pdf template itextsharp c# : Change link in pdf Library application component .net html winforms mvc Thesis-hongtu4-part60

BIBLIOGRAPHY
29
[20] M. George. (2006,
December) Memory
interface application
notes overview. [Online]. Available: http://www.xilinx.com/bvdocs/
appnotes/xapp802.pdf
[21] N. Gupta and M. George. (2004, May) Creating high-speed memory
interfaces with Virtex-II and Virtex-II Pro FPGAs. [Online]. Available:
http://www.xilinx.com/bvdocs/appnotes/xapp688.pdf
[22] N.
Gupta.
(2005,
January)
Interfacing
Virtex-II
de-
vices
with
DDR
SDRAM
memories
for
performance
to
167 mhz. [Online]. Available:
http://www.xilinx.com/support/
software/memory/protected/XAPP758c.pdf
[23] W.
L.
Goh,
S.
S.
Rofail,
and
K.-S.
Yeo.
Low-power
design:
An
overview.
[Online].
Available:
http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=27212&rl=1
[24] G. E. Moore, “No exponential is forever: But ”Forever” can be delayed!”
in Proc. of IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC),
California, USA, February 2003, pp. 20–23.
[25] B. Chatterjee, M. Sachdev, S. Hsu, R. Krishnamurthy, and S. Borkai,
“Effectiveness and scaling trends of leakage control techniques for sub4
30nm CMOS technologies,” in Proc. of International Symposium on Low
Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED), California, USA, August 2003,
pp. 122–127.
[26] T. Olsson, “Distributed clocking and clock generation in digital CMOS
SoC ASICs,” Ph.D. dissertation, Lund University, Lund, 2004.
[27] J. M. Rabaey and M. Pedram, Low Power Design Methodologies.
Springer, 1995.
[28] A. P. Chandrakasan, S. Sheng, and R. W. Brodersen, “Low-power CMOS
digital design,” IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, vol. 27, pp. 473 –
484, April 1992.
[29] D. Garrett, M. Stan, and A. Dean, “Challenges in clockgating for a low
power ASIC methodology,” in Proc. of International Symposium on Low
Power Electronics and Design, California, USA, August 1999, pp. 176 –
181.
[30] Y. J. Yeh, S. Y. Kuo, and J. Y. Jou, “Converter-free multiple-voltage scal-
ing techniques for low-power CMOS digital design,” IEEE Transactions
on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, vol. 20, pp.
172 – 176, January 2001.
Change link in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links pdf document; add link to pdf acrobat
Change link in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf in preview; change link in pdf
30
BIBLIOGRAPHY
[31] T. Kuroda and M. Hamada, “Low-power CMOS digital design with dual
embedded adaptive power supplies,” IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits,
vol. 35, pp. 652 – 655, April 2000.
[32] A. Garcia, W. Burleson, and J. L. Danger, “Low power digital design in
FPGAs: a study of pipeline architectures implemented in a FPGA using a
low supply voltage to reduce power consumption,” in Proc. IEEE Interna-
tional Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), Geneva, Switzerland,
May 2000, pp. 561 – 564.
[33] P. Brennan, A. Dean, S. Kenyon, and S. Ventrone, “Low power method-
ology and design techniques for processor design,” in Proc. International
Symposium on Low Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED), California,
USA, August 1998, pp. 268 – 273.
[34] L. Benini, G. D. Micheli, and E. Macii, “Designing low-power circuits:
practical recipes,” IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine, vol. 1, pp. 6–25,
2001.
[35] F. G. Wolff, M. J. Knieser, D. J. Weyer, and C. A. Papachristou, “High-
level low power FPGA design methodology,” in Proc. IEEE Conference on
National Aerospace and Electronics Conference (NAECON), Ohio, USA,
October 2000, pp. 554–559.
[36] S. GadelRab, D. Bond, and D. Reynolds, “Fight the power: Power re-
duction ideas for ASIC designers and tool providers,” in Proc. of SNUG
Conference, California, USA, 2005.
[37] K. K. Parhi, VLSI Digital Signal Processing Systems: Design and Imple-
mentation. John Wiley & Sons, 1999.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add hyperlinks pdf file
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
active links in pdf; add url to pdf
Hardware Accelerator
Design of an Automated
Video Surveillance
System
31
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
add links to pdf; pdf link to email
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression mode
add hyperlink pdf file; adding a link to a pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
clickable links in pdf from word; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
add a link to a pdf in preview; clickable links in pdf
Chapter
1
Segmentation
1.1 Introduction
The use of video surveillance systems is omnipresent in the modern world in
both a civilian and a military contexts, e.g. traffic control, security monitor-
ing and antiterrorism. While traditional Closed Circuit TV (CCTV) based
surveillance systems put heavy demands of human operators, there is an in-
creasing needs for automated video surveillance system. By building a self
contained video surveillance system capable of automatic information extrac-
tion and processing, various events can be detected automatically, and alarms
can be triggered in presence of abnormity. Thereby, the volume of data pre-
sented to security personnel is reduced substantially. Besides, automated video
surveillance better handles complex cluttered or camouflaged scenes. A video
feed for surveillance personnel to monitor after the system has announced an
event will support improved vigilance and increase the probability of incident
detection.
Crucial to most of such automated video surveillance systems is the quality
of the video segmentation, which is a process of extracting objects of interest
(foreground) from an irrelevant background scene. The foreground information,
often composed of moving objects, is passed on to later analysis units, where ob-
jects are tracked and their activities are analyzed. To be able to perform video
segmentation, a so called background subtraction technique is usually applied.
With a reference frame containing a pure background scene being maintained
for all pixel locations, foreground objects are extracted by thresholding the
difference between the current video frame and the background frame. In the
33
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security level; PDF text Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
add email link to pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
c# read pdf from url; chrome pdf from link
34
CHAPTER 1. SEGMENTATION
50
100
150
200
250
300
50
100
150
200
(a) Indoor environment in the lab
50
100
150
200
250
300
50
100
150
200
(b) TH = 5
50
100
150
200
250
300
50
100
150
200
(c) TH = 10
50
100
150
200
250
300
50
100
150
200
(d) T H = 20
Figure 1.1:
Video segmentation results with the frame difference ap-
proach. Different threshold value are tested in the indoor environment
in our lab.
following section, a range of background subtraction algorithms are reviewed,
along with the discussions on their performances and computational complex-
ity. Based on these discussions, trade-offs are made with a specific algorithm
based on Mixture of Gaussian (MoG) being selected as the baseline algorithm
for hardware implementation. The algorithm is subjected to modifications to
better fit implementation on an embedded platform.
1.2. ALTERNATIVE VIDEO SEGMENTATION ALGORITHMS
35
1.2 Alternative Video Segmentation Algorithms
1.2.1 Frame Difference
ABackground/Foreground detection can be achieved by simply observing the
difference of the pixels between two adjacent frames. By setting a threshold
value, a pixel is identified as foreground if the difference is higher than the
threshold value or background otherwise. The simplicity of the algorithm comes
at the cost of the segmentation quality. In general, bigger regions are detected
as foreground area than the actual moving part. Also it fails to detect inner
pixels of a large, uniformly-colored moving object, a problem known as aperture
effect [1]. In addition, setting a global threshold value is problematic since the
segmentation is sensitive to light intensity. Figure 1.1 shows segmentation
results with a video sequence taken in our lab, where three people are moving
in front of a camera. From these figures, it can be seen that with lower threshold
value, more details of the moving objects are revealed. However, this comes
with substantial noise that could overwhelm the segmented objects, e.g. the left
most person in figure 1.1(b). On the other hand, increasing the threshold value
reduces noise level, at the cost of less details detected to a point where almost
whole objects are missing, e.g. left most person in figure 1.1(d). In general,
inner parts of all objects are left undetected, due to their uniformity colors that
result in minor value changes over frames. In spite of the segmentation quality,
the frame difference approach suits well for hardware implementation. The
computational complexity as well as memory requirements arerather low. With
the memory size of only one video frame and minor hardware calculation, e.g.
an adder and a comparator, it is still found as part of many video surveillance
systems of today [1–4].
1.2.2 Median Filter
While the frame difference approach uses the previous frame as the background
reference frame, it is inherently unreliable and sensitive to noise with the mov-
ing objects contained in the reference frame and the varying illumination noise
over frames. An alternative approach to obtain a background frame is by using
median filters. A median filter has traditionally been used in spatial image fil-
tering process to remove noise [5]. The basic idea of noise reduction lies in the
fact that a pixel corrupted by noise makes a sharp transition in the spatial do-
main. By checking the surrounding pixels that centers at the pixel in question,
the middle value is selected to replace the center pixel. By doing this, the pixel
in question is forced to look like its neighbors, thus the extinctive pixel value
corrupted by noise are replaced. Inspired by this, median filters are used to
model background pixels with reduced noise deviation by filtering pixel values
36
CHAPTER 1. SEGMENTATION
in the time domain. they are used in many applications [6–8], with the median
filtering process carried out over the previous n frames, e.g. 50 − 200 frames
in [6]. To avoid foreground pixel values to be mixed into the background, the
number of frames has to be large so that more than half the pixel values be-
longs to the background. The principle is illustrated in figure 1.2, where the
number of both foreground and background pixels are shown in a frame buffer.
Due to various noise, a pixel value will not stay at exactly the same value over
frames, thus the histograms are used to represent both the foreground and the
background pixels. Consider the case when the number of background pixels
is more than that of foreground pixel by only one. The median value will lie
right at the right foot of background histogram. With increasing background
pixel filled into the buffer, the value is moving towards the peak of the back-
ground histogram. Under the previous assumption that no foreground pixel
will stay in the scene for more than half size of the buffer, the median value
will move along the background histogram back and forth, representing the
background pixel value for the current frame. Using buffers to store previous
nframes is costly in memory usage. In certain situations, number of buffered
frames could increase substantially, e.g. slowly moving objects with uniformly
colored surface are present in the scene or the foreground objects stopped for a
while before moving on to another location. The calculation complexity is also
proportional to the number of buffers. To find the median value it is necessary
to sort all the values in the frame buffer in numerical order which is hardware
costly with large number of frame buffers.
1.2.3 Selective Running Average
One similar alternative to median filtering is to use the average instead of the
median value over previous n frames. Noise distortions to a background pixel
over frames can be neutralized by taking the mean value of the pixel samples
collected over time. To avoid huge memory requirements similar to the median
filtering approach, a running average can be utilized which takes the form of
B
t
=(1 − α)B
t−1
+αF
t
,
(1.1)
where α is the learning rate, F and B are the current frame and background
frame formed by the mean value of each pixel respectively. With such an
approach, only a frame of mean values are needed to be stored in a memory.
The average operation is carried out by incorporating a small portion of the
new frames into the mean values at a time, using a learning factor α. At the
same time, the same portion of the current mean value is discarded. Depending
on the value of α, such a average operation can be fast or slow. For background
modeling, a fast learning factor could result in foreground pixels to be quickly
incorporated into background, thus limiting its usage to certain situations, e.g.
1.2. ALTERNATIVE VIDEO SEGMENTATION ALGORITHMS
37
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Color Intensity level
Number of pixel
background
pixels
median value
foreground
pixels
Figure 1.2:
Foreground and Background pixel histograms: With more
pixels in the buffer falling within Background, the median value moves
towards the center of Background distribution.
initialization phase with only background scene.
To avoid a foreground pixel to be mixed into the background updating
process, a selective running average can be applied. This is shown in the
following equations:
B
t
=(1 − α)B
t−1
+αF
t
if F
t
⊂background
(1.2)
B
t
=B
t−1
if F
t
⊂foreground.
(1.3)
With the foreground/background distinction performed before background
frame updating process, more recent “clean” background pixels contributes to
the form of the new mean value, which makes the background modeling more
accurate. The selective running average method is used in many applications,
e.g. [9, 10], and forms the basics of other alternative algorithms with much
higher complexity, e.g. Mixture of Gaussian (MOG) discussed in the follow-
ing sections. The merit of the approach comes in its relatively low hardware
complexity, e.g. simple multiplications and additions are needed to update the
mean value for each pixel. Together with low memory requirements of storing
38
CHAPTER 1. SEGMENTATION
only one frame of mean values, running selective average fits well for hardware
implementation. Acting virtually with the same principles as a mean filter,
selective running average achieves similar segmentation results as that of the
median filtering approach.
1.2.4 Linear Predictive Filter
To be able to estimate the current background more accurately, linear predictive
filters are developed for background modeling in several literatures [11–15]. The
problem with taking the median or mean of the past pixel samples lies in the
fact that it does not reflect the uncertainty (variance) of how a background
pixel value could drift from its mean value. Without any of this information,
the foreground/background distinction has to be done in a heuristic way. An
alternative approach can be utilized which predicts the current background
pixel value from its recent history values. Compared to mean and median
values, a prediction value can more accurately represent the true value of the
current background pixel, which effectively decrease the uncertainty of the
variation of a background pixel. As a result, a tighter threshold value can
be selected to achieve a more precise segmentation with a better chance of
avoiding camouflage problem, where foreground and background holds similar
pixel values. Toyama et al. [11] uses an one-step Wiener filter to predict a
background value based on its recent history of values. In their approach, a
linear estimation of the current background value is calculated as:
ˆ
B
t
=
N
k=1
α
k
I
t−k
,
(1.4)
where
ˆ
Bis the current background estimation, I
t−k
is one of the history values
of a pixel, and α
k
is the prediction coefficient. The coefficient are calculated to
minimize mean square of the estimation error, which is formulated as:
E[e
2
t
]= E[(B
t
ˆ
B
t
)
2
].
(1.5)
According to the procedure described in [16], the coefficients can be obtained
by solving a set of linear equations as follows:
p
k=1
α
k
t
I
t−k
I
t−i
=−
t
I
t
I
t−i
, 1 ≤ i ≤ p.
(1.6)
The estimation of coefficients and pixel predictions are calculated recursively
during each frame. In [11], a pixel value with a deviation of more than 4.0 ×
E[e
2
t
]is considered foreground pixel. In total, 50 past values are used in [11]
for each pixel to calculate 30 coefficients.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested