pdfsharp table example c# : Add hyperlink to pdf application software utility html windows wpf visual studio unleashing-greatness2-part425

Unleashing greatness – getting the best from an academised system
20 
Add hyperlink to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add link to pdf acrobat; add url to pdf
Add hyperlink to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
accessible links in pdf; pdf hyperlinks
21
2.  Academisation and 
school improvement
This chapter considers the implications for school improvement of an 
increasingly academised system. We have interpreted school improvement 
as a strategy for improving not only learning and outcomes for pupils but 
also school capacity and capability. 
The evidence presented to the Commission indicates that 
academisation alone cannot be relied on for whole-system improvement. 
This chapter does not rehearse the key elements of school improvement 
that are well known and established but seeks to identify the core 
properties that are essential for systemic change through academies. 
These properties relate to establishing a school-led, self-improving system 
that builds professional connections, collaborative activity and learning 
across schools that are characterised otherwise by their autonomy 
andindependence.
The Commission believes more needs to be done to:
• build a more powerful national vision for change
• strengthen professional ownership of accountability
• make school review in academies more open and inclusive 
ofparents and the local community
• capture the power of collaboration for system change
• support schools in taking responsibility for whole-system 
improvement
• use Ofsted to support a school-led, collaborative approach 
tosystemic improvement.
The context 
Evidence of impact
In considering the future of a substantially academised system, one of 
the major challenges for the Commission has been the changing nature of 
academies. The Commission has found it helpful to identify three models.
Academies Mark I were introduced by the Labour government in 2002 
with the opening of three academies. The first city academy, Business 
Academy, Bexley, was one of a new generation of schools intended to 
transform performance in areas of profound social and educational 
challenge. 
The model and mission were clear: the original and failing school was 
closed and a new school was opened, sponsored by a philanthropist or 
business partner, keen to make a difference to the lives of poor children 
Academies MarkI 
were introduced 
by the Labour 
government in 2002 
with the opening 
ofthree academies
2.  Academisation and school improvement
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add links to pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add hyperlink to pdf in; clickable links in pdf
Unleashing greatness – getting the best from an academised system
22 
and young people in deprived areas. The ambitious vision and business 
acumen of the sponsor were seen as key in establishing an ambitious new 
school, outside any governance by the local authority and in radically 
transformed buildings with highly paid headteachers. The new academies 
were considered strategic investments in change. They had start-up funds 
and freedoms to vary the curriculum, school year, staff pay and conditions 
of service. 
Over the next eight years, the Labour government rolled out these 
academies across the country, seeking to transform educational outcomes 
for children and young people in weak schools. In the process the original 
model shifted to Academies Mark II. This model allowed organisations 
such as universities, charities and even some schools and local authorities 
themselves to act as sponsors. Start-up funding was abolished, more 
conditions were specified in academy funding agreements and few 
academies had as much investment in their buildings as the original 
ones. By May 2010, 203 of these Academies Mark I and II were open 
andanother 60 or so were planned. 
Figure 3: Timeline of the development of Academies Marks I, II and III 
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Mark II sponsored academies
•  Universities, colleges & schools able 
  to sponsor without providing £2 million
•  Tighter control of funding agreements
Academy sponsors no longer obliged
to provide financial contribution
•  Some relaxation of restrictions 
  on funding agreements in relation
  to curriculum content, target setting 
  and “submission of rigid plans”
Mark III converter academies
•  Schools performing well (including
•  primary schools) can convert to 
•  academy status on a stand alone 
•  basis or as part of an umbrella 
•  trust or multi-academy trust
Original academies retain their
funding agreements but new 
academies established on
Mark II principles
Some schools convert to 
be an academy as part of 
a sponsored multi-academy
trust and some convert 
and then become academy 
sponsors
Mark I sponsored academies
•  Philanthropic sponsors contribute 
•  up to £2 million towards capital costs
Source: Academies Commission.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
add email link to pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add links to pdf acrobat
23
2.  Academisation and school improvement
Considerable debate has taken place about whether academies have 
been successful in driving improvement and improving outcomes for 
pupils. The Commission considered a range of evidence about the impact 
of Academies Mark I and II. Certainly some, including the widely cited 
Mossbourne Academy in Hackney, have demonstrated stunning success, 
but this is not common. Indeed, Stewart (2012) suggests that many 
previously poorly performing schools in disadvantaged areas have done 
just as well as those which embarked on the academy route.
Several evaluations of Academies Mark I and II have shown some 
modest improvement in pupil performance (PricewaterhouseCoopers 
(PwC), 2008; NAO, 2010). For example, PwC’s five-year evaluation 
report found a higher percentage point increase in the GCSE results of 
academies compared to the national average, although it concluded that 
there was ‘insufficient evidence to make a definitive judgement as a model 
for school improvement’. Of course, as these schools were typically the 
lowest performing, their percentage point increase was likely to be higher 
than that of better-performing schools. The NAO Report (2010) found 
significant improvements in the proportion of pupils achieving GCSE 
A*–  C grades and in attendance at school compared to a comparison 
group, but it also noted that Ofsted had judged some academies to be 
inadequate. A number of researchers (Curtis et al., 2008; Wrigley, 2008; 
Machin and Vernoit, 2011) caution that improvements in performance 
cannot be disentangled from the changing intake in these schools; they 
point to adecline in the proportion of disadvantaged pupils in some 
academies.
Machin and Vernoit (2011) conclude that academies ‘can deliver faster 
gains in GCSE performance than comparable schools’. They warn that 
benefits can take time to materialise and that further work was needed 
to explore the benefits and costs of academisation, both for individual 
academies and other schools. 
The complexities of comparing the performance of even a small 
group of sponsored academies with other schools is reflected in the DfE’s 
publication, Attainment at Key Stage 4 by pupils in academies 2011 (DfE, 
2012d). Results in 2011 for pupils in sponsored academies were broadly 
the same as in a group of similar, statistically matched, schools. However, 
if equivalence qualifications are excluded, results in sponsored academies 
were slightly lower than in a group of similar schools.
The clearest improvement in performance can be seen in a small group 
of 33 sponsored academies open for at least five years. Between 2006 and 
2011, results in these academies improved at a faster rate than those of a 
group of comparator schools tracked over the same period. Attainment 
was higher the longer a sponsored academy had been open (Figure 5). 
Pupils’ progress, as measured by value added, was on average greatest for 
those sponsored academies that had been open the longest. There was 
the positive finding too that pupils eligible for free school meals who were 
in academies that had been open the longest achieved higher results than 
similar pupils in other state-funded schools. The message here is that 
change takes time. 
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
chrome pdf from link; add links pdf document
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add,
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink to pdf
Unleashing greatness – getting the best from an academised system
24 
Figure 4: Percentage of pupils in sponsored academies and in 
agroup of similar schools that achieved 5+ A*–C (including and 
excluding equivalent qualifications and including English and 
mathematics GCSE)
5+ A*–C GCSE (inc. equivalent qualifications)
including English and Mathematics GCSE
5+ A*–C GCSE (exc. equivalent qualifications)
including English and Mathematics GCSE
Sponsored
Academies
Similar
schools
Sponsored
Academies
Similar
schools
46.0%
45.7%
32.6%
35.8%
Source: DfE Performance Tables, quoted in Attainment at Key Stage 4 by pupils in Academies 
2011 (DfE, 2012).
Figure 5: Percentage of pupils in sponsored academies that 
achieved 5+ A*–  C (including equivalent qualifications and English 
and mathematics GCSE) by Free School Meals eligibility and 
number of years the school has been open as an academy
Number of years open as an Academy
1
2
3
4
5
All state-funded
schools
30.3
46.1
30.4
48.4
32.4
53.7
36.9
56.9
41.9
55.9
34.6
62.0
FSM
non-FSM
FSM
non-FSM
FSM
non-FSM
FSM
non-FSM
FSM
non-FSM
FSM
non-FSM
Source: National Pupil Database, quoted in Attainment at Key Stage 4 by pupils in Academies 
2011 (DfE, 2012).
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add hyperlink to pdf online; pdf reader link
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
add link to pdf file; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
25
The Commission accepts the evidence of some improvements 
inAcademies Mark I and II, although believes, too, that the impact 
isvariable and that, in terms of qualifications, there was considerable 
reliance on GCSE equivalence (Burgess and Allen, 2010). At the same 
time, the Commission also accepts the warning by Curtis et al. (2008) 
that‘academies are in danger of being regarded by politicians as 
apanacea for a broad range of educational problems’. 
Even with these early academies, the move to academy status itself 
wasnot an automatic route to school improvement. Hutchings et al. 
(2012) conclude that many sponsored academies did not have effective 
school improvement strategies between 2008 and 2011. Her research 
indicates that ‘the only sponsored academies that improved more than 
non-academies in the same quintiles of attainment were those that had 
already benefited from City Challenge improvement strategies’. 
The Commission believes that these early academies revitalised the 
system, including initiating a shift in culture, and that the debate about 
their impact is a healthy one. Some of them showed just how much 
could be achieved with high aspirations, determination that young 
people would achieve well, and a rigorous and consistent approach to 
school improvement. They raised expectations locally and stimulated 
competition that led to better outcomes for pupils in the area. 
Academies Mark III (see Figure 3) were introduced after the 2010 
general election. At this point, academy status was opened to all schools 
that Ofsted had judged to be outstanding, and to some judged to be 
‘performing well’, on a single vote by the governing body. Because such 
schools typically contain lower proportions of disadvantaged pupils 
(Francis, 2011), academies now have significantly lower percentages 
of pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) and significantly better 
attainment at GCSE level. There are, therefore, problems in looking to the 
academy programme before 2010 to learn lessons for the future. Machin, 
in particular, has openly criticised the way his work has been used to 
validate the current academies programme. Machin (2012) warns that: 
‘… it may be, in due course, that these new academies do deliver 
performance improvements. But we know nothing of this yet, and 
translating the evidence from the old programme over to the new, without 
appropriate reservations about whether the findings can be generalised, 
is,at the moment, a step too far.’ 
The new context – and Academies Mark III 
Several different types of academies now cluster under the 
MarkIIIumbrella:
a. sponsored academies that follow a model somewhere between 
Mark I and Mark II. Funding agreement requirements have 
been relaxed. As explained in Chapter 4, one of the first acts of 
the new Coalition government was to restore ‘autonomy and 
freedoms’ for academies that it considered had been eroded since 
2007. It removed requirements, which it described as having 
been ‘shoe-horned’ into the model academy funding agreement, 
The Commission 
believes that these 
early academies 
revitalised the 
system, including 
initiating a shift in 
culture, and that 
the debate about 
their impact is a 
healthyone
2.  Academisation and school improvement
Unleashing greatness – getting the best from an academised system
26 
including ‘unnecessary central prescription about curriculum and 
qualifications, target-setting and the production of rigid plans’ 
(DfE, 2010).
b. free standing converter academies that are either ‘outstanding’ 
or ‘performing well’
c. schools that have converted to academy status and joined a 
chain of schools – either because the DfE has used this route to 
avoid the protracted process for closing and opening a school, or 
because a school has jumped into the arms of a sponsored chain 
before being pushed, or because of a wish to work with other 
schools through association with a particular chain.
d. schools that have converted to academy status but, as part of the 
conversion process, are required to work with or be supported 
by another school because they are not performing sufficiently 
well on their own
e. schools that have converted as a federation and form 
amulti-academy trust
f. schools that have converted, either individually or as a group, 
and join an umbrella trust, typically a faith grouping, where 
schools have an individual funding agreement with the Secretary 
of State but one, or more, of their trustees is nominated by 
acentral charitable body, such as a diocese
g. schools that have converted to academy status individually but have 
agreed to work with others in a soft partnership orcollaboration.
As at November 2012, there were 536 sponsored academies. Thesewere 
academies set up pre- and post-2012 that had been targeted as needing 
improvement and were being sponsored by another school, individual or 
organisation, with the agreement to do so set out in a funding agreement 
with the DfE. The Commission heard from a number of schools, many 
of which (but not all) had below-average attainment levels, who felt 
forced by the DfE into becoming a sponsored academy. Nevertheless, the 
rationale for becoming a sponsored academy remains transformational 
improvement. 
A key concern of the Commission about sponsored Academies Mark 
III is that the centralised process for selecting sponsors and driving change 
is no longer rigorous. The Commission heard much critical evidence. 
This lack of focus is exemplified by the ‘beauty parades’ which currently 
allow weak schools to choose their own partners as sponsors, although 
the Secretary of State retains the right to make the final decision, as he 
did in the case of Downhills Primary School in the London Borough 
ofHaringey. This is explored more fully in Chapter 7. 
At the same date in November 2012, there were 1920 converter 
academies. These schools already have above-average results and, in the 
secondary sector, score higher on the EBacc measure than other schools. 
In 2011, 77.1% of their pupils achieved 5+ A*– C GCSE, including English 
and mathematics, compared to 58.2% pupils across all state-funded 
schools (DfE, 2012a).They have fewer pupils eligible for free school meals 
and fewer Black and minority ethnic pupils than the national average.
The government’s message to these schools is not one of 
transformational improvement. Instead, they are asked to keep doing 
27
what they were doing, including improving, and they enjoy greater 
freedom and resources as independent academies. As Francis (2012) 
suggests, the risk of complacency slowing improvement is stark, 
particularly now that Ofsted no longer has a statutory duty to undertake 
routine inspection of outstanding schools. To be fair, the government 
expected converter academies to play a key role in supporting other 
schools, even acting as sponsors themselves; this is set out as a clear 
expectation by the DfE, and commitments to such activities have to be 
specified by schools in their applications for academy conversion. The 
evidence before the Commission suggests relatively few have taken on 
the supportive roles expected. Some schools told the Commission that 
the pressure in terms of public accountability to achieve good results 
and good judgements from Ofsted prevented them from taking on the 
accountability and responsibilities associated with sponsorship. 
A number of converter academies reported keen local competition 
from other schools and indicated that they did not want collaboration 
with and support for other schools to divert them from individual success. 
The headteacher of a highly successful school in an Outer London 
Borough told a Commissioner that he saw his main competition as 
coming from independent schools in the area and that this stopped him 
from spending time supporting other schools. 
The Commission saw positive indications of support and greater 
collaboration emerging from a number of converter models:
• schools converting in groups and supporting each other through 
‘soft’, but still useful, school improvement partnerships 
• some schools converting as part of an umbrella trust, such 
as faith schools in a diocese. Each academy retains its 
independence but schools share common values and there is 
potential for collaborative activity
• some converters converting as part of a hard federation, amulti-
academy trust, such as a secondary school and some of its 
primary schools 
• the emergence of more school-led chains. The government is 
now strongly encouraging high-performing schools to become 
sponsors. 74 converter academies, or 3.85% of the 1,920 
converter total, are now acting in this way and we are seeing 
thegrowth of new school-led chains such as the Park Federation 
or Altrincham Grammar School for Girls
• primary schools converting as a cluster to support one another.
The learning from Academies Mark I and II is that to engender real 
change the move to academy status has to be supported by a rigorous and 
coherent approach to school improvement. The converter academies from 
Academies Mark III have huge potential to be at the vanguard of aschool-
led model of school improvement and more incentives need to be found to 
encourage this. 
The Commission heard evidence that the headteachers of converter 
academies prized their autonomy and independence. However, as the 
OECD (Pont et al., 2008) suggests, at least two conditions are necessary 
for autonomy to result in beneficial impact: leaders must be focused on 
2.  Academisation and school improvement
Unleashing greatness – getting the best from an academised system
28 
education and learning and adequate professional support is needed, 
including effective training and development. Each converter academy 
needs to articulate and implement an approach to school improvementthat 
will ensure school capacity improves and pupils’ progress is accelerated. 
Case study: The Park Federation
A primary multi-academy trust and a school led chain
In 2009, the head of Cranford Park Primary school, a large and ethnically 
diverse primary school in the London Borough of Hillingdon, was asked by the 
local authority to start supporting another nearby large primary school that had 
been given a ‘notice to improve’ by Ofsted. Along with other leaders and staff 
at the school, the head, Martin Young, a National Leader of Education, worked 
with teachers at Wood End Park to introduce the systems and approaches 
that had made Cranford Park a very successful school. In November 2009, the 
governors of both schools agreed that the schools should become part of a 
single federation, with the head of Cranford Park becoming the Executive Head 
with overall responsibility for 1,500 pupils and more than 200 staff.
By summer 2010, Cranford Park had been assessed by Ofsted as out-
standing and Wood End Park was improving fast and no longer classified 
as inadequate. Later that autumn, the federation started to provide support 
through a partnership agreement with a primary school in Slough (30 minutes 
down the road from Hillingdon) that had been placed in special measures. 
In 2012, the governors and leaders of the federation carefully weighed the 
pros and cons of moving to academy status and, in September 2012, it became 
a multi-academy trust known as the Park Foundation. 
The school in Slough, James Elliman, has also come out of special measures 
and is expected to join the academy trust early in 2013. The governors of the 
trust see the scope for expansion of the federation but are careful to apply due 
diligence before taking on each school improvement assignment. 
Looking forward
In an increasingly academised system, the Commission believes greater 
attention should be paid to identifying the distinct system features or 
‘properties’ of school improvement. Levin (2012) argues that the most 
successful countries give more attention to system properties than they 
do to autonomy for individual schools. As Glatter’s evidence (2012) to the 
Commission suggests, autonomy needs to be set within a clear framework 
and a strong infrastructure of support if school improvement is to be 
accelerated (see also Hutchings et al., 2012). 
The Commission considers academisation should be used to inject 
new energy into school improvement to effect more fundamental change 
across the whole system. It therefore makes six recommendations that 
should lead to accelerated and sustainable improvement in an increasingly 
academised system:
• Build a more powerful national vision for change.
• Strengthen professional ownership of accountability. 
• Make school review in academies more open and inclusive 
ofparents and the local community.
• Capture the power of collaboration for system change.
• Support schools in taking responsibility for 
whole-systemimprovement. 
29
• Use Ofsted to support a school-led, collaborative approach 
tosystemic improvement.
These recommendations are discussed below. 
Recommendation: Build a more powerful national vision 
forchange 
The academies programme originates in the goal of transforming the lives 
of children and young people who are growing up in the poorest parts 
of the country. A number of academies are succeeding in doing this but 
not in sufficient numbers to ensure all pupils get a good deal from the 
education system in England.
David Albury, the Director of the Innovation Unit and Design and 
Development Director for the Global Education Leaders’ Program, told 
the Commission:
‘International evidence and experience of innovation, reform and 
transformation in education and in other state sectors demonstrate the 
importance of establishing and widely communicating a powerful and 
compelling “case for change”.’
Such a case for change should be rooted in an analysis of evidence but 
also in how the current education system continues to fail many young 
people. Two pupils in every ten still leave primary schools without the 
literacy skills they will need to thrive in secondary schools – let alone 
beyond. The gap between poor and rich children remains shockingly 
inequitable with just 34.6% of young people eligible for free school 
meals achieving five GCSEs at A*–  C, including English and mathematics, 
compared to 62% of those from wealthier backgrounds (DfE, 2012n). 
The Secretary of State should set the case for change within a vision 
oftheknowledge, skills and dispositions young people will need for 
lifeand work in the twenty-first century. 
A vision of such learning might be rooted in goals such as:
• developing the skills and motivation for genuine lifelong 
learning, ready access to knowledge and resources anywhere 
andanytime (Cisco Systems, Inc., 2010)
• collaborative as well as competitive working 
• use of new technologies to increase possibilities for learning 
outside classroom settings
• performance-based assessment. 
It would then be left to schools to use their freedom to create learning 
experiences locally that engage and educate all their pupils. 
Recommendation: Strengthen professional ownership 
ofaccountability
The autonomy of English schools is not matched by that of many other 
countries, but schools in England also work within a strong framework 
of accountability that has been in place for over 20 years. The three 
core elements of national tests and examination results, published 
Two pupils in 
every ten still leave 
primary schools 
without the literacy 
skills they will 
need to thrive in 
secondary schools
2.  Academisation and school improvement
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested