pdfsharp table example c# : Add a link to a pdf in preview application Library tool html asp.net .net online theology_mission_20065-part45

51
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
Add a link to a pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
Add a link to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf online; pdf edit hyperlink
52
RECOVERING THE MISSIONAL CHURCH:  INTEGRATING LOCAL AND GLOBAL
Stephenson, Peter. "Christian Mission in the Postmodern World" @ 
www.postmission.com
White,  John.  The  Church  and  the  Para-Church.  Portland:
Multnomah Press, 1982.
Winter, Ralph. "The Two Structures of God
'
s Redemptive Mission"
Missiology 2:121-139, 1974.
FOOTNOTES
1
Brian McLaren, The Church on the Other Side. Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 2000. p. 141.
2
Alan Roxburgh, The Missionary Congregation, Liminality and
Leadership (Harrisburg: Trinity Press, 1997) pp.23-56.
3
Roxburgh, p.47.
4
Ralph  Winter,  "The  Two  Structures  of  God
'
s  Redemptive
Mission." Missiology 2:121-139, 1974.
5
David  Bosch,  Transforming  Mission:  Paradigm  Shifts  in
Theology of Mission. Maryknoll: Orbis, 1991. p. 43-44.
6
Gary Burger, "The Local Church and Para-Local Church: A
Proposal for Partnership in Ministry." International School of
Theology: Monograph Series, 1990, p.4.
 H. Cook, Who Really Sent the First Missionaries
?
Evangelical
Missions Quarterly 12:233-239, 1975 in G. Burger, p.4.
 R. Winter, p.128.
9
John  White,  The  Church  and  the  Para-Church.  Portland:
Multnomah Press, 1982.
10 For instance, George Hunter, The Celtic Way of Evangelism.
Nashville:Abingdon Press, 2002.
11  R. Winter, p.135.
12  ibid., p. 135.
13  ibid., p.135.
14 Howard Snyder, The Radical Wesley and Patterns for Church
Renewal. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 1980. p.112.
15 Craig  Van  Gelder,  "Understanding  the  Church  in  North
America" in Missional Church (D. Guder, ed.). Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998. p. 74.
16  Roxburgh, p.50.
17  ibid., p.52.
18  Roxburgh, p.54
19  Gerald  Arbuckle,  Earthing  the  Gospel.  Maryknoll:  Orbis
Books, 1990, p.208.
20  Charles Van Engen in Missional Church, Guder.  p. 255.
21  Darrell Guder, Missional Church. p. 256.
22 Stanley  Hauerwas  and  William  Willimon,  Resident  Aliens.
Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1989. p.83.
23  Hauerwas and Willimon, p. 116.
24  ibid., p. 139.
25  Arbuckle, p. 214.
26  Roxburgh, p. 59.
27  ibid., p. 60-61.
28  Ibid., p. 62-66.
29  Roxburgh, "Equipping God
'
s People for Mission" in Missional
Church, Guder (ed.)
30 James  Engel  and William  Dyrness, Changing  the  Mind of
Missions. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2000. p. 178.
31  Ibid., p. 178.
32  Guder, Missional Church. p. 264.
33  Ibid., p. 265.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
c# read pdf from url; add link to pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add hyperlink to pdf in; adding a link to a pdf in preview
53
M
y assigned task in this paper is to present a
working model for Shalom Communities.  I
am to try to show how a shalom community is
ekklesia in which evangelism, diakonia, and incarnation
are  inseparably  linked  without  dichotomy  or  the
"balancing of priorities".
The understandings presented here have grown out
of two decades of serious reflection and teaching on the
issues  surrounding  the  Biblical  notion  of  devotion,
justice/righteousness  and  shalom.   This  reflection  has
furthermore been set in the context of nearly two decades
of serious concern with the  shaping and nurture of  a
theological  learning  community  in  South  Africa  and
against  the  background  of  nearly  two  decades  of
experience in the process of shaping and nurture of a
mission community in what is now Zimbabwe.
Since the middle of the last century John Bright
'
s
study The Kingdom of God (Abingdon 1953) has led to
a major shift in thinking about the Church.  David 
Y
ardy
wrote a paper summarizing some of the best thinking on
the  Kingdom  of  God  in  a  Free  Methodist  Mission
context. (
Y
ardy
'
s paper was distributed at the Mission
Boot Camp in Bangkok, it is not published, but should
be available) A discussion of shalom is not a contender
with Kingdom of God Theology.  Shalom is the theme
that fleshes out what the "Rule of the King" is about.
Early in the reflection period my attention was drawn
to a small book by James E. Metzler, From Saigon to
Shalom,  (Herald  Press,  1985).      I  continue  to
recommend  this  book  as  one  of  the  most  clear  and
SHALOM:  
GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
By Philip L. Capp
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
add links pdf document; add hyperlink pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
pdf link; clickable pdf links
54
significant presentations of the notion of Shalom.
Even before this, my thinking has been nurtured and
shaped by the influence of some of  Howard  Snyder
'
s
writings.  Amongst those, perhaps The Community of
the King (Intervarsity Press, 1977) has been the most
influential.    Although  Snyder  does  not  use  the  term
shalom what he describes is part of the shalom process.
His theology of the church fits the shalom theme.
Just a word about my title.  This was not the assigned
title
!
I am using it because I believe it symbolizes an
important conception.  Shalom is  not the  product  of
reason.  It is not the outcome of reasoned assumptions
from philosophical thought. (There have, however been
numbers  of  utopian  schemes  presented  from  a
philosophically reasoned basis.  For a serious listing of
such  literature  explore  the  following  internet  link:
http://www.nypl.org/utopia/primarysources.html)
Shalom  is  given  by  God  in  response  to  a  human
community
'
s response to God.  Shalom is not utopian.
Shalom has to do with the full range of reality as humans
experience it and, I believe, has to do with how God
enables  human  community  to  live  and  thrive  in  this
world and how God enables such human community to
represent  God  in  the  world.    Therefore  Shalom  is
inseparably related to Incarnation.  Shalom cannot be
separated, then, from the Life, Cross and Resurrection of
Jesus.  Nor can it be separated from the meaning and
purpose of the Holy Spirit as given to the community of
believers.  (Note, there is a sense in which certain larger
and more generalized aspects of God
'
s response to the
world can be said to be shalom  -  sunshine, rain, day and
night, the earth as a resource for life - and with that must
be accepted the giving  of storms, earthquakes,  floods,
etc..  In this sense there is a metaphor of more particular
shalom - there are realities connected with the giving of
God that are not explained by words like nice, happy, joy,
good and others.)
One further introductory note:  In my occasional use
of the term grace there is a serious conceptual difference
from the prevalent notion of Grace as I have read and
heard it expressed.  Beyond the felicitous and loving way
in  which  God  comes  to  us  and  surprises  us  with
unexpected  and  undeserved  favor,  I  understand  grace
with  the  Eastern  Orthodox  Christian  tradition  as
"Uncreated Grace" rather than "Created Grace".  The
implication of this is that, for my understanding, grace is
not  just the occasional giving of something by God, but
is  rather  the  entire  substance  of  divine  presence  and
enabling power, it is distinct, but not different from the
the  wholeness of  the Trinity - Father, Son and Holy
Spirit.    In  this  sense,  then,  grace  is  the  "Trinitarian
Community"  abiding  and  enabling  the  human
community  to  "godliness"  or  "god-likeness"  in  this
present world.  For an interesting Orthodox treatment of
this  notion  of  grace  see  the  following  internet  link:
http://home.nyc.rr.com/mysticalrose/grace.html
WHAT IS SHALOM?
Shalom is one of the central and overarching themes in
the story of God
'
s interaction with earth and humans.
Without Shalom, Redemption becomes meaningless in
relation to this world and without coherence as far as
how life and eternity may be linked.  I believe this to be
true  because  Shalom  is  presented  in  the  Biblical
narratives as what God wills human society to look like -
to be like - and redemption deals with God
'
s enabling of
humans to be becoming godlike instead of anti-godlike
or non-godlike.
The main form of the Hebrew (shalam) appears 276
times in the Old Testament and is found in every book
except Amos, Habakkuk and Zephaniah.  However, a
very strong "shalom-justice" statement appears in Amos
5:24.  (The word used here is a form of tsedek (related to
right, righteous, just) which is another related idea that
cannot be separated from the idea of shalom. Tsedek is a
large theme in the Old Testament and forms part of the
shalom theme. 
Shalom is literally translated as "peace" and used as a
greeting in both Hebrew and Arabic, shalom is actually a
multifaceted  word  with  a  complex  set  of  meanings.
Consistently translated in the Septuagint as eirene, and
used by New Testament writers in the Greek form with
the background of the Old Testament Hebrew usage, the
word becomes almost consistently translated as "peace"
in the New Testament.  The absorption of the Greek
notion of "cessation of hostility" as the primary meaning
of  eirene  completes  the  dilution  of understanding for
English readers of the New Testament.  The awesome
power  of  the  simple  phrase  "the  Gospel  of peace" is
diluted to non-recognition by this translation loss.  The
profound usage of peace with the underlying notion of
shalom is lost in the New Testament for most people
unless  it  is  restored  through  careful  Biblical
understanding. (cf.  James E. Metzler, From Saigon to
Shalom, Herald Press, 1985:57-64, especially p.58)
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Able to add a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; check links in pdf
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references:
add links to pdf in acrobat; add a link to a pdf
55
1.1 Th
e
c
on
s
i
s
t
e
nt and lar
ge
i
ss
u
es
in Shalom ar
e:
Wholeness,  health,  well-being    and  belonging  -
individual, but  especially  communal or  societal versus
sickness,  fragmentation,  broken  and  divided
relationships, greed, hostility, fraud  - all of which appear
in a variety of ways in modern world social and political
settings  under the terms of ethnic or racial prejudice,
class oppression, political extortion and embezzlement of
national  resources,  environmental  destruction  in  the
name  of  development  or  business  enterprise,  poverty,
hunger, - the list could go on.
Harmony,  love,  friendship,  cooperation  -  again,
between individuals, but most especially in community
or societal relations versus the competitive, ethnocentric,
self-centered,  power  accumulative  and  unbalanced
economic  distributive  structures  characteristic  of  the
world we live in.
Justice, true (integrity), right (righteous) -particularly
in  relation  to  communities  versus  the  entrapment  of
much of the world in cul-de-sacs of impoverishment and
powerlessness.
Peace, unafraid, safe as characteristics of community
relations  versus  the  violence,  war,  rampant  crime,
political aggression that in fact characterize much of the
world communities.
Beauty, order, coherence, radiance, loveliness versus
the  chaos,  disorder,  littered,  smelly,  unsanitary,
overcrowded, ugliness that characterizes so much of the
world
'
s  cities,  and  "developed"  countryside  -  even
sometimes the wilderness areas.
Wholeheartedness,  good,  Godliness  versus  the
environmentally  damaging,  devious,  slothful,  non-
caring, evil and sinfulness characteristic of much of the
world
'
s personal, social and economic activities.
1.2  Som
e
of th
e
g
r
e
at  Bibli
c
al ima
ges
of 
s
halom ar
e:
Q
The Garden of Eden
Q
The Vision of the New Jerusalem and the Garden in
the City
Q
The Beauty of the Tabernacle
Q
The Desert Blossoming (Isaiah 35)
Q
The Wolf and the Lamb (Isaiah 11:6,7; 65:25)
Q
Every  man  (person/family)  with  vine  and  fig  tree
(Zech. 3:10, Mic. 4:4,  see Hos 14:7; 
Ze c h .
8:12; Mal. 3:11)
Q
Covenant  of  blessing  to  Abraham,  Moses  (Gen
12:17,18; Ex 3:20)
Q
Mission of Jesus "seek and save that which was lost" -
cf Sermon on the Mount and the "Kingdom of God"
theme
Q
Healing of the sick and deformed, resuscitating the
dead in the New Testament
Q
Transformed people in Corinth-"such were some of
you" (I Cor 6:9-11) 
Q
Pauline expectation of Social Transformation through
Christ-"put on then" (Col 3:1-4:6)
Som
e
of th
e
c
hara
c
t
e
ri
s
ti
c
Bibli
c
al  u
s
a
ge
of 
s
halom   (in
variou
s
form
s
of th
e
root) ar
e:
Old Testament
Q
When  life  in  the  community  is  not  disrupted  by
violence
Q
Protection
Q
Safety (a very frequent usage)
Q
Agreement, accord, alliance, friendship, confederates -
(note:   What  could  Christians,  Jews  and  Muslims
agree to do together
?
)
Q
Health - Jer 14:19
Q
Well  being - personal and  community - very large
usage  (linked to listening to God - Is 48:18; 48:22, Jer
8:11; cf  Ex.20:24 - the Sacrifice of "Well-Being" or
peace offering
Q
Unafraid because  of trust in the Lord (Deut  20:1;
Josh11:6
Q
Comfort or Solace
Q
Harmonious  living  together  -  treaty,  consultation
versus war (Note the Penteteuch
'
s  emphasis  on  war
machinery  (eg horses  and chariots -cf Deut  17:16;
20:1 and see also Zech 9:10 - image of no war
Q
Justice  -  (note  the  reality  of  justice  linked  to  the
notion of "devoted" herem  I Kings 
20:42)
Q
Victory in war often described in shalom terms
Q
Satisfied
Q
Greeting (very common)
Q
Prosperity - a result of rain, sun, weather, fertility, all
of which are God
'
s gifts to earth (prosper carries the
notion of sufficiency, not surplus)
Q
Order, organization - expressed often in concern for
widow,  orphan,  poor  -  distributed  order  and
prosperity opposed to elitism  (Order that oppresses is
Anti-Shalom even when good for some.)
Q
Ethical - Depart from evil, do good (Ps 34:14, Ps 72;
73)  Free of deceit, Intent of well- being  for  all,
blameless behavior
Q
Restitution - Gen 44:4, Ex 21:34, 21:36 etc.  There
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins installed. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references:
pdf links; adding a link to a pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; change link in pdf
56
are many references to this.  It seems that if there are
no required consequences of good behavior to make
up  for  bad  behavior,  then  there  are  no  real
consequences.  And if there are no consequences for
bad behavior then there can be no Shalom.
Q
Complete - Shalom carries ideas of finishing and the
integrity to  do that (Keeping one
'
s  word)    See  Ps
50:14, Ps 56:12
Q
Trust; Stability; Pleasure
New Testament
Q
In the New Testament, "peace" equals shalom almost
every time.  
Q
As in Gospel of peace equals Gospel of Shalom
Q
As in Jesus is our peace equals Jesus is our Shalom
Mat.  10  describes  a  Shalom  Mission  strategy  for
Palestine  - note the greeting of  "peace"  and  the
instruction to "let your peace return to you" if there is
rejection of the mission.   Implied is the notion that
receiving  and  responding  to  God  will  result  in
Shalom, rejecting will result in "anti-shalom"
1.3 Shalom a
s
s
om
e
thin
g
God brin
gs
or mak
es:
Q
Shalom is God
'
s creation through, not by his people
(Is 45:7; 54:10; 53:5
Q
Looking to God and Justice are criteria of living in
Shalom (Is  60:17; 59:8)
Q
Shalom is a result of obedience to God - Exiled Jews
to seek welfare of the foreign city and in that find their
own welfare - Jer 29:7, 11
Q
Vision of shalom in Jerusalem - the result of God
'
s
doing, just as the destruction was God
'
s doing  Jer
33:1-16
Q
Image of Shalom in Jerusalem - false as attempted by
the leaders versus the true brought by God (Jer33:1-
31)(Note: Shalom is not about everything being nice)
Image of Shalom among the Remnant -God
'
s doing
with  response  from people that includes  a  mission
outreach  resulting  from  the  evidence  in  the
community of  God
'
s presence  Zech 8:11-23 (Note
some  of  the  issues  here:  worship,  truth,  justice,
goodwill toward others)  And note 7:8 - not oppress
the widow, orphan, poor alien, nor devise evil against
another.
Q
Prophecy  of  One  of  Peace  (read  Shalom)  out  of
Bethlehem  Mic 5:5 
Q
Shalom is not about gaining power  Micah 3:5
Q
Shalom comes from God
'
s activity as the one who
repays,  not  from  ours;  from God  as the  one  who
recompenses, not us: from God who performs, not
our  performance;    from  God  who  completes  or
restores, not us.  Cf Jer 25:14; Is 66:6; Is 65:6
A  few  years  ago  Cornelius  Plantinga,  Jr,  professor  of
theology  at  Calvin  Theological  Seminary  in  Grand
Rapids published an article about Sin.  His central point
is that sin upsets, disturbs, distorts, destroys the Christian
concept of the way things ought to be.  He describes that
way, drawing on a passage from Nicholas Wolterstorff in
Until Justice and Peace Embrace, (Eerdmans, 1983:69-
72) as follows:
The webbing together of God, humans, and all creation
in justice, fulfillment, and delight is, of course, what the
Hebrew prophets call shalom.  We call it peace, but it
means far more than just peace of mind or  cease-fire
between enemies.  In the Bible, shalom means universal
flourishing,  wholeness,  and  delight,  in  which  natural
needs are satisfied, natural gifts fruitfully employed - the
whole process inspiring joyful wonder as the creator and
savior of all opens doors and speaks welcome.  Shalom, in
other words, is the way things ought to be. ("Not the
Way It
'
s S
'
pposed to Be: A Breviary of Sin" in Theology
Today, vol 50, No 2 - Jul 1993:182)
One thing that needs to be said again is that Biblical
Shalom is not utopian - that is, it does not appear in the
Bible as disconnected from the hard realities of life, the
suffering, the incomprehensible, and the unexplainable.
One of the most difficult parts of the Bible is the epic of
Job.  God directly involves himself with Job
'
s suffering -
there is no fuzzy dualism in the theological conceptions
of the author of Job.  Evil is not an equal, or unequal,
opposite to God.  Evil upsets Shalom, but it does not
upset the God of Shalom, nor God
'
s power to continue
to bring Shalom into the worst of human circumstances.
SHALOM AND THE NOTION OF MISSION
The intersection of the Biblical understanding of Shalom
with the New Testament conception of a Community of
God
'
s People as bearers of the presence of God into the
world in which  they  live is the  crucial connection of
Shalom and participation in God
'
s mission.  
I agree with Howard Snyder
'
s contention that the
church is the community of God
'
s people and that the
structures that develop to facilitate how the community
responds to God, are "alongside the church", non-sacred,
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class. Add text to PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed.
add links to pdf; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
57
humanly constructed (and therefore changeable) means
to an end that God gives, not an end that we achieve or
create.  (See  Howard  Snyder, The  Community  of  the
King, IVP, 1977, a carefully developed Biblical theology
of the church and this theme is repeated in several places,
but see especially pp 178-182).
God  is  present  in  the  world.    This  has  been
historically focused by the incarnation.  But the Biblical
notion of  Shalom  refocuses  the historical  presence  of
God in the Community of God
'
s people.  (I do not mean
by this to limit God
'
s presence to the Community of
God
'
s People)
The connection of Shalom with mission necessitates
community.  Not just general community, but particular
community.  Shalom without a particular community is
not  possible.    A  particular  community  in  process  of
responding  to  God  and  experiencing  God
'
s  Shalom
would be the equivalent of the New Testament "body of
Christ, filled with the Spirit".  (By the way, this is the
central issue in how John Wesley understood what his
mission  was  about  -  "the  recovery  of  scriptural
Christianity")
I  believe  that  a  particular  Community  of  God
'
s
People responding to God through the enabling of the
Grace of God is not only a church, but it is then the
bearer of the face of God. It becomes a viable incarnation
of God, bearing witness to God in the midst and the
bearer of God
'
s good news through the interaction of
God
'
s  love  through  themselves  toward  the  larger
community in which they live.
The  Holy  Spirit  has  been  given  to  enable  every
church to become "witnesses" (do not read evangelistic
methods) - the living presence of God because of "Christ
in us" or because Grace is at work - the Divine Energy in
us. (But to say again, not just as individuals, in fact not
primarily  as  individuals,  but as members  of the body
which thinks and works together as a community being
nurtured, energized and directed by Grace.)
So where the church is not only proclaiming Christ,
but also choosing to be part of the healing and well being
of the communities or areas in which it lives, there is God
and so there is Shalom.  Shalom is what the Kingdom of
God or Rule of God should look like in persons and
communities.
In the words of the assigned task, such a community
is Ekklesia in particular and by its participation in the
larger  community  evangelizes  and  ministers  to  the
community and thus puts a face or faces on a particular
incarnation of God.
3. SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE
IMPLICATIONS FOR MISSION PRACTICE
Shalom mission means putting a face on God - dwelling
in  the  midst  -  representative  of  "God  with  us"
(Emmanuel) rather than the faceless forms of mission.
Shalom mission means  "heralding" or announcing
that God redeems -  forgives transforms, empowers  or
energizes, sanctifies.  It means being the words of Christ
Shalom mission  means  doing  the works of Christ
particularly  amongst  the  poor,  helpless,  needy,  sick,
sinful, or in other words, the lost.  But not just doing
something to someone else, rather -and this is important
- working in such a way that we enable, or empower the
people amongst whom we work.  
NOTE:
John  Perkins has  given  a  lifetime  to  urban
community development.  He develops the above three
themes  as  Relocation-living  in  the  community,
Reconciliation-loving  God,  loving  people,  and
Redistribution-enabling or empowering the people.  A
recent exposition of this is in his book Restoring at-Risk
Communities:  doing  it  together  and  doing  it  right
(Baker, 1996).
Shalom  mission  means  structuring  our  church
communities  for  shalom  community.    The  Body  of
Christ is seen, not so much in single individuals but in
the community of believers acting in love in particular
situations in particular places.   See Ephesians.  (Howard
Snyder, Community of the King, is a careful exegesis of
this.)
Shalom is "Trinitarian" - it is communal.  Shalom
cannot exist without an "other" and Christianity can not
truly exist in one person only.
So  Shalom  mission  counters  the  progressive
individualization of the current world and in particular,
the  city.  It enables restoration of thinking  about the
community and the forms it can take in the city.   
Jeremiah said (29:7 - speaking of the dispersion of
the Jews after the fall of Jerusalem),  "But seek the welfare
of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to
the LORD on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find
your welfare."  (For "welfare" read shalom)
3.1  Shalom  i
s
a  valuabl
e
c
on
ce
ptual  ima
ge
for  mi
ss
ion
th
e
olo
g
y b
ec
au
se:
It is one word (it requires explanation, but that is better
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
58
than trying to untangle misunderstood words.)
Q
It has a historic context that is Biblical.
Q
It  can  be  illustrated  from  Biblical  text  and  from
contemporary life.
Q
It  is  comprehensive  in  depth  of  meaning.  (Not
because we say so, but because of Biblical usage)
Q
It is a process, a goal and a vision - all in one
Q
It is reachable by the least.   Big money and power are
not necessary for shalom to happen.  In fact, in some
cases they may prevent it from happening.
Q
Shalom  is what  the  church  is  about  and  why  the
church is.  It is a missionary word by definition.
Q
Shalom provides a way to keep focused and a way to
measure or evaluate.
Q
Shalom is the reason why we are in mission.
Q
For God so loved the world...should have eternal life
(John 3:16)
Q
For God sent not his son...to condemn the world, but
that the world, through him, might be saved. (John
3:17)
Q
Christ came to defeat the works of the devil.   He
came to insist that Christians not only can, but must
love one another.  (cf. 1 John 3:8,10)
Q
"As you sent me into the world, I have sent them into
the world." (John 17.18 NIV)
3.2 Shalom mi
ss
ion a
s
c
orr
ec
tiv
e:
Shalom mission is a corrective to the kind of mission that
derives its vision from the foreign "sending" culture and
implements  a  process  driven  by  "foreign"  interests.
Shalom by definition is what happens because God is
living in and working through a community.  Shalom
mission  is  the  outgrowth  of  a  particular  shalom
community living in a particular place, who, being led by
God, focus on how they can increase the "well being" of
the place in which they live.  
When such a vision is brought into being, it will
belong to those who participated in generating the vision
- being the local body of Christ, it will belong to them
and hence will "fit" the community.
3.3 Shalom mi
ss
ion
:
impli
c
ation
s
for how mi
ss
ion i
s
don
e
Shalom mission has serious implications for how mission
is done, how missionaries are recruited and trained and
how mission strategy is developed.   Please note that these
implications are the same for whoever the sending church
is and wherever the host church may be.
These implications have to do with problems such as:
Cultural imperialism (sending domination of project and
process).  A shalom community planted in the midst of a
larger  community  with  another  faith  system,  would
begin  by  "seeking  the  welfare"  of  that  larger  host
community.  To do that it would be necessary to learn
from that community, understand its world of meaning
and behavior and enter the process of understanding how
to let  Jesus  become  recognizable as one  of  them    A
learning,  inquiring,  ministering  shalom  community
would  not  try  to  transfer  irrelevant  structures  of  the
church as though they were the essence of the church,
but  seek to  find how communities work  in  this  host
situation. 
Eugene Peterson makes a comment that is designed
for pastoral ministry, but is relevant here.  (for pastor,
read missionary)
The  program-director  pastor is  dominated  by  the
social-economic  mind-set  of  Darwinism:  market-
orientation, competitiveness, survival of the fittest.  This
is  a  shift  in  pastoral  work  away  from  God-oriented
obedience to career-oriented success.  It is work at which
we gain mastery, position, power, and daily check on our
image in the mirror.  A Tarshish Career.  
The Spiritual director pastor is shaped by the biblical
mind-set  of  Jesus:  worship-orientation,  a  servant  life,
sacrifice.  This shifts pastoral work from ego-addictions
to grace freedoms.  It is work at which we give up control,
fail and forgive, watch God work.  A Nineveh vocation.
With that paradigm shift everything changes.  The place
we stand in is no longer a station for exercising control;
it is a place of worship, a sacred place of adoration and
mystery where we direct attention to God...In program
direction,  the  pastor is  Ptolemaic---At the center.   In
spiritual direction, the pastor is Copernican--in orbit TO
the  center.      (Under  the  Unpredictable  Plant:  An
exploration in vocational Holiness, (Wm. B. Eerdmans,
1994:176).
Communication  (serious  language  and  culture
learning as a pre-requisite to leadership roles).  A shalom
community in mission would learn to speak, and use the
language of their host community.  It would be their first
ministry  task.   They  would  engage  in  it  as  ministry,
learning to be friends with the host community.
Status  /  Role  understandings  For  instance  -
learner and story teller role assumption versus teacher or
director role assumption even when different status and
accompanying role is assigned by either or both of the
sending and host communities.  A Shalom community
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
59
would assume a learner role as the necessary tool, but
beyond that, as the only functional role for new members
of a community to assume.  Story telling would become
the privilege of learners in the conversational learning
process.
The Specialist/Technician lock box (the problem of
confusion of "Technical Aid" and Mission -even when
done  by  serious  Christians).      Mission  is  prior  to
"technical aid".  Technical aid is not mission, but may be
a significant part of how good mission strategy is carried
out.      A  shalom  community  could  not  be a  shalom
community  if  it  plunged  into  the  "teaching"  role
necessary to the Technical Aid or Specialist roles.   The
fundamental  role  of  mission  communities  is  not  to
transfer  technical  expertise,  but  to  allow  a  living
community without Jesus, to see Jesus.  It is not what a
shalom community knows, but who they know that is
the focus of mission.
The "any serious Christian is/can be a missionary  -
just go" syndrome (The problem of failure to recognize
that  there  is  a  huge  store  of  wisdom  and  specialized
understanding available for the very delicate process of
cross-cultural mission.)  By ignoring the preparation and
equipping we condemn "missionaries" to re-invent the
wheel.   A shalom community in mission would need to
have  access  to  the  reservoir  of  expertise  and
understanding, and furthermore would need to grapple
with  the  serious  implications  that  what  they  already
know  from  another  cultural  world  may  be  either
irrelevant,  or  harmful  in  another  setting.    There  are
wonderful  insights  that  help  in  language  learning,
analysis  of  culture,  listening  to  other  viewpoints,
communicating in ways that do not offend, etc.
The "response to the need" syndrome (The sense that
we can fix what is wrong in the world). Only God does
that. Shalom is given, not made.  Shalom mission flows
out of deep rooted listening and obedience to what God
is saying to persons and communities.  It is not the result
of visionary proactive intervention, but the result of the
call and sending of God.
3.4 Shalom mi
ss
ion
:
impli
c
ation
s
in th
e
c
ity
Shalom mission has particular implications for mission in
the city. Such a mission involves a community making
their home in the city, with vested interest rising from the
fact that they live in the city, bringing beauty, justice,
harmony,  wholeness,  and  peace  into  the  ugliness,
rapaciousness,  violence,  irresponsibility,  greed,
deceitfulness and power struggles that are characteristic
of the city.
There  is  a  great,  and  appropriate,  emphasis  on
mission  in  the  city.    There  is  also  a  great  deal  of
disagreement about the  nature  of cities.   These range
from the notion that the city is evil to the notion that the
city  is  good.    (I  am  unable  at  this  writing  to  give
bibliographical  information  -  but  see such  authors  as
Ellul, Linthicum, Waymire, Robert Orsi, Harvey Conn,
Peter Wagner, Bruce Winter and many others.
Ray Bakke went to a nearly dead church in the inner
heart of Chicago.  His ministry there involved building a
sense of community in the congregation, a sense of how
they  could  carry  out  their  own  lives  as  a  mission  of
healing and transformation.  He also established his own
ministry  by  building  relationships  with  the  business,
civic, political and other leaders, getting to know them
and making himself available to them for helping them
do what they were supposed to be doing.  The result was
transformation  within  his  own  congregation  and  the
nurture  of  a  large  effective  church  in  the  city.  (See:
Raymond  Bakke,  The  Urban  Christian:  Effective
Ministry in Today
'
s Urban World . IVP, 1987)
3.5 Shalom  mi
ss
ion
:
Conn
ec
tin
g
with W
es
l
e
yan thou
g
ht
and pra
c
ti
ce:
This  section  deserves  a  serious  and  longer  treatment.
However, there are a number of clear ways in which John
Wesley
'
s  thinking  was  along  the  lines  of  the  Biblical
shalom notion.
Holiness, as Wesley understood it, had to do with
opening life (individual and community) to listening to
and obeying God.  He understood Holiness as the work
of Grace (please remember the early note in this paper
about  Grace)  with a behavioral response.  Two  items
clearly indicate this: His rules for belonging to a society,
and his pamphlet "The Character of a Methodist".  What
Wesley called "Christian" Perfection, Perfection in Love,
Sanctification, etc. is closely akin to the development in
the Bible of the notion of Shalom.  That his depth of
interpretive perception has been diluted in the revivalism
and triviality of doctrinal controversy is a great loss.
The New Birth, in Wesley
'
s preaching and writing,
had to do with experiencing God - a conversion of the
heart, not just the head.  It was God coming to us, not us
achieving by some disciplined path - it was the self-giving
of  Grace  that  resulted  in  turning away  from  all  that
offended God and the doing of everything possible that
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
60
pleased God because of a personal relationship with God
- Grace at work in us.
Wesley maintained an open ecumenical  spirit that
fostered cooperation  and fellowship without regard to
affiliation except to Jesus Christ.  His mission involved
the nurture of those who were willing to be nurtured
within  the  Methodist  Movement,  but  his  vision  was
other than the building of a denomination - this his inner
spirit refused.
The  class  meeting  was  a  time  of  utter  honesty
between persons about who they were, how they were
living, the help they needed, the failure, the success, the
process.  And the class itself was organized to provide
support  for  the  nurture  and  growth  of  everyone
associated with it.  This kind of community could listen
to and obey God.  And they did.  The transformed lives
of  Methodists  were  a  marvel  in  Britain  in  the  18th
century.
The effect of Wesley and others influenced by him
has been a history of societal and political change that has
been consistent with the notion of shalom.  Such things
as orphanages, homes for the elderly, small capital loan
societies,  Christian  book  and  tract  publishing,
community  food  assistance,  public  opposition  to
substance abuse, public medical assistance for the poor,
anti-slavery activity and  publication, regular assistance
for the poor in the societies are some examples that are
well documented.
Wesley
'
s clear vision was the world.  His expectation was
that "scriptural Christianity" would increase to the ends
of the earth.  
4. EVIDENCES OF SHALOM MISSION:
I would like to note three stories that I believe illustrate
shalom mission.  They are notable not because they are
rare examples, but because they are not characteristic of
what  the  bulk  of  churches  are  understanding  as  the
mission of God in their midst.
4.1  U
g
anda
First, on a national scale, what has been happening in
Uganda since 1936  is a major footnote to what God
might  be ready  to  do  in  any  nation that responds as
Uganda  has  responded.    Recently  a  video  has  been
released "Transformations II"  (see the following internet
link: http://www.transformnations.com/ )   This video
presents an important part of the picture, but cannot
detail the history since 1936 of the people instrumental
in the beginning of what is known is the East Africa
Revival Movement, nor the heroic part of  the Anglican,
Bishop Festo Kivengere, as well as many less well known
persons (except to God) over a period of years in which
Uganda  suffered  the  vicious  rapacity  of  political
oppression, genocide and theft of the people
'
s resources.
The  story  is  long  and  tragic. The  suffering  has  been
immense.    Never-the-less,  there  has  been  a  strong
Christian  segment  that  has  intervened  in  prayer  and
preached hope.  It is also a matter of record that hundreds
of Christians in Uganda died because they refused to give
up their Christian faith under pressure or threat of death.
In  Idi  Amin
'
s  time  there  was  a  serious  upsurge  of
Christian  involvement  in  opposition  and  community
prayer  that  totally  transcended  the  denominational
boundaries  that  typically  separate  the  evangelical
community.    When  Amin  was  gone  it  seems  that
coalition  relaxed.   The  next  regime  was,  if  anything.
worse.  Christians joined again in prayer and in 1986 the
current head of Government , 
Y
oweri Kaguta Museveni,
was  chosen.  (For  official  reports  see:
http://www.government.go.ug/        including  a
comprehensive  report  from  the  World  Health
Organization  with  statistics  on  Aids/HIV  infection
decrease.    But  for  reports  from  Christian  sources  see
pages  such  as:  http://www.impactfm.org/  ,
http://www.luziusschneider.com/News/English/Uganda
E.htm ,   http://www.sentinalministries.org  and many
others.)  
Since 1986 there has been major turn around.  The
economy has improved, there are significant Christians
in government who are actively participating in better
SHALOM:    GOD'S UNREASONABLE MISSION
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested