Southern Sudanese hold pro-independence banners as they travel the streets of the southern capital 
Juba on October 9, 2010, to mark three months until a referendum for their independence. 
AFP Photo: Peter Martell 
other. Following the transitions of the early 1990s, 
USAID turned its attention to consolidation as a 
long-term vision. Consolidation became central 
to five-year strategies featuring local governance, 
the rule of law, elections, and civil society. As one 
strategy followed another, practitioners came to 
view consolidation as an aspiration—not an urgent 
problem. Nearly 20 years later, the concept of 
“democratic consolidation” has gone stale and lost 
its utility. It is time to let it go and rethink how we 
assist democracy, human rights, and governance if 
the triumph of democratic rule is to become more 
than ideological. The fundamental challenge today 
is to make governments work. 
Of the 20 largest recipients of USAID 
assistance in 2010, only 4 rank above the 
World Bank Institute’s 50th percentile in 
government effectiveness scores. While a few 
cases have shown modest improvements, only 
one (Colombia) has moved from below the 50th 
percentile in the past 10 years.
3
Consistently over 
the past decade, 16 rank below the 50th per-
centile, and half of those at the 25th percentile 
or lower. These scores are consistent with other 
governance categories, such as transparency and 
the rule of law. Of course, USAID invests its 
resources where they are most needed—in poorly 
governing states. But even with considerable 
3 USAID, Policy, “Where Does USAID’s Money Go?” September 30, 
2011, http://www.usaid.gov/policy/budget/money/; World Bank, “World 
Governance Indicators,” http://info.worldbank.org/governance/wgi/index.
asp
, accessed December 22, 2011. World Bank data for Sudan are prior to 
the independence of Southern Sudan in 2011. Indonesia, Ethiopia, and 
West Bank/Gaza have shown modest but steady improvement. 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  29 
Pdf reader link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
change link in pdf file; pdf hyperlink
Pdf reader link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add email link to pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
USAID assistance, many have made relatively 
little progress in this critical indicator. 
To make matters worse, weak governments 
confront young, impatient populations. The 
median age for the 16 low-ranking USAID recipi-
ents falls below 19 years, compared with the global 
average of 27.
4
All of this means higher pressure 
on limited resources—land, water, and jobs—and 
chronic incapacity to respond. Most of the 16 are 
trapped in a state of internal or external conflict, 
or are recently recovering from one. In countries 
such as Afghanistan and Pakistan, these conflicts 
are about fundamental questions of legitimacy and 
identity. But in others, such as Haiti, the ongoing 
pressures on resources create a permanent state of 
misery and exclusion. 
Therefore, an open-ended commitment to 
“democratic consolidation” needs to give way to a 
more clearly defined goal of making governments 
work better, and to do so in a decade. Effective 
governance, then, should translate into concrete 
improvements, such as: 
/ɹi
>LɼʃɼÌÞ
Ìʐ
ʇ>ʌ>}i
VʐʌyɼVÌ
>ʌ`
ʌ>ÌÕÀ>ʃ
resources 
Ài>Ìɼʐʌ
ʐv
ʁʐLÃ
ʇ«ÀʐÛi`
i`ÕV>Ìɼʐʌ
>ʌ`
Ãʂɼʃʃ
ʃiÛiʃÃ
vʐÀ
ÞʐÕÌɹ
and women 
*ÀʐÌiVÌɼʐʌ
ʐv
«ÕLʃɼV
ɹi>ʃÌɹ
This requires action to integrate governance 
around the environment, economic growth, and 
the health sectors, among other disciplines. 
Placing Governance at the Center 
A decade ago, we feared that a decline in citizen 
participation would lead to democratic break-
downs and the return to authoritarianism. Today, 
open authoritarianism—in the form of military 
4 UNDP, Human Development Report 2011, Statistical Tables, 
pp. 164–165. 
juntas, for example—is increasingly difficult to 
impose, for the reasons stated at the outset. The 
greater threat is to development. Our investments 
in agriculture, food production, education, health, 
gender equality, and conflict resolution all depend 
on participation and ownership—by governments, 
but more importantly, by citizens. When citizens 
lose confidence in the ability of their governments 
to provide services, and they cannot improve those 
services through political action, they opt out in 
various ways: 
/ɹiÞ
LÕÞ
ÃiÀÛɼViÃ
«ÀɼÛ>ÌiʃÞ
­ÃÕVɹ
ÌÕÌʐÀɼʌ}
ʐÀ
private security in its various forms). 
/ɹiÞ
«>Þ
vʐÀ
ÃiÀÛɼViÃ
Ûɼ>
LÀɼLiÀÞ°
/ɹiÞ
ÀivÕÃi
Ìʐ
ÕÃi
ÃiÀÛɼViÃ
­ÃÕVɹ
i>ÀʃÞ
ÜɼÌɹ-
drawal from school). 
/ɹiÞ
ʃʐʐʂ
Ìʐ
ÌɹiɼÀ
Ûɼʃʃ>}iÃ
>ʌ`
ʂɼʌ
>ʌ`
ÃʐʃÛi
their problems locally. (Although local initiative 
is positive, state weakness can feed local disputes 
as well as broader conflicts. Such is the case of 
Afghanistan.) 
/ɹiÞ
iʇɼ}À>Ìi
ɼʌ
vÀÕÃÌÀ>Ìɼʐʌ]
Ì>ʂɼʌ}
ÌɹiɼÀ
VÀɼÌɼ-
cally needed skills with them to better places. 
(This is occurring throughout the former Soviet 
Union and Central America.) 
These forms of opting out undermine the 
quality of governance, which remains the founda-
tion of USAID’s development mission and the 
quality of democracy. 
Re-engaging a Cross-disciplinary 
Approach 
In the 1960s and 1970s, USAID invested heav-
ily in public administration and human resource 
training because the early practitioners assumed 
that development rested on an effective civil ser-
vice. This assumption was correct, though open-
ended training programs were not the answer. 
Unfortunately, attention to the core public sector 
was lost in the various development approaches 
30  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator.
add hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
pdf link open in new window; add hyperlink to pdf online
that followed, which focused on communities, the 
private sector, civil society, and local government. 
The challenge is to balance both the demand for 
good governance with its supply, engaging both 
public and private spheres. This means taking 
what we have learned about governance and 
integrating that knowledge with the substantive 
specialties of agriculture, health, natural resource 
management, and education to achieve specific 
objectives. Today, experts in these fields do coordi-
nate, but they tend to operate in parallel—even in 
field missions. 
Governance (a subset of democracy assis-
tance) may remain its own discipline, but 
governance specialists should be embedded with 
teams working in other sectors to acquire as 
much substantive knowledge as possible, and 
reciprocally, non-governance specialists should 
serve with teams working on governance initia-
tives. This approach requires new thinking and 
more holistic training. Perhaps a new version of 
the former Development Studies Program—a 
rigorous course which years ago brought different 
disciplines together around development prob-
lems—can serve this purpose. 
The principle of integration is illustrated in 
youth programs. About a decade ago, USAID 
launched anti-gang programs in Central America 
under its “rule-of-law” program. It gradually 
became evident that the lack of educational and 
economic opportunities were the decisive factors 
driving the growth and resilience of gangs, more 
so than the weakness of justice institutions. While 
effective prosecution and policing could suppress 
a fraction of offenders, the only way to stop the 
constant regeneration of gangs was to choke off 
their supply of uneducated, unemployed, and 
abused youth. That led to creative solutions bring-
ing educators, businesses, and churches together 
around community initiatives to create “youth 
centers” and job programs, jointly supported by 
education and rule-of-law programs. Combating 
youth violence could no longer easily fit into any 
single program category: It may have been led 
by the democracy and governance office, but it 
became everyone’s business. 
Notwithstanding numerous conflicts and 
economic crises since the end of the Cold War, 
the expansion of democracy has brought about an 
unprecedented level of peace and an opportunity 
for greater prosperity. The irony is that this hard-
won achievement is threatened not by any ideo-
logical or national force, but by the steady erosion 
of governance—with direct negative consequences 
on the quality of life. Importantly, building 
effective governance provides powerful support 
to the growing consensus among donors to make 
great use of local institutions in development. 
Those efforts extend beyond the passing of money 
through host governments to the explicit transfer 
of responsibilities to local public institutions and 
the sharing of risks over a sustained period. 
Ultimately, the fate of democracy will depend 
not only on credible elections and an effective 
legislature, but also on the effective management 
of issues that affect citizens’ daily lives, such as 
climate change, providing water and education, 
and creating jobs. More than a universal ideology, 
democracy can become a universal way of life for 
billions of people. We can achieve this in our time. 
José M. Garzón has directed democracy and gover-
nance programs in Asia, Europe, and Latin America. 
He is currently the Deputy Director of USAID’s Ofce 
of Conict Management and Mitigation. The views 
expressed in this essay are his own, and do not neces-
sarily represent the views of the United States Agency 
for International Development or the United States 
Government. 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  31 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlinks pdf file; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
adding links to pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Carol Lancaster 
Democracy and Development  
in Sub-Saharan Africa 
T
wenty-five years ago, Sub-Saharan Africa 
(SSA) was a region of despair. Outside of 
Botswana and Mauritius, democracy was 
but a distant dream. Unelected and unaccount-
able governments held power across the subconti-
nent. Dictators treated their countries as personal 
fiefdoms, ruling by force and intimidation, taking 
what they wanted, doling out riches to a favored 
few, and sprinkling a handful of crumbs to the 
rest. The terrible scar of apartheid made a mockery 
of justice and plunged the entire southern region 
into conflict and crisis. And the politics of the 
Cold War made a bad situation worse, as East 
and West propped up unsavory rulers for their 
own purposes with little regard for the effect on 
Africans themselves. 
The leadership crisis translated into an eco-
nomic crisis that left the region effectively bank-
rupt. Authoritarian leaders used the state to try 
to control the economic commanding heights, in 
part to finance their patronage systems. In the end, 
their control only destroyed economic assets and 
personal livelihoods. For 20 years starting in the 
mid-1970s, nearly all of the countries of SSA saw 
zero or negative economic growth in per capita 
incomes. Promising businesses were ruined, and 
new investment virtually stopped, except for the 
grab for natural resources. Unemployment soared, 
and working men and women could no longer 
provide for their families. Schools and health 
facilities deteriorated badly. The only things that 
seemed to thrive were poverty, graft, and conflict. 
But that was then. Today, all of that has 
begun to change—not across all of SSA, but 
across much of the region. Dictators are being 
replaced by democracy. Authoritarianism is giving 
way to accountability. Economic stagnation is 
turning to resurgence, with SSA today one of 
Parts of this essay are excerpted from Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, “Introduction,” in Steven Radelet, Emerging Africa: 
How 17 Countries Are Leading the Way (Washington: Center for Global Development, 2010). We are indebted 
to Molly Cashin for comments on earlier drafts. 
32  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
create PDF document viewer & reader in ASP.NET web application using C# code. Related C# PDF Imaging Project Tutorials! Please click the following link to see
pdf link to email; clickable pdf links
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
add hyperlinks pdf file; accessible links in pdf
A Sudanese supporter of secession pastes posters upon the arrival of Sudan’s President Omer al-Bashir 
at Juba airport on January 4, 2010, ve days prior to the country’s referendum for independence on 
January 9. | AFP Photo: Yasuyoshi Chiba 
the fastest-growing regions in the world. Poverty 
rates are falling. Investors who never would have 
considered Africa a decade ago are lining up to 
look at new opportunities. Political conflict has 
subsided, and governments are strengthening the 
protection of civil liberties and political freedoms. 
About half of the countries in the region have 
embraced democracy, fragile and imperfect, to be 
sure, but a far cry from the dictatorships of old. 
And most important, despair is being replaced by 
hope—hope that people can live in peace with 
their neighbors, that parents can provide for their 
families, that children can go to school and receive 
decent health care, and that people can speak their 
minds without fear. 
What happened in SSA? How did authoritari-
anism begin to give way to democracy? How has 
the economic resurgence affected the move toward 
democracy, and how has democracy affected the 
economic turnaround? How is democracy likely to 
evolve in the future in SSA? 
The Contested Relationship 
For the past nearly half-century, scholars and prac-
titioners have heatedly debated the relationship 
between democracy and economic development, 
and have had difficulty matching global theories 
with African realities. They also debate the mean-
ing of the basic terms. Here we consider “democ-
racy” in ideal terms to mean a political system 
where the people rule, usually through periodic 
elections, and whose rights include meaningful 
degrees of freedom of assembly, of free speech, and 
of equality before the law. “Development” includes 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  33 
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
adding links to pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding a link to a pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
economic progress—increasing national invest-
ment and income, expanding education and health 
services, and reducing poverty.
1
It also features 
social progress, in the expectation that quality of 
life, economic progress, and democratic culture go 
hand in hand. 
Arguments on the relationship between the 
two have followed several familiar paths, with 
dramatic implications for foreign policy, alliances, 
and international assistance. There are four broad 
prevailing views: 
1. Economic development leads to the 
establishment and maintenance of democracy. 
In this view, economic development leads to the 
creation of a middle class, a broadly educated 
citizenry, and a vibrant civil society. The argument 
is that members of a middle class and educated 
citizens typically demand political voice and 
participation, government accountability, and the 
rule of law to protect their property, often working 
initially through civil-society organizations. Some 
also argue that sustained development produces 
political values like an emphasis on personal 
agency and freedom that contribute to demands 
for political liberalization. 
These changes, whether through slow evolu-
tion or street demonstrations and, at times, civil 
violence, can paralyze economies, provoke external 
pressures for change, or splinter authoritarian elites 
(including militaries), and so compel authoritarian 
governments to agree to a transition to democ-
racy. A poster child for this type of relationship is 
Korea, which had an authoritarian government at 
the beginning of its economic miracle in 1961. 
1 Vast numbers of books and articles have been written to define these 
two broad terms. Here we are including only the basic qualities associ-
ated with both conditions. Unlike authors such as Amartya Sen, we do 
not include political freedom in “development” because we are trying 
to examine the relationship between economic progress and political 
freedom. Including freedom in “development” would lead us into 
tautological arguments. 
It wasn’t until the mid-1980s, with pressures 
from its increasingly prosperous populace and 
the international community, that its rulers 
began a credible transition to democratic gover-
nance. Arguably, much of the experience of Latin 
America in the past several decades also fits this 
general model, suggestive less of causal relations 
between economic development and democracy 
than long-term determination, international glare, 
and good luck. Few credit it with blanket applica-
tion for Africa. 
2. Democracy is a requirement for 
successful and sustained economic develop-
ment. 
This view reverses the cause and effect. 
Democracies, with their open, participatory 
politics, are seen as putting restraints on rulers 
and forcing government accountability through 
the availability of information on public policies 
and the periodic elections that penalize politi-
cal mismanagement and misbehavior. In effect, 
democratic governments, accountable to their 
populaces, are more likely in the long run to be 
less corrupt, more responsible economic managers, 
more stable (since political opposition is channeled 
into open political discourse and competition and 
not repressed into violent demands for change), 
and more protective of property rights (deemed 
necessary to encourage the investment required 
for long-term growth and development). This 
argument has been among the justifications for 
democracy promotion programs funded by the 
United States and other governments in SSA. We 
believe that this view is the most applicable to the 
experience of SSA. 
3. Democracy can create obstacles to eco-
nomic development.
Some scholars and public 
officials (the latter almost always in authoritarian 
governments) have argued that democracy can 
undercut development through its cumbersome 
decision-making processes and the potential 
34  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Workers unload ballot kits for the independence referendum on South Sudan before a handover 
ceremony between the UN and the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission in the southern 
Sudanese city of Juba on December 23, 2010. | AFP Photo: Trevor Snapp 
gridlock created by competing powerful interests. 
In this view, authoritarian governments—or at 
least a subset that might be thought of as benign 
dictators—can better resist or suppress power-
driven redistributive and populist pressures to con-
sume national resources, thus protecting national 
savings and investment, as well as property rights. 
Many have pointed to the success of the early East 
Asian “miracle” countries to support this view. 
These arguments continue to hold sway, 
especially as China continues its rapid growth 
and development. But as a general proposition 
they have lost credibility as more developing 
country democracies have begun to succeed. 
Indian growth has surged over the past two 
decades, along with emerging democracies in 
Asia, Eastern and Central Europe, SSA, and Latin 
America. At the same time, many authoritarian 
regimes, especially some countries in Africa 
and the Middle East, have proven to be preda-
tory, corrupt, and indifferent to property rights 
and human rights, constituting obstacles to the 
development of their countries. One has only to 
think of Algeria, the Democratic Republic of the 
Congo, and Zimbabwe to recall development lost 
to seemingly irrational despotism. 
But there are additional arguments that democ-
racy can create problems for development, for it can 
exacerbate regional, religious, and ethnic differ-
ences. As groups based on these affinities become 
the focus of political competition, societal divisions 
can be deepened, exacerbating potential sources of 
instability and conflict and endangering develop-
ment and regional security beyond country borders. 
Recognizing this threat, a number of African con-
stitutions have provisions requiring political parties 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  35 
to have branches and members in a high proportion 
of domestic provinces in order to negotiate local 
conflict through constitutional means. 
4. Democracy and development must go 
together. 
One final argument made later in this 
essay is that democracy and development must 
in some circumstances go hand in hand, rather 
than one clearly leading the other—especially in 
post-conflict situations where a new government 
must take rapid action across a variety of issues 
to create the conditions for recovery and growth 
in the future. Without the legitimacy that comes 
with free and fair elections, a new government 
will lack the credibility to make the contested and 
sometimes painful decisions needed to implement 
reforms. Legitimate elected governments are also 
important to persuade international institutions, 
foreign governments, and investors to adopt 
supportive policies essential for recovery—for 
example, reducing international debt, providing 
generous amounts of aid, or making crucial invest-
ments. Development is also important in these 
countries to signal to the population that recovery 
is underway and to ensure the political stability 
necessary for both development and democracy 
to endure. This is not a theory that has been 
elaborated or tested in the scholarly literature, 
but it reflects a reality for a country like Liberia. 
(Much depends on how democratic governments 
are structured and how elections are held. Where 
elections are based on a “winner take all” model, 
the losers—often ethnic, religious, or regional 
groups—can lose any stake in the system, under-
cutting both democracy and development. This is 
what happened in Angola.) 
Thus, the relationship between democ-
racy and development remains contested and 
unclear. Things appear altogether more complex 
than a direct causal relationship between these 
two conditions. Empirical evidence is mixed. 
For example, one data-based survey found that 
prosperity can help democracies survive but has 
little relationship to transitions to democracy.
Other analysis reaches different conclusions, with 
no clear consensus. One of the major problems 
for demonstrating a clear relationship comes from 
simple differences in place and time. Regions and 
countries differ substantially from one another; 
what works in one country at one time may not 
work in another at a different time. Clearly, one 
size does not fit all—neither in terms of demo-
cratic structures nor in the relationship between 
democracy and development. 
A Brief History of Democracy in 
Sub-Saharan Africa 
The history of democracy and development in 
Africa has not been a happy one. Most countries 
gained independence in the 1960s and early 
1970s. They inherited democratic governments 
at independence (which had typically been put 
into place a year or two before the colonial powers 
withdrew), but in many cases, these governments 
were undercut by constitutional changes that cre-
ated one-party states, or were overturned by mili-
tary coups. Most of Africa’s first-generation leaders 
governed with few legal or institutional constraints 
on their behavior (they controlled the press, the 
courts, the sole political party, the unions, and 
most other civil-society organizations), and many 
treated the country and the economy as their 
private preserve, basing their rule on patronage to 
favored elites and ethnic groups and repression of 
any potential critics or rivals. 
Ghana, the first SSA country to emerge 
from colonialism and gain its independence in 
2 Adam Przeworski, Michael Alvarez, José Antonio Cheibub, and 
Fernando Limongi, Democracy and Development: Political Institutions 
and Well-Being in the World, 1950–1990 (Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 2000). 
36  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
1957—and so often seen as a bellwether for 
important trends in Africa—was a democracy at 
first, led by the charismatic Kwame Nkrumah. 
Within three years, he had altered the consti-
tution to create a one-party state. He spent 
Ghanaian resources freely to promote African 
unity and his own power and prominence. 
Nkrumah was overthrown by his military in 
1966, and economic mismanagement and politi-
cal instability continued to depress the economy. 
By 1980, Ghana was poorer on a per capita basis 
than it had been in 1957. Not all African coun-
tries followed Ghana’s authoritarian path in the 
years after independence, but many did. 
One exception to this pattern was Botswana. 
This small, very poor country neighboring South 
Africa, gained its independence in 1966 under the 
leadership of Sir Seretse Khama. From that time 
until the present, the government of Botswana 
has been both democratic and a model of good 
economic management. It has held regular elec-
tions that are regarded as free and fair (even if the 
same political party has consistently won) and 
has managed its mineral wealth (discovered well 
after independence) in a prudent and effective 
manner, making it one of the fastest-growing 
countries in the world for nearly a half century. 
What explains this exception to the broader rule 
in the region? Some have speculated that the 
culture of Botswana, being very legally oriented, 
led to relatively clean and effective government. 
Some have claimed that the fact that 80% of the 
population are part of the same broad ethnic 
group (the Batswana) helped. Others have argued 
that economic and political success at home was a 
survival strategy, given that South Africa had once 
claimed the territory that is now Botswana. But 
Botswana also enjoyed a stroke of luck (in addi-
tion to its mineral resources). The first leader of 
the country was a chief with essential legitimacy 
in the eyes of his people, an able, honest person, 
committed to the welfare of his country—what 
we call “leadership.” And he led the country for 
18 years, time enough to institutionalize good 
governance and democracy. 
About half of the countries 
in the region have embraced 
democracy, fragile and 
imperfect, to be sure, but a far 
cry from the dictatorships of old. 
The impact of Africa’s corrupt and repres-
sive regimes on the region’s development was 
often disastrous. Earnings from national resources 
were stolen or wasted, and corruption was rife. 
Economic policies often favored key political 
groups (consumers and urban dwellers) and disad-
vantaged rural producers. In the 1970s and 1980s, 
poor economic management, political instabilities, 
coups, and the lack of property rights, along with 
poor (and often deteriorating) infrastructure and 
international economic volatility depressed growth 
throughout the region. Volatile world prices for 
primary products exported by these countries exac-
erbated these problems. Finally, by the beginning 
of the 1980s, the debt burden of some countries 
and the swiftly deteriorating balance-of-payments 
problems of most others forced much of Africa to 
turn to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) 
and World Bank for increased assistance. The 
assistance came with conditions—a variety of eco-
nomic reforms from currency adjustments to more 
fundamental changes in economic management, 
DEMOCRACY AND SECURITY  |  37 
Year!
Free!
Partly!Free!
Not!Free!
1990!
4!
15!
28!
2000!
9!
24!
15!
2011!
9!
22!
17!
In 1990, Freedom 
House categorized only 
4 African countries as 
“free,” 15 as “partly 
free,” and 28 as “not 
free.” But by 2000, the 
balance of free and 
non-free had shifted. 
Nine countries were 
free, 24 were partly free, 
and 15 were not free. By 
2011, 9 countries were 
free, and 22 countries 
were partially free. 
The remaining 
17 were not free. 
Source:“Freedom in the 
World: Percentages by Year,” 
Freedom House, 
www.freedomhouse.org, 
accessed December 26, 2011. 
ASSESSMENT OF FREEDOM IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA 
almost always leading to less-government-con-
trolled and freer markets. Many governments 
implemented reforms, but economic conditions 
did not improve significantly for most—at least 
not right away. 
The disappointing initial results of struc-
tural adjustment programs in the 1990s led the 
international aid community to ask why. One 
of the answers was that economic reforms were 
either only partially implemented or were insuf-
ficient. What was needed further, it was argued, 
was improved governance—meaning more open 
political systems where government transparency 
and accountability were greatly increased. In short 
(though the World Bank and IMF were reluctant 
to say the word), democratization would put real 
constraints on rulers and give political rights to 
citizens, including the information needed to 
assess (and punish through elections if need be) 
economic failures of governments. 
Reinforcing the trend toward political reform 
was a wave of democratization following the end 
of the Cold War that swept most of the region. It 
Number of Countries, Selected Years 
30 
20 
10 
Free 
Partly Free 
Not Free 
1990 
2000 
2011 
began with the National Conference in Benin 
that installed a democratic constitution, called 
for elections, and ultimately voted its long-term 
dictator, Mattieu Kérékou, out of office. At almost 
the same time, the political winds changed 
dramatically in Southern Africa. Namibia’s 
independence in 1989 led to a new democratic 
government. By far the most important change 
was the crumbling of apartheid in South Africa, 
which paved the way for a shift to democracy 
across much of the southern region. Following 
Benin, other Francophone countries held their 
own national conferences, after which some 
implemented real democratic reforms (such as 
Mali and the Republic of the Congo). In others 
(such as Togo and the Democratic Republic of the 
Congo), sitting presidents managed to prevent real 
political change. In Anglophone Africa, political 
reforms also began, usually through constitutional 
changes that permitted multiparty elections. 
Again, political reforms varied from country to 
country, but in most, some opening and increase 
in transparency and political rights did occur (such 
38  |   USAID FRONTIERS IN DEVELOPMENT 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested