41
process in his doctoral dissertation. Spontaneous
contextualization  arises  immediately  among  the  host
people as they come to understand the gospel and express
it in their own terms. Aghamkar puts it this way, "Based
on  my  ministry  experience  among  new  believers,  I
contend that contextualization is shaped spontaneously
under the guidance of the Holy Spirit while new believers
still live in their socio-religious settings."
26 
Aghamkar 
narrates 
the 
spontaneous
contextualization  of  a  Hindu  merchant  in  a  remote
village in response to hearing and believing the gospel as
preached by Aghamkar himself over the radio. At the
merchant
'
s request Rev. Aghamkar visited him in his
village.  He  found  the  merchant  had  spontaneously
painted a cross in the place in his shop where a symbol of
a protecting deity should have been placed. He further
put the same sign on his scales. Aghamkar is certain he
had done this artwork in accordance with a Hindu ritual.  
Aghamkar was also convinced the merchant had not
just  mixed  a  Christian  symbol  with  Hindu  magical
meaning and intent for two reasons. For one thing the
merchant  had  never  experienced  any  miraculous  or
spiritual power for protection or healing emanating from
Jesus or the cross. For another, the merchant experienced
a  certain  level  of  persecution  from  village  Hindus,
including his son who told Aghamkar that his father had
become insane. He had not just pasted Jesus over Hindu
customs and powers. He had genuinely placed the Savior,
symbolized by the cross, at the heart of his livelihood the
way he had placed it at the heart of his life. He had no
contact with traditional national Christians, yet he had
spontaneously expressed his faith in the only symbolic
way  he  knew  how,  using  the  primary  symbol  of
Christianity in a traditional Hindu way.
27
It seems to me
that,  if  we  practice  story  telling  as  a  means  of
communication and communal discernment as a means
of knowing where the Spirit is at work, we will discover
many instances of spontaneous contextualization.  
In other words I believe that what I have advocated
here will result in the transformation of the world and
self of even resistant peoples.  
In summary, because a people
'
s religion gives them
their world and their sense of self and because it enables
them  to  experience  that  world  and  self  as  uniquely
realistic and ultimately true, people of major religious
traditions remain resistant to the gospel. And largely
because of that resistance, they remain unreached.  
But because God has not abandoned them and the
Holy Spirit is at work among them, they can be reached
and their individuals and communities transformed. But
this takes a high degree of spiritual discernment on the
part of the missional team. Because it means determining
where the Spirit has been at work and cooperating with
that work. It means story telling because stories elicit a
revealing response on  the  part of listeners. It  means
careful  observance  of,  and  inquiry  about,  symbols,
especially as they are orchestrated in myth and ritual. It
means  listening,  learning,  and  discovering  how  even
resistant people go about contextualizing the gospel in
their own cultures.  
There is so much more I would like to say relevant to
this topic. For example, I feel that mission should always
plan for churches to be established for they represent the
body  of  Christ-the  new  Israel,  the  demonstration
communities of the coming kingdom of God casting its
shadow into the present. I believe it is essential to avoid
Westernization  and  secularization  because  religious
peoples resist these processes as much or more than they
resist the gospel. But I have taken my time and said what
I feel most passionately about. May God bless us in our
deliberations on this vital and demanding task.
FOOTNOTES  
1
The phrase clash of worlds occurred to me before I thought of
David Burnett
'
s useful book, Clash of Worlds: A Christian
'
s
Handbook  on  Cultures,  World  Religions,  and  Evangelism
(Nashville, TN: Oliver Nelson, 1992).  
2
Clifford Geertz, The Interpretation of Culture (New 
Y
ork: Basic
Books, 1973), 90 and 91.  
3  Geertz deals with all these systems in ibid.  
4
Paul Tillich, "Theology and Symbolism," in F. Ernest Johnson,
ed., Religious Symbolism (New 
Y
ork, N
Y
and London, UK: The
Institute for Religious and Social Studies, Harper and Brother,
1956), 109. 
5
See Alva William Steffler, Symbols of the Christian Faith (Grand
Rapids, MI and Cambridge, UK: Eerdmans, 2002) and Jean
Chevalier and Alain Gheerbrant, eds. The Penguin Dictionary of
Symbols, 2nd ed., trans. John Buchanan-Brown (London and
New 
Y
ork: Penguin Books, 1996).  
6  Pramod 
Y
. Aghamkar,  "Building  Church on  Holy Ground:
Proposals to Contextualize Worship Places in India," Ph.D.
Dissertation, Asbury Theological Seminary, 2002.  
7
Y
ahya ibn Sharaf al-Din al-Nawawi (d. c. 1277), An-Nawawi
'
s
Forty Hadith, 10th ed., trans. Ezzeddin Ibrahim and Denys
Johnson-Davies (Beirut: Holy Koran Publishing House, 1982),
no. 14, p. 58.  
8
Michael A. Rynkiewich points out that culture is constructed and
contested ("The World in My Parish: Rethinking the Standard
Missiological Model," Missiology, 30/3 [July 2002], 315 and
316). And, since religion gives cultural convictions an aura of
authority and both shapes and reinforces the culture of a people,
I  have  used  this  in  connection  with  religious  worlds  and
identities.  
9  Jerry  L.  Page,  "Turner
'
s  Model  of  Human  Sociality  and
Missionary/Host Relationships: A Case Study in Intercultural
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
Clickable pdf links - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlinks to pdf; clickable pdf links
Clickable pdf links - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
check links in pdf; add page number to pdf hyperlink
Bonding," Ph.D. Dissertation, Asbury Theological Seminary,
2000, draft 
?
  
10 In modern Persian poetry "with many writers, the cross emerges
as a meaningful symbol. . . . [T]his may reflect the fact that many
contemporary poets have been engaged in social and political
struggles, and suffered adversity because of their involvement"
(Oddbjorn Leirvik, Images of Jesus Christ in Islam: Introduction,
Survey  of  Research,  Issues  of  Dialogue.  Studia  Missionalia
Upsaliensia, no.76. Uppsala: Swedish Institute of Missionary
Research, 1999), 163.  
11
Y
ou won
'
t  find  it in Neal  Robinson,  Christ  in Islam and
Christianity (Albany, N
Y
: SUN
Y
, 1991).  
12
Y
ou won
'
t find it among the themes nicely laid out in Tarif
Khalidi, ed. and trans., The Muslim Jesus: Sayings and Stories in
Islamic  Literature  (Cambridge,  MA  and  London,  England:
Harvard University Press, 2001).  
13 See the tape of an interview of Lamin Sanneh by Graham Green.
[Somehow this tape has escaped me at least for the moment]. See
also his article in IBMR for October 1984
?
14 David Barrett and Todd Johnson in World Christian Trends
(Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library, 2001) provide nuances
galore for types of religious traditions. Their categories illuminate
the global religious situation fruitfully. For example what I am
calling  "major  religious  traditions"  they  call  (among  other
designations) geogreligions. That is they are global in scope and
any person anywhere who has the opportunity may become a
member of their societies. Because people groups identify in one
form or another with a georeligions such as Christianity, Islam,
Hinduism, and Buddhism, they have greater confidence. That is
they can identify with a global and universal movement that
boasts  a  significant  history,  important  writings,  heroic
representatives,  and  an  impressive  culture. This  confidence
renders these people groups more resistant than people groups
whose world and self are shaped by an ethnoreligion. That is a
religion that shapes only their ethnic group (Chapter 17). A
careful study of Barrett and Johnson will help mission teams
prepare adequately for their assignments. 
15 I have dealt with this motivation in two articles, "The Trinity:
Paradigm for Mission in the Spirit," Missiology, 17/1 (January,
1989),  71-72;  and  "Christian Witness in  a Marketplace  of
Cultured Alternatives," Missiology, 30/2 (April, 2002), 152-153.  
16  See  John  Wesley
'
s  similar  sentiment  in  "A  People  Called
Methodist" (Works, Jackson, ed., Vol. 8, 257). "The thing which
I was greatly afraid of all this time, and which I resolved to use
every possible method of preventing, was, a narrowness of spirit,
a party zeal, a being straitened in our own bowels; that miserable
bigotry which makes many so unready to believe that there is any
world of God but among themselves."  
17 I have dealt with God
'
s nature and intimate human issues in
Symbol  and  Ceremony:  Making  Disciples  Across  Cultures
(Monrovia, CA: MARC, 1997), especially in Chapter 2.  
18 Johan Herman Bavinck, An Introduction to the Science of
Missions,  trans.  David  H.  Freeman  (Philadelphia,  PA:
Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Company, 1960), 266-72.  
19  Two theological factors have led me to the strong conviction that
no one is lost eternally because he or she has not heard of the
gospel. One is the teaching of Jesus about the nature of God and
the other is the teaching of scripture about the engagement of
God among all people. Now it is true that many, many people
who have not heard of Jesus will resist the work of the Holy Spirit
in their lives and thus be lost. If they had heard the story of Jesus
they might have been moved to respond to the work of the Holy
Spirit in their lives and cultures. In this sense many people have
been lost because they have not heard the story. But no one will
be lost simply because they did not know to place their faith in
the Jesus revealed in the New Testament. I take, therefore, an
inclusivist position about the "unevangelized." They can be saved
by virtue of the work of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit in cross,
resurrection, and Pentecost even if they have only placed their
trust in what they do know of truth and right as mediated by the
Holy  Spirit-God  in  their  stories. This  position  has  been
admirably interpreted by John Sanders in No Other Name: An
Investigation into the Destiny of the Unevangelized (Grand
Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1992)  and Clark  H. Pinnock in  A
Wideness in God
'
s Mercy: The Finality of Jesus Christ in a World
of Religions (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1992). Other
evangelical position have been taken by Gabriel Fackre (divine
perseverance)  and  Ronald  H.  Nash  (restrictivism)  in  John
Sanders, ed. What about Those Who Have Never Heard
?
Three
Views on the Destiny of the Unevangelized (Downers Grove, IL:
InterVarsity, 1995). The third view is Sanders
'
view interpreted
more fully in No Other Name.  
20  Vincent Donovan, Christianity Rediscovered (Maryknoll, N
Y
:
Orbis Books, 1985). This book deserves multiple readings for
method. He draws on important older books such as Roland
Allen
'
s Missionary Methods: Saint Paul
'
s or Ours (Fleming H.
Revell, 1913).   
21 Larry D. Shinn, Two Sacred Worlds: Experience and Structure in
the World
'
s Religions (Nashville, TN: Abingdon, 1977), 86-98.
David Burnett  offers  ten questions to help in discerning a
people
'
s worldview: 1) What beliefs are strongly held
?
2) How do
parents teach children to behave
?
3) What do people regard as
major offenses (sins)
?
4) What do people do in crises
?
5) What
rituals do people perform
?
6) Who are the trendsetters
?
7) What
are the greatest fears the people have
?
8) What are considered to
be words of wisdom
?
9) What is expressed in the art forms of the
people
?
10) What aspects of the culture are most resistant to
change
?
Answers to these questions obviously involve a lot of data
gathering, listening, asking, and observing (Clash of Worlds, 26-
29).  
22 John C. Haughey, S. J., The Conspiracy of God: The Holy Spirit
in Us (Garden City, N
Y
: Doubleday Image Books, 1976), 84.  
23  Ibid., 83. 
24  Ibid.
25  Since time is limited, I will mention here a couple of important
sources  for  contextualization:  Darrell  L.  Whiteman,
"Contextualization:  The Theory,  the  Gap,  the  Challenge"
(International Bulletin of Missionary Research, 21(1) 1997: 2-7),
for a survey of the current issues, and Paul G. Hiebert, "Critical
Contextualization,"  (International  Bulletin  of  Missionary
Research 11(3):104-112), for a method of contextualization that
is thorough and dialogical. See also Aghamkar, "Building Church
on Holy Ground," chapter 7, for an excellent discussion of
contextualization with some live pastoral examples from the
Indian context.  
26  Aghamkar, "Building Church on Holy Ground," draft 191.
27  Ibid., draft 191-94.  
A. H. Mathias Zahniser
Wilmore, Kentucky 40390
mathias_zahniser@asburyseminary.edu
ENCOUNTERING WORLD RELIGIONS:  AN EVANGELICAL RESPONSE
42
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Standardization (ISO). Clickable links and buttons, form fields and video can be inserted into a PDF file without quality loss. Documents, forms
accessible links in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
43
1.  INTRODUCTION
That Western society and, by extension, the Christian
institutions which function within that society are  in
convulsion is a surprise to no one. The issue, for our
purposes, is how is the Church responding to the death
knells of modern Western society, and in particular how
are local congregations viewing their involvement in the
mission  of  the  Church  in  a  postmodern,  globalized
context
?
In his book Th
e
Chur
c
h on th
e
Oth
e
r Sid
e
, postmodern
writer and pastor, Brian McLaren says, "the bad news is
that missions as we have known it appears to be in decline
and will probably become a casualty as we pass to the
other side [of the postmodern matrix]."
1
But what will
emerge on the other side
?
Missiologist Alan Roxburgh speaks of Western society
and the Western Church  as functioning in a liminal
environment.
2
Roxburgh  uses  anthropologist  Victor
Turner
'
s stages of the ritual process (separation, liminal,
reaggregation)  to  describe  our  present  context.  The
modern Church has separated from the warm, nurturing
environment of the mother (modernity) and has entered
into the liminal stage between the comfortable past and
an unknown future. In the liminal stage there is a desire
to return to the known world of the past combined with
a fear  of  the  future.  However,  as  the  liminal  period
extends there can be a weaning from the past and an
anticipation of the still, as yet, unknown future. Neither
Western society, nor the Church, has emerged from the
liminal stage into reaggregation. Therefore, as Roxburgh
suggests, we are living in a tension "between discovering a
means of getting back to the former social location or
anticipating  a  transformational  relationship  with
society."
3
It is precisely this transformational model of
church that we want to discuss.
In  our  modern  history,  the  Western  evangelical
church has seen the mission task as primarily a sending
activity. That is, there are needs "out there" for gospel
proclamation and so we have "sent" gifted (at least in
some cases) workers from "us to them." We have set up
specialist  structures  (agencies/autonomous  or
departments/semi-autonomous)  to  guide  our  sending
activities. Local churches have had very little to do with
the mission task beyond releasing workers and finances so
the specialist structures could do their specialized work.
The  mythologized  rationale  for  this  model  follows
William Carey
'
s experience - if the established church
won
'
t get involved in doing the mission task, then we will
have to set up separate structures ("means") to allow this
to happen. And thus was born the modern missionary
movement. 
This model was probably best captured by Ralph
Winter in his influential essay "The Two Structures of
God
'
s Redemptive Mission," published in 1974.
4
Winter
uses the sociologist
'
s terminology of sodality and modality
to  describe  the  necessary  structures  for  church  and
mission.  Winter  defines  a  modality  as  a  structured
fellowship  in  which  membership  is  broadly  seen  as
inclusive and makes no distinction between age, sex or
other  factors.  A  sodality,  however,  is  a  structured
fellowship in which membership involves an adult second
decision  (a  special  commitment)  beyond  modality
membership which may include marital status or other
inclusive  restrictions.  In  the  modern  missionary
movement  these  distinctions  have  come  to  refer  to
congregational/nurture  structures  (modalities)  and  to
mission 
structures 
(sodalities). 
The
congregational/nurture structures are inward and nurture
oriented while the mission structures are outreach or task
oriented.
The  outcome  of  this  dichotomized  approach  to
church and mission has come to mean that local churches
and their leaders often have little understanding of the
implications of mission for their own context. A Theology
of Mission course is not required of M.Div students at our
seminaries because that is seen as a specialized subject for
those who have made the "second decision" to minister in
a  sodality  rather than  in  a  modality.  Global  mission
engagement is not understood as a logical extension of
local mission engagement because we are not doing "local
mission" - i.e., viewing ourselves as "sent" into our own
communities.
In  our  present  context,  however,  we  are  being
reminded that "the mission field" is no longer only "over
there" - we, as Westerners, are also living in a post-
Christian  society  to  which  the  mission  needs  to  be
extended. We can no longer only "send over there," we
now need to "be sent" in our own social context. This is
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:
INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
By Dan Sheffield
44
precisely where local churches are now scrambling to
discover  how  to  be  missional  churches  in  their  own
communities, as well as beyond.
Much of the previous half-century has been spent by
evangelical churches trying to recover their place in a fast-
departing Christendom. The Church Growth Movement
and  the  emphasis  on  pragmatic  methods,  strategic
planning  and  guru/coach/therapist/CEO-type  pastors
have all been attempts to find ways to remain relevant. We
have  not yet  discovered  how  to be the church in  a
tribalized world where our voice and our professionalism
has been marginalized to "just one among many." It is
precisely at this point that the Church outside of the West
needs to be listened to because they have existed in the
margins of their societies and yet found ways to provide
meaning and impact in their communities.
In this paper I intend to discuss some of the biblico-
historical models of mission engagement while seeking to
discover a model of the missional church appropriate for
our present context which demonstrates an integration of
responsible engagement with its own local setting, as well
as with the wider world.
2.  BIBLICAL-HISTORICAL MODELS
2.1 Antio
c
h
Perhaps the most striking biblical model of a missional
church is that of the Antioch church recorded in Acts
11:19-30 and 13:1-5.
5
Just a cursory glance suggests that
this  church  was  founded  by  Christians  who  thought
"outside the box." 
The Jewish believers reached out to the "different-
other" - to Gentiles - to share the good news of Jesus
Christ. At the same time we understand this wasn
'
t such
a stretch because this intercultural witness was led by
believers who had already lived and functioned in cross-
cultural contexts (Cyprus and Cyrene). 
Barnabas and Saul conducted in-depth teaching and
equipping  of  the  fledgling  congregation.  Ministry
proceeded  from  the  exercise  of  spiritual  gifts.  The
congregation looked beyond themselves to share their
resources with famine victims back in Jerusalem.
In 13:1 we have a picture of a multicultural leadership
team waiting upon the Lord in Spirit-guided worship. In
this context the Spirit is able to ask that Barnabas and Saul
- two of the church
'
s key leaders - be "set apart" for a
special ministry. That the leadership team responds to this
direction  is  indicated  by  the  speed  with  which  the
"missionary team" is sent out. The first mission ministry
returns Barnabas to his home (Cyprus) and Paul to a likely
area of familiarity (southern Turkey).
This synopsis seems to suggest a local church founded
through relational engagement with, and proclamation
to, a particular community; the development of healthy
systems for nurture and ministry; and a Spirit-guided
leadership team responding to God-given vision to reach
out, first in relief to near neighbours and fellow believers,
and then on to gospel proclamation in unreached areas.
However,  Gary  Burger,  a  Campus  Crusade  staff
worker in a 1990 essay published by the International
School of Theology indicates, "this passage is commonly
interpreted to teach that all missionaries must be sent by
and on behalf of a local church to be legitimate. However,
a more careful study of the passage will show this to be a
questionable interpretation."
6
Burger goes on to quote H.
Cook from a 1975 Evangelical Missions Quarterly article:
The organized church at Antioch was not involved in
the setting apart of Barnabas and Saul. It was only the
mentioned  prophets and teachers who  were involved.
There is no indication that these men were leaders of the
church and/or were acting on behalf of the church... the
Holy Spirit, not the church, sent them. Luke repeats for
emphasis  that  it  was  the  Holy  Spirit  who  set  apart
Barnabas and Saul and sent them out by His authority to
perform their special mission... the laying on of hands was
an act of blessing, not an act of appointment... the three
certainly did not have any authority other than that which
Barnabas and Saul also enjoyed...
7
This brief example suggests how viewing this text
from  a  different  paradigm  has  supported  the
disconnection of local and global, modality and sodality.
2.2M
e
di
e
val mi
ss
ion pra
c
ti
ces
In the Roman era the church developed along the lines of
Roman institutional models. The Latin word for a Roman
magisterial  territory,  "diocese,"  came  to  convey  the
territorial  jurisdiction  of  a  bishop  who  supervised
numerous parishes, or congregations. This governmental
framework  came  to  represent  the  modalities.  The
monastic  groupings  however  followed  the  Roman
military  model  where  nominal  Christians  were
encouraged to make a special, second decision into a
disciplined, ministry-oriented grouping functioning as a
sodality. There was no sense that these groupings were
connected to or under the oversight of parishes or even
the diocese as in the Antioch model, only giving nominal
adherence to a distant central authority.
8
As the Empire began to disintegrate, however, the
monastic groups seemed to be much more durable and
able to maintain both a sense of spiritual vitality and
mission involvement than were the local parishes. The
heart of vital Christianity is often understood to have
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
45
been preserved better in the monastic orders rather than
in the diocesan system. John White believes this was the
beginning of  "a  movement  of  laymen  carrying  on  a
personal ministry outside the direct authority and control
of the church." 
9
While resurgence of everything Celtic has led to a new
appreciation of the Celtic missionaries and their practices
in the early Christian period,
10
it is also obvious that there
is very little historical data upon which to base a sound
methodology.  Essentially  Patrick  and  his  followers
adopted mission teams based around monastic methods
rather than parish models. Wholistic mission engagement
with tribal groupings resulted in churches being founded
for the purpose of furthering that mission engagement.
These churches are understood to have functioned on a
sodality basis rather than modality.
2.3Mod
e
rn Prot
es
tant mi
ss
ion pra
c
ti
ces
Winter explains that, although not originally intended,
the Lutheran movement produced a diocesan structure
modeled after the Roman diocesan tradition. Luther
'
s
desire was to bring the vitality of the spiritual life he
experienced in his monastic order back into the life of the
ordinary Christian in the parish. The Reformers, however,
did not readopt the Catholic orders (the sodalities) which
had played such an important role in the renewal of
Roman Catholicism. Winter suggests it was this omission
that represented the greatest error of the Reformation and
the  greatest  weakness  of  the  resulting  Protestant
tradition.
11
In Winter
'
s opinion, it was the Pietist movement
which became the organized renewing structure of the
Protestant community. He maintains that this movement
was a sodality, "inasmuch as it was a case of adults meeting
together and committing themselves to new beginnings
and higher goals ... without conflicting with the stated
meetings of the existing church."
12
From these Pietist
gatherings, "alongside"  the  existing  church  structures,
came both the Danish-Halle Mission and the Moravian
mission bands in the early 1700s.
It was John Wesley
'
s encounter with one of these
Moravian  sodality/mission teams traveling to America
that led  to Wesley
'
s  own  renewal/conversion. Winter,
amongst others, sees the Wesleyan bands/classes/societies
as sodalities and  thus contributing  to  the  thesis  that
independent bodies are necessary to the renewal of the
church and its mission.
13
Snyder, however, would use
more relational language to describe the role of these
bodies:  that  they  are  "seeking  to  be  a  self-conscious
subcommunity or ecclesiola working to revitalize and yet
remain loyal to the larger church body.
14
With the advent
of the "mission society" following Carey
'
s 1792 call for
"the use of means for the conversion of the heathen," the
Protestant sodalities became part of mainstream practice. 
The first burst of societies (1792-1824) were largely
related to existing denominational structures, serving as
sodalities within a larger framework. On the heels of
Finney and Moody Revivalism, the Keswick Movement,
and the Holiness Movement in the mid-1800s, came a
new burst of mission societies formed largely by boards of
laypeople functioning independent of any formal church
structures. In the post-WWII era there developed a whole
new grouping of mission societies targeting those regions
not already reached in the so-called "second wave." Most
notably, however, there developed a grouping of mission
sodalities targeted at the North American context on the
premise that the "home church" was no longer able to
evangelize and disciple its own communities; specialist
organizations  were  needed  here  as  well.  Van  Gelder
suggests that these "paralocal ministry structures are, in
general, a reflection of deficiencies inherent within the
understanding  of  the  church
'
s  nature,  ministry,  and
organization  as  defined  in  denominational
ecclesiologies."
15
Despite modifications and tinkering over the 20th
century  these  are  still  the  primary  forms  of  mission
activity  based  in  North  America:  mission  arms  of
denominational  structures  and  independent  mission
societies directed by lay boards. Local churches, still, for
all intents and purposes, have a limited understanding of
their role as mission outposts and mission initiators.
It is now time to move toward a new model of church,
or perhaps, it is to recover forgotten models, which enable
ekklesia
'
s of God
'
s people to be a transformative presence
in their own communities and through intentional effort
to their Judea
'
s, Samaria
'
s and the ends of the earth.
3. RECOVERING AN INTEGRATED MODEL
Roxburgh returns to Turner
'
s ritual stages to discuss the
significance of communitas in the liminal state. As a
society moves through the liminal state there are two
options  for  human  relatedness,  the  development  of
structure  or the development  of  communitas.  In the
development of structure during a liminal period "we are
presented  with  an  orderly  social  world,  a  recognized
system of social control, prescribed ways of acting toward
people by virtue of our incumbency of status-roles."
16
This might be compared with the rush, following 9/11, to
set up a Dept of Homeland Security, to introduce new
laws regulating border crossings, and the transference of
funds  from  non-profit  organizations,  etc.  The
development of communitas on the other hand, results in:
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
46
The stripping of former roles and status which "may
have the effect of strengthening the bonds of communitas
even  as  it  dissolves  antecedent  social  structural  ties"
(Turner, 1969). Communitas suggests the formation of a
new peoplehood, the constitution of a new vision for
being a group. The basis of recruitment is no longer status
or role function but identity and belonging  within  a
group  that,  in  some  clear  ways,  stands  outside  the
mainstream of the culture.
17
Are we talking about ekklesia as sodality, rather than
as modality
?
Perhaps the church was never supposed to
function as a parish, primarily concerned with the nurture
of insiders. Perhaps we are to be a sodality to the modality
of our society. Perhaps I need to be reminded of the
meaning of ekklesia...
To return to Roxburgh:
What is required is a communitas that calls forth
an alternative vision for the social and political
issues facing the people. A fitting image for this
communitas is the city on the hill that Jesus used
to anticipate the new social reality he was calling
into being. This is a distinct but visible society
offering an alternative form of life. This is the way
Christianity entered history. It was a new social
reality formed out of a liminal experience that
created the communitas of a new peoplehood.
18
In the recent resurgence of interest in the model of Celtic
Christianity, we are returned to the notion of church as
sodality, as mission team. There is no place for passive,
nominal Christians, no place to sit, bask and "get by til
next  week."  We  are  all  in  progress;  we  are  all  in
development  in  Christ  even  as  we  are  involved  in
engaging with the society around us. 
Catholic missiologist, Gerald Arbuckle calls for "re-
founding the Church." He suggests that two fundamental
acknowledgements demand that we start over:
*
That the Church is the People of God; all -
pastor and laity - share a common baptism and
mission in Christ; we are all called to ministry,
that is, to respond to the pastoral needs of the
members of the community.
*
That the People of God are to be no longer
concerned only with their own growth in Christ,
but they must strive to respond to the pastoral
needs of the world.
19
Van Engen exposits the language of the Nicene Creed
when he proposes that the church
'
s missional ministry is
unifying,  sanctifying,  reconciling  and  proclaiming.
20
Guder prefers the proclaiming aspect in the forefront:
"the missional nature of the church is more emphatically
affirmed when the apostolic activity  itself defines the
church."
21
Hauerwas and Willimon quote Karl Barth: "[The
Church] exists... to set up in the world a new sign which
is radically dissimilar to [the world
'
s] own manner and
which contradicts it in a way which is full of promise."
22
3.1Th
e
l
e
ad
e
r
s
hip i
ss
u
e
The calls for a radically different form of church are not
new,  of  course.  What  is  needed  is  leadership  which
understands the times, has a fundamental sense of the
nature of the church, has the courage to act outside the
accepted norms, and the ability to take people with them
into this new journey.
Seminary  professors,  Hauerwas  and  Willimon,
however, paint a picture of the leadership development
process as it now stands in most denominational systems:
The seminaries have produced clergy who are agents
of  modernity,  experts  in  the  art  of  congregational
adaptation  to  the  status  quo,  enlightened  facilitators
whose years of education have trained them to enable
believers to detach themselves from the insights, habits,
stories and structures that make the church the church.
23
Along with their critique they call for courageous
leaders:
But if we live as a colony of resident aliens within a
hostile environment, which, in the most subtle but deadly
of ways, corrupts and co-opts us as Christians, then the
pastor is called to help us gather the resources we need to
be the colony of God
'
s righteousness.
24
Arbuckle  calls  for  "re-founding  prophets"  with
memories of hope (able to communicate the essence of
Y
ahweh
'
s abiding love), with creative imagination (to see
as others don
'
t see), who are community-oriented (they
keep seeking to build redemptive communities), with a
sense of humour (able to see joy in the incongruities of
life), full of faith, courage and prayer, and finally, skilled
in grieving, in empathy (they see the pain, the insecurity
behind the facades).
25
Roxburgh suggests three roles:
Th
e
pa
s
tor/po
e
t; poets are the articulators of
experience and the rememberers of tradition; the poet
listens to the pain and questioning and knows these
are cries that long to be connected to a Word that calls
them beyond themselves into a place of belonging.
"There  will  be  no  vision  of  a  missionary  people
without  the  poet/pastor  living  within  the
congregation
'
s  experience  and  giving  voice  to  its
desire for transformation and renewal."
26
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
47
Th
e
pa
s
tor/proph
e
t; the prophetic imagination
directs the poetic discourse of the people toward a
vision of God
'
s purposes for them in the world at this
time; addresses the hard side of discipleship where we
must face the reality that in God
'
s kingdom we are
not at the centre of the universe. The prophet speaks
a Word which engenders hope out of which arises
authentic missional engagement.
27
Th
e
pa
s
tor/apo
s
tl
e
; pastors must lead congregations
in places where old maps no longer work. Discipling
and equipping require a leadership that demonstrates
encounter with the culture in action, not just teaching
and sending. In our present mission situation pastors
must be in the world rather than in the church. "The
pastor/apostle is one who forms congregations into
mission groups shaped by encounters with the gospel
and culture - structuring the congregations shape into
forms that lead people outward into a missionary
encounter."
28
In  Roxburgh
'
s  model,  the  apostle/prophet/poet  leads
from the front. These leaders "call into being a covenant
community; second, they direct its attention out toward
their  context...  being  at  the  front  means  that  the
leadership  lives  into  and  incarnates  the  missional,
covenantal future of God
'
s people."
29
In  this  "in-between  time"  in  Western  society,
missional  churches  are  needed  who  will  reposition
themselves as sodalities, as communities on a mission with
the Spirit, responding to their contexts with authentic
engagement.
4.  A SUGGESTED WAY FORWARD
Our particular challenge as global ministry practitioners is
how to encourage the emergence of missional churches in
the  North  American  context  which  will  function  as
sodalities in regard to intercultural and global ministry.
What is the appropriate role for a specialist community
like the present mission department
?
The most obvious examples of churches who have
often thought of themselves as missional congregations
are those doing  ministry in our inner-cities. This, of
course, has led to misunderstandings when their missional
nature has not been understood or respected by both
domestic leaders, who serve churches that view themselves
primarily as modalities, and by global ministry leaders
mandated only to look across the ocean. These churches,
however, may become our most likely candidates for re-
founding a way of thinking about the character of the
church. These churches may find their way more clearly
to the reconnection of local and global ministry.
I would like to suggest a model which sees the local
church as mission initiator and the specialist department
as mission empowerer.
4.1Lo
c
al Chur
c
h a
s
mi
ss
ion initiator
An inner-city church which has sought to bridge that
connection has been the Rainier Avenue FM Church in
Seattle. While not knowing all the details myself, I would
like to paint a broad picture of the local church as mission
initiator using Rainer Ave as an example. This multi-
ethnic, mission-oriented church, in a large urban center,
engaged in team-based outreach to the Southeast Asians
in their local community, in particular amongst Laotians.
As this ministry grew, a gifted and trained Thai national
became part of the ministry team. This leader had a
burden  for  church-planting  in  his  own  country  and
expressed this to the wider leadership team of the local
church. The leadership team encouraged the development
of this burden as a local church initiative. An exploratory
trip to Thailand in 2000 was arranged with a multi-
national team and funded from the local church. Free
Methodist  connections  in  the region  were  contacted.
From this exploratory trip contacts were developed which
eventually led to the planting of a church. The Free
Methodist Mission and the Pacific Northwest Annual
Conference became partners in this joint venture initiated
by the local church. Short-term VISA personnel, ministry
teams, funding, and oversight have come from multiple
OLD
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
W
Leaders
as counselor manager, technician
Core
Congregation
W
Context
Covenant
Community
Pilgrim People
[congregation]
Leader
[as apostle,
prophet,
poet]
W
W
NEW
48
participants;  the local church,  the  PNW  Conference,
FMWM and APFFMA have all been engaged in this
initiative. 
Another church, a bit further behind but moving in
the same  direction, is  the  Kingsview FM  Church  in
Toronto. This church, located in what was once a Toronto
residential suburb, is now surrounded by high-density
housing in a volatile community dominated by Muslim
Somalis. Kingsview has begun a journey of ministry with
the Somalis, first of all through sports outreach and now,
after-school tutoring and summer day-camp programs.
Church leaders recently began a process of exploring their
wider mission commitments. Following the presentation
of the Gateway Cities Vision at the Canadian General
Conference (2002), the pastors were approached by a
Somali refugee about the possibility of partnering in the
development of a health clinic in Mogadishu, Somalia.
The church, in liaison with the Canadian NLT Mission
Contact and FMWM, has followed up on this contact.
An exploratory trip composed of local church members, a
Somalian and a FMWM representative is being planned
for Feb 2003. This venture is being funded and driven by
the local church.
These examples give an embryonic picture of the kind
of model I believe  we  should  be encouraging.  Local
churches, driven by missional involvement in their own
communities, take the next step of wider involvement in
the global village. The diagram in the appendix gives a
picture  of  the  potential  involvements  of  a  church
committed to seeing itself as a sodality rather than a
modality - as a missional church. 
4.2Sp
ec
iali
s
t a
ge
n
c
y a
s
mi
ss
ion 
e
mpow
e
r
e
r
But where does this model leave the specialist role of a
denominational mission department
?
I believe that we
need to re-tool as empowerers of local church initiatives. 
In  the  past  the  specialist  agencies,  whether
denominationally  related  or  independent,  have  seen
themselves as primary initiators of mission vision as well
as the deployers of personnel and resources - after local
churches had supplied those workers and resources to the
agency. A key task of the autonomous mission body was
to communicate that mission vision to the local church in
such a way that workers and resources were pryed loose
from the local church. "We (the mission) are your (the
church) hands in the world." That may seem like an
unfair characterization, however, in the present context
this is the perception of many pastors, church leaders and
congregational members. The model being proposed here
suggests that the specialist agency needs to become the
actual  enabler  of  the  local  church
'
s  "hands"  in
accomplishing the local church
'
s vision for their world.
What do
es
th
e
a
ge
n
c
y pr
ese
ntly "do for" th
e
lo
c
al 
c
hur
c
h
?
Th
e
a
ge
n
c
y provid
es:
*
Research  and  development of resources  for  vision
casting and identifying ministry goals
*
Screening and deployment of personnel (now, some
cross-cultural ministry training)
*
On-field  oversight  of  mission  personnel  by
experienced workers
*
Administration of financial requirements
*
Vision-casting and prayer communications to local
churches
*
Liaison with national churches and leadership
How could the 
s
peciali
s
t agency empower local church
initiative
s?
*
Can we not provide research and information that
enables churches to develop their own vision and
ministry goals
?
*
Can we not use existing denominational systems for
screening personnel
?
Perhaps specialist cross-cultural
training programs can be provided to local churches.
*
Team-based ministry has less requirement for outside
encouragement,  but  experienced  mission  mentors
may be in greater demand.
*
Can local churches not oversee cross-cultural ministry
budgets  and  receipt  their  own  donors,  in
collaboration  with  specialist  knowledge  from  the
agency
?
*
Vision-casting,  motivation and  prayer information
become the domain of the local church
*
Can  local  church  leaders,  with  developed  cross-
cultural communication skills, not liaise with national
church leaders
?
5.   IMPLICATIONS FOR A 
DENOMINATIONAL STRUCTURE
In their book, Changing the Mind of Missions, Engel and
Dyrness arrive at several conclusions about the future
direction of church-mission relations. They suggest that
the reign of Christ "will be extended primarily through
localized  initiatives  that  infiltrate  all  segments  of
society."
30
They go on to say that "the local church will
once  again  be  affirmed  as  God
'
s  chosen  means  for
spreading  the  gospel  through  ministry  that  radiates
outwards  and  multiplies  from  these  cells  of  the
kingdom."
31
It
'
s all about the local church
!
At  the  same  time,  Guder  indicates  that  "the
connectional  structures  of  the  church  are  needed  to
represent the missional unity that transcends all human
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
49
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
50
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
boundaries and cultural distinctions."
32
The crucial issue
is the beginning point.
The  movement  toward  missional  connectedness
should  be  centrifugal,  starting  from  particular
communities and expanding to the global dimensions of
the church, the community of communities. God
'
s Spirit
forms particular communities for mission in particular
places  and  multiplies  that  mission  by  increasing  the
number of particular communities: the church moves
from Jerusalem to Judea to Samaria and out to the ends of
the earth. As this happens, the Spirit has shaped this
church  to  become  multicultural,  multiethnic,
geographically extensive, and organizationally diverse.
33
I would like to suggest that there are several places
where the specialist mission agency will have to think and
act differently in regard to the empowerment of missional
churches.  We  will  have  to  depend  upon  relational
connections rather than structural  protocol. Missional
churches are driven by gifted, passionate people who are
not going to automatically look for "the proper way to do
this." Specialist leaders will have to build relationships
with churches that are functioning in a missional manner,
ready  to  provide  resources  when  the  relationship  is
activated. 
We will have to accept a loss of control and value
diversity. Initiative and oversight revert to the local church
in the missional model. Specialist leaders will encourage
local churches by facilitating all the contacts necessary for
a new international outreach, rather than functioning as
gatekeepers. We will have to recognize that the diversity of
ways of going about cross-cultural ministry - which are
inevitable - are important and valuable. Mistakes have
been made by the specialist agencies and mistakes will be
made by local churches. In the multiplicity of approaches,
however, the Spirit is sure to be working.
We will have to accept a loss of hierarchical, ascribed-
status management and move to gift-based ministry and
leadership. The mission empowerers who will be accepted
as specialist resource personnel to local churches will have
earned-status  and  will  be  respected  as  their  ministry
leadership is seen to flow from giftedness and passion.
Authenticity will have more value than position or title.
Since specialist mission structures have a long history
and perception amongst pastors and local churches, the
movement to a mission empowerment model will place
the onus on the specialist agencies to take the pro-active
role in becoming a servant to the local churches. We can
no longer be the "ambassador of" the local church, we
must become the "servant to" the local church.
CONCLUSION
In this "in between" time, with so much disorientation
and uncertainty, we have an opportunity to do something
different. We can choose to scramble after emasculated
ways to remain relevant in society as a whole, or we can
begin to be a different kind of people, from the margins.
We can begin to function as missional churches, sent on a
mission into our own context. And then, following the
natural  connections  resulting  from  life  in  the  global
village, we can begin to reach out to our Samaria and to
the ends of the earth as cross-cultural mission initiators.
And,  If  this  transformed  model  emerges,  the  cross-
cultural specialists will have to transform both philosophy
of  ministry  and methodology  to  function  as  mission
empowerers.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Arbuckle, Gerald. Earthing the Gospel: An Inculturation Handbook
for the  Pastoral Worker. Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 1990.
Bosch, David. Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology
of Mission. Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 1991.
Burger,  Gary.  "The  Local  Church  and  Para-Local  Church:  A
Proposal  for  Partnership  in  Ministry."  International  School  of
Theology: 
Monograph 
Series, 
1990.
www.leaderu.com/isot/docs/parachur.html
Engel, James and William Dyrness, Changing the Mind of Missions:
Where Have We Gone Wrong
?
. Downers Grove, Ill: InterVarsity
Press, 2000.
Guder, Darrell (editor). Missional Church: A Vision for the Sending
of the Church in North America. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998.
Hauerwas, Stanley and William Willimon. Resident Aliens: Life in
the Christian Colony. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1989.
Hunter, George. The Celtic Way of Evangelism: How Christianity
Can Win the West... Again. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2002.
McLaren, Brian. The Church on the Other Side: Doing Ministry in
the Postmodern Matrix (2nd ed.). Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2000.
Murray, Stuart. Church Planting: Laying Foundations. Scottdale,
PA: Herald Press, 2001.
Roxburgh, Alan. The  Missionary  Congregation,  Leadership  and
Liminality. Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 1997.
Snyder, Howard. The  Radical Wesley and Patterns for Church
Renewal. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 1980.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested