the demographic dividend. As children live longer 
and family sizes decrease, the productive share of a 
population rises with the percentage of those able 
to work—usually those between 15 and 64—much 
larger than the share of the very young or very old. 
Along with smart economic and labor policies, 
that demographic pattern can add as much as two 
percentage points of growth annually. 
Development is full of problems we have 
few ways to solve, but leveraging innovation to 
help children reach their fifth birthday is not 
one of them. 
Bending the Curve 
Throughout the history of the United States, our 
nation’s development has been defined by a drive 
for innovation and an unfailing determination to 
push the boundaries of science and technology. 
From advances in medicine that eliminated some of 
society’s most debilitating diseases to cutting-edge 
strategies for combating droughts and effectively 
managing drylands, we have continually looked to 
science and technology to overcome immense chal-
lenges. Today, when drought threatens our farmers 
and ranchers, they can buy insurance products, 
access our government’s real-time data-monitoring 
systems, and count on our universities to study the 
problem and foster new solutions. 
Even as we support developing countries as 
they chart their own futures, we can learn from 
our own history to help unleash human ingenu-
ity around the world. As President Obama and 
Secretary Clinton have both emphasized, the focus 
of the development community must always be 
to work ourselves out of business, replacing our 
efforts with those of responsible institutions, thriv-
ing civil societies, and vibrant free markets. 
To help build genuine country ownership, 
we recently launched a major effort—the most 
significant in our history—to shift 30% of our 
investments toward local entrepreneurs, NGOs, 
and partner governments by 2015. By putting 
more resources in the hands of those who need 
it, we help empower change-agents who have the 
cultural knowledge and expertise to ensure our 
assistance leads to sustainable development. 
That is why we created the Development 
Innovations Ventures fund to find and support 
entrepreneurs throughout the world who have 
a good idea and need the resources to test it. 
That is why we developed Grand Challenges in 
Development to encourage innovators—no matter 
where they live—to break through development’s 
most intractable problems. That is why we are 
harnessing mobile banking platforms in nations like 
Haiti and Afghanistan to expand opportunity and 
catalyze local wealth creation. Today we have mobile 
banking programs in four countries. By next year, 
it will be 20. And that is why, right now, USAID 
teams dedicated to finding investments and empow-
ering entrepreneurs are on the ground in places like 
Cairo, Lima, Nairobi, Bangkok, and Dakar. 
Today, the very challenges that confront us 
also dramatically expand the realm of possibility 
in development. In our work to build resilience, 
fight poverty, and improve child survival, we can 
bend the curve of development, realizing trans-
formational leaps of progress that would have 
been unimaginable only a decade ago. By working 
closely with innovators and entrepreneurs around 
the world, we can seize these unprecedented 
opportunities and help developing countries solve 
some of the greatest challenges of our time. 
Rajiv Shah is the Administrator of USAID. 
INTRODUCTION  |  XIX 
Pdf link to specific page - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links pdf document; pdf link to email
Pdf link to specific page - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf file; add email link to pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF
clickable pdf links; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
By referring to this VB.NET guide, you can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF file; you are also able to copy and paste pages from a PDF
add links to pdf file; change link in pdf
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  
AFP Photo: Sabah Arar 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB. This demo explains how to use VB to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file .
adding a link to a pdf in preview; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in C#.NET. This C# demo explains how to insert an empty page to a specific location of current PDF file.
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Emilia Pires 
Building Peaceful States Against All Odds:  
The g7+ Leads the Way 
E
very morning I am greeted by the local 
gardener, Guilherme, who busily tends 
half-broken trees and overgrown bushes, 
planting seeds in the modicum of soil available in 
the suburbs of Dili, the capital of Timor-Leste, in 
hopes of springing new life to a city that had been 
almost wholly destroyed in 1999, devastated by 
war and cyclical instability. Salutations are brief. 
Guilherme considers himself my de facto advisor. 
Each day he offers a brief but new insight into the 
health, well-being, and livelihood of the collective 
“we” that is his village—one of 442 sucos in Timor-
Leste. In early 2008, Guilherme said, “Minister, 
we are not producing; bellies will not be full come 
rainy season.” Guilherme knew what I knew: Food 
security and peace go hand in hand. 
As I entered the office, I asked my chief econ
omist to look up the price of rice. He returned 
ashen-faced bearing the bad news: The price of 
rice had risen 218%. With a reduction in domestic 
production and rice imports rising, our budget was 
now in shambles. This is what the international 
community calls an “external shock.” As Minister 
-
of Finance, I call it “being in shock,” a state I have 
become well versed to since coming into office on 
August 8, 2007. 
On day one of my mandate as Minister, 
I walked into the Ministry of Finance with no 
handover, no functioning computers that could 
spit out the kind of standard information minis-
ters of other nations would expect, and a highly 
politicized public service that was deeply loyal 
to the previous ruling party. I admit I was never 
trained in how to “rule”; I am a technocrat with a 
background in public service. We were a govern-
ment formed to serve. A major mentality shift was 
about to be introduced. 
The final crisis of 2006 resulted in 150,000 
internally displaced persons (IDPs)—almost 15% 
of our population—and adding to our burden, we 
had more than 700 rebels in the mountains threat-
ening stability. Economic growth was negative 
5%; consumption had declined 26%. If the engine 
room of any government is a well-oiled public 
finance management system, my engine reflected 
that of a 1967 Chevy that had never been serviced. 
 |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties.
add link to pdf acrobat; add hyperlinks pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties.
c# read pdf from url; add url pdf
East Timor Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao (right) campaigns for presidential candidate Taur Matan 
Ruak (left) at a rally in Likisa. Preliminary results from April 17, 2012, showed former guerrilla Ruak 
winning East Timor’s presidential run-off by a wide margin in a pivotal year for the nation almost a 
decade after independence. | AFP Photo: Valentinho De Sousa 
The highly centralized systems had all but stalled 
service delivery, and my people were suffering. 
Reform was the name of the game, but even in 
that, the challenges seemed insurmountable. The 
average math level of my 723 ministry staff was at 
third grade, remnants of a generation lost to war. 
The fight for freedom was a de facto education in 
pursuit of independence and democracy—all prin-
ciples that we as a government were now charged 
with operationalizing. But the reality was, I did 
not have one qualified accountant in the Ministry 
of Finance. A quick review by international 
auditors revealed 54% of the 2006–2007 budget 
was recorded to a vendor called “no vendor,” 
mechanization had yet to be introduced, and we 
had little information from which to collate a 
comprehensive budget going forward. We turned 
to the international community for answers, and 
so the $8 billion question came to be. 
The answer, of course, is in the question. More 
than $8 billion had been spent, and poverty had 
increased by a minimum of 15% and a maximum 
of 25%. Poverty had doubled in some regions, 
and the national average stood at 49.9%. One out 
of every two of my people now lived in extreme 
poverty. We were being called a failed state. After 
400 years of occupation, 24 years of war, 2 years of 
a transitional United Nations Administration, and 
5 years of a government mired by cyclical instabil-
ity, the hopes, dreams, and expectations of my 
people had been eroded. This mattered more than 
any label stamped on us. We were not a failed state 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  3 
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit Delete and remove all image objects contained in a specific PDF page
check links in pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. // Open a document.
add url link to pdf; pdf links
because the state had yet to be built. But we had all 
failed; that was an undeniable truth. 
We still had few functioning roads, virtually 
no connectivity, inoperable hospitals comparable 
to international standards, substandard schools, 
no electricity, not enough water, and substandard 
sanitation. We still had few teachers, accountants, 
lawyers, and doctors. Our standard of living was of 
the fourth world, and while so much money had 
been spent, so little had changed. 
I still believe the majority of the perception 
of the western world is that donor aid is handed 
to recipient governments to spend as they wish. 
But the reality is, governments in fragile states do 
not see aid money. It does not go into our coffers, 
it does not go through our systems to strengthen 
our capacities or align to our programs and service 
delivery, it does not go into our budgets; it is for the 
donors to spend on projects, programs, and techni-
cal assistance (usually sourced from their own coun-
tries). Imagine having technical assistance at any 
one time speaking some 30 different languages, not 
one of which is the local language. Program work-
ers cannot converse with local staff, and they are 
promoting different ways of thinking. This further 
fragments capacity-building efforts and governance 
structures and systems that are weak to begin with. 
If we did have a better vision of donor aid, I 
believe we would have roads, electricity, water, and 
proper sanitation. The fact is, we in fragile states 
rarely know how donor aid is spent. Donors often 
bypass the state agenda to pursue their own agen-
das, delivering services directly to our people, at 
times, without our knowledge and often without 
our consent. This not only causes fragmentation 
and proliferation in development but also weakens 
any legitimacy we as representatives of and for 
the people have in building viable institutions or 
leading a national vision and inclusive agenda for 
peace. This way of doing business must change. 
Harmonization and alignment between 
recipient states and donor countries has yet to 
become a reality to make long-lasting change to 
fragile states. We have achieved little results for 
those who matter the most—our people. When 
things go right, the international community is 
the first to take the credit. When things go wrong, 
the government is the target of blame. This is the 
way of the world, and the world must now be re-
educated on the aid paradigm so together we can 
get it right. 
In Timor-Leste, we quickly learned not to 
focus on the past; it was now about creating a 
future. If Guilherme could wake up every morning 
and plant seeds despite the challenges, so could 
we as a government. But we also knew that any 
chance we had to localize peaceful states through 
inclusive politics must first be socialized at the 
global level. In my country, we began with the first 
coalition of five political parties. Commentators 
said it would never last, and I sit here today, five 
years on, with continued peace—writing proudly 
and confidently that we still are a functioning 
brethren of ministers that put our politics aside for 
the bigger picture of peace, stability, and develop-
ment. We as a cabinet decided to strive for one 
thing internationally: 
Inclusive politics must 
be globalized before it is localized.
And so our 
agenda for fragile states began, with peacebuilding 
and statebuilding at the forefront. 
For decades, fragile states have been seen as a 
minority, when in the global context, we are the 
majority. We represent the critical mass, the 1.5 
billion people (or 20% of the global population) 
who live among the most extreme situations of 
poverty and are affected daily by current or recent 
conflict. We are the voiceless, the under-repre-
sented, the ones discriminated against because aid 
architectures that apply to “normal” developing 
nations don’t consider or calculate the unique 
 |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
challenges that we, in the fragile context, face. In 
fact, one cannot even be labeled a “fragile state” 
when there is no globally accepted definition of 
“fragility.” We also learned recently that fragile 
states are disadvantaged, by no fault of their own, 
receiving 5 cents per capita in aid compared to 
other developing countries that receive 11 cents 
per capita.
1
Interestingly enough, statistics show 
that aid to fragile states is an investment with a 
greater return. This is a simple equation. Billions 
are spent on defense each year by the global com-
munity. When development can act as a catalyst to 
peace, funnel it to where it counts the most. 
Politically, the word fragility has become akin 
to a curse word. The technocrats understand the 
word relates to institutions yet to be established, 
low capacity, lack of an established justice system, 
lack of infrastructure, lack of systems—all charac-
teristics that have nothing to do with strength of 
sovereignty. Politically, the word must be embraced 
for what it is. I often describe fragility as a fine 
champagne flute, something that is beautiful but 
easily broken and therefore must be handled with 
care. Imagine the citizens of the United Kingdom 
with little to no access to schools, health care, 
water, social security, police, or banks. It is easy to 
see then how conflict erupts. This is fragility. 
Less than two years ago, a milestone was 
reached when representatives of several frag-
ile countries sat together in a room and talked 
about our commonalities and our challenges. As 
colleagues from Burundi, the Central African 
Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of the 
Congo, Liberia, Nepal, Solomon Islands, Sierra-
Leone, South Sudan, and Timor-Leste spoke 
around one table, we discovered that, although 
we had our differences in regards to region, 
1 “Chapter 3: Trends in official development assistance” in Resource 
Flows to Fragile and Conflict-Affected States (OECD, 2010), 49–59. 
linguistics, culture, historical backgrounds, and 
our root causes of conflict, we had much more 
in common than we could have ever anticipated. 
Through this solidarity we formed a deep bond, 
and after hours together of sharing our experi-
ences, we acknowledged that in order to emerge 
from fragility, it would take a consolidated forum 
to make a tangible difference both in our own 
countries and in the way we do business with the 
international community. We needed a united 
and shared voice. We needed our own poli-
cies; we needed the international community to 
understand our unique challenges and shared 
objectives—and so the g7+ group of fragile and 
If we did have a better vision 
of donor aid, I believe we would 
have roads, electricity, water, 
and proper sanitation. 
conflict-affected states was born and rapidly grew 
from 7 to 19. The g7+ symbolizes the first time 
in history that we, as fragile states, have a voice 
in shaping global policy, advocating our own 
country-led and country-owned transitions out of 
fragility and, most importantly, identifying that 
peacebuilding and statebuilding are the funda-
mental foundations to transition from fragility to 
the next stage of development, the ultimate aim in 
reaching the Millennium Development Goals. 
Peacebuilding means that inclusive politics, 
security, and justice are the cornerstones of building 
stable and long-lasting states. Statebuilding means 
that donors can no longer bypass our state institu-
tions, weakening our ownership and hindering our 
nations from building the institutions and capacity 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  5 
Internally displaced Sudanese from the south pack their belongings in Khartoum on October 27, 2010, 
as they prepare to return home in preparation for South Sudan’s referendum on independence on 
January 9, 2011. | AFP Photo: Ashraf Shazly 
necessary for strong bureaucracies to serve the needs 
of our people. We ourselves must take responsibil-
ity for developing economic foundations, quality 
resource management, and service delivery with the 
support of the international community. 
Together with the international commu-
nity and through the International Dialogue on 
Peacebuilding and Statebuilding, the g7+ created 
a new aid architecture for fragile states called the 
New Deal. We made it simple, clear, and concise 
with three simple elements: the Peacebuilding 
and Statebuilding Goals (PSGs), FOCUS, and 
TRUST. The PSGs are the goals that will allow 
us to transition to the next stage of development. 
FOCUS is a new way of engaging, and TRUST is 
a new set of commitments. 
The five goals are 
Legitimate Politics
—to 
foster inclusive political settlements and conflict 
resolution, 
Security
—to establish and strengthen 
people’s security, 
Justice
—to address injustices 
and increase people’s access to justice, 
Economic 
Foundations
—to generate employment and 
improve livelihoods, and 
Revenues & Services
— 
to manage revenue and build capacity for account-
able and fair service delivery. 
The letters of the word FOCUS stand for: 
À>}ɼʃɼÌÞ
>ÃÃiÃÃʇiʌÌ°
7i
Üɼʃʃ
Vʐʌ`ÕVÌ
>
«iÀɼ-
odic country-led assessment on the causes and 
features of fragility and sources of resilience as a 
basis for one vision, one plan. 
"ʌi
ÛɼÃɼʐʌ]
ʐʌi
«ʃ>ʌ°
7i
Üɼʃʃ
`iÛiʃʐ«
>ʌ`
ÃÕ«-
port one national vision and one plan to transi-
tion out of fragility. This vision and plan will be 
country-owned and -led, developed in consulta-
tion with civil society, and based on inputs from 
the fragility assessment. 
 |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
ʐʇ«>VÌ°
Vʐʇ«>VÌ
ɼÃ
>
ʂiÞ
ʇiVɹ>ʌɼÃʇ
Ìʐ
implement one vision, one plan. A compact will 
be drawn on a broad range of views from mul-
tiple stakeholders and the public, and be subject 
to an annual multistakeholder review. 
1Ãi
*- Ã
Ìʐ
ʇʐʌɼÌʐÀ°
7i
Üɼʃʃ
ÕÃi
Ìɹi
*-
Ì>À}iÌÃ
and indicators to monitor country-level progress. 
-Õ««ʐÀÌ
«ʐʃɼÌɼV>ʃ
`ɼ>ʃʐ}Õi
>ʌ`
ʃi>`iÀÃɹɼ«°
7i
will increase our support for credible and inclu-
sive processes of political dialogue. 
The letters of the word TRUST stand for: 
/À>ʌë>ÀiʌVÞ°
7i
Üɼʃʃ
iʌÃÕÀi
ʇʐÀi
ÌÀ>ʌë>ÀiʌÌ
use of aid. 
,ɼÃʂɻÃɹ>Àɼʌ}°
7i
>VVi«Ì
Ìɹi
ÀɼÃʂ
ʐv
iʌ}>}ɼʌ}
during transition, recognizing that the risk of 
non-engagement in this context can outweigh 
most risks of engagement. We will identify 
context-specific, joint donor risk-mitigation strat-
egies, which will require different approaches to 
risk management and capacity development. We 
will conduct joint assessments of the specific risks 
associated with working in fragile situations and 
will identify and use joint mechanisms to reduce 
and better manage risks to build the capacity of 
and enhance the use of country systems, to step 
up investments for peacebuilding and statebuild-
ing priorities, and to reduce aid volatility. 
1Ãi
>ʌ`
ÃÌÀiʌ}Ìɹiʌ
VʐÕʌÌÀÞ
ÃÞÃÌiʇð
7i
Üɼʃʃ
jointly identify oversight and accountability 
measures required to enhance confidence in and 
enable the expanded use and strengthening of 
country systems. 
-ÌÀiʌ}Ìɹiʌ
V>«>VɼÌɼið
7i
Üɼʃʃ
iʌÃÕÀi
ivwVɼiʌÌ
support to build critical capacities of institu-
tions of the state and civil society in a balanced 
manner, increasing the proportion of funds for 
capacity development through jointly adminis-
tered and funded pooled facilities. 
/ɼʇiʃÞ
>ʌ`
«Ài`ɼVÌ>Lʃi
>ɼ`°
7i
Üɼʃʃ
`iÛiʃʐ«
and use simplified fast-track financial manage-
ment and procurement procedures to improve 
the speed and flexibility of aid delivery in fragile 
situations, and review national legal frameworks 
to support our shared objectives. We commit to 
increase the predictability of aid, including by 
publishing three- to five-year indicative forward 
estimates (as committed in the Accra Agenda 
for Action), and to make more effective use of 
global and country-level funds for peacebuilding 
and statebuilding. 
These interrelated and interdependent prin-
ciples are established through a tangible working 
model that each state and its partners can work 
through on a matrix that is both fluid and reflec-
tive of the fragile circumstances—and can be the 
foundation of a compact between the country and 
the international partners. In the Busan IV High 
Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, the New Deal 
was endorsed by 32 countries and 5 major interna-
tional organizations, with a trial that includes the 
UK, Australia, Denmark, Afghanistan, Timor-
Leste, and South Sudan. The agreement will 
change the way aid is configured, managed, and 
delivered—and most importantly, make a change 
in the outcomes of aid on the ground. What mat-
ters is results. 
We Say We Are Now Making the 
New Deal a Real Deal 
I have the honor of being the chair of the g7+ and 
the co-chair of the International Dialogue from 
where the agreement for the New Deal gained 
consensus. Coming from Timor-Leste, I knew that 
the only way we could make long-lasting change 
on the ground on inclusive politics, the founda-
tion of the PSGs, is pushing forward the agenda 
of globalizing inclusive politics. This is not an easy 
process because it requires changing the attitudes, 
perceptions, and way of doing business between 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  7 
the fragile states, the international community, 
and the public. 
I will use my own country as an example. 
This year we celebrate 10 years since the formal 
restoration of our independence. In 1999, after the 
national referendum that set us on this course, we 
were a country that was devastated by war. Most 
of our infrastructure and the homes of many of 
our citizens were burnt to the ground. Between 
1999 and 2007, despite billions being spent on 
Timor-Leste, as our President His Excellency Jose 
Ramos Horta often says, very little had been spent 
in Timor-Leste. When I assumed my mandate 
as Minister of Finance, time was not on our 
side. Accelerating development and fast-tracking 
It might take generations to 
change traditions and cultures 
but the will is there, and our 
partners in development must 
take the journey with us. 
reforms, especially in public financial manage-
ment; establishing institutions to manage our vast 
resources in oil and gas; and ensuring that trans-
parency and inclusivity led our actions in imple-
menting social and fiscal expansionary policies was 
a core element to transforming our small nation. 
The international community often had a 
different view of how we as a government should 
act and what we should do, and they were vocal 
in their interventions. For instance, with 15% 
of our population displaced, development could 
not progress. We were told it would take 10 years 
to resettle the displaced. However, we in govern-
ment knew that 10 years was not an option. 
Through dialogue with local actors and cash pack-
ages for families, we resettled all 150,000 IDPs in 
2 years, closing 65 IDP camps and reintegrating 
families back into communities across the nation 
without conflict or dispute. We were accused of 
buying peace. 
At the same time, we entered into conflict 
resolution with the rebels, former members of 
the army who had been released from duty by 
the previous government. From the mountains 
where they once threatened to destabilize national 
confidence, they returned to the capital, peacefully 
disarmed, and reintegrated into communities. We 
were accused of not providing justice. 
The government promised pensions to the 
elderly, the disabled, mothers, veterans, and 
orphans. This, we believed, was the obligation of 
the state for the sacrifices our people had made 
over the 24-year struggle for independence. We 
believed it was the responsibility of the state 
to take care of our most vulnerable as in other 
socially compassionate nations, such as Australia, 
the UK, and many countries throughout Europe. 
We were accused of being fiscally irresponsible. 
My point is that there is no price for peace, 
and governments of fragile states have one main 
objective—that is to keep peace and stability. 
Without peace, services cannot be delivered, and 
without services delivered, there can be no peace. 
We as government know our people and the 
political complexities. Often these complexities 
go back generations, and few outsiders can navi-
gate the political landscape. They must simply 
trust that with a constitution and the concept of 
democracy, a nation will find its way, but always 
with peace at the forefront of its journey to 
emerge from fragility. 
Timor-Leste is a nation blessed with natural 
resources. We have $10 billion in the bank and 
no debt, with growing capacity to execute. Our 
 |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested