open source pdf library c# : Add links to pdf in preview application software cloud html windows wpf class USAID_eBook18-part451

Sorting organic coffee beans in Aceh, Indonesia. USAID is improving production and processing 
techniques that bring added value to the local coffee. | Photo: USAID/Indonesia 
associated with compliance will only grow 
more complex. Traceability is a challenge that 
developing-country producers already struggle 
with in products such as apparel, where eligibil-
ity to claim tariff preferences depends on the 
importer’s ability to identify the source of every 
fabric and trim used to produce a given garment. 
Development of competitive agricultural and 
manufacturing export industries will depend 
on finding innovative and scalable solutions to 
address these challenges. 
Traceability in Your Kitchen and 
Your Medicine Cabinet 
Traceability is no longer an abstract concept. 
Anyone who has recently baked cupcakes for 
a kindergarten class understands that our rela-
tionship with the products we consume has 
dramatically changed. With the rise of childhood 
food allergies and dietary restrictions, baking 
requires a precise understanding of exactly what 
we are consuming. We must know the list of ingre-
dients, and also whether they have been processed 
with other products that contain allergens. 
The time when products were indistinguish-
able is disappearing. Consumers, government 
regulators, and private companies are demanding 
to know not only the country but the farm where 
a tomato or pepper was grown, the date and time 
it was harvested, production conditions (seeds, 
fertilizers, pesticides, water usage, labor), and how 
and when it was transported (temperature). The 
capability to track such information is not new. 
The U.S. agricultural sector has already developed 
a sophisticated capacity to track the flow of food 
along the supply chain, with some sectors capable of 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  159 
Add links to pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
chrome pdf from link; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Add links to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
active links in pdf; pdf hyperlinks
tracking food from the minute of production or the 
exact area of a field where it was grown.
1
What has 
changed is the breadth of products covered, the level 
of detail, the technology, the need to integrate data 
across firms, and the disclosure of that information 
to consumers. The products where traceability is 
being applied include livestock, agriculture, toys, 
apparel, pharmaceuticals, consumer products, con-
struction materials, jewelry, and “conflict minerals.” 
Traceability has overwhelmingly been driven 
by the private sector, utilizing private volun-
tary standards, in response to its own economic 
incentives. On the “soft” side, traceability is being 
introduced to provide assurance, via independent 
auditing by third-party organizations, to consum-
ers that are willing to pay premiums for organic, 
fair trade, hormone-free, “local,” or “sustainable” 
products. Beyond appealing to consumers, it is 
used widely as a supply-chain management tool to 
reduce the costs of recalls and improve inventory 
management and controls. 
Increasingly, however, traceability is also being 
driven by “hard” requirements, such as laws, regu-
lations, and international agreements that require 
importers to document the chain of production 
and custody to ensure a variety of societal objec-
tives, including: 
ʐʐ`
>ʌ`
ʇi`ɼVɼʌi
Ã>viÌÞ
*ÀʐÌiVÌɼʐʌ
ʐv
ɼʌÌiʃʃiVÌÕ>ʃ
«Àʐ«iÀÌÞ
Àɼ}ɹÌÃ
Õʇ>ʌ
Àɼ}ɹÌÃ
>LʐÀ
ÃÌ>ʌ`>À`Ã
ʌÛɼÀʐʌʇiʌÌ>ʃ
«ÀʐÌiVÌɼʐʌ
Examples include the Lacey Act (wildlife/ 
fish/plants/timber), the Extractive Industries 
Transparency Initiative, the Kimberly Process (dia-
monds), Consumer Product Safety Improvement 
1 Elise Golan, Barry Krissoff, Fred Kuchler, Linda Calvin, Kenneth 
Nelson, and Gregory Price, “Traceability in the U.S. Food Supply: 
Economic Theory and Industry Studies,” USDA Economic Research 
Service, Agricultural Economics Report No. 830, March 2004. 
Act (children’s products), and Dodd-Frank 
(conflict minerals). Enhancing enforcement of 
sanctions regimes is an area where traceability will 
also become increasingly important. 
While these “hard” requirements have largely 
been legitimate responses to demonstrated failures 
of private markets to offer sufficient protections, 
the potential for abuse of traceability requirements 
by governments will need to be watched closely. 
Some would use them as trade barriers to protect 
favored domestic industries in sensitive products, 
such as agricultural goods. Governments and 
donor agencies should monitor the development 
and enforcement of these requirements closely, lest 
they undermine fundamental objectives, such as 
the development of harmonized regional markets 
for agricultural products. 
The promise of traceability to improve public 
health and food safety is particularly noteworthy. 
The massive increase in counterfeit drugs on the 
market—associated with drug cartels and other 
organized crime—has been particularly high in 
developing countries. And millions of people each 
year in the United States alone are stricken with 
foodborne illnesses. New technologies that identify 
bad actors involved in manufacturing counterfeits 
or that speed recalls of contaminated food demon-
strate the potential gains to be made for consumers 
and public health outcomes. 
Seeking Innovative, Cost-effective 
Solutions That Can Achieve Scale 
The challenge for developing-country firms, gov-
ernments, and donors is to adapt programming to 
the rapidly evolving realities of the market. Firm-
level solutions to meeting export standards are well 
known and have been integrated into numerous 
USAID and other donor trade capacity-building 
programs. However, these interventions have gener-
ally worked with a relatively small number of firms 
160  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
change link in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
navigate viewing document by generating a thumbnail preview. on each part by following the links respectively & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add hyperlink to pdf; pdf reader link
Naz Gul sits outside school in the village of Chaghai with her family’s monthly ration of wheat, 
received from USAID. | Photo: WFPP 
or farms concentrated in a handful of products. 
The results at the firm level may be meaningful, but 
rarely do they transform the sector or the country. 
What is required are innovative technical assistance 
models with the potential for scale-up and cost-
effective delivery. 
In pursuit of innovation, the potential for 
public-private partnerships is compelling. Virtually 
all interventions will benefit from the technical 
expertise and financial resources of the private 
sector, leveraging potential collaborations with 
international buyers and retailers, private and 
government standard organizations, third-party 
auditors, traceability solution providers, transport 
providers, and financial institutions. 
Given that the growth of traceability has 
been enabled by the increasingly low costs of 
the underlying technologies—such as electronic 
product codes, labeling systems, and radio fre-
quency identification devices—the opportunities 
to partner with technology firms are particularly 
interesting. The African Cashew Initiative, for 
example, is a public-private partnership with SAP 
Research to create a smartphone application that 
enables tracing of Ghana’s cashew supply.
2
The 
technology assigns every farmer a unique barcode 
2 Grace Hoerner, “Innovative Technology Brings Traceability to Cashew 
Sellers and Buyers,” West Africa Trade Hub, August 12, 2011, http://
www.watradehub.com/activities/tradewinds/aug11/innovative-technolo
gy-brings-traceability-cashew-sellers-and-buyers
-
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  161 
C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
of original Word file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness C# Demo: Convert Word to PDF Document. Add references
change link in pdf file; pdf link to email
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
PowerPoint file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references
clickable pdf links; adding links to pdf document
that is attached to each sack of cashews produced 
from that farm. The buyer then uses a smart-
phone that registers the barcode and generates 
a price based on the weight of the cashews and 
prevailing market prices. A digital receipt of the 
sale is sent via text message and can serve as the 
basis for demonstrating sales and cash-flow data 
that could also help farmers obtain financing. 
Although the initial pilots rely on subsidies, the 
more exciting possibility is that private firms or 
associations develop a sustainable business model 
that can accelerate the widespread adoption of 
these emerging technologies. 
Integrating developing-country producers into 
international supply chains, even in large countries 
with major export sectors, is not an insurmountable 
task. In Thailand, technology-driven traceability 
techniques have already been introduced for some 
commodities (chicken, seafood, fruits, and vegeta-
bles) to document the farm of origin, date of harvest, 
location, and even temperature during shipping.
Technology is not a panacea. Structuring 
collaborations with local financial institutions to 
deliver innovative financing mechanisms to small 
firms will be required. Developing credible local 
standards bodies to audit and certify compli-
ance with both public and private traceability 
requirements should be a priority given the small 
presence of such organizations in the develop-
ing world. Success will also require partnerships 
within the U.S. government that recognize and 
leverage the expertise of other agencies such 
as the Department of Agriculture, the Food 
and Drug Administration, the Department of 
Commerce, and Customs and Border Protection. 
3 IBM, press release, “IBM, FXA and Thailand’s Ministry of Agriculture 
Join Forces on Global Food Safety,” March 26, 2011, http://www-03.
ɼLʇ°VʐʇÉ«ÀiÃÃÉÕÃÉiʌÉ«ÀiÃÃÀiʃi>ÃiÉÓʍÇxÈ°ÜÃÃ
°
An Afghan vendor arranges mangoes on a mobile 
stand in Kabul. Fruit production levels have 
increased in Afghanistan in recent years, but 
problems with packaging and distribution are 
stiing the country’s ability to reach markets 
beyond its borders. | AFP Photo: Shah Marai 
Making Government More 
Responsive and Accountable 
For the public sector, traceability has the potential 
to improve service delivery while reducing oppor-
tunities for corruption and waste. USAID’s experi-
ence in working with developing countries on 
supply-chain management of health commodities 
such as antiretroviral drugs, test kits, and laboratory 
supplies has demonstrated the possibility of track-
ing the movement of all products from the point 
of shipping, through regional distribution centers, 
down to local medical facilities operated by minis-
tries of health. The technology allows the tracking 
of inventory down to the location of pallets, as well 
as the capacity to manage stock levels, plan pur-
chases, and monitor expiration dates. The effective-
ness of these systems directly contributes to saving 
lives, while building confidence for the public and 
donors supporting these systems. Traceability can 
begin to give governments, citizens, and donors 
the information necessary to track the delivery 
of medicines, equipment, fertilizer, textbooks, 
construction materials, and emergency food and 
humanitarian supplies to their destination. The 
technology exists if the political will is present. 
The world is changing. It’s time our develop-
ment model did as well. 
Cory O’Hara is a trade and investment advisor in USAID’s 
Trade and Regulatory Reform Ofce. The views expressed 
in this essay are his own, and do not necessarily represent 
the views of the United States Agency for International 
Development or the United States Government. 
162  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
In Default.aspx, add a reference to the path in for Windows Forms application, please follow above links respectively. More Tutorials on .NET PDF Document SDK.
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add link to pdf acrobat
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PowerPoint to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Add references:
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add hyperlink to pdf in
163  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  163 
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Add references:
pdf links; pdf link open in new window
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PowerPoint
Conversely, conversion from PDF to PowerPoint (.PPTX) is also split PowerPoint file(s), and add, create, insert including editing PowerPoint url links and quick
add email link to pdf; add link to pdf
Michael C. Lisman 
Private Schooling 
for the Public Good  
O
n a recent visit to a small town in Latin 
America, several young children eagerly 
approached me in the street, and I 
readied myself for a familiar exchange. To my 
surprise, they asked if I could help pay their school 
tuition. “Which school is that?” I asked, aware of 
their country’s recent abolition of public school 
fees. “That one,” they said, pointing next door to a 
concrete-walled private school. 
This struck me for a number of reasons, not 
least of all because it seemed to bespeak a common 
and troubling theme across many countries of the 
Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region: how 
much genuine demand there is for access to quality 
education and how little supply there is to match it. 
Today, most LAC countries are richer, freer, 
and more stable than ever before—better poised, 
many believe, to make a lasting leap forward. To 
this end, many have also come to believe that no 
sector will be more transformative than education. 
It is one of the most powerful motors for pulling 
poor families out of poverty and for producing 
the missing links for needed labor and industry 
booms,
1
as a number of Asian countries have dem-
onstrated. LAC public education systems strive 
to improve, but it may be the power of private 
schools and services for the poor—particularly at 
the critical primary and pre-primary levels—that 
proves to be one of the most compelling develop-
ments. Tapping the capacity of the private sector 
will require a challenging reassessment of the 
mechanisms by which educational opportunity is 
ensured and a deeper understanding of the ways 
that incentives, finances, and frameworks impact 
the outcomes we all care about in the sector. 
A Sector Constrained 
The constraints to educational progress in LAC 
are significant and diverse. Looming large among 
them is the socioeconomic inequality that persists 
across the region, particularly in the poorest 
1 Eric Hanushek and Ludger Wößman, “The Role of Education 
Quality in Economic Growth” (World Bank Policy Research Working 
Paper 4122, February 2007), available at www-wds.worldbank.org/
servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2007/01/29/000016406_20070
129113447/Rendered/PDF/wps4122.pdf
164  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Word
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) is also and split Word file(s), and add, create, insert document, including editing Word url links and quick
pdf link to attached file; add links to pdf file
A Pakistani child reads the Koran during a recitation class in Islamabad on November 1, 2010. 
AFP Photo: Farooq Naeem 
Central American countries. In the United States, 
of course, we see a similar dynamic, but as the 
measures in the Gini index for socioeconomic 
inequality in LAC indicate, no region in the world 
has a larger gap between the “haves” and “have-
nots.”
This disparity is plainly evident in the 
education sector, where there are yawning gaps 
between rich and poor, between urban and rural 
communities, and between indigenous and non-
indigenous populations.
2 Jeffrey Puryear and Mariellen Malloy Jewers, “Fiscal Policy and the 
Poor in Latin America,” Inter-American Dialogue, 2009, www.corpo
racionescenarios.org/zav_admin/spaw/uploads/files/FiscalPolicyandthe-
PoorinLatinAmerica.pdf
-
3 A Lot to Do: A Report Card on Education in Central America and 
the Dominican Republic, Task Force on Education Reform in Central 
America (Washington, D.C.: PREAL, 2007). 
Since the 1990s, nearly all LAC countries 
have put more low-income children into pri-
mary schools faster than at any other moment in 
the region’s history, which represents a his-
toric achievement. By law, most of the region’s 
countries now provide free and compulsory 
education through the equivalent of grade nine 
as they close in rapidly on the Millennium 
Development Goal of universal primary educa-
tion.
4
But efforts to improve equality and quality 
of public schooling in the region have proven 
much more difficult than getting kids enrolled. 
Roughly a third of the region’s third graders 
are still functionally illiterate, and nearly half 
4 Ibid. 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  165 
ʃiʁ>ʌ`Àʐ >ʌɼʇɼ>ʌ] ʐÜ ÕVɹ ɹ Ài >Ìɼʌ ʌ ʇiÀɼV>ʌ ɹɼʃ`Àiʌ
Learning? Highlights from the Second Regional Student Achievement  
Test (SERCE) (Washington, D.C.: PREAL, 2009).  
cannot comprehend the most basic aspects of 
grade-level arithmetic.
x
Research shows that these early years are 
critical to establishing the basis for future learning 
and for staying at grade level—a crucial factor in 
deciding whether to stay in school, and in other 
key decisions made by the region’s underprivileged 
youth. The region’s governments and their civil 
society and development assistance partners now 
understand that the full task is getting kids to stay 
in school and learn more while they are there— 
key outcomes to both social progress and unlock-
ing the region’s human capital potential. 
A Sector Expanded: Private 
Primary Schools and Services 
for the Poor 
Private schools in the region, as elsewhere, have 
traditionally served the better-off, and are gener-
ally not included in public-system reforms or 
international aid programs designed to improve 
education results. While the last several decades 
have witnessed private-sector growth in upper sec-
ondary and tertiary education, in many countries 
private enrollment rates for both have surged to 
LiÌÜiiʌ
Óx¯
>ʌ`
{䯰
i>ʌÜɹɼʃi]
«ÀɼÛ>Ìi
«Àɼ-
mary enrollment across the region stands at about 
£x¯°
These rates belie a widely accepted axiom 
in Latin America: Most everyone who can afford 
to send their own children to a private school 
does so, whatever the cost. Most, however, cannot 
afford that cost. 
Private primary schools for the compara-
tively wealthy are generally of international cali-
ber and price. It is, however, the potential growth 
x
6 UNESCO, Institute for Statistics, custom statistical table from online  
Data Center, retrieved December 30, 2011.  
of lower-cost for-profit schools and services—and 
the support of non-profit or religious groups— 
that may represent an opportunity for the most 
meaningful demand-driven reforms and associ-
ated development aid innovations to address the 
fundamental inequality inherent in the current 
private/public divide. There is some regional 
evidence, for example, that private-school schol-
arships for the poor are associated with increased 
achievement.
7
Additional international evidence 
indicates that low-cost private schools for the 
poor have systematically demonstrated better 
outcomes than their public counterparts,
8
though 
rigorous evidence on these trends is still scarce 
and often controversial. Results from pioneer-
ing voucher programs in Colombia and Chile, 
for example, demonstrate lower cost per student, 
lower dropout rates, higher completion rates, and 
higher parental satisfaction.
However, there has been little experimenta-
tion with these and related approaches in the poor-
est countries of the region where donor agencies 
like USAID focus their education aid. This is not 
so by accident. Across the region, there are few 
concepts that elicit as much controversy as “priva-
tization.” In education, however, rising private 
primary and pre-primary school enrollment rates, 
increased regional interest in public-private part-
nerships, and the collective urgency to “do more 
with less” may motivate a change in understanding 
of the more nuanced possibilities. 
7 Joshua Angrist, Eric Bettinger, Erik Bloom, Elizabeth King, and 
Michael Kremer, “Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: 
Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment,” The American 
Economic Review (December 2002). 
8 James Tooley and Pauline Dixon, “Private Education Is Good for 
the Poor: A Study of Private Schools Serving the Poor in Low-income 
ʐÕʌÌÀɼiÃ]»  >Ìʐ ʌÃÌɼÌÕÌi 7ɹɼÌi *>«iÀ] Óääx]
ÜÜÜ°V>Ìʐ°ʐÀ}É«ÕLʃɼV>
tions/white-paper/private-education-is-good-poor-study-private-schools-
serving-poor-lowincome-countries
-
9 Alberto Arenas, Privatization and Vouchers in Colombia and Chile 
(The Netherlands: Khwer Academic, 2004). 
166  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
The Role for Development 
Assistance 
Since the 1960s, many donors—USAID 
included—have funded public education pro-
grams, embracing the traditional approach of 
partnering with ministries of education to help fill 
gaps in both the public schools and the ministries 
that manage them. Today, however, as donor 
agencies are under increasing scrutiny to show 
results and “bang for their buck,” there is reason to 
believe that traditional approaches to education aid 
in LAC may have diminishing returns. 
Armed with new mandates and visions, 
USAID and other donor agencies with similar 
aims are poised to help recipient countries in the 
region expand private educational offerings to 
benefit the neediest. While such a paradigm shift 
will be challenging, incorporating the concepts 
of accountability and choice in education for the 
poor can have profound enabling effects, benefit-
ing the entire hemisphere. They can help to more 
effectively bridge the labor gap that dissuades local 
and international investors from setting up shop 
in the region, and can help provide more viable 
alternatives for children whose present choices 
lead them out of school and toward menial labor, 
immigration, or violence. 
For donor agencies and governments, there 
are at least four particularly promising approaches 
to increase the educational options available for 
the poor and the market for competed education 
services in the LAC region: 
Channel assistance to private providers of 
public education services. 
While LAC countries 
like Chile and Colombia have successfully experi-
mented with privately operated schools funded 
by the state, it is also increasingly common for 
governments, through public-private partnerships, 
to fund the component parts of education, such 
as management, support, and operational services. 
Both whole-school and service-based competition 
can help the state operate with more accountabil-
ity and efficiency, and assistance might be given 
to help facilitate the growth of publicly funded 
charter, concession, or voucher networks, as well 
as the growth of sub-sectors in areas like competed 
school feeding programs, contract teachers, or in-
service training. 
No recipient country better represents the 
opportunity to implement promising non-public 
and supply-side education aid modalities than 
Haiti, where the private-school enrollment rate 
ɹ>àÃÕÀ}i` Ìʐ ʇʐÀi Ìɹ>ʌ Çx¯ ɼʌ Ìɹi «>ÃÌ ÃiÛiÀ>ʃ
decades.
10
Home to USAID’s largest education 
program in the region, Haiti faces immense edu-
cational challenges, but it will be a place to watch 
for evidence of how recipients of private-education 
subsidies and services—funded through public 
and donor sources—fare in the years to come. 
Help facilitate the reform of policies and 
regulatory frameworks.
Even if no public or 
donor funds go to private-school options for the 
poor, growth in private enrollment in LAC paid 
for by out-of-pocket expenditure suggests a grow-
ing demand. Still, many countries of the region 
have complex, costly procedures for opening 
private schools, or have caps on the number of 
petitions available for private or for-profit schools. 
Assisting regulatory reforms could include helping 
to channel foreign direct investment into 
the system.
11 
Engage the private sector in promot-
ing private education services for the public 
good.
Because private actors often have the most 
10 Jeffrey Puryear and Michael Lisman, “Haiti’s Educational Moment,”  
FOCALPoint, March 2010, www.focal.ca/publications/focalpoint/
227-march-2010-jeffrey-puryear-and-michael-lisman.  
11 Harry Patrinos, Felipe Barrer-Osorio, and Juliana Guáqueta,  
The Role and Impact of Public-Private Partnerships in Education 
(Washington, D.C.: World Bank, 2009). 
TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICE DELIVERY  |  167 
relevant and up-to-date knowledge about skills 
demanded in the labor market, their increased 
involvement in decisions around education 
reform is key for improving competitiveness in 
global markets. Corporate social responsibility in 
education is gaining traction in the region,
12
but 
more should be done to harness corporate knowl-
edge and its policy influence. Business leaders in 
the region should be enticed, not just encour-
aged, to invest in—not donate to—primary edu-
cation. Tax rebates for private-school scholarships 
(such as those pioneered in Florida) and more 
systematic integration of business interests in the 
crafting of educational policy and curricula might 
invite such investments. 
Promote a more robust base of evidence 
on the outcomes of incentive-based and 
private-education services.
Given the strong 
opinions associated with competed education 
services, nothing could do more for a potential 
paradigm shift in the region than increasing 
and improving data on the effects that differ-
ent private schools, services, and facilities have 
on kids’ learning. For USAID and both its new 
evaluation policy and education strategy, there 
is an opportunity to help discover and dissemi-
nate the impact of demand-driven modalities on 
learning—especially around early-grade reading, 
a LAC regional focus and USAID priority. A key 
issue therein is the critical question of teacher 
quality, a sub-topic also ripe for improvement via 
competitive incentive structures. 
Market forces alone will not solve education’s 
challenges. Drastically redistributing resources 
from public to private (or vice versa) is neither 
12 Justin van Fleet, “A Global Education Challenge: Harnessing Corpo
rate Philanthropy to Education the World’s Poor,” Center for Universal 
Education, Working Paper No. 4, April 2011, 
-
www.brookings.edu/~/
media/Files/rc/reports/2011/04_corporate_philanthropy_fleet/04_cor-
porate_philanthropy_fleet.pdf
viable nor advisable. Fortunately, the public versus 
private dichotomy, long viewed as zero-sum, 
need not be the one by which decision-makers 
view sector reform options.
13
Competition and 
market forces at play in education must be based 
on solid evidence, not ideology or even theory. 
They must—and can—combine to address many 
of the gaps currently and powerfully preventing 
educational success for all, regardless of income. 
Moving forward, finding ways to optimize 
unequal and underachieving education systems 
in the LAC region will mean looking beyond 
traditional approaches to the public finance and 
provision of education—and leveraging the best 
of both sectors for the public good. 
Michael C. Lisman is an education advisor in USAID’s 
Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean. The views 
expressed in this essay are his own, and do not neces-
sarily represent the views of the United States Agency 
for International Development or the United States 
Government. 
13 Laurence Wolff, Juan Carlos Navarro, and Pablo González, eds., 
Private Education and Public Policy in Latin America (Washington, D.C.: 
*,  ]
Óääx®°
168  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested