pdfsharp table example c# : Add link to pdf file control application platform web page html .net web browser University%20of%20Oxford%20Style%20Guide0-part414

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD  
STYLE GUIDE
Michaelmas term 2014
Add link to pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf file; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Add link to pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add a link to a pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
Objectives of the style guide | 1
How the guide is arranged | 1
How to use the guide | 1
What is/is not included in the style guide | 1
Quick reference guide | 1
1 Introduction
 Abbreviations, contractions 
and acronyms
Abbreviations | 2
Contractions | 2
Acronyms | 2
Specific abbreviations | 3
4 Capitalisation
7 Numbers
How to write numbers | 7
Times | 7
Dates | 8
Spans of numbers and years | 8
9 Punctuation
Apostrophe | 9
Brackets | 10
Bullet points | 11
Colon and semicolon | 11
Comma | 12
Dashes and hyphens | 13
Ellipsis | 15
Full stop, exclamation mark  
and question mark | 15
Quotation marks | 16
UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD  
STYLE GUIDE
17 Names and titles
General titles | 17
Oxford-specific titles | 17
Other titles | 18
Combining titles | 19
Postnominals | 20
21  Highlighting/emphasising 
text
Bold | 21
Italic | 21
Underlining | 21
22 Word usage and spelling
Common confusions in word usage | 22
Spelling | 23
25 Miscellaneous
Personal pronouns | 25
Plural or singular? | 25
Addresses, phone numbers, websites etc | 25
Contents
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
check links in pdf; adding an email link to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
clickable pdf links; active links in pdf
1
Return to Contents
Introduction
The Oxford University Style Guide aims to provide a guide to writing and 
formatting documents written by staff on behalf of the University (or one  
of its constituent departments etc). It is part of the University’s branding 
toolkit (www.ox.ac.uk/branding_toolkit) which enables  
the University’s formal documentation to be presented consistently across  
all communications.
The style guide is not intended for public or external use, and does not  
purport to compete with OUP’s professional writing guides and dictionaries.
Objectives of the style guide
We have three main objectives in writing this style guide:
 to provide an all-purpose guide to consistent presentation for University 
staff in written communications
 to review the guide at least once a year, ensuring that it properly reflects 
modern usage and is fit for purpose, and to update it as required
 as part of the review process, to invite proposals from members of the 
University who disagree with any existing guidance, and to act as an 
arbiter on those cases.
How the guide is arranged
The style guide is intended to be read as an interactive PDF, where it can  
be cross-referenced. However, the PDF can be printed if preferred for ease  
of reference.
If we update the style guide we will highlight on the main webpage  
(www.ox.ac.uk/styleguide) whether anything has changed as well as 
changing the term listed on the front cover.
How to use the guide
 search for a specific term (such as semicolon)
 browse through a section (such as Punctuation)
What is/is not included in the style guide
The guide does not tell you how to write. We aim to help you write correctly, 
and to encourage consistency across the University’s written communications.
Quick reference guide
The general rule
If there are multiple (correct) ways of doing something, choose the one which 
uses the least space and the least ink. For instance:
 close up spaces and don’t use full stops in abbreviations (eg 6pm)
 use lower case wherever possible
 only write out numbers up to ten and use figures for 11 onwards.
University of Oxford or Oxford University?
These terms are interchangeable and can either be alternated for variety or 
kept the same for consistency.
University branding information
Other information on University branding, including the use of the logo, can be 
found online at www.ox.ac.uk/branding_toolkit.
Queries
If you have any queries about using this guide, please contact:
Public Affairs Directorate 
University of Oxford 
Wellington Square 
Oxford OX1 2JD
gazette@admin.ox.ac.uk
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
add link to pdf; pdf hyperlink
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add email link to pdf; pdf hyperlinks
2
Return to Contents
Abbreviations, contractions and acronyms
General rule
Don’t use full stops after any abbreviations, contractions or acronyms and 
close up space between letters.
Abbreviations
These are formed by omitting letters from the end of a word.
 
Medical Sciences 
 Ž 
Med Sci
 
Doctorate of Philosophy 
 Ž 
DPhil
 
ante meridiem 
 Ž 
am
 
post meridiem 
 Ž 
pm
Contractions
These are formed by omitting letters from the middle of a word.
 
Mister
 Ž 
Mr
 
Doctor
 Ž 
Dr
 
The Reverend
 Ž 
The Revd
 
Saint
 Ž 
St
 
Street
 Ž 
St
Acronyms
These are formed from the initial letters of words (whether the result is 
pronounceable as a word or as a series of letters) and should be written  
as a single string of upper-case letters.
 
British Broadcasting Corporation 
 Ž 
BBC
 
Master of Arts 
 Ž 
MA
 
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 
 Ž 
AIDS
 
Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences 
 Ž 
MPLS
 
Planning and Resource Allocation Committee 
 Ž 
PRAC
 
Pro-Vice-Chancellor 
 Ž 
PVC
 
Portable Document Format 
 Ž 
PDF
When using an acronym that may be unfamiliar to your readers, spell it out 
in full the first time it is mentioned, with the acronym following in brackets; 
thereafter, use the acronym alone.
 
The decision was made by the Planning and Resource Allocation 
Committee (PRAC). There are several meetings of PRAC every term.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add links to pdf online; pdf link
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
pdf link to attached file; adding links to pdf
3
Return to Contents
Specific abbreviations
ampersands
Ampersands should only be used if they are part of official titles or names. 
Otherwise, spell out ‘and’.
 
Johnson & Johnson
 
Uehiro Foundation on Ethics and Education
people’s initials
Use a space to separate each initial.
 
J R R Tolkien
 
C S Lewis
measurements
When discussing large numbers in text, it is fine to use k/m/bn as shorter 
ways of spelling out 1,000/1,000,000/1,000,000,000 (or writing out ‘one 
thousand’/‘one million’/‘one billion’), as long as you are consistent throughout 
the document. For multiple millions/billions you can use a mixture of words and 
numbers (eg 7 million, 8bn); again, ensure you are consistent throughout.
names of universities, degrees etc
See Names and titles for details.
Latin abbreviations
If you are using Latin abbreviations, make sure you know what they mean and 
when to use them. Do not use full stops after them and don't italicise them – 
see the Highlighting/emphasising text section for when to italicise.
etc [et cetera] – means ‘and the rest’; use to indicate the continuation of a list
 
Oxford offers many language courses: Russian, French, Spanish etc 
[the list could continue with the other language courses offered].
eg [exempli gratia] – means ‘for example’ or ‘such as’; use with examples which 
are not exhaustive (and do not follow with a comma) 
 
Oxford offers many language courses, eg Russian, French, Spanish 
[those are some, but not all, of the language courses offered].
ie [id est] – means ‘that is’; use with definitions or lists which are exhaustive 
(and do not follow with a comma)
 
Catch a Blackbird Leys bus, ie numbers 1, 5 or 12  
[those are the only buses which go to Blackbird Leys].
ibid [ibidem] – means ‘in the same place’; use when making a subsequent 
reference/citation to a publication or other source mentioned in the 
immediately preceding note (ie no references to anything else have appeared 
in between)
 
For a fuller explanation of telepathy, see Brown [
Speaking with the 
Mind
, Chicago (1945) p125]; Brown also gives further information on 
cats and telepathy [ibid, p229].
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Add necessary references: using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic' or any other
add hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
4
Return to Contents
Capitalisation
General rule
Do not use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required.
Specific words
academic terms at Oxford
Capitalise the name but not the word ‘term’.
 
The Michaelmas term begins in October.
 
The coldest part of the year usually falls in Hilary term.
 
Finals take place in Trinity term.
If abbreviating term names, use MT, HT and TT.
 
The post is vacant from MT 2014 until TT 2015.
Chancellor
Always capitalise when referring to the Chancellor of the University.
 
Chris Patten is the Chancellor of the University.
 
The University has had 192 Chancellors since 1224.
college
Capitalise only when used as part of the title of a college, not when referring 
to an institution without using its full name.
 
Exeter College was founded in 1314. The college is one of the oldest in 
Oxford.
Exeter College was founded in 1314. The College is one of the oldest in 
Oxford.
collegiate University
Capitalise ‘University’ but not ‘collegiate’.
 
We are seeking opinions from all members of the collegiate University.
department
Capitalise only when used as part of the title of a department, not when 
referring to a department without using its full name.
 
The Department of Computer Science was previously known as the 
Oxford University Computing Laboratory. Both undergraduates and 
postgraduates study in this department.
 
The Department for Work and Pensions has to make significant cuts 
this year, as do many government departments.
division
Capitalise only when used as part of the title of a division, not when referring 
to a division without using its full name.
 
There are four academic divisions of the University: Humanities, 
Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences, Medical Sciences and Social 
Sciences.
 
The Medical Sciences Division is based mainly in Headington. The 
division’s head is Alastair Buchan.
faculty
Capitalise only when used as part of the title of a faculty, not when referring 
to a faculty without using its full name.
 
The Faculty of English is based in Manor Road. The faculty’s phone 
number is 271055.
fellow
Capitalise only when used as part of an academic’s formal title, not when 
referring to fellows in general.
 
There are ten Fifty-Pound Fellows at All Souls.
 
At its foundation, provision was made at All Souls for 40 fellows.
At its foundation, provision was made at All Souls for 40 Fellows.
5
Return to Contents
government
Never capitalise, whether referring to a specific country’s government or the 
concept of a government.
 
The current British government is a coalition.
names with prefixes
Follow the preference of the individual, if known; if not, use lower case for the 
prefix. Alphabetise by the prefix.
 
Dick Van Dyke is a star of daytime TV.
 
Jan van Eyck painted in the 15th century.
professor
Capitalise only when used as part of an academic’s formal title, not when 
referring to professors in general.
 
It is common for Oxford professors to publish their works in learned 
journals.
 
The Omega Solution
is the latest contribution to research in the field by 
Professor Stephanie Archibold.
Reverend
Capitalise both ‘Reverend’ and ‘The’ (as well as other parts of the title).
 
My tutor is The Reverend John Smith/The Very Reverend John Smith.
small caps
Do not use small caps, even for BC and AD.
 
Egypt’s Old Kingdom period began 
c
2700 BC.
tutor
Capitalise only when used as part of an academic’s formal title, not when 
referring to tutors in general.
 
The Oxford tutorial system creates strong ties between students and 
their tutors.
 
Dr Obadiah Braithwaite is the Tutor in Embroidery at Magdalen.
university
Capitalise only when used as part of the title of a university or when referring 
to the University of Oxford (both when ‘University’ is used as a noun and when 
it is used as an adjective).
 
Oxford University is a large employer. The University has ~10,000 staff 
members.
 
The University has four academic divisions.
 
The event is open to all members of the collegiate University.
 
The largest University division is Medical Sciences.
 
Funding for universities has been cut recently. 
 
She attended the University of Liverpool to study English. It’s a well-
respected university and course.
Titles
People 
See Names and titles for details.
Books/films/songs/games etc
Capitalise the first word of the title, and all words within the title except 
articles (a/an/the), prepositions (to/on/for etc) and conjunctions  
(but/and/or etc). See Highlighting/emphasising text for details on 
italicising and Punctuation for quotation mark advice.
 
The Last Mohican
 
Far from the Madding Crowd
 
Gone with the Wind
 
World of Warcraft
 
Grand Theft Auto V
 
‘Always Look on the Bright Side of Life’
‘Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life’
6
Return to Contents
Subtitles
Capitalise subtitles only if the original title is printed in that way.
 
The Tale of Samuel Whiskers, or The Roly-Poly Pudding
 
Dr Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Headlines, journal articles, chapter titles and lecture titles
Only capitalise the first word, any proper nouns and the first word following a 
full stop/question mark/exclamation mark.
 
‘Who speaks for climate? Making sense of media reporting on climate 
change’
 
Rock rafts could be ‘cradle of life’
 
‘Multiplicity of data in trial reports and the reliability of meta-analyses: 
empirical study’
Webpages
See Miscellaneous for advice on capitalisation of URLs, email addresses etc.
7
Return to Contents
Numbers
How to write numbers
Spell out whole-number words for one to ten; use figures for numbers  
above ten.
 
There were two people in the queue ahead of me, and six behind me.
 
I need to buy Christmas presents for 12 people this year.
Use a combination of a figure and a word for very large round numbers  
(such as multiple millions/billions etc), or abbreviate it to ‘m’, ‘bn’ etc.
 
The population of the earth is now 7 billion people.
 
The population of the earth is now 7bn people.
 
The budget came in at just under £2m.
If there are a lot of figures in a paragraph or text, some above ten and some 
below, use figures throughout to allow easy comparison by readers.
 
There were 2 people in the queue ahead of me, and 22 behind me.  
The queues for other advisors had 10, 3 and 12 people.
Spell out words for ‘first’, ‘second’ and so on up to and including ‘tenth’; use 
numbers and ‘st’/ ‘nd’/ ‘rd’/ ‘th’ for larger ordinal numbers. Don’t use superscript 
(to prevent problems with line spacing).
 
She was the first person from her school to get a place at Oxford.
 
He got an upper second, to his relief.
She got a 3rd class degree.
 
The 17th president of the United States was Andrew Johnson.
Always use figures and symbols for percentages, measurements and currency. 
Use commas to punctuate large numbers.
 
Question 12 is worth 10% of the available marks.
20 per cent of commuters use their cars.
 
The average height of a woman in the UK is 1.61m.
 
The cost, at £5.99, was less than their overall budget of £50.
 
The population of New York City is estimated to be 8,008,278.
Times
Use either the 12- or 24-hour clock – not both in the same text. The 12-hour 
clock uses a full stop between the hours and minutes; the 24-hour clock uses  
a colon and omits am/pm.
 
The lecture starts at 11.30am and ends at 1pm.
 
The lecture starts at 11:30 and ends at 13:00.
The lecture starts at 11.30am and ends at 13:00.
The lecture starts at 16:00pm.
Use ‘noon’ or ‘midnight’ instead of ‘12’, ‘12 noon’ or ‘12 midnight’.
 
The closing date for applications is noon on 12 July.
If using the 12-hour clock, don’t use additional ‘.00’ for times on the hour,  
and close up space between the number and the ‘am’ or ‘pm’.
 
The lecture starts at 9am.
 
The lecture starts at 11.30am and ends at 1pm.
The lecture starts at 9.00am.
The lecture starts at 9 am.
8
Return to Contents
Dates
Always put the date before the month.
 
Easter this year is on 13 April.
Easter this year is on April 13.
Don’t use ‘th’ etc with dates – just the number and month – and never precede 
the number with ‘the’.
 
Easter this year is on 13 April.
11th November is Armistice Day.
Armistice Day is on the 11 November.
Use days with dates only for emphasis or the avoidance of confusion/ambiguity.
 
The wedding is on 30 December.
The wedding is on Saturday 20 December.
 
The Modern Superstitions conference is on Friday 13 April.
Spans of numbers and years
Shorten periods where it is not ambiguous to do so and use the shortest text 
possible. However, do not elide numbers between 11 and 19, which must always 
be written in full (as they would be spoken).
 
The ‘short twentieth century’ refers to the period 1914–91.
 
The First World War (1914–18) was shorter than the Second World War 
(1939–45).
The First World war lasted from 1914–8.
 
The professorship was held 1993–5 by Alice Jenkins.
Inner-city flats cost £100–£200,000. [Price could start at £100 or 
£100,000.]
To refer to an academic or financial year, you can use either the format ‘2011–12’ 
or ‘2011/12’ – but ensure you are consistent throughout the text.
 
The Proctors for 2013–14 will be elected in the 2011–12 academic year.
 
Profits are up year on year: the company did better in 2011/12 than in 
2010/11.
If using ‘from’ with a start date/time, always use ‘to’ to indicate the end date/
time rather than an n-dash; alternatively, just use an n-dash without ‘from’.
 
Michaelmas term runs from October to December.
 
Michaelmas term runs October–December.
Michaelmas term runs from October–December.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested