic products may or may not 
have some production of their own, but usually buy most of the product from small and medium-sized 
producers. Sometimes these large exporters pay for the certification and therefore farmers can’t sell to 
other buyers.  
As to the domestic market, local community sales, weekly farmers’ markets in different regions and 
supermarkets are the main selling points. The national market is still very small but has been rapidly 
growing during the past five or six years. No confirmed data is available, but it can be stated that the 
national market for organic products is currently in strong expansion. In 2003, EcoLogica calculated 
that the domestic sales of organic products amounted to US$ 1.5 million. Three or four years ago, 
there were only three places were national consumers could buy organic products and they were all 
located in the capital. Today, there are at least 15 places and many of them in other cities or towns in 
the rural areas.  
The main limitation for the growth of the domestic market is the lack of supply. One of the main 
supermarket  chains that  offer certified  organic  products  has  said  its  demand  is  only  50  per cent 
satisfied but  it is unable  to  find  new suppliers.  One of the reasons  for this is that  many  organic 
farmers, in addition to being very small, are dispersed all over the country and, therefore, it is not 
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
application. Generating thumbnail for PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. This
pdf link open in new window; add links to pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata as well as updating, splitting and merging pages from existing PDF documents
add hyperlinks to pdf; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
51
economically  feasible  to  gather and  distribute production to the  main  selling  points.  Thus, many 
farmers choose to sell their products within the  community, where they  obtain better prices from 
direct sales to final consumers and do not necessarily have certification expenditures.  
Supporting structures  
In Costa Rica, training for farmers is offered by several actors. The National Institute of Training 
(INA), which is a governmental technical training centre with nationwide coverage, offers theoretical 
and practical training on a wide variety of issues related to agriculture. This institute has an organic 
agriculture training centre, which has been training farmers since 1998 on both basic and advanced 
technologies, such as compost making or on-farm-developed biological control methods. In relation to 
organic farming, the National University offers a master’s degree in Agroecology. The University of 
Costa Rica has developed a Programme of Organic Agriculture, which carries out research, teaches an 
optional basic course for the agricultural engineering students, and is in the process of establishing a 
master’s degree on organic agriculture to be launched in 2006. The Escuela Agrícola para la Región 
del  Trópico  Húmedo  (EARTH), which  is  a  sustainable  agriculture semi-private  university,  has  a 
didactical farm and teaches organic agriculture courses both for agricultural engineering students and 
farmers. The Centro Agronomico Tropical de Investigación y Enseñanza has a programme on organic 
coffee, which carries out both research and training, and the Costa Rican Technological Institute also 
carries out research and training, with emphasis on organic fertilization methods, at one of its regional 
centres.  
At the  governmental level,  the  recently  created  Institute  for  Innovation  and  Transfer  of  Farming 
Technology (INTA) is in charge of all agricultural research. Although most of INTA’s researchers are 
not trained to work on organic agriculture and there is not yet a specific programme for this purpose, 
there is interest and some small-scale research. Publications have been produced on organic the last 
two years.  
Within MAG, there are two offices specialized in organic agriculture services: the National Organic 
Agriculture Programme  (PNAO)
53
, in  charge of  offering support  and promotion  services; and  the 
Technical Office for Accreditation and Registry of Organic Agriculture (GTARAO)
54
, in charge of 
managing  the  national  organic  guarantee  system.  Both  these  offices  are  under  the  Direction  of 
Phytosanitary Protection. In 1999, PNAO established an inter-sectoral working group on research and 
technology transfer for organic agriculture called PITTA-P.O.
55
, which involves representatives from 
the  main  universities,  organic  farmers’  associations,  NGOs  and  the  public  sector.  PITTA-P.O. 
promotes a participatory on-farm research approach, and among its main activities is the organization 
of yearly organic agriculture technology exchange meetings at the national level.  
Extension is mainly carried out by the National Extension Programme of MAG, which provides for 
extension services in over 90 locations throughout the country. PNAO has one organic agriculture 
coordinator in every region of the country, eight in total, and has, over the last two years, made efforts 
to train a group of around 25 extension workers from different regions. These efforts are still widely 
insufficient compared to the current farmers’ demand for training and extension services in organic 
agriculture.  
Sector organization for organic farming 
The small-scale farmers and NGOs were the first actors to get involved in organic agriculture. The 
national  organic  movement,  now  organized  and  called  MAOCO  (Movimiento  de  Agricultura 
Orgánica Costarricense), has developed over the past 10 to 15 years. Some actors from the academic 
sector as well as exporters and certification bodies have also played important roles. Coordination 
among the different sectors and the scarce support from government institutions have been some of 
53 
Programa Nacional de Agricultura Orgánica del Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganadería. 
54 
Gerencia Técnica de  Acreditación y  Registro  de Agricultura  Orgánica  del  Ministerio  de  Agricultura  y 
Ganadería. 
55 
Programa de Investigación y Transferencia de Tecnología Agropecuaria de Producción Orgánica. 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
52
the biggest challenges since the late 1990s. During the past seven years, however, there has been a 
more active involvement from the public sector, as well as more openness to develop alliances among 
the different sectors involved, which has brought about a considerably stronger organic movement, in 
which the Government is one of the actors along with the other stakeholders.  
Regulation, standards and conformity assessment 
The national  organic  guarantee system is managed by the Technical Office for  Accreditation  and 
Registry of Organic Agriculture (GTARAO). The main functions performed by GTARAO are: (a) 
accrediting the certification bodies; (b) keeping a registry of certification bodies, inspectors, certified 
farmers,  processors  and  others;  and  (c)  supervising  and  auditing  the  whole  system.  To  do  this, 
GTARAO bases its work on the national legislation included in the following laws and regulations: 
Environmental  Law  No.  7554  of  1995; Phytosanitary  Protection  Law  No.  7664  of  1997  and  its 
Regulation; and the national standards for organic production contained in the Organic Agriculture 
Regulation  Decree  No.  29782  of  2001
56
 Compliance  with  ISO  65  procedures  is  required  for 
accreditation.  
Costa  Rica was  included  in  the “third country list” of the  European Union in March 2003. It  is 
approved by Switzerland for organic imports. The processes for equivalency recognition from the 
United States and Japan have been initiated.  
Currently,  there  are  two  national  certification  bodies  (EcoLogica  and  AIMCOPOP)  and  four 
international  ones  (BCS  Oko  Garantie,  OCIA,  Ecocert  and  SKAL)  accredited  by  GTARAO. 
Certification bodies have to comply with the national standards as a baseline but are also allowed to 
certify  to  more  stringent  standards.  Considering  the  number  of  clients,  EcoLogica  is  the  main 
certification body, controlling around 65 per cent of the clients. EcoLogica and BCS are the only ones 
accredited by the Government for EU export purposes and all of them, except AIMCOPOP, have 
obtained the United States’ NOP accreditation. A national seal to back up all nationally accredited 
certification has been developed by GTARAO and it may be used by farmers and exporters, at no 
charge. It is not yet widely recognized.  
For the domestic market, certification in compliance with the national standards is mandatory and can 
be performed by any of the accredited certification bodies. In Costa Rica, most certification of small 
and medium-scale organized farmers is organized through group certification
57
. This is about the only 
feasible option for small farmers in terms of costs but, even so, this is not always a “low-cost” option, 
since many indirect costs, such as training and management of the internal control system, are added 
to the direct costs, which are often too high, especially if the group is small. As an example of direct 
costs,  if EcoLogica certifies a group  of  1,000 farmers, each  one  will  have to pay approximately 
US$ 10, but if the group consists of only 10 farmers, each one will pay approximately US$ 150 and, 
in addition, both groups would have to pay 0.25 per cent of the gross farm sales per year. 
Other options, such as participatory guarantee systems, are currently being developed by a committee 
involving members of MAOCO and farmers in a couple of regions. 
Agriculture policy 
General 
Pesticides have been taxed in Costa Rica for many years, and the income from these taxes supports a 
large portion of the Ministry of Agriculture’s budget for Phytosanitary Protection Direction.  With 
regards to GMOs, national policies are rather cautious and express some concern about the possible 
adverse impacts on biodiversity, the environment and health. In practice, though, the mechanisms for 
the  development  of  GMO-related  activities  (research,  environmental  liberation,  seed  production, 
56
This decree modifies No. 25834 of 1997 and 29067 of 2000. 
57
Where farmers are organized in groups with internal control systems. 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
53
marketing,  etc.)  are  being set up  by  the  Technical Office of Biotechnology of the  Phytosanitary 
Protection Direction.  
The main  document containing the current agricultural policies is called  “Políticas para  el Sector 
Agropecuario Costarricense 2002-2006” (Policies for Costa Rican Farming Sector 2002-2006), and it 
contains a  wide  range  of  policies  oriented  to  support the  development  of  four  priority  areas: (a) 
strengthening  competitiveness  of  the  farming  sector;  (b)  development  of  human  capacities  and 
opportunities for agriculture and the rural areas; (c) agriculture in harmony with the environment; and 
(d) modernization of institutional services.  
Organic agriculture policies and programmes 
With  the  above  policy, for the  first  time,  official  agricultural  policies  include  several  actions  to 
promote and support the development of organic agriculture, which are contained in the chapter about 
agriculture in harmony with the environment. Some of these include promotion of indigenous farming 
practices, agro-biodiversity protection and enhancement, discouragement of contaminant pesticides 
use,  promotion  of  native  seed  production,  support  for  certification  alternatives  and  support  for 
conversion of production. In practice, the implementation of these general policies has been limited 
by the scarce resources available in the public sector.  
Governmental organic  agriculture policies and programmes  are  mainly  promoted  by  the National 
Organic  Agriculture  Programme of the Ministry of Agriculture and  Livestock  (PNAO).  This is a 
coordination  office  whose  main  objective  is  to  support  and  promote  production,  processing, 
international trade and local marketing of organic products. PNAO, with a small central staff and 
budget and eight regional organic agriculture coordinators from the national extension programme, 
develops  diagnostic activities at the  national level, in  order to identify organic farmers’ needs.  It 
coordinates with  both  public  and  private  institutions,  as  well  as  with  the  financial  and  technical 
cooperation organizations that support agriculture, to see that organic farmers have access to at least 
the same services as conventional farmers.  
Since  1999,  some  of  the  most  important  tasks  carried  out  by  PNAO  have  been  to  support  and 
strengthen  the  national  organic  movement  (MAOCO)  and  to  develop  awareness  both  within 
governmental structures and the general public, and to promote policy development. As a result of 
these efforts, the official national agricultural policies now include organic agriculture as a priority 
issue, and MAOCO is currently recognized by both Government and media as the main reference 
with regards to organic agriculture development interests.  
Table 6. Overview of governmental programmes for organic 
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
General  awareness  of  merits  of 
organic 
PNAO develops and distributes materials, articles, presentations and 
reports for both government decision-makers and the media. Training 
workshops for the national media have been organized.  
Organic  regulations,  standards  and 
certification 
A national guarantee system has been established and is successfully 
managed by GTARAO. 
Domestic market 
PNAO  coordinates  actions  with  both  supermarkets  and  farmers’ 
markets to assist in the inclusion of new suppliers to these markets. 
There  is  also  substantial financial  support for promotion  activities 
such as national fairs and festivals.  
Export market  
Both  PROCOMER  (national  export  promotion  office)  and  PNAO 
support participation of organic farmers at Biofach. 
Food processing 
The National Production Council (CNP) in alliance with researchers 
from  the  Centre  for  Food  Technology  Research  (CITA)  of  the 
University of Costa Rica support organic farmers in the development 
of simple food processing methods. 
Production  
Information on organic farming methods is available through PNAO 
and its organic agriculture coordinators nationwide. 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
54
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
A programme called  Programme for the Promotion  of Sustainable 
Agriculture Production (PFPAS), which involves  a US$ 14 million 
fund from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and MAG for 
credit incentives, training and studies, for both sustainable and organic 
agriculture, has recently been approved by the national congress.  
Inputs  (seeds, seedlings,  pest  control 
and fertilizers) 
Technical  assistance  on  natural  pest  control  is  available  at  the 
laboratory of biological control of INTA, as well as at INA.  
PNAO  provides  information  on  biological  control  methods  and 
organic fertilizers.  
PNAO  supports the  development  of  local  farmers’  seed exchange 
networks. 
Research 
Some small research projects have been developed by INTA. PITTA-
P.O. promotes small farmers experimentation exchange activities. 
Extension service 
PNAO has supported the  training of a group  of approximately 25 
extension  workers  on  organic  agriculture  methods.  Some  of  them 
provide technical assistance and training for small farmers and other 
colleagues.  
Other  
Through an alliance among the Ministries of Agriculture, Education 
and  Health,  a  programme  for  the  inclusion  of  organic  agriculture 
teaching  and  the  establishment  of  organic  horticulture  gardens  in 
schools has been put into practice during the past three years.  
Other policy influences, projects and programmes 
The  international  cooperation  sector  in  general,  and  specifically  through  NGOs  such  as  VECO 
(Belgium) or HIVOS (The Netherlands) or United Nations programmes such as the Small Donations 
Programme of the United Nations Development Programme Global Environment Facility (UNDP-
GEF),  support  projects  for  small  farmers’  associations,  NGOs  and  more  recently  for  MAOCO’s 
organizational  strengthening  process.  The  Inter-American  Institute  for  Agricultural  Cooperation 
(IICA) has provided technical support on information and organizational activities. At the national 
level, the Catholic Church’s social and environmental programme (Pastoral Social) conducts training, 
produces information materials and supports community-based networking activities in different parts 
of the country. Within the national financial sector, the Banco Popular, a state bank, has recently 
developed an alliance with MAOCO to develop financial products that are adjusted to the organic 
sector’s needs.  
The policy development process for organic agriculture 
In the process of organic agriculture government policy development in Costa Rica, there have been 
both “internal” and “external” driving forces working together. The internal forces were mainly the 
staff  of the  National  Organic  Agriculture  Programme, which  since  1999 could  count  on  political 
support from the highest level and a few allies within the public sector (mainly some agricultural 
professionals and extension workers who were interested in organic agriculture at a personal level). 
The external forces came from NGOs, farmers’ groups and the international cooperation sector, which 
were willing to develop an informal alliance with PNAO in order to work together towards common 
goals and proposals.  
A group of NGOs, farmers’ associations, and representatives from the public sector, with the support 
of the international cooperation, carried out a consultation process to develop a long-term concerted 
action plan, both at the regional and national levels, resulting in the National Strategy for Organic 
Agriculture Promotion. This process, in which over 1,500 farmers of some 50 organizations around 
the country participated, was the basis for the construction of MAOCO. This umbrella organization 
has been able to influence regional and national policies. MAOCO has also carried out a participatory 
process for  the drafting of  an act  for the support  and  promotion of  organic agriculture,  which is 
currently being discussed at the National Legislative Assembly.  
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
55
The action plan proposed alliances between public and private institutions to try to solve the main 
limitations identified. In terms of implementation, some of the main activities in this action plan, 
under the coordination of PNAO, include:  
1.  Development and facilitation of general information for decision-makers through printed 
materials, presentations and a Web page; 
2.  Strengthening of PNAO by appointing regional coordinators and the inclusion of organic in 
government priorities and planning processes; 
3.  Support of research, experimentation and technology transfer through the establishment of 
PITTA-P.O.; 
4.  Promotion through media, meetings with decision-makers and activities with consumers; 
5.  Support of MAOCO and the national strategy development process; 
6.  Support of regional production projects through coordination with national and international 
cooperation agencies; 
7.  Development of organic agriculture in schools initiative; and 
8. 
Support
of participation at Biofach, Germany.  
Opportunities and challenges 
Some of the most interesting opportunities for organic agriculture development in Costa Rica also 
present  the  main  challenges.  Two  of  these  opportunities  and  challenges  are  to  be  able  to  take 
advantage of the international recognition of the national organic guarantee system, in order to enter 
more international markets; and to take advantage of the rapid growth of the national market, in order 
to promote local marketing of organic products. 
The challenge is to develop the proper conditions to increase the current production. This, of course, 
is  related  to  other  challenges  such  as  strengthening  the  extension  services’  technical  capacity, 
developing  appropriate  financial  products  and  incentives,  strengthening  small  and  medium-sized 
farmers’  organizations  and  finding  effective  solutions  to  support  farmers  during  the  conversion 
period. In general, policies put in place, as well as those currently being proposed by MAOCO, seem 
to be oriented in the right direction. The main constraint seems to be the lack of available human and 
financial resources, which hinders a full implementation of the policies at the rapid and constant pace 
which is needed. 
Lessons learned 
Although some investment has been made by the public, private and international cooperation sectors 
for  the  development  of  policies  to  support  organic  agriculture  in  Costa  Rica  (especially  for  the 
implementation of the organic guarantee system and more recently for the strengthening of MAOCO), 
to this date, the achievements in organic policy development have been mainly the result of public-
private alliances rather than of any heavily funded policy development project. The process for policy 
development  might  take  more  time  but  it  is  certainly  more  participatory  and  concerted.  Most 
interested actors have participated in the processes and, therefore, are willing to defend and back up 
these policies, which should give sustainability and stability to the proposals as well as to the related 
organizational  processes.  This  is  especially  important  in  the  case  of  organic  agricultural  policy 
development,  since  it  first  developed  in  the  private  sector  and  many  are  concerned  that  if 
Governments get involved, the original orientation and goals will be lost. The policy development 
process in Costa Rica shows that this does not necessarily have to be the case, as long as the right 
alliances can be developed between the public and private sector actors and the process for policy 
development is given enough time to facilitate a transparent and widely participatory approach.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
56
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested