pdfsharp table example c# : Change link in pdf file application Library cloud windows asp.net .net class UNCTAD_DITC_TED_2007_39-part412

What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
77
Supporting structures  
Support for organic farmers through government research and extension has been non-existent to date. 
An  important  development  over  the  past  five  years  is  the  establishment of Quality  Management 
training and  procedures, which are  broader than  just organic  certification,  but  include EurepGAP 
requirements. Organic  producer groups have  started to work  together, and the first group of Zulu 
farmers was certified in  2001. This group has grown from 27 farmers to over  200. Several  other 
groups, all in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, have been established since then, and are in the process 
of organizing themselves as primary cooperatives, while establishing Zulu Organics as a secondary 
cooperative to set up a Quality Management system, coordinate logistics and packaging, and assist 
with marketing
83
. Several training organizations and non-government development organizations are 
providing  some  assistance  with  project  implementation  and  training.  The  Rainman  Landcare 
Foundation  is  currently the  only government-accredited  training  organization  offering  training  in 
organic agriculture, and these courses are now offered through a number of organizations which have 
arrangements to use the accredited training manuals.  
Regulation, standards and conformity assessment 
Organic standards were developed by a national group, based on the European regulation 2092/91, but 
modified  to  suit  South  African  conditions.  Representatives  from  the  National  Department  of 
Agriculture assisted with this process,  and took the draft to the Minister of Agriculture and Land 
Affairs as a proposed amendment to the Agricultural Product Standards Act in 2003. Despite repeated 
enquiries by Organics South Africa, the standards have yet to be presented to Parliament. The draft 
standard is however in practical use for the local market, that is, the local certification bodies certify 
producers according to the standards. Many producers are selling their products as organic without 
having obtained certification. By 2001, five foreign-controlled certification agencies were operating, 
and two local certifiers had been established.  
Agriculture policy 
South African agricultural policy has three major thrusts: increase commercial production through the 
use of  biotechnology;  increase  the  number  of  black  commercial  farmers through black  economic 
empowerment strategies; and assist small-scale, resource poor farmers to move towards household 
food security. In the past, government financial aid policies insisted that small-scale farmers should 
use  “development  packages”  in  order  to  qualify  for  loan  finance.  Thus,  the  KwaZulu  Finance 
Corporation  would  only  lend  money  to  farmers  for  crop  production  if  they  purchased  fertilizer, 
pesticides and hybrid seed – in fact, much of the money went directly to the input suppliers. More 
recently,  many  of  these  practices  have  been  discontinued.  The  State’s  “Strategic  Plan  for  South 
African Agriculture”
84
aims  to  set  up a cooperative  structure to assist  emerging  farmers into  the 
marketplace. There are programmes to promote trade opportunities for poor rural communities, and 
programmes to support agricultural exports.  
Organic policies 
The Department of Labour is actively supporting Organic Farmer Training, and the Department of 
Trade and Industry is assisting with the formation of cooperatives. Elements within the Department of 
Health are strongly interested in the potential of organic home gardens to assist those living with HIV 
and AIDS, both through the beneficial effects of small-scale market gardening on motivating people 
not to give up on life, and because of the support given to the immune system by adequate quantities 
of  fresh,  organically-produced  vegetables.  The  National  Department  of  Agriculture  does  have  a 
national  Landcare  Programme  which actively  encourages  soil  and  water  conservation,  and  which 
supports many community projects of organic farming groups. However, this programme does not 
support organic agriculture directly. In the past, the National Department of Agriculture showed little 
83
Key factors influencing KwaZulu-Natal organic producers in the context of market demand, keynote address 
by Raymond Auerbach, Rainman Landcare Foundation, 23 November 2005. 
84
Strategic  Plan  for  South  African  Agriculture,  2004.  National  Department  of  Agriculture, 
www.nda.agric.za/docs/sectorplan/sectorplan/htm. 
Change link in pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add link to pdf file; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Change link in pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf acrobat; add links to pdf
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
78
support  for  organic  agriculture  (Landcare  Directorate  Keynote  address,  Landcare  Conference, 
Pretoria, 2003). However, in 2006, the Department of Agriculture and the Industrial Development 
Corporation decided to develop a value chain strategy for sustainable development and growth of 
organic agriculture
85
. Provincial support  for organic farmers is rudimentary in  two provinces,  and 
non-existent in the other seven. Support for organic farming is now discussed in many forums, but it 
is still often tacit support (as through the Landcare Programme to some projects which happen to be 
organic). More recently, the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Agriculture and Environmental Affairs 
has come out in support of organic agriculture
86
.  
One of the major reasons for reluctance to support organic agriculture at the national level appears to 
be the strong commitment of the South African Government to the use of Genetically Engineered 
(GE)  seed.  It  was  pointed  out  at  the  Regional  Consultation  on  Genetic  Engineering/GMOs  for 
Development in Eastern and Southern Africa
87
in Nairobi that South Africa has signed the Cartagena 
Protocol, and yet has supposedly approved a number of GE crops without following the Protocol. 
Table 14. Organic agriculture policies and programmes 
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
General awareness of merits of organic 
agriculture 
Little awareness, some indication of change lately 
Organic  regulations,  standards  and 
certification 
Draft  standards have been  waiting three years  for  approval; 
little progress 
Research 
Little activity so far 
Extension service 
Poorly developed 
Other (credits, education, etc.) 
Education and training developing 
Other policy influences, projects and programmes 
The South African Government has a major interest in the New Partnership for Africa’s Development 
(NEPAD).  Although  the  Comprehensive  Programme  for  Agricultural  Development  advocates 
sustainable agriculture, conservation farming and natural resource management, the emphasis is still 
strongly on biotechnology and GE in particular. Developmental organizations have produced a triple 
strategy for the development of the organic industry in South Africa
88
. The document recommends 
that one strategy is required for organic food gardens, and that these initiatives should be seen in the 
context  of  health,  welfare  and  social  security.  A  second  strategy,  involving  research,  training, 
extension support and pilot project implementation, is required for the development of the commercial 
organic sector. Finally, since few would actually choose to be subsistence farmers, a bridging strategy 
is required to help those who so desire to move from subsistence farming to semi-commercial organic 
farming through the cooperative movement. 
The policy development process 
Through  long-term  engagement  with  Government  at  the  national,  provincial  and  local  levels,  a 
number of development professionals have been able to lobby for a less negative approach to the 
organics industry. In KwaZulu-Natal and the Western Cape, with the help of the Dutch development 
group  HIVOS,  effective  processes  of  integrating  support  for  organic  farmers  into  the  Extension 
Services are currently underway.  
85
Invitation to tender from IDC. 
86
The relevance of organic farming to KwaZulu-Natal, introductory address by Harry Strauss, Deputy Director-
General, KZN Dept Agriculture and Environmental Affairs, 23 November 2005. 
87
Regional Consultation on Genetic Engineering/GMOs for Development in Eastern and Southern Africa, 2004. 
K. Attah-Krah, F. Gasengayire, J. Ndun’u-Skilton and N. Nsubuga, International development Research Centre 
and International Plant Genetic Resources Institute. 
88
Rainwater harvesting, organic farming and Landcare: A vision for uprooting rural poverty in South Africa, 
2005. Dr. RMB Auerbach, Rainman Landcare Foundation, Durban, South Africa. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
add hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing 150F; // to change image compression
clickable links in pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
79
Opportunities and challenges 
At this point, there is an urgent need for lobbying so that the international developments within the 
organic sector are more appreciated by senior policymakers. Those policymakers who visit overseas 
countries,  especially in Europe,  return with  a  deeper appreciation of  the growing  role of  organic 
agriculture in addressing social, environmental and economic problems within the agricultural sector. 
It would be very useful if senior policymakers could be shown developmental projects in the course of 
their overseas visits (e.g. SEKEM in Egypt, EMBRAPA in Brazil). 
Lessons learned 
It is essential that the organic industry speak with one voice in communicating with the Government, 
and understand and respect the developmental objectives of the new South Africa. Proposals need to 
emphasize how organic farming can contribute to sustainable rural development. The potential for 
organic agriculture to help South Africa deal with low and erratic rainfall (through combining organic 
farming  and  rainwater  harvesting),  with  degradation  of  natural  resources  (through  increased 
biodiversity  and  reduced  pollution),  with  household  food  insecurity  (through  low  external  input 
approaches to local food production) and with the development of a vibrant small commercial organic 
agricultural  sector  (through  skills  training,  development  of  quality  management  systems  and  the 
establishment of secondary co-operatives to support the emerging primary co-operatives) needs to be 
illustrated with practical projects. A number of successful pilot projects will serve to show that these 
are practical propositions; the need is for professionalism, both in commercial organic production, and 
in developmental work with resource-poor communities. 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim setting As PasswordSetting = New PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword) ' Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
change link in pdf; pdf link to specific page
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
PasswordSetting setting = new PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword); // Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
add a link to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
80
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add links to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
add email link to pdf; pdf link
81
Annex 7. Thailand 
Agriculture conditions 
Thailand has three types of climates: a savannah type climate, with low precipitation and distinct dry 
winter season, is found through out the north-east, north and central regions; the south-eastern part of 
the central and  upper southern regions experience  a tropical monsoon climate, with heavy annual 
rainfall and a short dry season; and the lower southern region enjoys a tropical rainforest climate with 
high  humidity  throughout  the  year  and  no  month  with  less  than  61  mm  of  rainfall.  Once  a 
predominantly agricultural country, Thai agriculture has been on the decline since the 1950s. In the 
last 20 years, the contribution of agriculture to the national economy has dropped from 25 per cent to 
less than 10 per cent. Similarly, agricultural export has fallen from a dominant role in bringing foreign 
income into the country. Despite this decline, agricultural production is still expanding, though with a 
reducing rate, and over 60 per cent of the population is involved in the agricultural sector. 
Rice is the main staple crop and its production occupies more than half of the farmlands. Rice surplus 
after domestic consumption is exported and represents a third of the agricultural export value. Fishery 
exports, both from wild catch and aquaculture, especially shrimp, have been the number one export 
earning activity. The second most important agricultural export commodity is rubber. Average land 
holding size is just above four hectares.  
Organic agriculture 
Thai organic agriculture has its roots in traditional farming. Such practices have been developed and 
enriched through farmers’ knowledge of local agro-ecology and environmentally sustainable ways of 
farming.  Around  the  early  1980s,  many  farmers and  local  NGOs  came  together  to  establish  the 
Alternative Agriculture Network (AAN) to foster sustainable agriculture activism in Thailand. The 
AAN  provides  a  discussion  forum  for  experience  sharing  and  policy  advocacy  for  sustainable 
agriculture, including organic farming.  
Table 15. Recent chronology of organic development 
Year 
Key events 
1991 
Chai Wiwat Agro-industry and Capital Rice Co started an organic rice project in Chiang Rai 
and Phayao. 
1992 
Alternative  Agriculture  Network  organized  its  first  national  conference,  requesting  the 
Government to promote sustainable agriculture and organic farming. 
First Fair Trade rice from Surin was exported to Fair Trade groups in Europe. 
1993 
Green Net established. 
1994 
First public fair on “Chemical-Free Food for Health and Environment”, Bangkok. 
Capital Rice began selling organic jasmine rice in Thailand and overseas.  
1995 
ACT was established, and first Thai organic crop standards were drafted. 
1996 
IFOAM-Asia Regional Workshop on “Certification for Organic Agriculture and Alternative 
Market”. 
1997 
ACT commenced organic farm inspection and certification. 
1999 
Thailand Institute of Technological and Scientific Research, the Export Promotion Department 
of  the Ministry  of Commerce,  and  the  Department of  Agriculture  (DOA),  started  drafting 
organic crop production standards. 
2000 
ACT obtained IFOAM accreditation and its first certified products appeared in Thai markets. 
The Cabinet approved US$ 15.8 million (633 million baht) to support a three-year pilot project 
on  Sustainable  Agriculture for Small-Scale Producers.  The  project was coordinated  by  the 
Sustainable Agriculture Foundation and covered 3,500 farming families 
2001 
DOA published organic crop production standards. 
First IFOAM Organic Shrimp Consultation held in Thailand. 
2002 
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperative (MoAC) established National Office of Agricultural 
and  Food  Commodity  Standards  (ACFS),  responsible  for  implementing/enforcing  national 
agricultural and food standards as well as accreditation.  
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
add links to pdf file; clickable links in pdf from word
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File
add a link to a pdf file; add links to pdf online
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
82
Year 
Key events 
ACFS  completed  drafting  “Organic  Agriculture:  the Production,  Processing,  Labelling  and 
Marketing of Organic Agriculture”. They cover crop production, livestock and aquaculture. 
Swiss Government recognized  the competency of  ACT, allowing ACT to conduct  organic 
inspection and certification according to the Swiss Government’s organic standards. 
First produce bearing “Organic Thailand” label appeared in the Thai market. 
2003 
First  major  international  conference  on  organic  agriculture  held  in  Thailand  –  the  2003 
International Organic Conference, co-hosted by FAO, Green Net and Earth Net Foundation.  
The Surin province set up a large-scale organic project, planning to convert 16,000 households 
(with 37,760 ha.) into organic jasmine rice farming, of which 2,735 households (covering 2,735 
ha) would apply for organic certification from ACT.  
ACT was recognized by the Swedish competent authority for organic certification according to 
EU regulation 2092/91.  
2004 
ACFS launched an accreditation programme for organic agriculture.  
The Organic Agriculture Fair was organized by the  MOAC and  the Cabinet resolved that 
organic agriculture would henceforth be part of the national agenda. 
2005 
A government programme for organic is launched. 
The Green Net and the Earth Net Foundation estimate that the area under organic farming increased 
from  just  below  2,000 ha  in 2001 to 13,899 ha  in  2004,  representing  0.07 per  cent  of  the  total 
agricultural land area. The number of farms increased commensurately, with 2,498 organic farms, 
representing 0.05 per cent of the total number of farms in the country in 2004. 
Table 16. Organic certified production in  
Thailand (ha) 
Year 
Rice and field 
crops 
Fruits and 
vegetables  Other  Total 
1998 
1 005 
1 005 
1999 
881 
881 
2000 
1 120 
563 
1 683 
2001 
1 584 
563 
2 147 
2002 
5 254 
3 581 
123 
8 958 
2003 
7475 
3 561 
123  11 159 
2004 
9 606 
4 169 
123  13 899 
Thailand’s organic sector is still in its early stages of development. Most production systems are still 
simple, without sophisticated technologies. Most organic products are basic unprocessed commodities 
such as fresh fruits and vegetables, and rice. Increasingly, more intermediate processed products are 
being developed, such as sugar, tapioca starch and palm oil. Processed organic produce, as finished 
consumer products, are relatively few, as the raw material is usually insufficient to supply processing 
plants, and the supply is often not reliable. 
Organic markets 
Organic products were introduced into the Thai market in the early 1990s, but did not gain market 
profile until a decade later. Most Thai organic products are exported, mainly to European countries. 
The collapse of the Thai economy in the mid-1990s depressed the domestic market for organic food 
and it was not until 2002 that Thailand began to see signs of a revitalized domestic market for organic 
produce. However, urban consumers were just becoming aware of the benefits of consuming organic 
food. This was partly due to the lack of available information to help consumers differentiate organic 
produce from chemical-free produce, which was also available in the market, and promoted by two 
separate government schemes. By the end of 2004, many certified brands of organic farm produce 
appeared in local supermarkets and modern trade outlets, particularly in Bangkok. These new entrants 
into  the  market  led  to  an  increasingly  competitive  environment  and  helped  reduce  prices  to  the 
consumer. 
Reliable sources of data on organic produce are hard to find. The situation is confused by the various 
standards or systems of certification for organic produce and other safe produce (with no organic 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
83
certification). This makes it impossible to categorically differentiate between the two markets. Despite 
such  limitation,  Green  Net  and  Earth  Net  Foundation  estimate the  domestic  market  for  certified 
organic products in 2004 at US$ 940,000. The non-certified organic and health food market is much 
harder to quantify, but the total market value may be as high as US$ 75 million. In the domestic 
market, organic products currently carry around 10 to 50 per cent premium prices. The premium has 
gone down as more producers offering new organic products have entered the market. The main sale 
channel is modern trade outlets, such as supermarkets and discount stores. Specialized health shops, 
though booming in the mid-1990s, are unable to compete with the modern trade outlets and very few 
are now in operation. Direct marketing exists only to a very small extent, mainly in the countryside, 
where farmers’ markets are a preferred sale channel for fresh organic produce. 
Supporting structures  
As  organic farming  is  a  rather new phenomenon in Thailand, there  is no well-developed  organic 
extension  methodology available. The Government’s training and  extension utilize a conventional 
training  module  emphasizing  classroom  lecturing.  Also,  most  of  the  public  agencies’  training 
programmes  do  not have  a  clear  objective  of  bringing  farmers  into  certified  organic  production. 
Trainees  might  adopt  some  specific  organic  farming  practices,  such  as  bio-fertilizers,  but  not 
necessarily  adopt  all  organic  principles  and  convert  the  whole  farm.  The  organic  conversion 
programmes  developed by  local  NGOs  are  more  successful,  with a  combination  of  participatory 
learning  and  market  incentives.  Several  tertiary  education  institutions  are  preparing  curricula  on 
organic or sustainable  agriculture courses  for bachelor’s  and master’s degrees. None  of these  are 
available at this stage. 
There are many research projects on organic agriculture as many research institutions see organic 
agriculture as  a  way  to  promote  Thai  exports  and  sustainable  rural  development.  There  are  two 
streams  of  research,  one  focusing  on  local  producer  groups  as well  as  assessing  constraints  and 
conditions for  conversion; and the other on specific crop production technology  with high export 
potential, for example organic rice, baby corn, okra.  
Sector organization  
No specific organic producers’ organization exists at the national level.  Small-scale producers are 
organized  at  the  local  level,  especially  for  the  benefits  of  organic  certification  and  logistic 
arrangement.  The  Green  Net’s  producer  network  is  the  largest  network  of  organic  producers’ 
organizations, representing around half of all organic producers in the country. There is an informal 
group of individual government civil servants and researchers interested in organic agriculture, the 
“Organic Agriculture Society”, which serves as a forum for discussion and policy advocacy among 
the active members. Many of its activities are linked to the Government’s organic projects. The Thai 
Organic Trader Association was founded in November 2005. Although it has fewer than 10 members, 
the founding members are all the key players of organic trade, representing close to three quarters of 
organic trade in the country. 
Regulation, standards and conformity assessment 
There are many certification bodies offering service to Thai organic producers. For domestic markets, 
the Organic Agriculture Certification Thailand (ACT), a Thai national organization, is the largest, 
followed  by  the  Organic  Crop  Institute,  a  public  agency  under  the  Department  of  Agriculture, 
Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  Cooperative.  There  are  a  few  more  organizations  offering  organic 
certification services but their scope is limited to a particular area/region. All these national and local 
certification bodies have their own organic standards (as well as their own labelling schemes), not 
harmonized to any particular standards. The National Office of Agricultural and Food Commodity 
Standards (ACFS) has set voluntary national standard guidelines for organic agriculture, but so far no 
one has shown strong  interest in adopting the ACFS standard guidelines.  The  introduction of the 
ACFS national standards guidelines is an attempt to set up a regulatory framework compatible with 
the EU system. No official application has yet been submitted for the European Union’s third country 
recognition.  
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
84
Many foreign-based certification bodies, mainly from the European Union, offer certification services 
to Thai producers. Most certifications are based on EU regulation 2092/91, but some also have NOP 
and JAS organic certification. The majority of organic products sold in Thailand are certified by local 
bodies, which account for half of the certified producers in Thailand, while the other half is certified 
by foreign-based certification bodies. Because Thai organic producers are small scale, they are often 
certified under “grower group” schemes. The costs of inspection vary greatly from one certification 
body to another, with a range of US$ 500 per day (foreign certification) to free of charge (e.g. Organic 
Crop Institute and local certification bodies).  
Agriculture policy 
General  agriculture  policies  still favour conventional farming  with subsidized  agro-chemical farm 
inputs. As Thailand cannot produce its own agro-chemicals, all pesticides and chemical fertilizers are 
imported. The import taxes of these products are set lower than for other farm inputs. There is also an 
indirect subsidy of pesticides. For instance, on the perceived outbreak of crop pests and diseases, the 
Government would distribute free pesticides to farmers. Or if there is a special promotion project, the 
Government may give away farm inputs, often chemical fertilizers and pesticides, to participating 
producers. 
There has been a strong lobby for allowing GMO crop production in Thailand by some Thai research 
institutions and private companies engaging in GE technologies. Some unlawful field trials of GMO 
crops by research institutions also exist, already resulting in GMO contamination at the seed level for 
at least two crops, papaya and cotton. The push to allow GMO crop production or more GMO field 
trials will inevitably lead to further GMO contamination, endangering Thailand’s organic agriculture 
development. 
In support of organic agriculture, Thai consumers are aware of the risks of pesticides residues in the 
food chain, and there is a general concern about food and human health, thanks to the successful 
campaign of the public health organizations. This puts pressure on producers to adopt a safer use of 
agro-chemicals. Also, with the escalation of oil prices, the costs of all agro-chemicals have risen, and 
producers are further pressed to cut use of agro-chemicals and adopt some organic farming methods, 
such as organic fertilizers and botanical insecticides. 
The efforts by the royal family, especially the king, to promote a “self-sufficient economy” concept, 
have led to acceptance of self-sufficient sustainable agriculture among public agencies and the Thai 
public. As a result, many sustainable agriculture projects were initiated (both pilot production and 
research  projects).  The  Royal  Project  has  recently  converted  part  of  its  vegetable  production  to 
certified organic farms. The organic vegetables are sold in several shops and supermarkets throughout 
the country. 
The National Agenda’s Organic  Agriculture is  a  new  government programme implemented  since 
October 2005. The five-year programme is aimed at supporting 4.25 million farmers (0.85 million in 
2006)  to  use  organic  inputs  instead of  agro-chemicals covering an  area  of 13.6  million  ha (2.72 
million  ha  for 2006), reducing total import of agro-chemicals by 50 per cent  as well  as boosting 
organic export by 100 per cent annually. The programme aims are to be achieved through various 
supports and intervention mechanisms, including seminars, training, general promotion, and setting up 
organic fertilizer factories. There are 26 agencies from six ministries involved in this programme, 
which is coordinated by the Land Development Department. A 1.26 billion baht (US$ 31.5 m) budget 
is allocated for this programme in 2006. 
What developing country Governments can do to promote the organic agriculture sector 
85
Table 17. Overview of organic agriculture policies and programmes 
Item 
Government policy and programmes 
General  awareness  of  merits  of 
organic 
Done through publication and government websites, e.g. publications of 
Department  of  Agriculture  (DoA)  and  Department  of  Agricultural 
Extension (DoAE).  
Organic regulations, standards and 
certification 
Set up voluntary national standard guideline for organic crop, aquaculture 
and livestock (ACFS). 
Set up public certification body (Organic Crop Institute). 
Export marketing 
Some  public  seminar  and  more  specifically  subsidizing  traders  to 
participate in organic fairs. 
Production  
At provincial level, some governors started organic projects, e.g. Surin and 
Burirum organize organic rice projects. 
Several local and national agencies  started  organic agriculture training 
courses  for  producers.  Very  few  training  programmes  are  linked  to 
certification. 
Inputs  (seeds,  seedlings,  pest 
control and fertilizers) 
No  specific  activities  so  far.  Plans  to  set  up  several  hundred  organic 
fertilizer factories.  
Research 
Some research funding institutions start offering specific funding support 
for organic agriculture, e.g. Thailand Research Fund, National Research 
Council of Thailand. No clear budget allocation or research goals.  
Extension service 
Many  public  agencies  have  organized  seminars  on  organic  farming, 
normally one-day courses. These are not really an extension activity, more 
like a general promotion.  
Other policy influences, projects and programmes 
A few international institutions play a supportive role in influencing Thailand’s organic agriculture 
policy development. The most prevalent influence is from FAO and IFOAM, especially since FAO’s 
regional seminar on “Production and export of organic fruit and vegetables in Asia” and IFOAM’s 
Trade  Conference on  “Mainstreaming  Organic  Trade” held  in  Bangkok at  the end of 2003.  The 
international seminar and conference helped promote the general interest among public agencies and 
the private sector on organic agriculture. The recent project of the International Trade Center (ITC) on 
“Strengthening the export capacity of Thailand’s organic agriculture” in early 2005 has added some 
impacts on promoting organic agriculture among government agencies. 
The  Santi  Asoke,  a  Buddhist  sect,  has,  along  with  its  religious  preaching,  long  been  promoting 
“non-toxic” farming, a system that does not use chemical fertilizers and pesticides. There are many 
followers of this group throughout the country. They have a strong influence on organic production, 
especially at the extension level. Similar to most of the Government’s projects, the Santi Asoke’s 
programme only aims at encouraging producers to adopt some organic farming technology, but does 
not require full farm conversion or organic certification. 
The policy development process 
The development of Thai organic agriculture has so far been driven by the private sector and NGOs, 
who  play  key  roles  in  organizing  organic  conversion  projects  and  marketing,  making  a  major 
contribution to the growth of organic agriculture. The cabinet has set up a national organic agriculture 
committee, whose term of references focus on advising the Government on organic agricultural policy 
development. The private sector is not represented in the committee. Most of the organic policies are 
by  and  large  initiated  through  national  politicians  and  other  government  agencies,  especially  the 
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives. 
Opportunities and challenges 
Opportunities for Thai organic agriculture are mainly: 
•  Growing markets overseas (export opportunities); 
•  Favourable policy environments (especially the National Agenda’s Organic Agriculture); 
Best Practices for Organic Policy 
86
•  Good infrastructure and high standard food-processors; and 
•  Favourable agricultural resources (food exporting country). 
Challenges include: 
•  Poor coordination among public agencies on supporting and promoting organic agriculture, 
sometimes leading to competition among public agencies; 
•  Confusion among Thai consumers on organic agriculture and organic labelling schemes; 
•  Lack of interest among food processor to develop new organic products; and 
•  Lack of comprehensive supports for producers during conversion. 
Lessons learned 
•  The Government has prioritized national standards and regulations and the setting up of 
public certification bodies, which is less important compared to farm conversion support. 
•  Regulations imitate importing countries’ regulations, especially EU regulations. Conditions 
and special conditions of organic agriculture within the country were not taken into 
consideration when the national regulations were developed.  
•  The Government attempts to introduce too many “food safety” labelling schemes at the same 
time. Consumers often confuse the definition and value of the different schemes. 
•  Organic agriculture is often more knowledge-intensive and extension services need to address 
the knowledge aspects of farm management.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested