open source pdf library c# : Add url to pdf application Library cloud windows asp.net wpf class USAID_eBook14-part447

events, and leaching). These measures require 
investments in groundwater protection and 
recharge, tied closely to community needs. 
One could observe that these are what city 
experts, or development planners, know already— 
just good practices. However, these are not com-
mon principles that multiple departments put into 
practice in an integrated way. The growing threat of 
climate-change impacts is shaking up cities enough 
that individuals and institutions are willing to inno-
vate in ways they haven’t before, simply to survive. 
Building resilience, as in the ACCCRN case 
described above, requires addressing components 
of a system that operate across different speeds 
(slow and fast) and across different time scales 
(past, present, and future). Development and 
philanthropic organizations can achieve this by 
incorporating the following elements into their 
strategy and programming: 
r
Invest in trust- and cooperation-building activi-
ties to strengthen the self-organizing capacity of 
communities in reaction to crises that disrupt 
normal response mechanisms. 
r
Bring together stakeholders from a diversity of 
backgrounds to address problems, even where 
they have different aims, to create a multitude 
of simultaneous approaches. (Because some will 
fail when conditions change unexpectedly.) 
r
Establish strong feedback mechanisms. Make 
sure information feeds in from all levels of the 
system: Local knowledge and feedback are essen-
tial to understanding changing circumstances as 
well as when new approaches might be neces-
sary. These feedback mechanisms must function 
both within the communities and also between 
those communities and the organizational and 
governmental actors with which they interact. 
Foster innovation and learning. Experimentation, 
learning by doing, and a preparedness to 
continuously adjust approaches are required to 
build the dynamic response capacity needed for 
the type of unpredictable, disorganizing change 
that we are going to see more of in the future. 
r
Take a long view. Build capacity to detect 
and anticipate threats to spot the problems of 
tomorrow before they become unmanageable. 
r
Increase the robustness of systems by increasing 
redundancy at all levels to foster the diversity 
of the functions of parts and the diversity of 
mechanisms to provide identical functions. 
r
Facilitate decentralization and devolvement 
of responsibilities as much as possible to the 
lowest possible scale within the system to allow 
for simultaneous top-down and bottom-up deci-
sion-making and distributed services delivery. 
In addition to the technical, economic, social, 
and political complexities inherent in resilience 
efforts, there are ethical challenges raised by 
traditional resilience thinking. A forest burns and 
strengthens an ecosystem, a business fails and a 
new more competitive one emerges in its place, 
or an innovation or social policy isn’t successful 
but generates insights for future programs. These 
short-term shocks promote resilience over a larger 
scale and time frame. Their failure or destruc-
tion seems a reasonable cost to bear in promot-
ing sustainable forests, market economies, and 
experimentation. But when we consider people, 
alone or within families and communities, more 
immediate ethical obligations may overrule the 
longer-term, or higher-level, benefits. Faced with 
famine, an epidemic of acutely fatal infectious 
disease, or a natural disaster, the humanitarian 
response is geared toward preventing death or per-
manent disability. Yet to prevent this, one might 
need to overexploit resources to provide food and 
shelter, or to use antibiotics in a way that might 
increase the chance of resistant infections in the 
future. Until resilience has been built up enough, 
such difficult choices between present urgency 
PRESSURE ON THE PLANET  |  119 
Add url to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to email; add link to pdf file
Add url to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf in preview; add links to pdf file
and long-term sustainability still need to be made. 
Over time, resilience may mitigate the risks inher-
ent in these choices. 
The most resilient governance structures will 
be those that balance the livelihood and well-being 
needs of individuals and communities, especially 
minority or marginalized communities, against 
needs of larger-scale entities, for example the needs 
of a community in the context of an ecological 
system in which the community resides. Resilience 
efforts must take into account the coupled nature 
of social and natural systems. Efforts must build 
on the inherent strengths of a system rather than 
approach resilience as addressing or compensating 
for deficiencies. A community approach to resil-
ience requires a thorough, well-grounded assess-
ment of the current functioning of a community, 
measuring both its strengths and its vulnerabilities. 
Developing more sophisticated instruments 
for measuring resilience will be critical to the 
efforts of development and philanthropic organi-
zations in prioritizing the needs of those on whose 
behalf we are working. Vulnerability and resilience 
indices will allow us to make more informed 
choices about where to target interventions, focus-
ing on vulnerable groups and communities and 
gearing support to building their adaptive capacity. 
The World Development Report’s 2012 focus on 
gender, for example, begins to build an evidence 
base for understanding the complex implications 
of gender for vulnerability, the different ways in 
which women, men, boys, and girls experience 
and respond to shocks, and to design interven-
tions that build resilience. The growing body of 
data generated by mobile communications devices, 
even in some of the world’s poorest urban informal 
settlements, for example, will provide more oppor-
tunities to promote resilience based on analysis of 
data reflecting the inherent strengths and vulner-
abilities of those communities. The efforts of the 
United Nations Global Pulse program to create 
global-level data aggregation systems, support-
ing real-time interventions, cannot only help 
build large-scale, short-term emergency-response 
capacities but can also provide an evidence base 
for identifying, understanding, and prioritizing the 
vulnerabilities of the most marginalized communi-
ties and groups. 
Finally, in the same way that we will work 
to strengthen the resilience of vulnerable groups 
and communities, development and philanthropic 
organizations must also cultivate our own adap-
tive capacities. Although the large institutions of 
the development and philanthropic worlds do not 
experience the same types of vulnerabilities as the 
communities in which they work, we risk failure, 
irrelevance, or creating harm if we do not cultivate 
processes to evaluate, learn, and adapt, creating 
institutional resilience to changing global and 
local environments. Although difficult for large, 
complex organizations, we must constantly take 
in new information and alter our approaches cor-
respondingly, adjusting and transforming strategy 
and programs in response to changing conditions. 
The ability of development and philanthropic 
organizations to work closely with vulnerable com-
munities and groups and implement the lessons of 
resilience thinking, so richly informed from fields 
as diverse as engineering, psychology, and ecology, 
will determine our success in addressing the criti-
cal challenges of the 21st century. 
Judith Rodin is President of the Rockefeller Foundation. 
Robert Garris is a Managing Director for the 
Rockefeller Foundation. 
The views expressed in this essay are their own, and do 
not necessarily represent the views of the United States 
Agency for International Development or the United 
States Government. 
120  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
add hyperlink to pdf online; c# read pdf from url
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
add url to pdf; active links in pdf
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  
Photo: Peace Corps 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add links to pdf document; add a link to a pdf file
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf hyperlink; pdf links
John J. DeGioia 
Reimagining the Roles and 
Responsibilities of Education 
in the Work of Human Development  
W
hat is the role of education in human 
development? This is a critical ques-
tion, particularly today. I ask it from 
the perspective of a life lived within the contem-
porary American research university; in particular, 
one that attempts to educate within a Catholic and 
Jesuit tradition and seeks to integrate the demands 
of justice into the mission of learning and scholar-
ship. In 1973, Father Pedro Arrupe of the Society 
of Jesus awakened a need to confront the links 
between education and the common good when he 
challenged anyone associated with Jesuit institu-
tions of higher learning to be on the side of justice. 
I answer his challenge by discussing three 
different perspectives on education: 
ɼÃ
>
L>ÃɼV
ɹÕʇ>ʌ
Àɼ}ɹÌ°
Ì ʇÕÃÌ Li Õʌ`iÀÃÌʐʐ` >ʌ` Àiɼʇ>}ɼʌi` ÜɼÌɹɼʌ
the context of globalization. 
Ì ʇÕÃÌ «ʃ>Þ > ViʌÌÀ>ʃ Àʐʃi ɼʌ Ìɹi ÜʐÀʂ ʐv ɹÕʇ>ʌ
development, or the continuous achievement of 
self-transformation and thriving required for an 
individual to live authentically and effectively in 
our world today. 
Education Is a Basic Human Right 
Most efforts in human development focus 
on education, if Article 26 of the United 
Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human 
Rights is any proof: 
Everyone has the right to education. Education shall 
be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental 
stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. 
Technical and professional education shall be made 
generally available and higher education shall be 
equally accessible to all on the basis of merit.
This Article captures a profound truth about 
the importance of education. Two UN efforts to 
make real the promise of Article 26—the achieve-
ment of the six goals of its 1990 Education for All 
movement and of the Millennium Development 
Goals—are inextricably linked to education. 
1 UN General Assembly, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 
December 10, 1948, Article 26, available at: http://www.un.org/en/
documents/udhr/
, accessed February 13, 2012. 
122  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf email link
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add links to pdf file; add links to pdf acrobat
An Afghan pupil reads a poem to classmates at a girls’ school in Kabul. During 1996–2001, the Taliban 
banned female education and work. Since their overthrow, millions of girls have returned to school, and 
many women now work outside the home. | AFP Photo: Patrick Baz 
Education is the foundation for attain-
ing basic human needs. That an education 
prepares us to make our way in the world is 
widely acknowledged as conventional wisdom 
in the field of development. In promoting the 
Millennium Development Goals, the United 
Nations Education, Science, and Cultural 
Organization cites these statistics:
"ʌi iÝÌÀ> Þi>À ʐv ÃVɹʐʐʃɼʌ} ɼʌVÀi>Ãià>ʌ
individual’s earnings by up to 10%. 
£Ç£ ʇɼʃʃɼʐʌ «iʐ«ʃi VʐÕʃ` Li ʃɼvÌi` ʐÕÌ ʐv
poverty if all students in low-income countries 
left school with basic reading skills. 
2 Education Counts: Towards the Millennium Development Goals (Paris: 
UNESCO, 2010). 
Vɹɼʃ` LʐÀʌ Ìʐ > ʇʐÌɹiÀ Üɹʐ V>ʌ Ài>` ɼàxä¯
more likely to survive past age five. 
Educational attainment often correlates to a 
higher gross domestic product (GDP) for a coun-
try because it creates new economic opportunities, 
builds skills in individuals that can lead to better-
paying and more dignified jobs, and promotes 
fuller participation in the democratic process. 
Additionally, an overwhelming body of research 
shows that investing in the education of girls and 
women is critical to creating economic growth in 
developing countries.
3 See, for example, David Francis, “As Women Progress in Developing 
Nations, So Do Those Countries’ Economies,” The Christian Science 
Monitor, August 4, 2008, www.csmonitor.com/Business/2008/0804/
p14s02-wmgn.html
, accessed March 29, 2012. 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  123 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add links to pdf in acrobat; adding links to pdf
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add link to pdf
Within this approach, education can best 
be understood as a basic good that enables one 
to be prepared to enter the economy. Education 
provides the skills necessary for participation in 
the economy. “Good” in this sense is instrumen-
tal—something that can be traded. But in another 
respect, understanding the kinds of skills needed 
to participate in the economy has become increas-
ingly complicated. Viewing education as a tradable 
good is no longer sufficient; in fact, it imposes 
detrimental limitations both on the creators and 
administrators of educational content, and on the 
young women and men they educate. 
Education Must Be Understood 
and Reimagined within the 
Context of Globalization 
Globalization is the driving force in shaping 
our world today. This statement no doubt raises 
eyebrows, in part because it is never clear what 
we mean by the word. The word globalization is a 
“Rorschach test”—a term that is loaded with agen-
das and assumptions for any involved in using it 
to capture phenomena in need of explanation. For 
some, globalization captures the inevitable impli-
cations of a commitment to a neoliberal economic 
program that emerged in the mid-20th century 
with a group of economists associated with the 
Mont Pelerin Society. For others, it is an evil at the 
root of the inequalities that characterize our world 
today. Few are neutral when discussing the term. 
What is missing is a consensus as to what the word 
captures. We need to develop a vocabulary for 
working with the term. 
Globalization captures the integration of 
economic, political, and social life that has become 
possible through new technologies: information, 
transportation, energy, and an array of others. 
Peoples, nations, and individuals have never 
been more closely connected than they are today. 
Globalization has enabled us to all be connected 
to one another in ways that are unprecedented 
in history. This is by no means the first global
ization. The Persian Empire of the fifth to third 
centuries B.C. and the “Republic of Letters” 
ʐv
Ìɹi
£xÌɹ
>ʌ`
£ÈÌɹ
ViʌÌÕÀɼiÃ]
V>«ÌÕÀi
ÌÜʐ
earlier examples of global connectedness. But the 
resources that are available to us through our glo
balization offer us opportunities to make distinc
tive contributions to the welfare of humankind. 
The defining question for us is whether we can 
harness these resources in ways that can enable us 
to have this impact. 
-
-
-
We have never been more aware of the condi-
tions under which the people of our world live. 
We have a deeper understanding of the systems 
that sustain these conditions. We understand 
the implications of our systems—the “externali-
ties” that arise as a direct result of the systems 
and structures with breadth and depth. It is hard 
to hide from these realities. There is a transpar-
ency that emerges, and it is a responsibility of 
our institutions of education to engage this new 
understanding. 
As part of this second approach, education 
must enable us to develop more than skills to 
participate in the economy. Education must help 
us to understand how the world works. Such an 
education will allow us to ask ourselves, in the 
spirit of the Universal Declaration, whether our 
political, economic, and social systems provide the 
conditions to respect “the inherent dignity and… 
the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the 
human family….” 
Do some of our practices and systems 
undermine this inherent dignity and deny these 
4 UN General Assembly, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 
December 10, 1948, Preamble, available at http://www.un.org/en/docu
ments/udhr/
-
, accessed February 13, 2012. 
124  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
inalienable rights? Do labor practices give lie 
to the protection against slavery and servitude 
as described in Article 4? Do our supply chains 
undermine any effort to ensure the sustainability 
of our environment for future generations? Are 
growing income inequalities between the top and 
bottom tiers of our societies understood as “inevi-
table or natural?”
x
Or in the words of Katherine 
Boo, in her haunting account of life in a Mumbai 
undercity: “What is the infrastructure of opportu-
nity in this society? Whose capabilities are given 
wing by the market and a government’s economic 
and social policy? Whose capabilities are squan-
dered? By what means might that ribby child grow 
up to be less poor?”
Answering these questions is the work of 
education. It is the work associated with our insti-
tutions of higher learning. John Henry Newman 
provides a framework for understanding this role 
of education. Newman delivered a set of lectures 
in the mid-19th century while acting as the 
founding rector of the newly established Catholic 
University of Ireland, which would later become 
University College Dublin. These lectures came 
to be called The Idea of the University, and they 
have provided an articulation of the purpose of 
an undergraduate education that still informs our 
understanding today. 
For Newman, the “main purpose” of the uni-
versity is “a real cultivation of mind,” a “habit of 
mind” capable of grasping “a comprehensive view 
of the truth in all its branches….” An Intellect… 
“properly trained and formed to have a connected 
view or grasp of things….”
x
ʌ`ÀiÜ
>VʂiÀ]
º7i½Ài
ʐÀi
1ʌiµÕ>ʃ
/ɹ>ʌ
9ʐÕ
/ɹɼʌʂ]»
New York  
Review of Books, February 23, 2012.  
6 Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in  
a Mumbai Undercity ­ iÜ
9ʐÀʂ\
,>ʌ`ʐʇ
ʐÕÃi]
Óä£Ó®]
Ó{Ç–248.  
7 John Henry Newman, The Idea of the University (Notre Dame, IN:  
University of Notre Dame Press, 1982), Preface and 77.  
Newman captures a deep aspect of the 
purpose of learning. It is this comprehensive 
view of knowledge that enables us to contribute 
productively and meaningfully to the complex 
challenges facing our world. It is a type of learn-
ing that enables us to achieve a sense of human 
flourishing. Newman writes, “The perfection of 
the Intellect, which is the result of Education...to 
be imparted to individuals in all their respective 
measures, is the clear, calm, accurate vision and 
comprehension of all things….”
8
For Newman, 
education is understood as its “own end” pursued 
for the purpose of cultivating the minds of our 
young. Newman rejects the notion of an education 
pursued for purposes of “utility.” 
Education is the means through which 
we question and critique our existing systems 
and structures and the underlying assumptions 
that guide them. 
Education Is Necessary for 
Self-transformation 
There is still another approach to education that 
we must consider. As Amartya Sen has taught us, 
the goal of “development” is “freedom.”
We need access to goods—food, shelter, cloth-
ing—in order to survive. Without these goods, we 
cannot meet our basic needs, and without meeting 
these needs, there is no capacity to develop further 
and define our distinctive identities. If we can 
assume we are meeting our basic needs, the 
potential of education is to equip us with the 
resources that allow us to be our most authentic 
selves. The “freedom” we are seeking is an interior 
freedom—an awareness of the blocks that prevent 
us from realizing our authenticity. 
8 John Henry Newman, The Idea of the University]
£äx°
9 Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom ­ iÜ
9ʐÀʂ\
"ÝvʐÀ`
1ʌɼÛiÀÃɼÌÞ
*ÀiÃÃ]
£ʍʍʍ®]
Î]
ÎÈqÎÇ]
ÇxqÇÈ°
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  125 
Sévérine Deneulin and Lila Shahani, eds., An Introduction to the 
Human Development and Capability Approach: Freedom and Agency 
(London: Earthscan, 2009), 23. 
Afghan children and women attend a Koran reading class at an Islamic school in Kabul in September 2011. 
Women’s rights have improved since the end of Taliban rule, particularly access to education. 
AFP Photo: Adek Berry 
Ultimately, an education involves the trans-
formation of one’s self and the capacity to engage 
in that transformational process throughout the 
course of one’s life. The Greeks had a word for 
this, metanoia, which captures the idea of moving 
beyond one’s current way of thinking. At its 
deepest level, education involves the profoundly 
interior work of appropriation that results from 
a lifelong commitment to achieving the most 
authentic realization of one’s self. 
When exposure to this deeper conceptualiza-
tion of education is demanded, when it involves 
encounters with a broader horizon within which 
to explore and create individual worlds, it is 
possible that our thinking about education can 
shift. We can begin to imagine how the fostering 
of individual authenticity through education can 
become the engine of the greatest contribution to 
our thinking about human development to date: 
the capabilities approach outlined by Amartya Sen 
and further developed by Martha Nussbaum. 
The capabilities approach seeks to address the 
underlying economic, social, and political condi-
tions that enable each of us to fulfill our promise 
and potential. This is “an approach to development 
in which the objective is to expand what people are 
able to do and be….”
10
It emphasizes individual 
freedom as the defining aspect of these conditions. 
The animating concepts were established 
in the very first Human Development Report. 
Human development was defined as “both the 
process of widening people’s choices and the level 
10
126  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
of their achieved well-being.”
11
At the core, “… 
The purpose of development is to enhance people’s 
capabilities….”
12 
What does Sen mean by “capa-
bilities?” A capability is the “freedom to promote 
or achieve what [one] values[s] doing and being.”
13 
It is the freedom to engage in the practices and 
activities that one values doing and for which there 
is a value in doing. It is through these activities 
that one achieves “well-being” or “human flourish-
ing.” The question that Sen asks and that is at the 
heart of the Human Development approach is: Do 
you have the capability to engage in the activities, 
the practices, what Sen calls the “functionings,” 
that matter most to you? Do the social, political, 
and economic structures provide you with the 
framework to achieve this capability? 
For so much of the modern era we have 
considered our responsibilities to each other 
within the poles of utilitarianism and duty-based 
theories—between the poles of Mill and Kant. 
For so much of the modern era, in our under-
standing of political economy, this has translated 
into an exclusive focus on GDP. The Human 
Development and Capability Approach asks us to 
consider a different way. Again, in the words of 
the first Human Development Report: “The basic 
objective of development is to create an enabling 
environment for people to enjoy long, healthy, 
and creative lives. This may appear to be a simple 
truth. But it is often forgotten in the immediate 
concern with the accumulation of commodities 
and financial wealth.”
14 
This broader focus is lost 
with an exclusive focus on GDP, since indicators 
such as health and education—which the human 
11 United Nations Development Programme, Human Development  
Report ­ iÜ
9ʐÀʂ\
"ÝvʐÀ`
1ʌɼÛiÀÃɼÌÞ
*ÀiÃÃ]
£ʍʍä®]
£ä°
12 Sévérine Deneulin and Lila Shahani, eds., An Introduction, 26–27.  
13 Ibid., 31.  
14 United Nations Development Programme, Human Development  
Report 1990 ­ iÜ
9ʐÀʂ\
"ÝvʐÀ`
1ʌɼÛiÀÃɼÌÞ
*ÀiÃÃ]
£ʍʍä®]
ʍ°
development approach includes—are not part of 
standalone measures of GDP. 
This idea of human development deeply reso-
nates with the ethos of the university. 
It is within the context of the university that I 
believe we can find the resources for addressing the 
questions of moral responsibility. For it is the very 
ethos of a university that we can bring to bear on the 
challenges posed by globalization. I wish to recast the 
framing of globalization within the ethos of the uni
versity. By “ethos” I mean “the characteristic spirit” 
that animates the identity and purpose of the uni
versity.
-
-
£x
Our understanding of globalization is too 
limited, too constrained. I don’t believe our defini-
tions of globalization should be simply economic and 
market-driven considerations. Instead, globalization 
should be understood as a force through which we 
can further advance the betterment of humankind. 
This new understanding, and the dialogues 
that result, can be explored within the university. 
Animated by their ethos, universities can be lead-
ers in reframing the meaning of “globalization” 
and in the work of deepening our awareness of, 
and responsibilities to, each other. 
It would be invaluable if we could support 
efforts to expand an understanding of globaliza-
tion that accepts this understanding of human 
development. But beyond that, could we imagine, 
in the exercise of our institutional agency, the uni-
versity playing a deeper role in this work of human 
development? We can, and we must. 
John J. DeGioia is President of Georgetown University. 
The views expressed in this essay are his own, and do 
not necessarily represent the views of the United States 
Agency for International Development or the United 
States Government. 
£x
Oxford English Dictionary, Óʌ`
i`°]
6ʐʃ°
x]
ºiÌɹʐð»
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  127 
Priya Jaisinghani and Charley Johnson 
The “Ultimate Day”  
F
ifty years ago, in a letter that led to USAID’s 
founding, President John F. Kennedy wrote:
We…intend during this coming decade of devel-
opment to achieve a decisive turn-around in the fate of 
the less-developed world, looking toward the ultimate 
day when all nations can be self-reliant and when 
foreign aid will no longer be needed. 
That “ultimate day” has never before been in our 
sight—until now. The near ubiquity of mobile phones 
and the beginnings of a mobile-based network 
infrastructure brings this day ever closer into view. 
Roads, railways, and the Internet transformed 
markets and unleashed waves of innovation. They 
radically altered how we interact with one another, 
the private sector, and our government, opening 
the door to unimagined possibility. They not only 
lowered the barrier to entry for the private sector 
and a cavalry of eager entrepreneurs, but they cre
ated a platform for new ideas, new business models, 
-
1 John F. Kennedy, “Special Message to the Congress on Foreign Aid,” 
March 22, 1961, available at http://www.jfklink.com/speeches/jfk/pub-
licpapers/1961/jfk90_61.html. 
and new modes of communication and collabora-
tion. The development of a mobile-phone-based, 
networked infrastructure—with mobile money 
(mMoney) at its center—holds this same promise. 
This position should certainly be met with 
skepticism. This is not the first time we’ve heard 
that technology will ameliorate poverty on a scale 
never before seen. In 1964, Wilbur Schramm, the 
co-founder of Stanford University’s Department 
of Communication wrote, “What if the full power 
and vividness of television teaching were to be 
used to help the schools develop a country’s new 
educational pattern? What if the full persuasive 
and instructional power of television were to be 
used in support of community development and 
the modernization of farming?” Fifty years later, we 
know that television has fallen short of transforming 
education and farming practices. So why should the 
mobile phone revolutionize everything we do—in 
finance, education, health, agriculture, gover-
nance—in a way that the television never could? 
Ìʐʐʂ
Ìɹi
À>`ɼʐ
Þi>ÀÃ
Ìʐ
Ài>Vɹ
>Õ`ɼiʌVi
ʐv
ʇɼʃʃɼʐʌ
«iʐ«ʃi°
Ìʐʐʂ
Ìɹi
ÌiʃiÛɼÃɼʐʌ
£Î
Þi>ÀÃ]
128  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested