extract data from pdf c# : Add a link to a pdf application SDK utility azure wpf windows visual studio UT-ECIPA-FAIG-02-012-part673

The planner must solve the following program:
max
b,s,n,q
ε
U(c), where c =
·
M(b,s)
Z
1
0
εq
1−σ
ε
¸
1
1−σ
,
(42)
where subject to (9) and
M(b,s)
Z
1
0
q
ε
dε = f (n).
(43)
The Þrst-order conditions of this problem are:
εψq
−σ
ε
=µ,
(44)
M
b
(b,s)
Z
1
0
εψq
1−σ
ε
1− σ
dε −µM
b
(b,s)
Z
1
0
q
ε
dε = µf
0
(n),
(45)
M
s
(b,s)
Z
1
0
εψq
1−σ
ε
1− σ
dε −µM
s
(b,s)
Z
1
0
q
ε
dε = µf
0
(n),
(46)
where µ is the Lagrange multiplier of (43) and ψ = U
0
(c)c
σ
. In the Þrst best, the marginal utility
of consuming each good must be equal to the marginal production cost. Also, the marginal social
beneÞt of employment in all three activities must be the same. Comparing (45) and (46), we obtain
M
b
(b,s) = M
s
(b,s).
(47)
Equality (47) implies that for a given number of traders the number of trading meetings is max-
imized. Equations (9) and (43) to (46) can be easily manipulated to obtain an almost explicit
solution of the Þrst best allocation (see the Appendix for details):
Proposition 4 The Þrst best allocation, in which the central planner has both complete information
and control over all variables, is characterized by the following equations:
1
1+ θ
=1− η(θ),
(48)
(1 −n)f
0
(n)
f(n)
=
σ
1−σ
,
(49)
s=
1−n
1+ θ
,
(50)
b= θs, and
(51)
q
ε
=
1+ σ
σ
f(n)
M(b,s)
ε
1
σ
.
(52)
The following proposition compares the allocations in the Þrst best and in the directed search
equilibrium. To facilitate this comparison, it specializes the production and matching technologies
to standard functional forms:
21
Add a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink in pdf; pdf edit hyperlink
Add a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; check links in pdf
Proposition 5 Suppose all the assumptions used in Proposition 3 to ensure existence and unique-
ness of an equilibrium hold. Let an asterisk denote Þrst best and no asterisk denote directed search
equilibrium. The following relations hold:
b
s
>
b
s
,
(53)
n< n
.
(54)
In addition, if the f is isoelastic,
s
n
s
n
, with equality if η(θ) is constant.
(55)
Finally, if f is constant returns to scale,
q<
q
.
(56)
In a directed search equilibrium, selling costs are Þnanced with commercial margins that create
awedge between the marginal production cost of merchandises and the price paid by buyers. This
wedge reduces the quantities that buyers purchase in each transaction for given valuations of goods
and labor ψ and µ (compare (21) and (44)). However, ex-ante price competition among sellers
narrows commercial margins so the congestion of buyers to sellers in equilibrium is higher than
in the Þrst best. Intuitively, the equilibrium price schedule must play two conßicting allocational
roles: It must signal buyers the opportunity cost of the goods they are considering to purchase,
and it must Þnance retail costs in order to induce an efficient ratio of sellers over buyers. The
equilibrium price schedule settles on a compromise between these two roles. Prices are higher than
the social opportunity cost of goods but not high enough to Þnance the Þrst best ratio of sellers
over buyers. Even though, commercial margins induce buyers to purchase smaller quantities, the
comparison between q
ε
and q
ε
is ambiguous because the equilibrium and the Þrst best assign a
different shadow value to the cost of production relative to the utility of consumption (µ/ψ). In
the special case where f is constant returns to scale, we can prove that on average buyers purchase
an inefficiently low quantity when they meet a seller.
In the baseline case where both f and m
s
are isoelastic, the ratio (s/n) is identical in the
equilibrium and the Þrst best allocations. Therefore, in this baseline case the inefficiently high
(b/s) ratio implies that in equilibrium the measure of buyers is inefficiently high and the measures
of sellers and producers are inefficiently low. In general, the equilibrium allocation of labor relative
to the Þrst best depends on whether the elasticities f and m
s
are increasing or decreasing with
respect to n and θ respectively.
22
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C#
add links to pdf in acrobat; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
clickable links in pdf from word; add hyperlinks to pdf
As in Moen (1997) and Shimer (1996), the Þrst best allocation can be implemented as a directed
search equilibrium when buyers and sellers have complete information. In this case, a bilateral trade
must maximize the joint surplus of buyers and sellers. Moreover, the ex-ante price competition
among sellers leads to sharing this surplus according to Hosios’s (1990) rule, that is buyers get
afraction η(θ) of the surplus and sellers get 1 − η(θ), and θ is the Þrst best level of congestion.
With private information about buyers’ types, this equilibrium breaks down because the incentive
compatibility constraint (18) is violated.
The Þrst best allocation can be decentralized as a directed search equilibrium where buyers’
types are private information if sellers can charge a ßat fee to prospective buyers prior to the
realization of the preference shock ε. In this case, the fee covers selling costs without having to add
apositive commercial margin on the price of merchandises. In our model, such a fee is prevented
by the assumption that buyers get the preference shock as soon as they meet a seller, so a buyer
is not willing to pay the fee if the realization of ε is low. That is, ßat fees violate the individual
rationality constraint of buyers. More generally, one could realistically assume that the buyers’
satisfaction from a commercial transaction depends on the service effort provided by the seller. In
this more complicated model, the ßat unconditional fee is also discouraged by the moral hazard
problem it generates on the effort exercised by sellers. In reality, we Þnd ßat fees in warehouse
clubs. However, sales in warehouse clubs are a small fraction of the economy-wide retail sales, and
even these clubs charge fees that cover a small fraction of their commercial costs.
The following proposition summarizes these two ways of decentralizing the Þrst best allocation:
Proposition 6 The Þrst best allocation where the planner has complete information can be imple-
mented as a directed search equilibrium if buyers and sellers have complete information or if sellers
can charge a lump-sum fee to prospective buyers prior to the realization of the preference shock ε.
6.2 The Optimum with Private Information
This subsection characterizes second best allocations when the central planner has limited infor-
mation. Given that buyers’ types are private information it is natural to assume that the central
planner cannot directly observe them. However, if the central planner can monitor the allocation
of labor in each household, then the Þrst best allocation can be easily implemented by dictating
to households the allocation of labor, charging buyers the marginal cost of producing merchandise,
and transferring the proceeds of these payments to sellers. With this mechanism, buyers truthfully
23
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add links pdf document; add hyperlink pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
adding links to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
reveal their types without any efficiency loss. To make our analysis more realistic and more in-
teresting than this simple result, we assume that the central planner cannot directly observe how
households allocate their labor. This assumption is in line with the unobservability of leisure (and
so the allocation of time when there are two activities) in the standard theory of taxation.
SpeciÞcally, we assume that the planner can only observe market transactions and only has
control of the direct revelation mechanisms by which transactions are conducted, or equivalently
the price schedules faced by buyers and sellers. Given these price schedules, buyers choose the
quantities they want to purchase, which sellers supply as long as prices are above the marginal
costs of production. Households decide the allocation of labor taking into account the expected
returns from each activity.
In principle, buyers and sellers could face different price schedules. If so, the gap between the
two schedules is a sales tax (or a sales subsidy) to be collected (or distributed) by a government
who balances its budget with a lump-sum subsidy (or a lump-sum tax) on households. In the two
propositions that follow, we make alternative assumptions on the central planner’s ability to control
the pricing mechanism and to impose lump-sum taxes on households.
In the absence of any restriction on these policy instruments, the central planner can implement
the Þrst best allocation despite the presence of private information:
Proposition 7 If the central planner can resort to lump-sum taxes on households to Þnance a
linear sales subsidy, then the Þrst best allocation characterized in Proposition 4 can be decentralized
with the following price schedule faced by buyers:
Z(q) =
η(θ)µq
λ
,
(57)
and a linear sales subsidy at the gross rate:
T =
1− ση(θ)
(1− σ)η(θ)
,
(58)
where θ is the solution to (48). (The price schedule faced by sellers is TZ(q)).
This proposition implies that the planner could not do better by introducing additional control
instruments. Intuitively, the proposition holds because the planner picks the tab for the selling
costs with the sales subsidy. Hence, the prices faced by the buyers can be equated to the marginal
social cost of production of merchandises.
24
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add links to pdf document; add link to pdf file
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add link to pdf; pdf link
The implementation of the Þrst best allocation in Proposition 7 depends on the existence of
lump-sum taxes. In the model, this is not problematic because all households are identical. How-
ever, this homogeneity is unrealistic and has been assumed only for simplicity. The next proposition
assumes the absence of lump-sum taxes.
Proposition 8 If the only policy instrument is to set the retail trade price schedule and the mar-
ginal product of labor is constant (the production function is affine), a directed search equilibrium
is optimal.
If the production function is affine,
28
acentral planner without recourse to lump-sum taxes
cannot improve upon the directed search equilibrium. When the production function is not affine,
regulation of the price schedule can be welfare enhancing because it has an indirect effect on the
marginal product of labor which differs from its Þrst best value. However, as long as the production
function is differentiable, it can always be approximated with an affine production function, and so
the welfare gains of deviating from the directed search equilibrium are second order of magnitude.
In the next section, we use numerical simulations to check that these gains are very small.
7 Commerce in a Neoclassical Growth Framework
This section sketches how to embed the model developed in the previous sections in a Neoclassical
growth framework. In the extended model, time is inÞnite and discrete. Each period in the life of
ahousehold proceeds as in the static model. Also, in the resulting synthesis, the economy has two
sectors: one produces goods combining capital and labor as in the Neoclassical growth model, the
other exchanges goods in directed search markets where buyers’ types are private information.
29
To make our model as close as possible to the basic Neoclassical growth model, we assume that
investment does not require installation or commercial costs. However, future work could incorpo-
rate these features. For brevity, we omit all proofs, which are either standard in the Neoclassical
growth theory or parallel the arguments in the previous sections.
The household’s intertemporal utility function is
28Sincelaboristheonlyproductioninput,thisassumptionissatisÞedwithconstantreturnstoscale. Inthenext
section, we add capital to the production technology. In that case, the restriction to affine production functions is
not implied by constant returns.
29Intheabsenceofcapital,allperiodsareidentical,sotheequilibriumallocationistimeinvariantandidenticalto
the one constructed in Sections 2 to 4.
25
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add hyperlinks to pdf online; pdf links
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
X
t=0
β
t
U(c
t
),
(59)
where β ∈ (0,1) is the household’s discount factor.
Also, the production of goods requires not only labor but also capital:
y
t
=F(k
t
,n
t
).
(60)
The production function F : <
2
+
→ <
+
maps capital and labor into output. This function is
continuously differentiable, increasing in both arguments, concave, and homogeneous of degree
one. Also, the Inada conditions for an interior solution are assumed to apply.
Goods can be used for both consumption and investment. When goods are used for consump-
tion, they are exchanged in the same type of markets as those described in the previous sections.
Goods used for consumption are perishable and must be sold in the same period in which they
are produced. When goods are used for investment, they are perfect substitutes for one another.
To save commercial costs, households use part of their own output to increase their capital stock.
Therefore, households allocate a fraction of their output to be sold and another fraction to invest-
ment:
y
t
=k
t+1
−k
t
(1− δ) +s
t
m
s
t
)
q
t
,
(61)
where δ ∈ (0,1) is the depreciation rate. The fraction destined for sale is consumed by the pur-
chasing households.
Eachperiodtthe householdis subject toconstraints (5), (7) to (9),(60) and(61).
30
Theproblem
of the household is to choose {q
εt
}
ε∈[0,1]
,b
t
,s
t
,n
t
,c
t
,y
t
and k
t+1
to maximize (59) subject to this
system of constraints. We use Lagrange multipliers β
t
µ
t
t
λ
t
,and β
t
ϑt for the resource constraint,
the budget constraint, and the labor allocation constraint respectively. Then, the optimal behavior
of a household is characterized by the sameÞrst-order conditions as thoseinSection 2,that is (10) to
(13), with all variables indexed by the corresponding time subscript, and the obvious modiÞcation
that output and the marginal product of labor now depend on the capital stock. Moreover, the
30
Regardingcondition (8), we could allow the clearing-house to pay or charge interest on the balance of credits and
debits imposing only an intertemporal budget constraint on the households. However, since all households behave
identically, all balances must be zero in equilibrium. Therefore, we can simplify the exposition by assuming that the
balance of credits and debits for each household must be zero in each period.
26
following two conditions must hold:
µ
t
t+1
[F
k
(k
t+1
,n
t+1
)+1 −δ]β, and
(62)
lim
t→∞
β
−t
µ
t
k
t
=0.
(63)
Equation (62) states that the value of one unit of output today is equal to the present discounted
value of the gross marginal product of capital, while equation (63) is a standard transversality
condition.
Adirected search equilibrium is a set {θ
t
,n
t
,b
t
,s
t
,c
t
,y
t
,k
t+1
,q
εt
,z
εt
t
t
t
,Z
t
(q)}
t=0
sat-
isfying conditions analogous to the ones in the deÞnition in Section 5. This equilibrium is now
described by a system of difference equations for the variables k
t
and µ
t
: (61) and (62) together
with the time-indexed versions of conditions (1), (9), (15), (21), (30), (32), (34),
31
(35), (37), and
(60). This system together with the initial condition k
0
and the terminal condition (63) determines
the equilibrium path. For all capital stocks, equations (30) and (32) still determine the pricing
parameter γ
t
and the congestion θ
t
of buyers over sellers in the market for consumption goods.
Therefore, these two variables are constant along an equilibrium path.
Qualitatively, the dynamics of capital accumulation are identical to those of the Neoclassical
growth model. Capital converges monotonically to a steady state where k
t
and µ
t
are constant.
For low capital stocks, both the marginal product of capital and the utility price of capital µ
t
are
high relative to the steady state. High levels of µ
t
induce low consumption and high supply of
labor into production, and as a result high saving. As capital is accumulated, households not only
increase the fraction of output allocated for consumption, but also the fraction of labor allocated
to the exchange of commodities.
In the steady state, equation (62) implies that the net marginal product of capital is equal to
the subjective discount rate:
F
k
µ
k
n
,1
−δ =
1
β
−1.
(64)
When net investment is zero, analogous steps to the derivation of (38) yield:
F
n
µ
k
n
,1
F
µ
k
n
,1
−δ
k
n
1− n
n
=
σ(1+ γ)
1− σ
.
(65)
31Takingintoaccountthatthemarginalproductoflabordependsonbothcapitalandlabor.
27
Equations (64) and (65) determine the steady state capital stock and labor allocated into pro-
duction. The steady state values of the remaining variables (b, s, q
ε
,and µ) are obtained from
equations analogous to those in Section 4.
As in the version of the model without capital, a central planner who faces the same informa-
tional constraints as the market and who only has control of the direct revelation mechanism by
which transactions are conducted cannot improve upon the allocation in a directed search equi-
librium when the production technology is linear. With the existence of capital, constant returns
to scale does not imply that the production technology is linear. However, with constant returns
to scale the difference in welfare between a directed search equilibrium and the allocation that is
attained when the central planner chooses the direct revelation trading mechanism are negligible
for reasonable parameters (see the numerical example in the following subsection).
As in the Neoclassical growth model, output and capital converge to a steady growth path if
the utility function U is isoelastic and the efficiency of labor in the production of goods grows at a
constant rate. Also, the utility function can be easily extended to include leisure or home services.
In this case, the restrictions on U for convergence to a steady growth path are the standard ones.
7.1 Numerical Calibration
In the context of the Neoclassical growth framework, our model of commerce can be estimated
using standard economic data. In this subsection, we discuss how to identify the parameters of
the model, and we provide a numerical calibration of the model. For this purpose, we assume
logarithmic preferences: U(c
t
)= lnc
t
,and Cobb-Douglas matching and production technologies:
M(b
t
,s
t
)= A
0
b
η
t
s
1−η
t
and F(k
t
,e
t
n
t
)= A
1
k
α
t
(e
t
n
t
)
1−α
.
32
We also assume that the efficiency of
labor in the production of goods (e
t
)grows at a constant rate g.
As is standard in the Neoclassical growth model, the parameters α, β, δ, and g can be estimated
using capital and labor income shares in the sector producing goods, the real return on capital, the
durability of capital, and the average growth rate of output. In our numerical example in Table
2, we pick standard estimates for these parameters. The two remaining parameters of the model
to estimate are the preference for diversity (σ) and the elasticity of matches with respect to the
number of sellers (η).
33
These two parameters can be identiÞed with empirical estimates of the
32Whenpreferencesarelogarithmic,thesystemofdifferenceequationscharacterizingadirectedsearchequilibrium
is greatly simpliÞed because then s
t
ms
t
)
q
t
=(1+σγ)
−1
µ−1
t
.
33Thevalues ofthetechnological constants A
0
and A
1
are irrelevant for the calculations in Table 1, and affect
only the units in which we measure output and hedonic consumption.
28
average commercial margin and the congestion in the retail sector. In a directed search equilibrium,
equations (30), (33), and (41) imply:
Average commercial margin
µ
λ
t
z
t
−µ
t
q
t
µ
t
q
t
=
σ(1 −η)
1− σ
, and
(66)
Congestion
µ
b
t
s
t
=
1+ η
2(1− η)
.
(67)
Therefore, with estimates of the average commercial margin and market congestion we can solve
for σ and η.
The Bureau of the Census of the United States reports that the average commercial margin for
retail trade has quite stable around 0.28 during the last decade.
34
The Bureau of Labor Statistics
measures the number of production employees in retail trade and the average weekly hours that
these employees work. The product of these two measures is the empirical counterpart of s
t
(465
million hours/week in 1986).
35
To calculate b
t
,we multiply the average time spent shopping by
an adult (3.4 hours/week in 1986) reported in Robinson, Andreyenkov, and Patrushev (1989, p.
84)
36
by the number of shoppers in the economy (United States population 16 and over). This
product measures the empirical counterpart of b
t
(630 million hours/week in 1986). This implies
that congestion is 1.35 (' 630/465). Applying these estimates to the system (66) and (67), we
obtain η = 0.46 and σ = 0.42.
Using the estimated parameters, Table 1 compares the directed search equilibrium and the
Þrst best allocation.
37
In equilibrium, households spend less time producing and selling goods and
more time shopping than in the Þrst best. Also, in equilibrium buyers leave empty handed from
27 percent of the trading meetings while they always acquire a positive amount of goods in the
Þrst best. Welfare in the two allocations is quite different. Changing from the Þrst best balanced
34Seehttp://www.census.gov/svsd/www/artstbl.html. Thecommercialmarginvarieswidelybythetypeofbusi-
ness of the retailers. For example, in 2000, at the lower end, we Þnd the commercial margins for Warehouse Clubs
and Superstores (0.167), Automotive Dealers (0.175), and Gasoline Stations (0.208). At the upper end, we have the
margins for Specialty Food Stores (0.419), Clothing and Footwear (0.426), and Furniture (0.441). In this paper we
abstract from the reasons why different goods may trade with different margins, although this is an interesting topic
for future research.
35Weuse1986toestimatecongestion because the surveyonthe timeindividuals spend shoppingthat we have
on hand refers to that year. The data was downloaded in July 1, 2002 from http://stats.bls.gov/data/home.htm
(production employees in retail trade: 15.924 million, average hours worked by production employees: 29.2).
36ThisisthemostrecentestimateofaveragetimeallocatedtoshoppingthatwecouldÞnd.Wedonotexpectthat
indices of congestion vary dramatically over time.
37Thebalancegrowthpathsarecalculatedusingtheformulasdescribedintheprevioussections. Thetransitional
dynamics necessary to calculate the last row are obtained using standard numerical methods.
29
path to the equilibrium balanced path is equivalent to a 7.94 percent drop in consumption. When
the transitional costs of changing the capital stock are taken into account this percentage drops
slightly to 7.87.
38
This large welfare cost is not easy to avoid with correcting policies. For example,
regulating the price schedule in a directed search equilibrium leads only to a negligible welfare
improvement equivalent to less than a 10
−5
percent increase in consumption. (This improvement
would be zero if the production technology were linear instead of Cobb-Douglas). The large dif-
ference in welfare between a directed search equilibrium and the Þrst best allocation is due to the
necessity of Þnancing retail costs with large commercial mark-ups. This inefficiency is unavoidable
in the absence of some form of lump-sum taxes which would allow to subsidize retail trade.
8 Conclusion and Extensions
Search models have been used to study decentralized markets where traders meet bilaterally. These
models have been useful to analyse the labor market. Also, with the work of Kiyotaki and Wright
(1989 and 1993) they have become the dominant paradigm for the theoretical microfoundations of
money. Our paper uses search to capture some important features of the retail sector.
Our key assumption is that matching buyers with the sellers that carry their desired products is
costly. We model this cost with the search technology of Mortensen (1982) and Pissarides (1990).
We also assume that buyers are aware of the price schedules of sellers and as a result they direct
their search to a subset of sellers with the most desirable combination of prices and congestion.
To formalize this idea we incorporate the concept of directed search equilibrium in Peters (1991).
Finally, we assume that the buyers’ willingness to pay for a particular product is not observable.
In this way, we extend directed search to a framework with private information.
Inthis framework, we study the welfare properties of a directedsearch allocation by comparingit
tothe allocationchosen by acentralplanner. If the planner faces the same informational constraints
as the market and only has control of the direct revelation mechanism by which transactions are
conducted, then a directed search equilibrium coincides with the choice of the planner when the
production technology is linear. However, if the planner can use lump-sum taxes to subsidize sales,
the planner can improve upon the equilibrium outcome. In fact, the planner can achieve the Þrst
best allocation by introducing a linear subsidy on sales. The Þrst best also coincides with a directed
search equilibrium if sellers can charge a ßat fee to all buyers that seek to trade with them.
38Inthiscomparison,weassumethatboththeequilibriumpathandtheÞrstbestpathstartwiththesamecapital
stock (the one in the Þrst best).
30
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested