extract data from pdf c# : Change link in pdf file control Library system azure asp.net winforms console verspagen0-part688

1
E
CONOMIC 
G
ROWTH AND 
T
ECHNOLOGICAL 
C
HANGE
A
E
VOLUTIONARY 
I
NTERPRETATION
by
Bart Verspagen
(ECIS & MERIT)
Second draft, April 2000
Jan Fagerberg, Bart Los, Alessandro Nuvolari and Eddy Szirmai provided valuable comments
on an earlier draft. Controversial opinions and remaining errors are my own.
Eindhoven Centre for Innovation Studies (ECIS), Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB
Eindhoven, the Netherlands
Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT), PO Box 616, 6200 MD
Maastricht, the Netherlands, email bart.verspagen@merit.unimaas.nl, web:
http://meritbbs.unimaas.nl/verspagen.html
Change link in pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
Change link in pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf hyperlinks; pdf link open in new window
2
1. Introduction
The aim of this paper is to apply insights from evolutionary economic theory to the question of what
can explain recent trends in economic growth, with emphasis on the role of technological change.
Obviously, a basic question that precedes this question is “what is evolutionary economic theory”?
The answer to this is not simple. In mainstream economics, it is clear that the term "neoclassical
growth model" refers to Solow’s model (e.g., Solow, 1970), and the term "endogenous growth
models" refers to a relatively limited set of models, that can reasonably be described by perhaps four
prototypes (Romer, 1990; Lucas; 1988; Aghion and Howitt; 1992; Rebelo; 1991). However, even
when attention is limited to growth theory, it is impossible to define "the evolutionary growth model".
There are various reasons for this. The most basic one is that the very center of the evolutionary
argument is that growth is a process that takes place in historical time. This implies that economic
growth interacts with, and is influenced by many factors that are more or less outside the economic
domain (culture, institutions, science). It also means that an important part of evolutionary economic
theory consists of ex post explanation of events and developments, rather than strict ex ante prediction
of growth paths. Evolutionary economics is to a large extent a branch of theory that has to rely on
methods that go behind the standard toolkit of economic modeling, and this leads to a situation in
which many different approaches flourish. This makes it hard to speak about "the evolutionary
approach".
This is not to say that evolutionary economists dislike formal modeling. There are many formal
evolutionary growth models (see Silverberg and Verspagen, 1998, for a survey). But each single one
of these models is a strong abstraction of the much richer set of evolutionary theories that was
described above. This necessarily implies that the models usually focus on rather narrow issues as
compared to non-formal evolutionary economic theory, which on its turn means that all of these
models are rather different in terms of the setup and the issues analyzed.
Hence, the best one can do in terms of summarizing the evolutionary economic literature on growth
in a paper like this, is drawing on the big issues in the literature, and leave most of the details out of
the picture. Hopefully, such a broad sweep will yield a limited number of issues that can usefully be
tackled in an empirical way. Certainly, the biggest issue in evolutionary economics is technological
change. This is why this paper will focus largely on the relationship between technology and economic
growth.
What then is the relation to mainstream (neoclassical
1
) economics? I would argue that over the
1990s, some convergence between the two schools of thought has been taking place. Heertje (1993)
put it as follows: "neo-Schumpeterians have been productive in their criticism of the neoclassical
scheme on the basic of an evolutionary approach, but the questions they have raised have been
addressed more or less successfully by many scholars, who have close links with the neoclassical
tradition (…) I would not be surprised to  see  the  present Schumpeterian mood  to be part of
mainstream economics before the end of this century" (p. 273-275).
Although,  with  hindsight,  I  would  argue  that  Heertje  was  probably  a  bit  too  optimistic
(pessimistic?)  about the degree of ultimate convergence between  neo-classical and  evolutionary
economics, it is undoubtedly true that a number of topics that occupied the minds of evolutionary
economists in the 1970s and 1980s have been picked up in the new growth school. This is why a
number of topics that I will present below as evolutionary topics may look familiar to some readers,
1
Form now on, I will also group new growth theory (or endogenous growth theory) under the term neoclassical
economics.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
change link in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing 150F; // to change image compression
add links to pdf in preview; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
3
even if they have not been reading the evolutionary literature before. For example, the issue of
convergence and catching-up by means of international technology spillovers has recently been
analyzed in a neoclassical model by Benhabib and Spiegel (1994), but had been around in the
evolutionary literature at least since Pavitt and Soete (1982). I will discuss this idea further in Section
 below.  Similarly,  the  notion  of  general  purpose  technologies  ‘introduced’  by  Helpman  and
Trajtenberg (1994) bears large similarities to the issue of radical innovations that I consider crucial in
evolutionary economics (e.g., Kleinknecht, 1987; Freeman, Clark and Soete, 1982). I will use the
notion of radical innovations throughout this paper.
I will not touch upon these similarities in the remainder of this paper, nor go into the issue of
‘intellectual property rights’ of either school over the topics covered here. What ultimately concerns
the present paper is what evolutionary theory has to say about the empirics of economic growth. I
consider the question whether or not recent neo-classical economics has similar things to say as less
important for the current analysis.
Section 2 will pick up the issue of what characterizes evolutionary economics in some detail. As
argued above, it is impossible to do justice to the variety found in the field in such a short part of the
paper. I will therefore present four issues that I consider being absolutely essential to evolutionary
growth theory. Each of these issues will be picked up in a subsequent section, where I will try to
provide empirical substance to the argument, and to draw some conclusions about recent patterns of
growth. The final section will attempt to draw the issues together again, and to present an evolutionary
interpretation of the signs we have regarding the future trends of economic growth in the OECD area.
2. Evolutionary Economics
The term evolutionary economics has been used in many different meanings. At one level, the term
refers to a set of formal economic theories that makes use of biological metaphors. In these theories,
the biological notions of natural selection and (random) genetic mutation are applied to economic
processes such as industrial dynamics (Dosi, Marsili et al., 1995) or economic growth (Silverberg and
Verspagen, 1998). An early overview of the methods and issues in this branch of literature is
Silverberg (1988).
Two concepts  are  crucial  in these models. First, heterogeneity  between  economic  agents or
economic units, be it firms, consumers, countries or even technologies. This assumption criticizes the
standard neoclassical concept of the representative agent. Economic agents or units (I will refer to
firms from now) are different, and how these differences translate into economic growth or the
dynamics  of industry selection is  where the second concept  comes in. This second concept  is
economic selection as a counterpart of natural selection. Firms that have ‘better’ strategies than other
firms will tend to grow, while the firms with ‘worse’ strategies will tend to loose market share. What
are good or bad strategies is a matter of theory, and many different aspects of this have been explored
in recent evolutionary models.
One consequence of this perspective on economic dynamics is that the natural way of looking at
the economy is in terms of population dynamics. Evolutionary economic theory does not have much to
explain about the strategy of individual firms, at least not in the traditional way that economic theory
wants  to  explain  behaviour.  In  neoclassical  economics,  firm  behaviour  results  from  profit
maximization. What comes out of this is a concrete prediction of firm behaviour in terms of, for
example, how much labour is demanded, or much will be invested in machinery. These quantities are
explained in terms of the marginal returns to these factors in the production process, and the prevailing
market prices.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim setting As PasswordSetting = New PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword) ' Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
add hyperlink to pdf in; c# read pdf from url
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
PasswordSetting setting = new PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword); // Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
accessible links in pdf; c# read pdf from url
4
Evolutionary economic models, instead, usually revert to the concept of ‘rules of thumb’, as a
description of economic behaviour under bounded rationality (Nelson and Winter, 1982). Rules of
thumb take the form of a fixed ratio of, for example, investment to profits, or R&D to profits. What
determines the exact value of these ratios is not explained at the level of the individual firm. Instead,
the distribution of the rules of thumb over the complete firm population evolves endogenously (at least
in the more sophisticated evolutionary economic models). For example, in Silverberg and Verspagen
(1994), under the influence of economic selection, the distribution of the R&D sales ratio converges to
a fixed value that depends on technological opportunities and spillovers.
A second interpretation of the term ‘evolutionary economics’ takes the analogy to biology much
less strictly. In this case, the term is used to refer to a set of theories, more often informal than formal,
which pay particular attention to the role of technology and institutions in the process of economic
growth.  Usually,  these  contributions  draw  inspiration  from  Schumpeter’s  (1912)   notion  of
disequilibrium dynamics resulting from the introduction of (basic) innovations. Examples of this
approach are Fagerberg (1987), Fagerberg (1988), Freeman and Soete (1987) or Dosi, Pavitt and Soete
(1990).
The central theme in this literature is that one cannot make a useful distinction between ‘economic’
and ‘non-economic’ factors when trying to explain economic growth. These authors think of the
‘social system’ as composed of different ‘domains’, e.g., the  techno-economic domain and the socio-
institutional domain (Perez, 1983), or the separate domains of technology, economy and institutions
(Dosi, 1984). Each of these domains has its own dynamics and explanatory processes, but what is
important is that the domains exert strong mutual influences. Examples of such interaction are the
impact of European integration (a process that started very much as a way of stabilizing Europe in a
political way after the 1940s) on economic growth (Fagerberg, Guerrieri et al., 1999), the impact of
culture on regional innovation systems (Saxenian, 1994), or the influence of firm organization on
economic growth (Von Tunzelmann, 1995). In this view, any ‘model’ that limits itself to pure
economic factors (such as R&D, capital investment or human capital) provides a much too narrow
perspective on economic growth.
Thus, the perspective offered by these theories is one of the world economy as a process of
constant transformation, very much in the sense of classical authors such as Marx  and Smith.
Technologies and institutions change in time, and what drives economic growth in one era (e.g.,
economies of scale in relation to mass production) might become much less important, or substituted
by a different factor (e.g., network economies) in a different era. In terms of economic growth rates,
such a process is quite different from the neo-classical notion of steady state growth.
OECD (2000), under the heading of ‘The changing role of innovation in growth performance’,
discusses a number of transformations that are good examples of the processes I have in mind in the
present discussion of evolutionary economics. Among the factors mentioned there are shortening
technology cycles, changes in financial markets enabling easier financing of innovative activities
(venture capital), the increasing role of networks and alliances in technology development, and the
closer link to science. I will not discuss these factors in any detail here, but instead try to investigate
how these (and other) changes affect the causal links between innovation indicators and economic
growth (section 4 below).
One example of a non-steady state, evolutionary growth process is the Schumpeterian idea of long
waves. Originating from Schumpeter (1939), and later refined by contributions such as Freeman, Clark
and  Soete  (1982),  Kleinknecht  (1987)  and  van  Duijn  (1983),  this  hypothesis  states  that  the
introduction times of basic innovations are clustered in time. A ‘bunch’ of innovations may lead an
upswing of economic growth once it creates a bandwagon of follow-up, incremental innovations.
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
adding links to pdf in preview; add a link to a pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
add hyperlink in pdf; adding a link to a pdf
5
Wolff’s law (Freeman, 1982) about decreasing marginal technological opportunities ultimately brings
a slowdown of economic growth, after the new technological paradigm (the term is Dosi’s, 1982 ) is
diffused throughout the economy. Although this is clearly a technology driven theory of economic
growth, the attention for other than pure economic or technological factors is large. Perez (1983) and
Von  Tunzelmann  (1995)  are  particularly  strong  examples  of  approaches  where  the  notion  of
technological paradigms is linked to broad institutional change, firm strategy or industry dynamics.
Long waves are only one alternative to a steady state. Many researchers in the evolutionary school
would argue against a strict cyclical interpretation of economic growth (e.g., Freeman, Clark and
Soete, 1982; Silverberg and Lehnert, 1994). In this weaker interpretation of Schumpeter’s theory of
innovation and growth, periods of rapid and slow growth take over from each other, but the exact
duration of different phases depends on specific historical and institutional factors.
Can we draw any common conclusions from this diverse set of perspectives that can be grouped
under the heading of evolutionary economics? I would propose the following four.
1. Economic growth is first of all a process of transformation, not of convergence to a steady state
growth path. The transformation of capitalism involves interaction of the economic sphere with other
domains, such as science and technology, and institutions. This has three major implications. First,
that differences in economic growth (both over time and between countries) are hard to predict ex
ante, but often have clear underlying explanatory factors ex post. Second, that in the long run,
economic growth is not a process of general convergence. One might indeed observe historical periods
of convergence during times when institutions and technological developments allow this, but periods
of divergence of economic growth must also be expected. Third, any distinction between trend growth
and cyclical variations around the trend is problematic.
2.  Technology  is  a  key factor shaping economic growth,  and the changes  in growth rates.
Obviously, this on itself is something that evolutionary economics has in common with the new
growth  theory.  What  is  special  for  evolutionary  economics,  however,  is  the  question  how
technological change adds to the variability of trend growth rates signaled in point 1.In order to
answer this question, two issues seem to be relevant. The first is the distinction between radical and
incremental innovation. Radical innovations open up new possibilities for long-run changes in the
trend rate of economic growth. When radical (or basic) innovations occur, they disrupt the existing
economic structure and dependencies in the economy. This leads to changes in the growth rate that are
(again) hard to predict in a detailed way ex ante. Incremental innovations are associated with the
diffusion of the radical innovations throughout the economy, and they depend crucially on the specific
historical and institutional context.
The second issue is the (stylized) distinction between innovation and imitation. Technology cannot
be fully appropriated by the firm that develops an innovation. In time, technological knowledge spills
over to other firms and other nations. While innovation (the development of new technology) may lead
to  divergence  between  firms  or  nations,  imitation  tends  to  erode  differences  in  technological
competencies, and hence lead to convergence. When diffusion of innovations takes time, and depends
on ‘fuzzy’ institutional factors such as those mentioned above, the exact mix between innovation and
diffusion may lead to turbulent growth paths (Silverberg and Verspagen, 1995) provide a quantitative
model that illustrates this point).
3. The third conclusion follows from the notion of radical and incremental innovation. Radical
innovation will often, in opening up new possibilities for economic activities, create new industries, or
drastically revitalize existing industries. Incremental innovation is then one of the driving forces
behind the growth of these industries. In other words, the process of economic growth is one that is
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
add a link to a pdf file; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File
add hyperlink to pdf in; add a link to a pdf
6
characterized by structural change. Explaining the growth of new industries and the decline of old
industries is an important aspect of an evolutionary theory of economic growth (Los, 1999).
2
4. The final conclusion follows from the notion of economic selection. In evolutionary economics,
competition is seen as a process that is important in terms of its dynamics, not its long-run tendency.
The dynamics of selection shape economic growth. This leads to two important points. First, as was
argued above, the perspective of population dynamics, in case of economic growth a sample of
countries, is a natural to adopt. Second, adjustment of market shares in world markets is an important
aspect of an evolutionary explanation of economic growth.
3. Economic growth: transformation or steady state?
What evidence is there for the evolutionary hypothesis of economic growth as a non-steady state
process of constant transformation? As argued in the previous section, this question is very much
related to non-economic variables such as institutions and culture. Measurement of these factors is
hard,  although  not  completely  impossible.  However,  I  will  approach  the  issue  from  a  purely
quantitative perspective, focusing only on growth rates of GDP and GDP per capita, thus providing
rather indirect ‘evidence’.
The issue of changes in the trend rate of growth has been investigated in a recent set of papers (e.g.,
Crafts and Mills, 1996, and the references there). In general, the methodology used to investigate this
question is to estimate the log of GDP or GDP per capita as a (linear) function of time, where the slope
of the estimated relation ship gives the trend growth rate. Varying this slope for different periods, and
testing for the statistical significance of the differences, gives an indication of trend changes in
economic growth. Although this method has intuitive appeal, it has one major disadvantage in the
present context. The method posits trend breaks as discontinuous events: the trend growth rate is
assumed to change suddenly from one year to the other, and then to stay constant for a longer period.
Form an evolutionary point of view, one would like to investigate the possibility of more smooth
changes in the trend.
One way of dealing with this problem is to estimate the trend growth rate as a time varying
parameter, as can be done by using the Kalman filter. In this way, one may specify the trend growth
rate itself as a (stochastic) function that changes yearly. This is the method used here. As is commonly
done, GDP and GDP per capita are modeled as a loglinear function of time. However, both the
constant and the slope of this relation are modeled as time varying parameters in a Kalman filter
model, i.e., these parameters are assumed to change on a yearly basis by a stochastic process.
3
Figure 1 gives the Kalman filter estimations for 18 countries for which long time series are
available in Maddison (1995). For the most recent years (up to 1998), Maddison’s data were updated
with the data developed by the Groningen Growth and Development Centre.
4
The figures give the
2
Often, the statistical categories used to describe industries are not very adequate for measuring the impact of
new technologies. Thus, one would generally expect that the extent of structural change going on in the economy
is larger than what surfaces when looking at the statistics.
3
The specific result of the Kalman filter estimations depend on a number of parameters, of which the variance
factors in the transition and measurement equations are two important ones. I inferred the variance factor in the
transition equation from a number of initial estimations, according to the procedure described as "bootstrapping a
variance for the transition equation" in the TSP 4.4 Reference Manual under the KALMAN command. I used
defaults for all other estimation parameters, among which the identity matrix for the transition factor in the
measurement equation. However, the results are not very sensitive for these parameters, especially not for the
years in the graphs.
4
The updates were taken from the GGDC Total Economy Database, University of Groningen, Fourth Quarter
1999, http://www.eco.rug.nl/ggdc.
7
growth rate of GDP per capita (left axis, dark line) and the growth rate of GDP (right axis, light line).
The results indicate that there is indeed a great variability in the ‘trend’ growth rates for these 17
countries over time. Most evidently, the two world wars cause violent interruptions of trends. For
many countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Germany
5
, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland, United
Kingdom and United States), the start of the twentieth century is a period of high growth. The early
1910s signify radical breaks, usually with rapidly falling trend growth rates. With the two wars, the
roaring twenties and the Great Depression in the 1930s, the next 35 years are turbulent, with no clear
steady state settling in.
After 1950, the European countries show a common pattern of rapidly increasing trend growth
rates. Australia and Japan also show this pattern. In most cases, this strong increase of the trend brings
the countries involved on a path with growth rates that are higher than ever experienced before in the
twentieth century. This is very clearly the case for France, Italy, Japan, Spain and Sweden.
The 1970s bring the well-documented break with the golden age of the 1950s and 1960s. In most
countries, trend growth settle down at a relatively constant level (Canada, Denmark, New Zealand and
Switzerland are the main exceptions). It is notable, however, that compared to the end of the golden
age, the trend growth rates in most countries are at a similar or just slightly lower level. What is
different in the 1970s and 1980s as compared to the previous period is that the trend growth rates no
longer increase.
The 1990s show some ripples in many countries. Obviously, compared to the time span of the
graph, this period is rather short for any firm judgement about possible reversions of the trend. What is
interesting, however, is the fact that the estimated trends vary greatly between countries. On the one
hand, Germany, Italy and Japan seem to experience a decrease in the trend. Denmark, Finland,
Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States, on the other hand, seem to show signs of an
increase of trend growth.
OECD (2000) investigates changes in the trend rate of growth between the 1980s and the 1990s.
The method used in that paper is to compare the rate of growth 1980-1990 to that of 1990-1998. Based
on the difference in growth between these two periods, three groups of countries are distinguished
(increasing growth, equal growth, decreasing growth). The general finding of that analysis is that there
are indeed large differences between countries, with a substantial number of countries in each of the
groups. Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Australia, Denmark and the United States emerge as countries
with increasing growth. Comparing this to the results obtained here, one sees some interesting
similarities and differences. For Australia, the present analysis confirms increasing growth (for GDP
per capita), but seen in a longer historical perspective, this is a process that follows quite smoothly
from the past. The upswing in growth in the Netherlands, Norway and the United States seems more
fragile in the present analysis than in the OECD analysis. On the other hand, the present analysis
seems to indicate increasing growth rates in Finland and the United Kingdom (both classified as
falling growth in the OECD analysis).
In summary, the Kalman filter estimations seem to show that the concept of steady state growth is
not very useful from an empirical point of view. Growth paths of countries show a high degree of
variability over time. Periods of rapid and slow(er) growth take turns, without, however, a clear
cyclical pattern with fixed periodicity. There are some features of historical growth patterns that seem
to be shared by most countries: generally erratic patterns of trend growth before 1940, a long period of
increasing trend growth rates after the second world war, and slowdown of growth from the mid-
1970s. Despite these common patterns, there are important differences between countries with respect
5
The picture refers to West Germany only.
8
to the timing of changes in the trend, the level of growth rates, and the detailed shape of the patterns.
Moreover, there are quite a few exceptions to these common patterns. Interestingly, the 1990s are a
clear example of the variability of growth trends between countries. In some countries, one sees a clear
pattern of take off of growth rates, while in others the flat trend of the 1970s and 1980s is continued.
Australia
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.5
3.0
3.5
Austria
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Belgium
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Canada
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
Denmark
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.0
2.5
3.0
Finland
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
Figure 1. Trend growth rates of GDP per capita (light line, left axis) and GDP (dark line, right
axis), estimated with a Kalman filter
9
France
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Germany
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Italy
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Japan
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
Netherlands
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
New Zealand
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
Figure 1. Trend growth rates of GDP per capita (light line, left axis) and GDP (dark line, right
axis), estimated with a Kalman filter
(cont.)
10
Norway
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Spain
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
Sweden
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Switzerland
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
United Kingdom
0.5
1.0
1.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
1.0
1.5
2.0
United States
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
Figure 1. Trend growth rates of GDP per capita (light line, left axis) and GDP (dark line, right
axis), estimated with a Kalman filter 
(end)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested