extract data from pdf c# : Add hyperlink pdf file control Library platform web page asp.net .net web browser UT-ECIPA-FAIG-02-011-part672

diversiÞcation of trading risks. Further, we assume that this number is countable to ensure that
the set of buyers in the household is of measure zero relative to the set of goods for sale by other
households.
16
This assumption is technically important becauseit implies that there are norepeated
purchases of the same good with probability one.
17
For convenience, we normalize the measure
of individuals in the household to one, that is we measure sets of individuals in the household as
fractions of the individuals in the set relative to the individuals in the household.
The household’s utility is U(c), where U : <
+
→ < is continuously differentiable, strictly
increasing, and concave. The variable c is a hedonic measure of consumption, which satisÞes
c=
·
bm
b
(θ)
Z
1
0
εq
1−σ
ε
¸
1
1−σ
, σ ∈ (0,1) .
(5)
The term bm
b
(θ) is the measure of goods located by the b buyers in the household who on average
visit m
b
(θ) sellers each. The law of large numbers implies that, ex post, the realizations of the
preference shocks for these goods are uniformly distributed in [0,1]. This consumption aggregator
implies that c doubles whenq
ε
doubles for all ε, andc more than doubles whenb doubles. Therefore,
the household has a preference for variety,
18
which increases with the parameter σ and vanishes
when σ → 0. The Appendix derives the hedonic measure of consumption in (5) from a standard
Dixit-Stiglitz aggregator. Finally, to avoid dealing with uninteresting corner solutions, we assume
that U is sufficiently concave, so utility is a concave function of b.
Production y depends on the amount of labor n employed:
y= f(n).
(6)
The production function f : <
+
→<
+
is assumed continuously differentiable, strictly increasing,
and concave. The sales of the household are equal to the measure of buyers contacted by the
sellers of the household times the average quantity sold by each seller,
Q=
R
1
0
Q
ε
dε. Since there
is no aggregate uncertainty in a large household, the amount of output both produced and sold is
identical:
y= sm
s
(θ)
Q.
(7)
16
Remember that there is a continuum of households and thus a continuum of differentiated goods that each
household can purchase.
17Also,thestandardLawofLargeNumbersassumesacountableinÞnitenumberofrandomvariables.
18NotethatthehouseholddoesnotbuyinÞnitesimalamountsofthegoodsitpurchasesbecauseitiscostlytosend
extra buyers to the market.
11
Add hyperlink pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links to pdf online; add url pdf
Add hyperlink pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
chrome pdf from link; adding hyperlinks to pdf
The household must satisfy the budget constraint, that is, total expenditure cannot exceed total
sales revenue:
sm
s
(θ)
Z− bm
b
(θ)
z≥ 0.
(8)
Here,
Z =
R
1
0
Z(Q
ε
)dε is the average revenue of a seller, and
z =
R
1
0
Z(q
ε
)dε is the average
expenditure of a buyer.
The measure of individuals assigned to the three different activities in the household must add
up to one:
b+ s + n = 1.
(9)
The household chooses {q
ε
}
ε∈[0,1]
,b, s, n, c and y to maximize U subject to (5) to (9), and
non-negativity constraints for all variables. Condition (7) can be substituted into (6) to form a
single resource constraint. Also, (5) can be substituted into the objective function U(c). Using
Lagrange multipliers µ, λ, and ϑ for the resource constraint, the budget constraint, and the labor
allocation constraint respectively, the Þrst-order conditions for an interior maximum are:
U
0
(c)c
σ
εq
−σ
ε
=λZ
0
(q
ε
) for ε ∈ [0,1],
(10)
m
b
(θ)
Z
1
0
·
εU
0
(c)c
σ
q
1−σ
ε
1− σ
−λz
ε
¸
dε = ϑ,
(11)
m
s
(θ)
Z
1
0
(λZ
ε
−µQ
ε
)dε = ϑ, and
(12)
µf
0
(n) = ϑ.
(13)
Condition (10) states that, conditional on each possible realization ε, buyers must equate the
marginal utility of purchasing an extra unit of a good with the marginal value of the payment
required in return. The other conditions imply that the value of the marginal product of labor in
all three occupations must be the same. This common value is ϑ. Condition (11) equates ϑ to the
expected consumer surplus obtained by a buyer. Condition (12) equates ϑ to the expected surplus
generated by a seller. Finally, condition (13) equates ϑ to the value of the marginal product of
labor of a producer.
4 Commercial Pricing
In this section, we model the interaction between buyers and sellers in the marketplace in a di-
rected search equilibrium when sellers do not know how much buyers are willing to pay for their
merchandise. A bilateral trade is described by a pair (q,z) ∈ <
2
+
specifying the quantity q supplied
12
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file permission Hyperlink Edit.
add a link to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file permission Hyperlink Edit.
adding an email link to a pdf; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
by the seller and the payment z given in return by the buyer. In the previous section, the two
elements of this vector were linked by an exogenous price schedule z = Z(q). The purpose of this
section is to endogeneize Z.
The revelation principle allows us to reformulate the problem where sellers post price schedules
and buyers, with different realizations of the preference shock, self-select along the schedule of
the sellers they are matched with. Without loss of generality, we may assume that sellers posts
direct revelation mechanisms that induce truth-telling by the buyers (that is, incentive compatible
mechanisms). Feasible mechanisms must also satisfy the individual rationality constraints of the
buyers. Buyers observe the mechanisms posted by the sellers and decide to trade according to a
particular mechanism. In a directed search equilibrium, all posted mechanisms and the degrees of
congestion associated with them must maximize the expected payoff of the seller subject to the
constraint that buyers get a common expected payoff. This result has two direct implications.
First, the mechanisms posted by sellers must be optimal in the set of incentive compatible and
individually rational mechanisms. That is, any posted mechanism must be incentive efficient.
Second, the congestion associated with the mechanism must be such that no other combination of
an incentive efficient mechanism and a congestion level yield the same expected payoff to the buyer
and higher expected payoff to the seller.
4.1 Incentive Efficient Direct Revelation Mechanisms
We begin by characterizing the set of incentive efficient direct revelation mechanisms. That is, we
characterize the direct mechanisms that maximize a weighted sum of the expected payoffs of the
buyer and the seller subject to the incentive compatibility and individual rationality constraints.
We show that the outcome of each incentive efficient direct revelation mechanisms is implemented
when sellers post a price schedule in a particular class, and buyers who choose to trade at these
prices select their most preferred price-quantity combination depending on the realization of the
preference shock.
19
In a meeting between a buyer and a seller, the buyer knows the realized value of ε, but the seller
does not. All the seller knows is that ε is a random variable uniformly distributed on the interval
[0,1]. We refer to the realization of ε as the buyer’s type.
All traders maximize the objectives of the households they belong to. SpeciÞcally, the incre-
19OneelementinthisclasscorrespondswiththemonopolisticpriceschedulederivedinMaskinand Riley(1984)
and Mussa and Rosen (1978).
13
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add links to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide quick access to the website or other file.
add hyperlink to pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
mental utility of a buyer’s purchase to the household is the consumer surplus:
U
b
(q,z;ε) =
εψq
1−σ
1− σ
−λz,
(14)
where
ψ≡ U
0
(c)c
σ
,
(15)
and λ is the Lagrange multiplier associated with (8). The incremental utility of a seller’s sale is
the gross commercial margin:
U
s
(q,z) = λz −µq,
(16)
where µ is the multiplier associated with (7).
20
By symmetry, the variables ψ, λ, andµ are identical
across households. Because each buyer and eachseller are inÞnitesimal inthe household they belong
to, the values of ψ, λ, and µ are not affected by their individual actions. For ease of exposition, we
shall refer to U
b
and U
s
as the utility functions of buyers and sellers respectively.
Adirect revelation mechanism is a schedule of type-contingent trades {q
ε
,z
ε
}
ε∈[0,1]
.A direct
revelation mechanism is incentive efficient if it maximizes a weighted sum of the expected utilities
of buyers and sellers:
{q
ε
,z
ε
}
ε∈[0,1]
=argmax
·
(1 −ω)
Z
1
0
U
b
(q
ε
,z
ε
;ε)dε +ω
Z
1
0
U
s
(q
ε
,z
ε
)dε
¸
(17)
where ω ∈ [0,1], subject to the following constraints:
1. Incentive Compatibility: Buyers must have no incentive to lie about their type:
ε
0
∈arg max
ε∈[0,1]
h
U
b
¡
q
ε
,z
ε
0
¢
i
, for all ε
0
∈[0,1].
(18)
2. Individual Rationality: Buyers and sellers must receive non-negative utility in all meetings:
21
U
b
(q
ε
,z
ε
;ε) ≥ 0, for all ε ∈ [0,1], and
(19)
U
s
(q
ε
,z
ε
)≥ 0, for all ε ∈ [0,1].
(20)
In the appendix, we use standard arguments in the mechanism design literature to characterize
the set of incentive efficient direct revelation mechanisms. This solution is summarized in the
following proposition:
20UandUaredeÞnedsothattheyarealignedwiththehousehold’sÞrstorderconditions(11)and(12).
21
This property follows from the combination of two facts: the buyer observes the variety offered by the seller as
soon as they meet, and both buyers and sellers have the option of not trading. If sellers could hide their variety for
sale, then they could demand a payment from the buyers to reveal this information. In this case, buyers could end
up with negative utility in some meetings.
14
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; adding a link to a pdf in preview
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Add necessary references: The target resolution of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file.
add a link to a pdf file; pdf link to specific page
Proposition 1 The incentive efficient direct revelation mechanisms which solve program (17) sub-
ject to (18) to (20), are the following:
q
ε
=
0
for ε ∈ [0,γ)
³
ψ
µ
ε−γ
1−γ
´
1
σ
for ε ∈ [γ,1]
and
(21)
z
ε
=
1
λ
·
γ
ψq
1−σ
ε
1−σ
+(1− γ)µq
ε
¸
,
(22)
where
γ=
0
for ω ∈ [0,0.5)
2ω−1
3ω−1
for ω ∈ [0.5,1]
(23)
The following proposition establishes that the outcome of an incentive efficient direct revela-
tion mechanism can be implemented if sellers post a simple non-linear price schedule and buyers
optimally choose the quantity they want to acquire at these prices.
Proposition 2 The outcome of an incentive efficient direct revelation mechanism can be attained
when buyers choose q facing the following price schedule:
Z(q) =
1
λ
·
γ
ψq
1−σ
1−σ
+(1− γ)µq
¸
,
(24)
where γ ∈ [0,0.5] satisÞes (23). We refer to a price schedule with parameter γ as the price schedule
γ.
As long as commercial margins are positive (γ > 0), the pricing schedule Z(q) is strictly concave.
This concavity implies that the per unit price of goods declines with q, or equivalently buyers obtain
quantity discounts. This is not unrealistic. In retail trade, sometimes we observe explicit quantity
discounts, but most often quantity discounts are implicit in the packaging of products (the larger
is the box of nails, the lower is the per unit price).
When buyers have full market power, that is when ω = 0, prices cover only the marginal cost
of production (γ = 0). In this case, buyers capture the whole trading surplus and the individual
rationality constraint of the seller binds. This constraint continues to bind as long as ω ≤ 0.5. For
ω> 0.5, commercial margins are positive and both the buyer and the seller appropriate a fraction
of the trading surplus. Even when sellers have full market power, that is when ω = 1 and γ = 0.5,
they are not able to extract the whole trading surplus because they do not know their clients’
15
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
clickable pdf links; add hyperlinks pdf file
type. The latter case is an interesting benchmark, which we denote monopolistic search. With
monopolistic search, sellers post the prices that maximize their expected proÞts in an environment
where their price schedules have no effect on the number of clients visiting their outlets. This might
be the relevant equilibrium concept for some tourist areas where buyers have little knowledge about
where to shop. However, in most commercial areas sellers are aware that by posting low prices
they can attract clients to their outlets. To capture these competitive pressures on prices, we adopt
directed search as our concept of equilibrium.
4.2 Trade-off between prices and congestion
Let V
b
j
j
)and V
s
j
j
)respectively be the expected utility of buyers andsellers in a submarket
with congestion θ
j
and price schedule γ
j
:
V
b
j
j
)= m
b
j
)
Z
1
0
µ
εψq
1−σ
ε
1−σ
−λz
ε
dε, and
(25)
V
s
j
j
)= m
s
j
)
Z
1
0
(λz
ε
−µq
ε
)dε
(26)
where q
ε
and z
ε
are given by (21) and (22). Integrating these expressions we obtain
V
b
j
j
)= m
b
j
)
σ
2
1− σ2
ψ
1
σ
µ
σ−1
σ
(1 −γ
j
)
2
, and
(27)
V
s
j
j
)= m
s
j
)
2
1− σ
2
ψ
1
σ
µ
σ−1
σ
γ
j
(1 −γ
j
).
(28)
In a directed search equilibrium, V
b
must be common to all active submarkets, because buyers
are free to choose the submarket where they direct their search. Also, the pair (θ
j
j
) must
maximize V
s
j
j
) subject to the constraint that V
b
j
j
) is equal to the common expected
utility attained by buyers in all active submarkets. The solution to this maximization problem, if
one exists, is unique.
22
Hence, there is a unique submarket in a directed search equilibrium, and the
subscript j can be omitted. As long as sellers capture a fraction of the expected trading surplus,
23
the equilibrium pair (θ,γ) is interior and satisÞes the following Þrst order condition:
∂V
b
(θ,γ)
∂θ
∂Vb(θ,γ)
∂γ
=
∂V
s
(θ,γ)
∂θ
∂Vs(θ,γ)
∂γ
.
(29)
22Substitutingtheconstraintintheobjectivefunctionanddroppingunnecessaryconstants,θ
j
must maximize the
strictly concave function: ms
j
)
n
1−
£
vmb
j
)
¤
−0.5
o
£
vmb
j
)
¤
−0.5
,where v is a constant inversely proportional to
the given value for Vb.
23Inourmodel,azeroexpectedpayoffforsellerscannotbeanequilibriumbecausetherewouldbenosellers. See
next section.
16
That is, buyers and sellers must have a common marginal rate of substitution of θ for γ. Differen-
tiating (27) and (28) and substituting into (29), we obtain
γ=
1−η(θ)
2
,
(30)
where η(θ) is the elasticity of the function m
s
:
η(θ) =
m
s0
(θ)θ
ms(θ)
.
(31)
Equation (30) provides a simple restriction that pricing schedules and congestionlevels must satisfy
in a directed search equilibrium. In the next section, we pinpoint the equilibrium pair (θ,γ) by
combining this restriction with the optimal choice of the measure of buyers and sellers in each
household.
5 General Equilibrium
In this section, we characterize a directed search equilibrium by combining the optimal behavior of
households in Section 2 with the endogenous determination of the pricing function in Section 3.
DeÞnition: The tuple {θ,n,b,s,c,y,q
ε
,z
ε
,ψ,µ,λ,Z(q)} is a symmetric directedsearch equilibrium
if
1. All households choose {n,b,s,c,y,q
ε
} taking as given the payment schedule Z(q)
and the market congestion ratio θ, and the implied payments are z
ε
=Z (q
ε
).
2. The payment schedule Z(q) satisÞes (24) when ψ satisÞes (15) and µ and λ are the
Lagrange multipliers associated with the resource constraint and the budget constraint
in the household’s optimization program.
3. The pair (γ,θ) satisÞes condition (30).
4. Congestion ratios are consistent with individual behavior: θ = b/s.
Since ina symmetric search equilibriumallhouseholds behave identically, lower-case andupper-case
letters coincide.
In equilibrium, a household must obtain the same utility from allocating an individual to any
of the three activities, as it is implied by the Þrst-order conditions (11) to (13). Therefore, V
b
(θ,γ)
and V
s
(θ,γ) must be equal. Using (27) and (28) together with (2), this equality implies
θ=
1− γ
.
(32)
17
According to (32), the congestion of buyers in the market θ is inversely related to γ. As γ increases
buyers capture a smaller fraction of the trade surplus (see Proposition 2), so households respond
by sending fewer buyers and more sellers to the marketplace. Combining (32) with (30), we obtain
that congestion θ in a directed search equilibrium is the solution to
1
1
2
=1− η(θ).
(33)
Consequently, the efficiency condition (29) together with the equality of expected payoffs of buyers
and sellers determine the two key variables in the retail sector: congestion θ and price schedule γ.
To determine the remaining variables in the model, we must combine the resource constraints,
the household’s Þrst order conditions, and the deÞnitions of θ, c, and ψ. Equating V
b
(θ,γ) to the
marginal payoff of a producer, µf
0
(n), we obtain
f
0
(n) = m
s
(θ)
2
1− σ2
µ
ψ
µ
1
σ
γ(1 −γ).
(34)
Integrating the quantities traded when buyers face a price schedule γ which are given by (21), we
obtain the average sales
q=
σ
1+σ
µ
ψ
µ
1
σ
(1 − γ).
(35)
Combining (6), (7), (34), and (35) gives
f
0
(n)
f(n)
=
1− σ
γ
s
.
(36)
Using the equilibrium condition θ = b/s, and the labor resource constraint (9), we have
s=
1−n
1+ θ
.
(37)
Finally, combining (36) with (37) and using (32), we obtain
(1 −n)f
0
(n)
f(n)
=
σ(1 +γ)
1−σ
.
(38)
Equation (38) determines n for a given value of γ. In a directed search equilibrium, γ and θ are
obtained from (30) and (33). Given θ, γ, and n, the equilibrium values for s, b, ψ/µ, q
ε
,c, y, ψ,
and µ are recursively determined by (36), (1), (34), (21), (5), (6), (15), and (34). The utility value
of the payment schedule λZ (q) is determined by (24), but the precise values of λ and Z (q) are
indeterminate because they depend on the units in which payments are measured.
The following proposition summarizes the conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a
directed search equilibrium (the proof is in the Appendix):
18
Proposition 3 If the elasticity η(θ) is non-increasing and belongs to the interval (0,1),
24
and
the following terminal conditions are satisÞed: f (0) = 0 and f
0
(0) > 0, then a directed search
equilibrium exists and is unique.
25
To calculate the average commercial margin in a directed search equilibrium, we use (21) to
obtain the following relationship:
ψ
Z
1
0
εq
1−σ
ε
dε = (1 +γσ)µ
q.
(39)
Substituting (39) and (32) into (11) and (12), we get
1− γ
µ
1+γσ
1−σ
µ
q− λ
z
z−µ
q.
(40)
Using (40), we obtain that the average commercial margin
λ
z−µ
q
µ
q
=
σ
1− σ
[1− η(θ)].
(41)
The commercial margin increases with both the preference for diversity σ and the contribution of
sellers in the matching process measured by 1 −η(θ).
26
5.1 Multiple Matches
In our model, there is no logical reason to restrict buyers and sellers to at most one match each
period. The extension to multiple matches is straightforward for the following reasons. Individual
traders (buyers or sellers) are inÞnitesimal in the household where they belong, so their individual
actions have no effect on the shadow valuations of goods, labor, and payments in the household:
ψ, µ, and λ. Moreover, thanks to the clearing-payments mechanism, an individual buyer is not
restricted by the money he or she carries. Likewise, thanks to the immediate access to current
production, an individual seller is not restricted by available commercial inventories. Therefore,
the optimal strategies of buyers and sellers in successive trading meetings do not depend on their
24Thetwoexamples(3)and(4)satisfytheseconditions.
25Thisproofalsousesthecontinuityandconcavityofmandf,andthecontinuityandconvexityofm b assumed
throughout the paper.
26
With full information, 1− η(θ) is the fraction of the trade surplus appropriated by sellers in a directed search
equilibrium. This division of the surplus endogeneizes the matching externalities, so the equilibrium allocation is
efficient. See Hosios (1990).
19
individual histories. Our analysis and results apply with almost no modiÞcation to a generalized
model where buyers and sellers can perform multiple matches each period. In that model, we
reinterpret m
s
(θ) and m
b
(θ) as the expected number of trading matches that a seller and a buyer
perform during a period respectively. With this reinterpretation, the image of these two functions
is [0,∞) instead of [0,1].
27
Conveniently, this allows for a Cobb-Douglas matching technology for
which the elasticity of m
s
(θ) is a constant.
6 Welfare
This section studies the welfare properties of the directed search equilibrium. To this end, it
characterizes the optimal allocation that a benevolent central planner would choose in order to
maximize the utility of a representative household. Following standard practice, the central planner
is not only bound by the resources available in the economy, but also by the bilateral matching
among traders. In addition, it is sensible that we restrict the central planner to information that
is publicly available. However, imposing this restriction is much more subtle than it Þrst appears.
The incentive compatibility constraint (18) arising from the fact that the buyers’ types are private
information is only binding when selling costs must be Þnanced with the revenue from sales (see
below). Moreover, the central planner can easily affect this revenue with policy tools that, in
principle, are respectful to private information, for example, a sales tax or a sales subsidy. Due to
the subtleties of restricting the central planner to public information, we start by characterizing
the Þrst best allocation, in which the central planner is not bound by the incentive compatibility
constraints imposed by private information. This allocation is an interesting benchmark in itself
and is useful to evaluate the welfare costs of private information. Later, we introduce private
information with speciÞc assumptions about the policy tools at the disposal of the central planner.
6.1 The Optimum with Complete Information
The Þrst best allocation is one in which the central planner maximizes the utility of a representative
household subject to the resources available in the economy and the bilateral matching among
traders. Let M(b,s) be the aggregate matching function, that is M(b,s) = bm
b
(b/s) = sm
s
(b/s).
27With multiple matches, it is important that buyers can playmixed strategies when they choose which prices
to search. Otherwise, a deviating seller would have a hard time attracting prospective buyers because these would
dislike being in a submarket where there is a single good.
20
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested