pdfsharp table example c# : Add links pdf document application software utility azure windows winforms visual studio theology_mission_20063-part43

31
Motivations, in contrast, are more long-term. They relate
to purpose. For example, I have found that in counseling
students who lack motivation, I can be successful in
helping them to become motivated if I can help them
reconnect to their purpose for being in school, or help
them to discern a purpose in it all. Such discovery of
purpose could also come out of a singspiration or rock
festival.  Symbol  systems  create  these  moods  and
motivations.  By  establishing  moods  and  motivations
religions bring truth and way of life to the level of the
heart and even more deeply to the level of spontaneous
behavior. In so doing they render a people
'
s world and
identity uniquely and obviously true.  
A General Order of Existence  
Geertz says they create these moods and motivations in
part "by formulating conceptions of a general order of
existence." By this he means they convey conceptions of
how things really and truly are. They paint pictures of the
unseen world, of judgment and the afterlife, of gods and
ancestors,  of  demons,  and  angels.  They  sing  of  the
meaning of life, of what it means to be human. They
teach and remind a people of who they essentially are.
That is they give the people of their religious tradition a
world--a cosmic home--to live in and a sense of identity-
-they tell us who we are.  
An Aura of Factuality 
And they create these moods and motivations in part by
"clothing  these  conceptions  with  .  .  .  an  aura  of
factuality."  That  is  religions  do  not  depend  upon
persuasion  alone,  but  through  such  means  as  we
mentioned already they make these conceptions of world
and identity look, feel, and sound true. When a religion
of a people group is working well, what they believe
seems obvious. It takes a transforming act to instill doubt
in them. The result, again in Geertz
'
s words, is that these
"powerful"  and  "pervasive"  moods  and  motivations
"seem uniquely realistic." By uniquely I think he means
that, among all other possible feelings and purposes that
a person could have, these seem the most appropriate
because they are congruent with valid interpretations of
the world and the self.  
In other words, religion is a network of interrelated
symbolic objects, events, qualities, acts, and relationships
that helps people feel the world the religion teaches them
about is not only true but very real. Confidence about
these things is their default position. Furthermore, they
become convinced  over  generations and  centuries--in
some cases millennia--that their way of life is the only
appropriate one for them--and usually--but not always--
for others, if these others only knew and accepted the
truth.  Furthermore,  for  most  of  the  unreached  and
resistant peoples  we  are  commissioned  to  reach,  the
whole of their lives--every aspect, not just their worship
and  moral  aspects,  but  their  domestic,  economic,
political,  educational,  and  vocational  aspects--relate
intimately to the world and self as given them by their
religion.  
A former student of mine works among the Malay
people in Malaysia. He asked a Malay whom he had
gotten to know well if he--that is the Malay friend--had
ever met a Malay follower of Jesus. The Malay friend had
no idea what he meant. It was not that he did not know
what a follower of Jesus was. It was not that he did not
know of Malaysian nationals--for example, of Chinese
ethnic origin--who were followers of Jesus. It was simply
that being an ethnic Malay was so closely identified in his
mind with being Muslim that he had no place in his
world or sense of self for a Malay follower of Jesus. A
Malay  Christian  amounted  to  an  oxymoron.  This
provides us with a glimpse at the incredible power of
religious worlds to shape identity and interpret reality. So
lets look at some of the characteristics of religious worlds
relevant to us as people planning to reach the people who
inhabit them. It will help us to realize in part at least why
they are resistant and thus unreached.   
THE NATURE OF RELIGIOUS WORLDS 
In preparation for embarking on our journey toward
making the gospel known among unreached and resistant
people  groups  I  want  to  make  some  more  specific
observations  about  the  self  and  world  as  given  by
religion. I will use the term world, keeping in mind these
religious worlds contain an understanding of individual
and communal identity as well.  
First, 
Religious Worlds are Sacred
It is of course obvious that religious worlds are sacred.
But it needs to be emphasized nevertheless. Traditional
religious people have a greater sense of the sacred than do
Western  missionaries.  For  example,  I  know  of  a
missionary in a Muslim country who completely lost the
interest  of a very serious Muslim seeker because the
missionary in one visit took her Bible--not her Qur
'
an--
out of her back pack and placed it on the floor. The
relationship  ended  as  far  as  spiritual  inquiry  was
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
Add links pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding links to pdf document; pdf hyperlinks
Add links pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
clickable links in pdf files; c# read pdf from url
32
concerned. This violation of the sacrality of scripture
ended the person
'
s interest in the gospel
!
Essentially, however, to say that religious worlds are
sacred is to say that a people
'
s view of reality and sense of
identity  has  the  sanction  of  the  most  powerful
transcendent and ultimate spiritual realities. If we take
this analysis of religion seriously, we will be ready to
understand why people for whom religion is working
well are  resistant to the gospel--why missionaries are
involved in an encounter, a clash of worlds.  
Second, 
Religious Worlds are Communal
Traditional religious societies are much more communal
than  are  Western  secular  societies.  Religion  is  not
understood by these people as an aspect of life that can
be  replaced,  modified,  or  innovated  by  individuals.
Changes made by individuals have to be disguised usually
as a revival of tradition. The community considers people
who change religions as either insane or treasonous.  
One of  the soundest  Islamic  traditions, according to
Muslims,  identifies  three  acts  warranting  capital
punishment:  married  persons  committing  adultery;
murder; and when someone "forsakes his religion and
abandons the community."
7
Whether we  are dealing
with Thai Buddhists, caste Hindus, Malay Muslims, or
even expatriates from traditional Buddhist, Hindu, and
Muslim societies, we need to be aware--appreciatively
aware  because  identity is  a  sacred  and truly  human
reality--of both the potential impact of our gospel on
their world and communal identity and the impact of
their world on the gospel, should they accept it. It also
provides us, as I have already said, with part of the reason
why they are in fact resistant.  
Third,  
Religious Worlds are Constructed
From what we have said thus far, one would get the
impression that the worlds and identities of unreached
and  resistant  peoples descended from  heaven  in one
whole piece, completely unified  in  their impact  and
unchanging in their nature. In fact this impression is
appropriate for our discussion because such worlds do in
fact  clash  with  ours  as  though  they  were  unified,
invulnerable,  and  unchanging.  This  apparent
invulnerability represents a major reason these peoples
are unreached and resistant. These  people have  been
found difficult and not visited. It is crucial for us to
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Add necessary references:
pdf email link; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically. Document
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; chrome pdf from link
33
appreciate  the  fact  that  these  worlds  are  sacred  and
communal.  They  may  be  more  vulnerable  than  we
realize, but their vulnerability will not be open to us
unless we respect their invulnerability--and prepare for it.  
But sacred, communal worlds given and maintained
by religion are in fact constructed.
8
They result from
human activity and interpretation and they change and
evolve. Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims, and Christians have
significantly different conceptions of what Geertz calls a
"general order of existence"--conceptions of what I have
called self and world. They are all based on what their
forbears perceived to be revelation: the Vedas were heard
by the ancient Rishis in a state of spiritual receptivity; the
Four Noble Truths of the Buddha were perceived in a
state of deep meditation; and Muhammad received the
Qur
'
an impressed upon his heart or dictated by the Angel
Gabriel. But these revelations do not agree on the general
order of existence they espouse as real. Unless you are a
complete relativist, it seems obvious that these visions
cannot  all  be  true.  These  visions  have  come  down
through  the  centuries,  they  are  reinforced  by  their
symbol systems, but they are ultimately constructed by
human beings in community.   
These visions are not only constructed; they are also
under construction. They gradually or suddenly change
and develop. For this reason we can never assume that
what we learn about the culture or religion of a particular
people group is actually true in every detail of that group.
This represents good news for us, because we wish to
introduce significant innovation as we bring the story of
Jesus to match up with what the Holy Spirit is actually
trying to accomplish in this people groups--or in persons
from it--already.  
While I was at Cambridge University working on a
book to help Christians respond to Muslim rejection of
the cross of Jesus, I met a featured speaker at a Christian-
Muslim  dialogue  sponsored  by  the  Muslim  Student
Association.  To  my  surprise,  he  believed  in  the
crucifixion of Jesus. Granted he was an unusual Muslim.
He was a former Baptist missionary to Russia out of West
Virginia  who  was  teaching  anthropology  at  the
University of Stockholm in Sweden and married to a
Finnish woman. He is also one of the few remaining
speakers of a Native American dialect he learned from
one set of grandparents. Definitely not a typical Muslim.  
Nevertheless, he served as a reminder to me of the way in
which religious traditions go on being constructed by
groups and individuals--how a variety of cultural and
religious influences constantly play on people
'
s minds--
even in a tradition like Islam that looks so unchangeable
to  the  outside  viewer.  Even  in  the  unusual  Muslim
speaker I met in Cambridge a number of worldviews and
ways  of  life  contend for  his  attention. He  is  under
construction himself. Even as a featured, trophy, Muslim-
convert speaker he also sews a few seeds of challenge to
the established world of his Muslim audiences.  
Thus if we wish to establish communities of faith in
Jesus Christ among unreached and resistant peoples we
need to learn to be expert agents of change. The Holy
Spirit has already been working diligently among these
people to  influence the construction  of  their  world-
working with great creativity against great opposition.
We need to be able to discern where the Spirit is at work
and bring the story of Jesus to that point to illuminate
what the Spirit  is up  to  and to support the  Spirit
'
s
project.  
Finally,  
Religious Worlds are Contested  
Another comforting fact as we address unreached and
resistant people groups is that their sacred and communal
religious worlds are constantly being contested. There
would not have been a Christian gospel if Jesus had not
challenged the assumptions, values, and actions of his
own Jewish tradition. No Buddhism would have existed
if Gautama Buddha had not challenged the truths of the
caste system and Vedic scriptures of his ancient Indian
tradition. Muhammad emerged from Arabian traditional
religion to challenge it radically. He drew from both
Judaism and Christianity as he knew them, but radically
contested some of their general orders of existence and
ways of life as well.  
But  religious  worlds  are  not  just  contested  by
prophets and sages who catch a wider or deeper vision of
reality. Religious worlds have to deal every day with
challenges to their efforts to clothe their conceptions
"with an aura of factuality." Factors in the lives of all
individuals and  groups work against the  moods  and
motivations created by their religion
'
s seeming "uniquely
realistic."  
Clifford Geertz identifies several factors that work
against religious worlds. That is, they operate in every
place and time to one degree or another. Chaos threatens
religious worlds of people at three principal limits: at the
limits of their ability to make sense of things; at the limits
of their powers of endurance; and at the limits of their
moral insights.  
When people can no longer explain the experiences
and ideas they encounter from within the framework of
the world religion gives them, they experience chaos and
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
adding a link to a pdf in preview; add link to pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
active links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
34
fear. For example, I gave a speech commemorating the
beginning of the fifteenth Islamic century at a library in
Baltimore. It was a very constructive speech about how
monotheists can work together in a secular world to
achieve benefit and order for our communities. But in
the question and answer period I was almost assaulted by
questions from a young Muslim man from Egypt. He
started by wanting to know if I was a believer. I told him
that I was a believer and not just a nominal believer or a
believer because of my family background, but a believer
by conviction and participation. So I felt I understood
what it felt like to be a Muslim believer. But I was not a
Muslim, but a committed Christian believer.  
I cannot remember what his further remarks and
questions were. I do remember he  apologized to me
afterwards during the refreshment time. He said he was
not upset at what I was saying, but struggling with the
fact that he had been taught in secondary school in Egypt
that all Christians who studied Islam seriously became
Muslims.  My  presence  and  presentation  called  that
conviction into question. He was dealing with a certain
amount of bafflement. His faith was being contested.  
A more relevant experience along these lines occurred
to my student, Jerry  Page, while a missionary in an
Islamic village in West Africa. His mission board allowed
him to live and dress like the people of the village but
denied his request to wear the little kippa that all adult
men in his village wear. His board refused because they
felt it would identify him as a Muslim. He reluctantly
obeyed their directive. He discovered in the short run
that the villagers all assumed he was not a believer in God
because he did not wear the little head covering. The
little cap functioned for them as a symbol designating the
person wearing it as a male believer.  
In the  long run, however, having discovered that
Jerry was in fact a devout believer in God, they had to
change their understanding of the significance of the
little kippa. They could no longer consider it a symbol of
belief in God and of appropriate piety. From this and
similar experiences, Jerry developed the concept in inter-
cultural communication of the worldview wedge. Jerry
'
s
bare head represented a small challenge to their world
and identity, it suggested subtly that they may be wrong
about other things as well. As such it paves the way for
the kind of innovation it takes for the people to accept
the gospel. Jerry was gently contesting the viability of
their world. In a vast array of ways a people
'
s world is
being  contested  day  in  and day  out  by  new  things
requiring interpretation.
9
When people can no longer endure the suffering they
have to undergo, their world and identity suffer threat.
Suffering also contests a people
'
s world. One interesting
phenomenon about Muslims and the cross of Christ is
that, even though the orthodox Muslims of both Sunni
and Shiite traditions, reject our stories of Jesus
'
death on
a cross, contemporary Islamic poets in both Persian and
Arabic societies are affirming the crucifixion using Jesus
'
death on a cross as a symbol of authentic willingness to
suffer for the public social good.
10
This image of Jesus
does not occur in the Qur
'
an
11
or subsequent traditional
Muslim literature.
12
It contests  the Islamic  tradition.
Evidently their religious tradition did not supply them
with what they needed to endure the suffering of their
circumstances or to mount the commitment necessary to
carry  out  their  public  duty.  Religious  worlds  are
contested at the point of human suffering.  
The problem of evil emerges out of the problem of
suffering. It  is not  merely a threat to our ability to
endure, as is the problem of suffering, but to our ability
to make sound moral judgments. Judaism has a sound
doctrine of suffering and the Jewish people from early in
the existence of their tradition have suffered. 
Y
et the
Holocaust was too major an event to explain in any
adequate way. It therefore has created a very large amount
of moral quandary--not only among Jews, I might add. I
heard of a Jew who became a Christian after reading
Martin Luther
'
s "Table Talk." Someone had given him
the book so he could see the anti-Semitic dimensions of
it.  In  addition  to  the  anti-Semitic  material,  he  also
encountered Luther
'
s theology of the cross. He found it
the only theology he had known that made any sense out
of the holocaust experience.  
I  can imagine  there  being individuals in  Muslim
societies who question whether God has any concern for
them when their society has suffered so severely. These
closet atheists may respond almost immediately to the
conviction that God was in Christ suffering with us and
giving us hope and assurance--beyond our suffering--of
eternal life. Atheists reject the view of God their world
gives them. They have not rejected views of God they
have not yet known about. Hindus and Buddhists do not
seem to be bothered with the problem of evil as much as
Muslims, but it can challenge any person regardless of his
or her religious affiliation.  
Lamin Sanneh, professor of Christian mission and
African  studies at 
Y
ale University,  had  an experience
related to this moral limit as a teenage heir to leadership
in a West African Islamic community, studying Islamic
disciplines. His deep conviction that there must be a God
of love was not rewarded by his Islamic studies. When he
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
adding hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add hyperlink pdf
35
was taught that Christ was not crucified, that God could
not have let his great prophet die, he wondered what
would it say about God if he would let Jesus die
?
His
conclusion so satisfied his heart that he became a believer
in the God who let Jesus die. This conversion eventually
led to his baptism.
13
When we add to this all the influences that flood into
even the most remote places of the earth from world
views and ways of life that radically challenge those of
traditional religious societies, it is not hard to realize that
these  sacred  communal  worlds,  constructed  by  us
humans,  are  being  contested  constantly.  Movies,
television, internet, CDs, cassettes, books, newspapers,
magazines,  radio  broadcasts,  advertisements,  leaflets,
modes of clothing--many, many factors of our modern,
global context--like Trojan horses come into these sacred
worlds and then slowly unpack, sending challenges to
sacred,  communal,  and  constructed  religious  worlds.
Indeed those who appear to cling most tenaciously to the
traditional paths, may be, like Saul of Tarsus, some of the
ones most  deeply troubled  by problems of meaning,
suffering, moral outrage, and uncertainty. No wonder
religious  traditions  try  to  protect  their  people  from
becoming Christians.  
What I have tried to say so far is that the unreached
and resistant peoples God wants us to reach with the
story  of  Jesus  are  resistant  and  sometimes  at  least
unreached because they live in religious worlds and hold
to concepts of identity that are deeply ingrained by their
religious  traditions.  Their  moods  and  motivations
convince them their view of truth and their way of life
cohere uniquely with reality. But I also want to leave you
with  the  impression  that  these  socially  constructed
realities are not free from threats and problems. They not
only are open to change, they are undergoing it steadily.  
So what does this mean for our efforts to reach these
people with the story of Jesus
?
I am asked to give
AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
I cannot hope to define evangelical for you for this
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively. are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
add url to pdf; adding links to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
pdf link to email; clickable pdf links
36
talk. I am not willing to say that only evangelicals take
the Bible with utmost seriousness. But I want to say
evangelicals do take the Bible with utmost seriousness.
Another dimension of being evangelical is to take classic
Christian doctrines such as the Trinity, the Incarnation,
and the Atonement with utmost seriousness. We believe
the truths of scripture and orthodox tradition to be true.  
Furthermore, evangelicals believe that all people can
come  to  know  God  in  their  own  communal  and
individual experience. We believe in deep personal piety,
in daily devotions, in faithful attendance at the means of
grace, and in evangelistic witness and service to brothers
and sisters within our communities of faith and to those
outside it.  
We believe strongly that evangelism and works of
mercy and justice are incumbent upon our communities
of faith--that the people of God in Christ should be
about both of these vital businesses.  
We believe the Bible should be read, marked, and
studied by all; that it should be faithfully interpreted
from the pulpit and in the classroom.  
We believe in the sacraments of baptism and the
Lord
'
s  Supper  and  that  public  and  private  worship
should be offered to God--communally several times a
week and individually on a daily basis.  
Congruent with these convictions, we take the Great
Commission with utmost seriousness. We believe it is our
duty,  burden,  privilege,  and  joy  to make the  gospel
available to all peoples, and to make disciples of them by
baptism and teaching, that is, by verbal and non-verbal
means. We believe furthermore that this task will result in
people making Heaven their home who would otherwise
be lost. We believe that the way of salvation presented in
the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments represents
God
'
s  one  way  of  salvation.  We  believe  people
everywhere can and need be convicted and convinced
that Jesus is Lord-that they need to be convinced of sin,
righteousness, and judgment. We also believe that to be
the work of the Holy Spirit (John 16:8).  
I labored with you above about the nature of religion
in order to show both the difficulty and possibility of
helping  the  Holy  Spirit  in  drawing  unreached  and
resistant  people  groups  shaped  by  major  religious
traditions to Christ. Although I am certainly not familiar
by any means with all the motivations, methods, and
messages  that  Free  Methodist  missionaries  currently
espouse--far from it--nevertheless, based on what I do
know,  I want to suggest a message,  motivation, and
method  I  believe  appropriate  for  mission  among
unreached,  and  resistant  people influenced  by  major
religious traditions.
14
We start with motivation. Let us be  
MOTIVATED BY THE LOVE OF GOD 
First, let me say that I b
e
li
e
v
e
our ta
s
s
hould b
e
und
e
rtak
e
n in li
g
ht of th
e
Trinity.
15
God the Father
'
s
universal love and sovereign lordship over all creation
ought to be our primary motivation for sharing the story
of Jesus. Other motives certainly apply such as the fact
that if we neglect what I am calling our task, people that
otherwise  would  enjoy  fulfillment  in  Christ  as
individuals and as communities of faith in this world and
the next, will be lost both in this world and the next.  
This is a worthy motivation, but it is included in the
love of God. Unless it is enfolded in that universal love
deeply and consistently, however, it can be compatible
with  other  unacknowledged  but  ethnocentric
motivations  such  as  our  civilization  and  national
achievements make us superior to you. And our religion
is better than yours is. 
Y
ou need us.
16
Second, what God ha
s
don
e
in Chri
s
t a
s
r
e
v
e
al
e
d in th
e
N
e
w T
es
tam
e
nt, 
es
p
ec
ially in th
e
g
o
s
p
e
l
s
, r
e
pr
ese
nt
s
not only
th
e
g
uid
e
lin
es
to 
s
alvation in thi
s
world and th
e
n
e
xt, but
al
s
o a r
e
v
e
lation of how thin
gs
in 
s
h
ee
r r
e
ality ar
e
The
gospels, interpreted with help of both the Old Testament
and the other New Testament documents, compose the
founding story of Christianity. Through the lens of the
Christian story God has revealed the general order of
existence--how things truly are. Without this revelational
story we would not know the true nature of God and
everything else. This story reveals Jesus and especially the
symbols of the cross and the empty tomb as both the
model of the love of God for all the people of the world
and the model for the extent to which we should go to let
people know about his story. We are empowered by the
love Christ reveals to participate in the obedience he
exemplifies. We are motivated by the victory he won for
us  to  believe  in  the  possibility  of  full  Christian
discipleship for resistant people.  
Third, w
e
b
e
li
e
v
e
in th
e
work of th
e
Holy Spirit.The
Holy Spirit is God at work in the world and in the
church.  When  Amos  spoke  for  God  to  Israel  who
thought their special chosenness set them above all other
nations he referred to what the Holy Spirit had been
doing in those other nations. "Did I not bring Israel up
from Egypt and the Philistines from Caphtor and the
Arameans  for  Kir
?
"  (Amos  9:7).  God  was  not  only
involved in Israel
'
s story, but also in the stories even of
their enemies and captors
!
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
37
The Holy Spirit works among all individuals and
people groups toward the goals and values of God the
Father. The Spirit has worked and is working creatively
and consistently even where the story of Jesus and the
greater story of the Bible are unknown. Thus we are
motivated by the fact that the story of Jesus we know will
illuminate the work of the Spirit whom they do not
know, but will come to know. It is easier to explain a
reality than to defend a theory. We are eager to explain
reality by means of the story of Jesus. The Spirit has been
involved in the construction and contesting of the worlds
of resistant and unreached people. We need to know this.
We need to respect this and see it as a feature of God
'
s
love for these people. We are motivated by "the grace of
our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the intimate
engagement (my words for koinonia) of the Holy Spirit"
(2 Corinthians 13:13).  
See the example above where Lamin Sanneh without
knowing the story of Jesus came to realize the love of a
God who would allow his prophet to die. What greater
joy than to have been the one to narrate that story to
illuminate  his  experience  of  God.  But  what  of  our
message
?
Just as we are motivated by the nature of the
Triune God, so also the good news about who God is
represents the essence of our message.  
OUR MESSAGE:
The Ultimate Lord as Intimate Companion 
Many  entire  books  are  devoted  exclusively  to  the
Christian understanding of God. What I want to say here
is that the nature of God should be the essence of our
message. We can get way off the track comparing Jesus,
Muhammad, and Buddha for example. We can argue for
the  doctrine  of  original  sin  without  comprehension
because it is so hard to defend a theory with people who
inhabit a different world from our own.  
Comparative scriptures would be a hard way to go
because Hindu, Buddhist, and Islamic scriptures are not
comparable with Christian scripture. It is like comparing
apples, oranges, peaches, and bananas. Starting with a
critique of their worldview and life ways, would hardly be
a fruitful avenue because  of the problem of clashing
worlds I mentioned above. As the Spirit leads, any of
these avenues may turn out to be fruitful. I
'
m not saying
they can
'
t possibly work. But I am saying that the key
issue is God.  
The  startling  news  is  this:  the  one,  eternal,  all-
powerful  Creator,  the  only  fully  sovereign  and  holy
Person,  the  one fully  and consistently reliable Being
wants to enter into relationship with every person and
every community.  
This Ultimate Being wants to engage with people
and communities in their most intimate concerns. God
wants a part in supplying the needs which people employ
magic, divination, and other forms of supernatural and
human ingenuity to supply. This mighty Lord is jealous
of any being, procedure, or thing that would take his
place as the source of good for his people (Exodus 20:3,
4).  
Most Hindus have gods who are specialists at the
various things they need for a full and safe life. But most
of them do not believe that the Ultimate Reality is a
personal being interested particularly in them. Thus the
lesser  gods  who  are  specialists  in  meeting  specific
immediate needs get most of their attention. Even lay
Thai Buddhists whose Monks look to themselves for the
meeting  of  their  needs--especially  for  salvation  or
nirvana--find in the available spirits the power they need
for full and secure life. Most Muslims have a conception
of God who is adequate and reliable, certainly ultimate;
but they do not know how intimately God wants to
relate to them. They thus turn to sources orthodox Islam
frowns  upon  to  seek  guidance,  protection,  jobs,
offspring, and healing.
17
I want to make the point that the main issue is God.
The great Dutch Reformed missiologist, Johan Herman
Bavinck,  held  that  the  most  important  question  for
Christian mission is the question, "What have you done
with God
?
" He points out that peoples have identified
God with cosmic processes, they have replaced God by
their immediate concerns, they have allowed God to be
eclipsed by focusing primarily on moral order, or they
have equated God with an impersonal Absolute.
18
All these responses to God involve separating the
ultimate deity or reality from the intimate issues of life.
Jesus brings them together. Even the prayer he taught his
disciples does this, "Our Father in Heaven, hallowed be
your name, your kingdom come, your will be done on
earth as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive  us  our  debts,  as  we  also  have  forgiven  our
debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us
from the evil one" (Matthew 6:9-13 NIV).  
Bavinck rightly identifies the most important focus
for mission communication; namely, the understanding
people have of God. But I want another chapter added to
the discussion. The questions must also be asked, "What
has God been doing with these people
?
" Recall Amos
'
declaration that God was involved even in the stories of
Israel
'
s enemies. God has been revealing himself through
creation for these people. God has been healing, rescuing,
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
38
feeding, clothing, sheltering, forgiving, reconciling, and
supplying  offspring  for  these  people.  God  has  been
providing personal and social order and requiring justice
of  these  people.  God  has  been  revealing  himself  in
persons and communal symbols, stories, and events.
19
Of  course  this  discussion  of  God  gives  rise  to  the
question, How do we know what they have done with
God and, even more difficult to discern, what God has
been doing with them
?
Usually people groups have a name for the Ultimate
God. It can often be clear that a particular deity has some
of the attributes of the God revealed most clearly in the
Jesus story. In this case, we have news about this God that
will liberate and thrill these people. It may be that the
God Jesus reveals is in fact more sovereign and more
ultimate than our hosts have come to believe. It may be
that he is even more intimate and interested in the details
of their lives--even the lives of their women and children-
-than any beings they have known. Of course what Jesus
revealed about God may antagonize and scandalize them
also.  After  all,  his  teaching  about  God,  even  when
partially disguised in parables, got him some enemies.  
Y
es the gospel is about revelation--because our God
wants all to know his justice, mercy, and love. He wants
to know and be known. 
Y
es, the gospel is about salvation-
-because our God is a saving God and sin separates. The
gospel is about God. It is the God spell (or story) and it
is spell binding. The gospel reveals what God has been
doing among our host people. It reveals who God is. It
provides a core for a transformed world and self for our
host  people.  What  missional  method  does  all  this
suggest
?
A Method for Mission to Unreached 
and Resistant Peoples  
As people wanting very much to reach the unreached and
willing to work even with resistant peoples we need to
know that we cannot go anywhere where God has not
been. We do not bring God anywhere. Rather we meet
God wherever we go. Even religious worlds and identities
that seem totally invulnerable to the gospel have been
shaped in part by the work of the Holy Spirit.  
In fact, God has given us the story of Israel in our
Bibles partly to demonstrate how people groups (since
Adam and Eve left the garden at least) characteristically
respond to the work of God in the Spirit and how God
in the Spirit characteristically responds to their responses.  
Isn
'
t it obvious by now that reaching unreached and
resistant religious peoples involves a method based solidly
on discernment
?
Of course, books have been written
about missionary method. I cannot adequately defend
my contentions in this presentation about method. I
cannot even adequately describe the method in full. But
I  can  sketch  in for you  three key  components of a
method appropriate for reaching unreached and resistant
peoples. 1) Our mission should communicate by story. 2)
A discerning mission community or team should carry it
out.  3)  It  should  work  toward  a  contextualizing
community of host people.  
1.  Communi
c
ation by Story  
Story telling represents the best form of communication
for people who have never heard the gospel and who are
likely to be resistant to it. Three reasons support this
claim.  For  one  thing,  people  in  traditional  religious
societies use stories to convey spiritual truth. They are
used to this method of discourse. They trust it.  For
another, people get caught up in stories before they get
down on the communicator. Jesus used this method well
in dealing with opposition and resistance. And finally,
listeners  will  reveal  themselves  and  their  worlds  in
response to a story. In other words, story telling is a form
of  discernment.  It  can  reveal  where  God  has  been
eclipsed and distorted by the culture. It can reveal where
God has been at work in the culture.  
This was a major part of the method of Vincent
Donovan in bringing the gospel to the resistant Massai of
East Africa. He went to their villages and asked if he
could tell stories about the God who had called him to
their people from far away. He found that their reactions
to the stories revealed both the places biblical truth stuck
in their  throats  and  the  places  where  it  was  clearly
acceptable to them. He did not ask them to decide for or
against the gospel until he had finished his story telling
and knew that the issues for acceptance and rejection
were clearly understood. The majority of the villages
accepted  the  gospel.  It  radically  transformed  their
religious world in a way that did not mean taking on the
religious world of an American missionary, but one that
was truly a Massai Christian world.
20
2.  Dialo
g
i
c
al Di
sce
rnm
e
nt in Community  
Because  mission  is  essentially  God
'
s  work  in  the
unreached and  resistant people  already,  in  us  as  the
missional team, and in the convicting and convincing
that accompanies our message and witness, the basis of
our method needs to be discernment. We have to be able
to detect where the Spirit is at work. Adequate answers to
both the questions, What have they been doing with
God
?
And What has God been doing with them
?
require
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
39
dialogue and discernment.  
Christian dialogue with representatives of the non-
Christian  religions  has  gotten  a  bad  name  among
evangelicals  because they  associate it  with  Christians
whose main interest is harmony and cooperation with
other religions and not with their being convinced that
Jesus is Lord. Proclamation sounds better to us because it
means  announcing  the  truth,  bearing  witness  to  it
convincingly,  and  not  compromising  with  other
alternatives. Have we explored, however, the possibility
that we can pray for and expect proclamational results
from  dialogical  engagement
?
This  I  believe  is  both
possible and essential.  
Dialogue is necessary for discernment and it permits
those to whom we would witness make clear what their
world is like. It can be much less threatening than a
proclamational approach.  It also can reveal  how  our
message is being understood. In dialogue our host people
have a chance to respond to our self-expression and to
reveal their convictions and reactions. In such a process,
we have a chance to see where the Spirit has been at work
in them and in us.  
I devoted a separate section to the crucial method of
story telling. One of the reasons for using this method of
communication was its dialogical quality. Through their
reactions to our stories we can discover what our host
people believe, know, and care about. We can also discern
these things from listening to their stories.  
We learned in the first part of this presentation that
religion  is  a  system  of  symbols.  Through  symbols,
religious communities create the moods and motivations
that make their view of the world and their way of life
seem uniquely realistic. These symbols can also reveal
through dialogical discernment the nature and structure
of their world and ways. Through inquiry about and
observation of their symbols and the stories and rituals
that orchestrate these symbols, the role of God in their
lives and community can more easily be discerned.
21
It will considerably enlighten us about a host people
'
s
world if we ask them carefully and persistently about the
meaning of their symbols and rituals. Some symbols are
peculiar and exclusively related to a people
'
s world and
identity. Other symbols turn  up in just about  every
culture. 
Dialogical  discernment  engages  much  more  in
sharing  stories  and  non-verbal  symbols  than  in
comparing ideas and standards of conduct. By observing
their  festivals  and  inquiring  into  the  symbols  and
symbolic stories and actions associated with the festivals,
we can learn a lot about our host people in a non-
confrontational way. By listening to their stories and
showing  genuine  interest  in  their  symbols  and
ceremonies, we engage them in something they have
deep  interest  in.  In  some  cases,  however,  they  may
interpret our interest as prying into their secrets in order
to gain their power. Obviously, the more genuine our
relationship with them is, the  less  likely they  are to
interpret our interest as an attempt to steal their secrets
and their power. It is important to discern whether they
interpret our interest as flattering or threatening. This
brings us to the communal dimension of our dialogical
discernment. The missional team provides the context
where discernment can best take place.  
What I am calling for here is a dialogical discernment
of the working of the Spirit in the people to whom we go,
the people who host us (note I am avoiding the popular
designation "target people"), the working of the Spirit in
the missional team, and the working of the Spirit in
making our witness convincing, represents essentially a
missional spirituality. Our mission preparation needs to
include among  other vital  components, a spirituality
focused on communal discernment. It is a simple process,
but not an easy one.  
Pneumatic Spirituality for 
Missional Discernment
While time does not permit me to elaborate in any detail
upon  such  a  spirituality,  I  want  to  mention  some
dimensions of what I have in mind. I have in mind what
Father  John  C.  Haughey  has  called  pneumatic
spirituality.  
In his illuminating study of the Holy Spirit, he identifies
three types of spirituality: programmatic, autogenic, and
pneumatic. Most Christians are engaged in one or both
of the first two types. What is so necessary for any fruitful
participation  in  God
'
s  mission-especially  to  resistant
people-is the third one.  
Programmatic  spirituality  means  sincere
participation in the program of the church: involvement
in  communal  and  private  worship,  communal  and
private study, and service to the community of faith and
to the outside world. Autogenic spirituality represents
those spiritual disciplines, practices, and perspectives that
individual Christians choose for themselves. One need
only go to a Christian bookstore to see the multiplicity of
print and other media devoted to individual spirituality.
Haughey  does  not  denigrate  these  two  important
common spiritualities. Indeed, we could wish for more
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
40
people to benefit from them. Nevertheless, his third type,
pneumatic spirituality, represents a biblical spirituality
for discernment, a crucial task of mission.  
Pneumatic spirituality means spirit-led discernment
in community. It takes place where two ("spouses for
example," says Haughey
22
), three, or even more believers
are gathered together, believing Jesus is with them in the
Spirit. They  practice  listening  to the Spirit  together,
sharing their insights and concerns. In the following
paragraph, Haughey describes the essence of pneumatic
spirituality:  
Those living [the pneumatic] . . . to God claim to
have a sense of the immediacy of the presence of Risen
Lord that only the Spirit can produce. . . . They live  . . .
according to a felt knowledge, an inner unction the Spirit
provides. Affective prayer is the medium in which they
experience God.
23
In another paragraph he stresses the discerning and
communal dimensions of pneumatic spirituality. 
A faculty of discernment develops in pneumatics,
since they are concerned with the direction in which God
is calling them. . . . What is presupposed for a pneumatic
spirituality is an unmediated experience of God in Christ
over  a  sufficiently  long  period  of  time,  so  that  the
metaphor  "companionship"  becomes  an  accurate
description  of  their  interior  life.  .  .  .  [Pneumatic
spirituality] presumes community.
24
Here in the missional community spiritual gifts given
to members of the community of faith are exercised for
discerning the work of the Spirit. It is this spirituality that
needs to be practiced as part of the missiological training
of our missionaries to resistant and unreached people. It
can be practiced by our mission leadership from the top
down and by our mission rank and file from the bottom
up.  It  will  result  in  an  appreciation  for  gifts  of
administration and divinely gifted authority; it will result
in appreciation for the gifts of encouragement, healing,
discernment of spirits, and all spiritual gifts-named and
unnamed,  known  and  unknown-of  every  person
connected with the mission from the service-oriented
field hand to the eloquent fund-raiser on the deputation
trail. It represents the body of Christ in the world.  
Pneumatic spirituality is as simple as two people
praying  together  and  seeking  God
'
s  inspiration  and
guidance for their task and opportunities. It can be as
complicated  as  a  communal  prayer  meeting  where
everyone is consulted on an issue after bathing it in
collective  and individual prayer. Leaders in the early
church appear to have used this process in their crucial
deliberations over what was to be required of gentile
converts to the new way. The phrase the community
began its report with, "It seemed good to the Holy Spirit
and  to  us"  (Acts  15:28)  encapsulates  pneumatic
spirituality.  
It would not surprise me if this kind of spirituality
prevails  among  Free  Methodist  missionaries,  church
leaders, and mission executives. The point here is that we
need to practice it in connection with the discernment
necessary to determine the crucial features of a people
'
s
world and where the Holy Spirit has been and is at work
among them. Knowledge of cultural anthropology, of
biblical and systematic theology, of religious studies and
mission history, knowledge of the religious tradition of
the host people and their general culture (if known)
represent  indispensable  preparation  for  mission  to
unreached and resistant peoples. But all this knowledge
must always be background.  
The people themselves who host us must always be
foreground.  Our  knowledge  can  obscure  the  actual
realities of the people we meet and the work of the Holy
Spirit among them and among us. Pneumatic spirituality
will turn out to be essential for keeping all these things in
perspective. No matter how much we know-and you can
never know enough, though you can sometimes know
too much-we must always remain learners together in
communal discernment based on open dialogue with the
host people.  
Our missional teams will always be their guests and
must always be their students. This is true even in the
third crucial area of our method, contextualization.  
3.  Cont
e
xtualization with th
e
Ho
s
t Community
Unless the meaning of the gospel expresses itself in
forms that are rooted in the religious world of the host
people, the gospel will be a foreign implant and not an
indigenous innovation and transformation. A missional
method  based  on  story  telling  and  communal
discernment should naturally lead to the expression of
Christian  meaning  in  forms  meaningful  to  the  host
people. For this to happen, it  is important that the
contextualization of these forms be done in dialogue with
the host people as well.
25
Contextualization is a vast
topic about which much could be said. I will satisfy
myself with treating briefly just one particularly relevant
form of contextualization.  
Pramod Aghamkar, a missiologist with vast missional
experience among resistant people has come up with the
term spontaneous contextualization. He exemplifies this
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested