pdfsharp table example c# : Add hyperlinks to pdf online Library software class asp.net winforms wpf ajax UNCTAD_DITC_TED_2007_38-part411

What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
67
Sector organization  
NGOs play a significant role in supporting the organic movement in Egypt. Some of these include: 
•  The Egyptian Biodynamic Association (EBDA), established in 1997; 
•  The Union of Growers and Exporters of Organic and Biodynamic Agriculture (UGEOBA), 
established in 1998; 
•  Fayoum Organic Agriculture Society (FOAS); 
•  Ecological Agriculture Protection Association (EAPA); 
•  Egyptian Center of Organic Agriculture Society (ECOAS); 
•  Wafaa Society for Organic Agriculture Development (WSOAD); and 
•  Council of Organic Agriculture within EAGA (Egyptian Agribusiness Association). 
All these organizations provide training and extension services in organic agriculture to its members. 
Regulation, standards and conformity assessment 
There are two national certification bodies: Egyptian Center for Organic Agriculture (ECOA) and the 
Center of Organic Agriculture in Egypt (COAE). Both are accredited by a European accreditation 
body and are members of IFOAM. There are seven foreign certification bodies working in Egypt.  
Egyptian legislation for organic agriculture  
No official  legislation for organic agriculture is issued  in Egypt as yet.  However, there is a draft 
“Regulation to Process and Handle Organic Products in Egypt, Part I on Plant Production”. This draft 
was prepared by a committee  assigned  by  the Agriculture Council, Ministry of  Trade. It  will  be 
submitted to the National Assembly for ratification. When this law is ratified, it will be submitted to 
the European Union for Egypt’s approval as a third country. 
Table 11. Overview of organic programmes and policies 
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
General awareness of merits of 
organic agriculture  
Training programmes for extension staff and farmers exist. 
Organic regulation, standards and 
certification 
A draft regulation of organic agriculture exists. 
Research 
The Government supports research in the Agricultural Research Center 
and universities. 
Extension service 
Some of the extension staff is trained in organic agriculture. 
Others (credit, education) 
For all farmers, not only organic farmers: credit  lines with agriculture 
banks and revolving funds for certain projects. 
Other policy influences projects and programmes 
There are several international programmes that promote organic agriculture: 
a.  Italian technical assistance programmes: there are two projects being implemented in Fayoum and 
Mersa-Matrouh which assist farmers with the establishment of farmers’ associations and training 
on organic agriculture principles and application. 
b.  CARE  international  is  providing similar  services for 750  farmers  in  the governorates  Quena, 
Sohag and Fayoum. CARE is also establishing associations for marketing of organic products. 
c.  A USAID project provides training for farmers in organic production in Egypt. It also organizes 
study tours for selected farmers to visit organic agriculture in some developed countries, e.g. the 
Netherlands, Germany and Spain. 
d.  FAO provides technical assistance to the country to enhance organic development. 
Add hyperlinks to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links to pdf in preview; pdf link to attached file
Add hyperlinks to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links pdf document; adding an email link to a pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
68
e.  The European Union has commissioned a study on organic agriculture in Egypt and methods to 
enhance the organic sector.  
Opportunities and challenges  
Egypt has high potential for organic farming and has reached an important stage in implementing this 
practice  for  a  large  number  of  crops.  Newly  reclaimed  areas  (more  than  500,000  hectares)  are 
available to expand the cultivated area with organic practice. The Government of Egypt, NGOs and 
the private sector should develop organic agriculture through: 
•  National laws for organic agriculture to put Egypt on the European Union’s third country list;  
•  Production of Egyptian standard specifications (ESS); 
•  Encouragement of the central laboratory of organic agriculture as a research and extension body 
with help from the NGOs to coordinate the organic movement and disseminate the knowledge 
and the culture of organic agriculture among farmers and extension staff; 
•  Encouraging and supporting the establishment of organic and consumer protection associations; 
•  Establishment of a database and information centres for organic farming; 
•  Establishing a market information centre for organic products; 
•  Encouraging exports to international markets; 
•  Increasing the public awareness of organic agriculture and the need for safe food; and 
•  Investing in education.  
The association of organic exporters has identified the following limits for the competitiveness of the 
organic sector in Egypt:  
•  Limited methodologies available for processing organic foodstuffs that avoid the use of 
prohibited substances; 
•  High cost of organic ingredients for processed products, some of them imported, e.g. sugar; 
•  High cost of the machinery (i.e. composting machinery and steam sterilization machines to 
disinfect products from bacteria and fungi); 
•  Low availability of organic seeds, seedlings and vegetative materials; and 
•  High cost for logistics, keeping organic products separate. 
Tapping unused local knowledge and smallholder access 
Subsistence farmers living under various ecological conditions have acquired invaluable knowledge 
of  genetic  stock,  cultivating  techniques  and  natural  resource  management  that  can  contribute  to 
developing  organic  farming  systems.  However,  little  of  this  heritage  of  learning  and  insight  is 
recorded and disseminated. A key to further advances lies in building institutional bridges between 
farmers and research and extension services. The initial focus has to be on the knowledge and wisdom 
of the local farmers and their capacity to innovate and develop cultivation procedures, pest control 
and harvesting procedures, which enhance the productivity and quality. 
Because smallholders are quite isolated, they often don’t receive the technical information needed to 
enable them to improve their livelihoods. Connecting them to knowledge networks, particularly those 
that allow them to learn from each other, is essential for the development of organic farming systems. 
Many  opportunities  to  increase  the rate  of  development  are  missed  because  the smallholders  are 
seldom listened to, learned from, and engaged in the development process. Only if partners have a say 
in why, what, and how programmes and projects can be made to work for them, can real development 
occur. This participatory approach may be slower and more difficult, but it works better. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add links to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references:
pdf link open in new window; pdf links
69
Annex 5. Malaysia 
Agriculture conditions 
Malaysia is divided into West (or Peninsular) Malaysia and East Malaysia, with a total land area of 
330,000 km
2
. The climate is hot and humid throughout the year. Average temperature is 26°C and 
average humidity is 80 per cent (peaks to 94–100 per cent). Daily temperature varies between 21 and 
32°C and 13  and 27°C on the coast  and in  the  highlands respectively. Annual average rainfall is 
between 200 and 250 cm (higher for East than Peninsular) with a north-east monsoon from October to 
March (wet period) and a south-west monsoon from May to September (dry period). 
Malaysian  agricultural  production  consists  of  commodity  tree crops  (mainly  for export),  rice and 
livestock (mainly for domestic consumption), and fruits and vegetables (for both export and domestic 
consumption). The main export crops include oil palm, rubber, cocoa, pineapples and pepper, and 
cover  over  three  quarters  of  the  cultivated  land.  Production  is  divided  between  self-employed 
smallholders and plantations. Smallholders hold the majority of land, but the more efficient larger 
plantation sector dominates production. Green Revolution agriculture has been promoted, together 
with  infrastructure  and  technical  support  to  smallholders,  to  increase  yield  and  income.  The 
Government is encouraging a shift of production to higher-value crops. A minimum area will remain 
under paddy because of its strategic importance. The domestic rice self-sufficiency production target 
is  set  at  65  per  cent.  New  growth  sectors  identified  include:  floriculture,  aquarium  fish  and 
biotechnology products, including plant cell tissue culture techniques for producing metabolites for 
pharmaceuticals, dyes and food additives; use of hormones to improve animal productivity; enzyme 
action in fermentation processes; and GMOs.  
Organic agriculture 
There were two streams of development initiatives, NGOs and the private sector. NGO involvement 
started in the second half of the 1980s. In the early 1990s, a number of pioneer organic production 
initiatives started up. Parallel to the above, consumer demand for organic produce, primarily from 
cancer patients on diet therapies, began to catch on. Imported organic products of limited selection 
were reportedly available as early as 1985, at a retail shop in Kuala Lumpur. But it was only in the 
mid 1990s that regular importation of organic products was organized. 
A major breakthrough came about in 1995 with the conversion of a number of commercial vegetable 
growers.  The  produce  was  distributed  through  a  subscription  system,  where  subscribers  paid  a 
monthly fixed  price in advance  for their  weekly pack of vegetables. Distribution  covered several 
major cities of Peninsular Malaysia, reaching more than 500 families. The company drew a lot of 
press  attention, including  a  feature on national  television. Although  small,  the Malaysian  organic 
sector is a growing niche sector. Production is now mainly undertaken by professional (commercial) 
operators. Early NGO-type initiatives are now largely taken over by small and medium-sized market 
entrepreneurs.  
Production 
In  2001,  the  Department  of  Agriculture  (DoA)  reported  there  were  27  organic  producers  in  the 
country with a total area of 131 ha, a five-fold increase in the number of organic initiatives listed in an 
earlier NGO country report on sustainable agriculture in 1996. In a local press report (NST, 6 March 
2005) the DoA estimated that organic farming involved about 900 hectares with a sector value of 
about US$ 10 million a year.  Domestic  production  is  largely limited  to  vegetables  and  fruit  with 
possibly one organic poultry operator in East Malaysia. Whilst growing, total estimated acreage is still 
statistically insignificant. This may change, given signs of interest from the palm oil industry.  
A  number  of  local  retail  bakeries  are  using  organic  ingredients  (imported).  There  is  small-scale 
processing of tofu, soymilk, soy sauce, tempeh, various sauces and pickles.  
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Replace a Page (in a PDFDocument Object) by a PDF Page Object. Add necessary references:
add hyperlink to pdf; add links in pdf
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. How to VB.NET: Create Thumbnail for PDF. Add necessary references:
adding a link to a pdf; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
70
Sector organization for organic farming 
The first of several efforts to form a national network was the Malaysian Organic Farm Network 
(MOFAN) initiative in 1990, but it is currently not active. In 2001, Organic Alliance Malaysia (OAM) 
was founded as a membership-based private sector association to fill the gap. It currently has over 30 
members, mostly from the trade (importers and retailers). OAM hosts a monthly lunch meeting for 
organic operators in Kuala  Lumpur  and publishes the  Organic Directory.  It is also considering a 
private label scheme. Besides MOFAN and OAM, there are two other groups.  
Markets 
Most local production is sold domestically with  some export  to Singapore. Today, sales channels 
include dedicated organic/health food shops and supermarket chains. No reliable market statistics are 
available. Market turnover was estimated to be about US$ 14 million for 2004 (market interviews), 
and growing. The market has largely been developed through personal recommendations and word of 
mouth, with each dealer cultivating his/her own group of consumers. Adverts are occasionally found 
in health-related magazines, but rarely in newspapers. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, when organic 
was relatively new, press coverage was frequent. Press coverage is now infrequent and incidental. 
Public seminars  are  held  now  and then,  often  in  conjunction  with events  such as  world  food  or 
environment days. An annual fair called Organic Search has been staged by an NGO since 1999.  
Imports 
Imports comprise the larger portion of organic products sold in the country. The main import items 
are grains (wheat and beans), pasta, juices, cereals and beverages. Imports also include vegetables and 
fruits. Fresh produce is mainly imported from Australia and New Zealand. Processed products are 
also shipped from the United States and Europe. Some items are sourced from Thailand and China. It 
is worth noting that Malaysia is overall a net  importer of food products with imports of  US$ 3.4 
billion in 2003 (Source: Statistics Department 2004). 
Distribution 
As  retailers and supermarkets were not keen to stock organic  products  earlier, distribution in the 
1990s  was  mainly  through  home-based  dealers,  who  are  mostly  consumers  of  organic  products 
themselves or advocates of natural/alternative health systems and diets. The pioneer organic importers 
and distributors were new companies set up and dedicated to handling only organic products. Some of 
them have since been taken over by conventional business corporations interested in expanding into 
organics. The major importers, distributors and a majority of retailers are located in the Klang Valley, 
where the capital city Kuala Lumpur is located. Markets are also developing in other major cities in 
the country.  
Supporting structures  
Training: There is no formal  organic agriculture training  available in  the country.  Introduction to 
organic agriculture is available through the occasional seminars and workshops organized by NGOs 
and more recently by the DoA. Technical development in the field comes mainly from self-initiative 
and learning from experience. Few private-sector, NGO activists or government personnel are trained 
in organic agriculture.  
Advisory service:  The  DoA has service stations spread  over the country and employs a visit and 
training  system  for  extension  in  general.  Information  about  organic  agriculture  is  likely  to  be 
disseminated through the existing visit and training system, as is IPM. Professional private sector 
advice on organic production and certification is available from a limited number of people in the 
country. 
Research:  Few  studies  on  organic  agriculture  have  been  made.  Previous  and  current  organic 
production experiences are largely not documented. MARDI (Malaysian Agriculture Research and 
Development  Institute)  has  started  research  in  this  field.  Nevertheless,  reliable  data  about 
productivity, fertility, pests and diseases management, and cost-benefit analysis, are not yet available.  
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on. Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support all
check links in pdf; adding links to pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and Note: PDF processing and conversion is excluded in NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on
pdf hyperlink; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
71
Regulations, standards and conformity assessment 
There  is  currently no  regulation  on  organic labelling in  the country.  Except  for  a few  operators 
certified by foreign certification bodies  working in the region,  most farms,  processors,  importers, 
wholesalers and retailers are not certified. Most processed products are imported and sold as finished 
certified packed products. Bulk items such as grains and dry food are repackaged and relabelled by 
importers under their own organic brands. The market basically works on trust. Fraud has not been a 
serious problem.  Retailers generally purchase  from  producers they  trust and  consumers  buy from 
retailers they trust.  
In August 2001, the Malaysian Standards for the production, processing, labelling and marketing of 
plant based, organically produced foods (MS1529) was approved and published by the Department of 
Standards Malaysia. MS1529 mentions three major references in its development: 
•  FAO/WHO  Codex  Guidelines  for  the  production,  processing,  labelling  and  marketing  of 
organically produced foods; 
•  IFOAM Basic Standards, September 2000; and 
•  Concepts,  Principles  and Basic Standards  of Organic  Agriculture  by  the Indian Standards 
Committee. 
MS1529  is  not  written  as  a  standard  for  producers.  The  DoA  has  since  finalized  more  detailed 
standards.  The  Government  has  established  a  certification  programme,  Skim  Organic  Malaysia 
(SOM),  within  the  DoA.  Registration  for  certification,  currently  covering  only  primary  crop 
production, was officially opened in December 2003. There are about 40 applicants on the list. No 
certification has yet been issued.  
Agriculture policy 
The first National Agricultural Policy (NAP) in 1984 was oriented towards stemming rural–urban 
migration. It  was thought at  the  time  there  would  not be enough urban jobs  to  absorb  migrants. 
Because  of  rapid  industrialization  and  economic  growth  in  the  late  1980s,  Malaysia  experienced 
labour shortages in the manufacturing sector. The second NAP in 1992 turned to facilitating rural–
urban migration with a focus on encouraging the evolution of larger farms and intensifying human 
resource development for rural youth to migrate to higher value added jobs in other economic sectors.  
Organic agriculture policies and programmes 
Though  previously  ignored,  the  Third  National  Agriculture  Policy  (NAP3)  identified  organic 
agriculture as a niche market opportunity, particularly for fruit and vegetables. The Government plans 
to encourage small-scale producers to venture into organic farming as part of the strategy to raise 
producers’  incomes,  overcome  problems  of  chemical  residues  in  food  production,  protect  the 
environment, reduce food imports and enhance the country’s export of high-quality safe food. Setting 
up an accreditation scheme to facilitate domestic market development is included in NAP3.  
Under  the  Eighth  Malaysia  Plan  (2001–2005),  the  Government  targeted  an  increase  of  organic 
production area by 250 ha. It includes provision of additional one-time assistance of up to US$ 1,300 
per hectare in infrastructure development, for example farm road, irrigation, drainage, electricity and 
water. Organic producers are also eligible for existing credit schemes as well as a special loan for 
agriculture enterprises. At a public seminar announcing the DoA organic certification scheme (August 
2002),  the  Minister  of Agriculture  noted  that  in  the  future,  support  comparable to  that  given  to 
conventional  agriculture,  such  as  credit  facilities,  extension,  research  and  development,  will  be 
devoted to developing organic agriculture in the country. The Ministry, he said, was studying the 
DoA’s proposal to establish special organic production areas.  
Under  the  Ninth  Malaysia  Plan  (2006–2010),  the  Government  is  targeting  the  organic  farming 
industry to be worth more than US$ 200 million in five years. The Ministry of Agriculture plans to 
have 20,000 ha under organic farming methods by 2010, increasing local production by 4,000 ha per 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
72
year. Organic consumption is expected to grow by 20 per cent per annum. Allocation for organic 
farming  is  expected  to  increase  substantially  from  the  US$ 135,000  allocated  under  the  Eighth 
Malaysian Plan. Various courses are lined up to teach the benefits of organic. (Source: press report, 
NST 6 March 2005). 
Table 12. Summary of government measures to support organic farming 
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
General awareness of merits of organic 
Activities projected in Ninth Malaysian Plan (2006–2010). 
Organic regulations, standards and 
certification 
No regulation. 
National voluntary standards published.  
Government certification  programme  established  but not 
fully operative. 
Domestic market development 
Government certification programme. 
Production  
20,000 ha expansion by year 2010 is planned. 
Research 
MARDI is conducting some research. 
Extension service 
Conducted through current visit and training system. 
Other (credits, education, etc.) 
Access to existing support for conventional agriculture. 
Policy development process 
In  the  late  1990s,  although  organic  agriculture  was  in  its  infancy  stage,  the  need  for  Malaysian 
Standards was raised at a number of forums by NGOs in the country. A working group in the DoA 
was formed and draft standards were prepared in 1999/2000. A request was subsequently made by the 
DoA to the Department of Standards Malaysia to adopt Malaysian Standards on organic foods. A 
Working Group on Organic Foods under the authority of the Food and Agriculture Industry Standards 
Committee was established to follow up deliberations on the standards initially prepared by the DoA 
working group. Members of this group include a mix of government bodies (e.g. DoA, Ministry of 
Health,  Malaysian  Agriculture  Research  and  Development  Institute,  Malaysian  Palm  Oil  Board, 
Malaysian Palm Oil Association, Malaysian Pepper Board, NGOs and a private company). 
In  August  2002,  the  DoA  introduced  the  government  certification  programme,  including  an 
innovative  public–private  partnership  implementation  arrangement  on  inspection  with  Organic 
Alliance Malaysia (OAM), the private-sector organic association. Less than a year later, in July 2003, 
with the change of programme manager, the arrangement was rescinded. Acceding to requests for 
greater  support,  the  DoA  announced  that  it  will  offer  certification  to  all  operators  (primary 
production)  free  of  charge.  The  certification  scheme  targeted  for  the  domestic  market  will  be 
implemented on a voluntary basis. It is projected that certification could eventually be private-sector 
based. The DoA is expanding the scope from primary production to cover processing, repacking and 
retailing.  
Implementation  of  other  aspects  of  the  government  support  for  organic  agriculture,  for  example 
research, extension and promotion, is not open to private-sector involvement.  
Opportunities and challenges 
The  Malaysian  organic  sector  is  a  young  growing  sector  and  lacks  sector  organization  in  many 
respects. Sector development is partly constrained by the absence of support services, for example 
research and training, and a strong common platform to provide clear sector leadership and direction.  
Production and conversion: Although market premiums are high, farm conversions are still low due to 
the  risk  and  cost  of  conversion.  Conversion  support  requires  time  and  resources.  Technical 
development currently is largely dependent on the producer’s own initiative and self-learning from 
practical experience. Many farmers are reluctant to invest time and resources in soil improvement due 
to insecurity of land tenure.  
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
73
Agriculture production in Malaysia is also segregated. Crop cultivation and  animal  husbandry are 
normally farmed separately. Animal manure and/or plant residues have to be brought and transported 
over distances for composting. As vegetable holdings are small, restructuring the farm to incorporate 
animals is not generally feasible.  
Quality assurance and regulations: Although approved in 2001, MS1529 has so far had no impact on 
the Malaysian organic industry. Few are even aware that it exists. The DoA certification programme 
scheduled for implementation in January 2003 has yet to emerge in the market. Whilst appreciating 
the  Government’s  initiative,  producers  and  market  players  are  concerned  about  the  lack  of 
transparency and efficiency in the process. The sector is also concerned of the possible establishment 
of mandatory labelling regulations that would be premature for sector development.  
Pricing, selection and product development: Prices for imported as well as local organic products are 
generally  high.  Retail  prices  for  fresh  organic  fruit  and  vegetables  can  be  up  to  four  times  the 
conventional prices. The high price tag for organic products is an impeding factor for wider market 
uptake. Total market volume is relatively small. There is still a lack of selection. Many food items are 
still  unavailable,  for  example  animal  products.  Local  processing  is  in  its  infancy  and  available 
products do not always meet consumer taste preference.  
Sector development: There is plenty to do, mainly in the area of research  and extension, product 
development  and  private  sector  norms  and  certification.  The  sector  is  somewhat  trapped  in  a 
comfortable, high-margin “bubble” market and not quite able to address the infrastructure deficiencies 
to get out of its niche situation. Unfortunately, government involvement is focused on certification 
and not on the critical gaps in research, extension and consumer education. 
Impact  of  government  policies:  The  private  sector  is  worried  that  the  Government’s  interest  in 
pushing the supply side could flood and destabilize the market. Imports have been instrumental to the 
development of the domestic market (regarding the availability of a variety of products). The private 
sector is also concerned that the Government’s interest to reduce the national food import bill may 
lead to regulations that will also restrict organic imports. The above may rally private sector actors to 
a more cohesive private sector–NGO advocacy position that would inform government intervention.  
Lessons learned 
The  two  major  lessons  or  challenges  are  building  sector  consensus  and  better  public–private 
partnership.  
Sector consensus: NGO activists continue to be sceptical of private sector intentions to collaborate 
well together. The private sector, made up of “competitors”, has also yet to find ways and means of 
collaborating in common sector building initiatives.  
Consistency in  policy  implementation:  Frequent  changes  of leadership in  the public  sector,  from 
Ministerial to Department head levels, make it hard to maintain consistency in policy implementation. 
Over three years of the DoA certification programme, there has been a change of the Minister of 
Agriculture, three programme managers and three chairpersons of the steering committee.  
Lost opportunity: Although it is projected that certification could eventually be private-sector based, 
the DoA later rescinded the joint implementation arrangement due to requests from parties wanting 
free service or opposing the appointment of OAM as the private sector inspection body. The DoA 
turnaround placed OAM in a quandary. OAM suspended its founding objective to establish private-
sector  certification  in  favour  of  collaboration  with  the  DoA.  Having  waited  and  waited  for  the 
Government to roll out its certification programme, private sector actors and NGOs are beginning to 
recognize their needs may be better served by a private-sector initiative. 
74
75
Annex 6. South Africa 
Agriculture conditions 
South Africa, with its apartheid history, still suffers from a dual economy, and this is particularly true 
of agriculture. In the 20th century, 60,000 white commercial farmers were heavily subsidized by the 
State. Of these, 3,000 highly efficient farmers produced 40 per cent of the Gross Agricultural Product, 
while another 10,000 produced a further 40 per cent
75
. Other farmers made little profit, or in many 
cases  substantial  losses,  but  they  were  supported  by  low  interest  loans.  Much  of  the  indigenous 
agricultural  tradition  was  destroyed  by  the  British  colonial  and  South  African  nationalist 
administrations.  Land  reform  is  a  priority  of  the  new  democratic  Government,  and  although  the 
practical support  for emerging commercial  farmers is  often poorly  implemented,  slow  but steady 
progress is being made
76
.  
A second factor affecting South African agriculture is the arid to semi-arid nature of the country. 
Although the eastern seaboard is reasonably well watered, the further west one travels, the drier the 
country becomes. Typically, the sub-tropical east coast enjoys annual precipitation of 900–1200 mm 
(forestry, sugar, vegetables, dairy, tropical fruit); the central rain-fed cropping areas have 600–900 
mm (maize, sheep, beef cattle, goats, wheat); while the arid west has annual rainfall of 300–900 mm 
(sheep, goats, with pockets of fruit, tobacco, cotton, groundnuts, mohair and Rooibos tea). Only 3 per 
cent of the country’s 122 million ha can be irrigated, and more than half of this is already developed 
(about 14 per cent of the total is arable). Maize is the staple food. Although the overall contribution of 
agriculture to the Gross Domestic Product has fallen steadily from the middle of the 20th century, 
agricultural exports  have  risen  sharply over  the past 12 years  (US$ 0.4 million in 1992;  US$ 2.2 
million in 2002
77
). In spite of this, there has been a dramatic exodus of skilled agricultural workers 
from the sector
78
, with totals dropping from 1.7 million in 2000 to 1.2 million in 2003.  
Organic agriculture 
Within this context, organic farming, too, suffers from the “dual economy” syndrome. Whereas in 
1970 there were fewer than 20 certified organic farmers and about 50 small-scale organic gardeners 
actively involved with Bio-Dynamic or Organic Associations, all of these were South Africans of 
European origin, except for  one, the notable Zulu organic pioneer, Robert Mazibuko. He inspired 
many young South Africans, black and white, to become involved in organic farming, and to build on 
the African tradition of organic farming. Many traditional farmers were still organic, carrying on with 
the indigenous traditional knowledge which is part of the African heritage. However, much of this 
tradition had been deeply damaged by limitations on land ownership (first imposed by the British in 
1897, under the Glen Grey Act, which forbade black South Africans to own more than four ha of 
land), and the whole apartheid land deprivation, which saw 13 per cent of the land allocated to over 
80 per cent of the people.  
Organic farming among white farmers grew from its low base in 1970 to about 50 small commercial 
organic farmers farming actively by 1990. In 1993, the first organic farmers were certified, by the 
United Kingdom Soil Association, and the export market developed, with a few large commercial 
enterprises  exporting  avocadoes,  tropical  fruit,  and  later  Rooibos  tea,  wine  and  some  seasonal 
vegetables. By 2001, the number of certified farmers had risen to 291, covering over 200,000 ha of 
land, most of which was extensive grazing land in the dry Karoo. A survey established that at that 
stage, approximately 25,000 ha of arable land was certified organic
79
 
75
Land  Policy:  Towards sustainable  development,  1990.  RMB  Auerbach,  Indicator  South  Africa:  Policy 
Review, vol. 8 no. 1, University of Natal, Durban. 
76
National Skills Development Strategy Implementation Report, 2003/04. Dept of Labour, Pretoria. 
77
Ibid. p.238. 
78
National Skills Development Strategy Implementation Report, 2003/4. Dept of Labour, Pretoria. 
79
Organic Farming: A world revolution in agriculture, 2001. R Auerbach in Farmers Weekly. 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
76
Leonard Mead, Chair of Organics South Africa, estimates that in the year 2005 there were about 200 
certified organic farms in South Africa covering some 515,000 ha. Of this, he estimates that about 
500,000 ha is natural veld (grass), and about 11,000 ha is Rooibos tea. Of the balance, 59 per cent is 
fruit, 6 per cent essential oils, 4 per cent wine, and the rest vegetables
80
. The domestic and export 
markets are both currently showing healthy growth. 
Organic markets 
The past five years have seen the development of a small but vibrant domestic market in South Africa. 
Several supermarkets are actively promoting organic products, and some are supporting small farmer 
producer groups
81
. However, the supermarkets tend to insist on exclusive supply to one market by a 
farmer group, and are reluctant to provide meaningful developmental support to farmers, even though 
they use their support of the farmers extensively in advertising campaigns. The organic export market 
continues to grow steadily, with the main lines being Rooibos tea (to Japan), organic wines (mainly to 
Europe) and subtropical fruits (mainly to Europe and the United States). Pack houses are inadequate 
for current needs of the organic sector. Food processing is mainly developed for wine, soy, wheat and 
fruit.
The table below gives a rough estimate of the value of the organic industry in South Africa. There are 
only  about  200  large  and  medium-scale  farmers  certified  in  the  country,  producing  perhaps 
US$ 16 million to US$ 19 million in (mainly export) earnings per year. Then there are a substantial 
number  of  small  commercial  farmers,  only  a  few  of  them  certified.  This  sector  represents  a 
tremendous potential for the growth of the organic industry, and will largely respond to the demands 
of the domestic market. These farmers, like the large and medium sectors, comprise mainly white 
farmers, but increasingly, emerging black farmers are showing interest in organic agriculture, seeing it 
as  a  development  of  their  indigenous  knowledge  systems,  and  also  recognizing  the  potential  of 
certified  organic  production  in  opening  up  access  to the  marketplace. The  category of  emerging 
farmers shown  in  the table  represents  the  subsistence farmers, most  of whom are  not  organic by 
design,  but  rather  organic  by  default.  The  estimated  total  value  of  organic  produce  is  therefore 
between US$ 30 million and US$ 60 million, but a big share of this is neither certified nor sold as 
organic. 
Table 13. Estimate of the value of organic produce in South Africa
82
Number per category 
Intensively farmed area 
and value 
Total yield value/ 
category 
100 large (500–5,000 ha) 
R5,000/ha x 200 ha = R1 million 
R100 million 
100 medium (50–500 ha) 
R2,000/ha x 100 ha = R200,000 
R20 million 
5,000 small (5–50 ha) 
R1,000/ha x 10 ha = R10,000 
R50 million 
1 million emerging (0.5–5 ha)  R200/ha x 1 ha = R200 
R200 million 
Sector organization  
Four main farmer organizations exist in the organic sector. The oldest is the BioDynamic Agricultural 
Association  of  Southern  Africa.  Organics  South  Africa  is  the  largest  organization  and  has  now 
established  itself  as  a  credible  mouthpiece  for  commercial  organic  farmers.  The  Cape  Organic 
Producers’ Association is a small but highly commercial, and highly focused group in the Western 
Cape. The Network of Community Organic Farming Associations works with small-scale emerging 
farmers.  
80 
Key developments in the global organics market, and their potential for KwaZulu-Natal, keynote address by 
Leonard Mead, Chair, Organics South Africa, 23 November 2005.
81 
The Organic Journey, 2005. Woolworths (www.woolworths.co.za). 
82 
The organic industry in South Africa, 2003. Dr. Raymond Auerbach, Director, Rainman Landcare Foundation. 
R1 = US$ 0.16. Paper delivered to the Symposium on the Potential Contribution of Organic Farming to South 
Africa’s Economy. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested