extract data from pdf c# : Adding hyperlinks to pdf Library control API .net azure windows sharepoint verspagen1-part689

11
4. Innovation and diffusion, convergence and divergence
At a macroeconomic level, the population dynamics perspective that evolutionary economics suggests
links up naturally to the debate on convergence and divergence. Part of the empirical facts of this
debate  is  by now  well established,  such as the strong tendency for convergence that the OECD
countries experienced during the period from 1950 to the mid-1970s. However, in order to set the
agenda on what must be explained in terms of ‘macroeconomic population dynamics’, these facts will
be summarized here again, with an emphasis on the most recent period.
Figure 2 gives, for the same countries as in Figure 1, the long-run trends of convergence. Two
different indicators of differences between countries are used. The first one is one that has been used
often in the convergence-divergence debate. It is defined as the standard deviation of the log of GDP
per capita in the sample of countries. This is the dark line in Figure 2. A falling standard deviation
points to convergence (country differences diminish over time). This measure essentially compares a
country’s GDP per capita to the (unweighted) sample average.
The figure shows that there was no or little convergence over the period 1870 - 1913. After this, a
weak  convergence  trend  sets  in  until  the  outbreak  of  World  War  II.  This  event  increases  the
heterogeneity in the sample drastically. From the late 1940s onwards, a very strong convergence
process sets in. Around 1960, the level of the indicator is back to where it was before the war, but
convergence keeps going on. In the mid-1970s, when trend growth starts to slow down in most of the
countries in Figure  1,  convergence also comes to a halt. For about a decade, per capita income
differences remain stable, but from the mid-1980s, a weak convergence trend sets in again.
The light line in Figure 2 gives a different convergence indicator. This indicator is defined as the
mean of the log difference of per capita income in a country relative to the most advanced country in
the sample. Australia, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Germany and the United States appear as
countries with the highest value of per capita GDP in one or more years. During the post-World War II
period, the United States are in the lead for most of the time. This includes the most recent period
(from 1983 onwards).  Abramovitz and  David (1996)  suggest that  this  indicator  fits  the  idea  of
catching-up as a result of technology diffusion relatively well. The reason for this is that technology
diffuses from the relatively advanced countries to the more backward countries, and this suggests
comparing a country to the productivity frontier rather than to the sample average.
For the postwar convergence boom and the slowdown of this in the mid-1970s, the two indicators
match  relatively  well.  However,  for  the  earliest  period,  the  second  indicator  points  to  more
convergence than the first one, and the opposite is true for the period from the start of the twentieth
century to 1920.
Of most immediate interest, however, is the strong divergence of the two indicators in the most
recent period. While the first indicator, which measures convergence relative to the sample mean,
shows weak convergence from 1990 onwards, the second indicator, measuring convergence relative to
the leader in terms of GDP per capita (i.e., the United States), shows relatively strong divergence. In
other words, while the United States seems to move ahead of the other countries on average, this does
not imply that these other countries are not converging to each other.
Figure 3 enlarges the most recent period (after World War II), and also adds two more countries for
which only postwar data are available (Portugal and Ireland).
Adding hyperlinks to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding an email link to a pdf; add link to pdf file
Adding hyperlinks to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf; pdf links
12
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
1.2
1870
1880
1890
1900
1910
1920
1930
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
Figure 2. Long-run trends of convergence and divergence
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
1960
1965
1970
1975
1980
1985
1990
1995
2000
0.1
0.15
0.2
0.25
0.3
0.35
0.4
Figure 3. Convergence and divergence after World War II
13
What is the interpretation of these dynamics? I will take part of the second conclusion of Section 2
and try to sketch a stylized interpretation. For that purpose, I will use and re-estimate a model that was
developed by Fagerberg (1988) (see also Kortum, 1997, for a somewhat similar model). Fagerberg,
building  on  Pavitt  and  Soete  (1982),  makes  the  distinction  between  the  development  of  new
knowledge (in a country) and the diffusion of knowledge (between countries) that was also made in
the  second  conclusion of  Section  2. In  an attempt to quantify these two  sources of  knowledge,
Fagerberg  regresses the level of GDP per capita on two different technology indicators: external
patents per dollar of export, and total R&D expenditures as a fraction of GDP. His hypothesis is that
this  relation is loglinear  rather than  linear,  because countries closer to the technological frontier
depend more on the development of new knowledge than on diffusion. Especially patents must be
considered as an indicator of the development of new knowledge, while a part of R&D will generally
be related to assimilating foreign technology. Thus, countries with high values of GDP per capita are
expected to have relatively higher values of patenting per dollar export, while this relationship may be
somewhat less steep for R&D.
Fagerberg’s regressions were undertaken for the period 1973-1983. Tables 1 and 2 repeat the
regressions for this period, and extends the time coverage to an earlier period (1966-1972) as well as
two more recent period (1984 - 1995 as a whole and 1990-1995 separately). Although an attempt was
made to replicate Fagerberg’s results exactly, some of his data was not available for the present
exercise, and I had to resort to slightly different measures. In particular, while Fagerberg’s data on
patents refers to total external patents (patents by the country’s residents in foreign countries), I did
not have access to these data for the non-OECD countries. Therefore, I used data on patenting in the
United States.
6
Also, I did  not have access  to data on non-military R&D that Fagerberg uses. I
therefore  use  total  R&D  (including  non-business  financed/performed  R&D).  I  use  29  countries,
including Hongkong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Turkey in
addition to the countries used so far.
7
Table 1 gives the relation between GDP per capita and patenting per billion dollar exports (EPA).
In addition to the adjusted R
2
, three additional statistics are given as (indirect) tests of the nonlinearity
assumption.
8
The first of these (LM het.) is a Lagrange multiplier test for heteroscedasticity of the
residuals. The second (JB test) is a Jarcque-Bera test for normality of the residuals. The final test
(RESET test) is a Ramsey RESET test for the specification used.
The table generally points to the outcome that the log-linear specification is better than the linear
specification, as expected. For example, the RESET test for the two early period rejects the null
hypothesis of correct specification for the linear variant, while it does not reject the same hypothesis
for the log-linear form. Also, for the linear equations 3, 5 and 6, homoscedasticity is rejected, while
this is not the case for the log-linear counterparts 4, 6 and 8. For the period of Fagerberg’s estimations,
I find a coefficient of 2.7 on ln(EPA), whereas Fagerberg finds a value of 2.14. The two values are
slightly off, and the fact that the present value is slightly higher may be explained either by the
different sample or by the fact that I am using US patents instead of total external patents.
6
I compared data on total external patenting and data on patenting in the US to each other for the OECD
countries in the sample. There are three countries that are clear outliers in the total sample for the complete
period under consideration. These are the United States (because of a ‘home market effect’), Canada (similar)
and Japan. I adjusted the data for these three countries downwardly in such a way that the ratio between their
value for total external patenting and the mean value of that variable of Germany, the United Kingdom and
France is replicated in the US patenting data. Details available on request.
7
Compared to Fagerberg, the present sample excludes India, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, but adds Malaysia,
Philippines, Turkey, Singapore and Thailand.
8
I do not test Fagerberg’s double ln relationship.
14
Table 1. The relation between GDP per capita and patenting activity
const.
EPA
ln(EPA)
adj. R
2
LM het.
JB test
RESET test
n
1966 - 1972
1
0.209
(0.00)
5.721
(0.00)
0.51
0.87
(0.35)
1.54
(0.46)
6.28
(0.02)
28
2
5.098
(0.00)
2.060
(0.00)
0.75
0.24
(0.62)
0.45
(0.80)
1.39
(0.25)
27
1973 - 1983
3
7.475
(0.00)
0.361
(0.00)
0.53
3.78
(0.05)
1.14
(0.57)
8.08
(0.01)
28
4
6.903
(0.00)
2.716
(0.00)
0.80
0.98
(0.32)
1.96
(0.38)
0.015
(0.90)
28
1984 - 1995
5
10.265
(0.00)
0.503
(0.00)
0.44
4.79
(0.03)
0.83
(0.66)
2.53
(0.12)
29
6
11.002
(0.00)
2.460
(0.00)
0.61
2.58
(0.11)
0.27
(0.88)
0.08
(0.79)
29
1990 - 1995
7
11.404
(0.00)
0.498
(0.00)
0.35
4.45
(0.04)
1.41
(0.49)
1.51
(0.23)
29
8
12.229
(0.00)
2.315
(0.00)
0.55
1.88
(0.17)
0.63
(0.73)
1.07
(0.31)
29
Note: GDP per capita is always in levels, not logs; p-values of a two-sided t-test between brackets.
Table 2. The relation between GDP per capita and R&D intensity (total R&D)
const.
RD
ln(RD)
adj. R
2
LM het.
JB test
RESET test
n
1966 - 1972
1
6.255
(0.00)
3.015
(0.00)
0.58
0.69
(0.41)
0.53
(0.77)
0.00
(0.98)
16
2
9.899
(0.00)
2.692
(0.00)
0.55
1.06
(0.30)
0.70
(0.70)
0.84
(0.38)
16
1973 - 1983
3
8.637
(0.00)
3.228
(0.00)
0.58
0.06
(0.81)
0.45
(0.80)
1.42
(0.25)
19
4
12.366
(0.00)
3.79
(0.00)
0.64
0.33
(0.56)
0.31
(0.85)
0.00
(0.98)
19
1984 - 1995
5
7.449
(0.00)
4.319
(0.00)
0.58
0.21
(0.64)
1.89
(0.39)
5.53
(0.03)
27
6
12.970
(0.00)
5.135
(0.00)
0.67
0.09
(0.76)
9.01
(0.01)
0.00
(0.95)
27
6a
13.944
(0.00)
4.877
(0.00)
0.66
0.75
(0.39)
0.59
(0.74)
0.94
(0.35)
19
1990 - 1995
7
8.205
(0.00)
4.181
(0.00)
0.55
0.02
(0.89)
2.82
(0.24)
9.06
(0.01)
27
8
13.464
(0.00)
5.263
(0.00)
0.69
0.50
(0.48)
7.88
(0.02)
0.09
(0.77)
27
8a
14.412
(0.00)
4.996
(0.00)
0.63
2.33
(0.13)
0.98
(0.61)
1.54
(0.23)
19
Note: GDP per capita is always in levels, not logs; p-values of a two-sided t-test between brackets.
15
The values on ln(EPA) differ somewhat for the other periods. Post-1983 lower values are obtained,
with almost no difference between the period 1984 - 1995 as a whole and the last 6 years of this.
However, the difference compared to the 1973-1983 period is only small. For the period 1966 - 1973,
the value is also smaller compared to Fagerberg’s period.
Table 2 gives the same regressions for R&D intensity (RD). Here again the specification tests
generally point to the log-linear form as a better approximation of the true relationship, especially so
for the period since 1984 (RESET test). There is one crucial difference with Table 1, however, and
that is the fact that the coefficient on ln(RD) is rising strongly and monotonically over time. Because
the sample size also grows over time (especially the Asian countries do not have R&D for the two
early periods), equations 6a and 8a repeat, respectively, equations 6 and 8 for the same sample of
countries as in equation 4. The results show that although a part of the rise of the coefficient is due to
the larger sample, this does not explain the largest part of the rise.
What the results show then, is that for given levels of R&D intensity, it is easier to attain a
(relative) level of GDP per capita in the recent period than it was in the early period. This holds to a
much lesser extent for patenting. Although the argument is admittedly somewhat speculative, I suggest
that  this  result  is  a  good  illustration  of  the  nature  of  the  economic  growth  as  a  process  of
transformation that was argued above to be typical for evolutionary economics. In the early period,
R&D  and  patents  could  be  viewed  more  or less  as  different  indicators  of  the  same  process  of
technology  accumulation.  Then,  with  the  process  of  technological  catching  up  of  the  relatively
backward nations, R&D became a process that, in some countries, is increasingly aimed at imitating
foreign technology. This is why high R&D intensities now also start to arise at relatively low levels of
development. Patenting, on the other hand, remains an indicator of innovation rather than assimilation
of diffused knowledge, and hence the value of the coefficient on this variable does not decline so
much. What this shows is that catching-up by assimilating foreign technology becomes a more active
process, at least in terms of R&D, while the ultimate technological frontier remains to be a matter of (a
handful of) highly developed countries.
Table  3 re-estimates the  dynamic  specification  of  Fagerberg’s  growth  model.  The  dependent
variable is the average annual compound growth rate of GDP. The basic point about the model is the
distinction between innovation as a source of divergence and diffusion as a source of convergence that
was made above. Hence the two crucial factors in the model are innovation (as indicated by either
patents or R&D), and catch-up potential, as indicated as GDP per capita. The patent variable  is
specified as the average annual growth rate of the number of patents in the United States, R&D as the
average annual growth rate of real R&D expenditures.
9
Investment (as a fraction of GDP, average over
the period indicated) and the growth rate of real exports (annual compound growth rate) are included
as two factors influencing the realization of catch-up potential.
The model is specified with slope dummies, where the period 1984-1995 is the base period. In the
columns (1), (2) and (3) the effects for the other periods are specified as changes to the base period.
Significant p-values in these columns point to significant deviations from the coefficient values in the
base period 1984-1995. The columns (1a), (2a) and (3a) can be derived by adding up the base period
effect and the change to this for the current period, both to be found in the previous column. The p-
values given here are for tests on the joint significance of the two coefficients, i.e., for the significance
of the variable in question for the period under consideration.
9
The GDP deflator is used, and R&D expenditures are total expenditures (GERD).
16
Table 3. Estimation results for Fagerberg’s growth model
1
1a
2
2a
3
3a
constant
c 84-95
0.024
(0.12)
0.004
(0.83)
0.038
(0.00)
(D) c 73-83
0.019
(0.40)
0.043
(0.01)
0.052
(0.03)
0.056
(0.00)
-0.007
(0.56)
0.031
(0.00)
(D) c 66-72
0.030
(0.22)
0.054
(0.00)
0.051
(0.04)
0.055
(0.00)
0.011
(0.59)
0.049
(0.01)
patents
p 84-95
0.162
(0.00)
0.142
(0.00)
0.164
(0.00)
(D) p 73-83
-0.118
(0.00)
0.044
(0.02)
-0.080
(0.01)
0.062
(0.00)
-0.165
(0.00)
-0.001
(0.25)
(D) p 66-72
-0.177
(0.03)
-0.015
(0.85)
-0.167
(0.04)
-0.025
(0.74)
-0.058
(0.54)
0.106
(0.25)
investment
i 84-95
0.064
(0.22)
0.090
(0.03)
(D) i 73-83
0.034
(0.68)
0.098
(0.12)
-0.059
(0.40)
0.031
(0.57)
(D) i 66-72
0.087
(0.36)
0.151
(0.06)
0.056
(0.51)
0.146
(0.05)
catch-up potential
t 84-95
-0.114
(0.08)
-0.086
(0.10)
-0.142
(0.00)
(D) t 73-83
-0.226
(0.01)
-0.340
(0.00)
-0.213
(0.01)
-0.299
(0.00)
0.030
(0.70)
-0.112
(0.12)
(D) t 66-72
-0.305
(0.02)
-0.419
(0.00)
-0.339
(0.01)
-0.425
(0.00)
0.014
(0.91)
-0.128
(0.31)
exports
e 84-95
0.342
(0.00)
0.155
(0.08)
(D) e 73-83
-0.385
(0.11)
-0.043
(0.84)
-0.239
(0.16)
-0.084
(0.57)
(D) e 66-72
-0.291
(0.02)
0.051
(0.34)
-0.120
(0.45)
0.034
(0.80)
R&D
r 84-95
0.010
(0.56)
(D) r 73-83
0.175
(0.05)
0.185
(0.03)
(D) r 66-72
0.053
(0.56)
0.063
(0.49)
adj. R
2
0.66
0.68
0.84
n
80
79
63
p-values of a two-sided t-test between brackets.
The results generally support the two sides of technological changes. The significantly negative
signs on the GDP per capita variable (rows with coefficients t) show the relevance of the diffusion
argument. However, for  specification (1)/(1a), which is the most basic variant of the model, the
strength of this relationship diminishes over time (this trend also seemed to surface already in the
17
original Fagerberg, 1987 estimations). This also holds for specification (2)/(2a), which adds export
growth to  the explanatory variables. It does  not  hold,  however,  for specification (3)/(3a),  which
includes R&D as a technology variable alongside patents. Hence, in general, the results seem to
indicate that for the present sample of countries, catching up becomes a less and less easy way of
growing rapidly. R&D may well interact with catching up, as suggested in the comments to Tables 1
and 2 above, as indicated by the different results between models (1) and (2) on the one hand, and
model (3) on the other hand.
In model (1)/(1a), patenting (rows with coefficient p) is significant in the two last periods (with a
much higher coefficient in the very last period), but not in the early period. Thus, when catching up
(i.e., relying on diffusion) seems to become less and less easy, ‘pure’ innovation seems to become
more and more important. Model (2) confirms this result. In model (3), patenting is only significant
for the most recent period, while R&D (rows with coefficient r) is only significant for the period 1973-
1983.
Investment (rows with coefficient i) is not significant in model (1), but it becomes significant in the
most recent period when exports (rows with coefficient e) are included, as in model (2). The exports
variable is also only significant in the recent period.
Two conclusions emerge from these estimations. First, the relative importance of diffusion (leading
to convergence) and innovation (leading to divergence) differs between sub-periods of the time span
1966-1995. The slowdown of convergence since the mid-1970s seems to be related both to an increase
of the elasticity of economic growth with respect to technology (patents), and to a decrease of catch-up
potential. The second conclusion is that catching-up (assimilating technology diffusion) may have
become harder over  the period.  There are  indications that  R&D is  now an  important  aspect  of
assimilating international technology diffusion, rather than a ‘direct’ source of growth. 
10
This links up
naturally to the conclusions derived on economic growth as a transformation process from the above
‘static’ estimations.
5. Structural change and technology
That radical innovation leads to structural change and economic growth is a central hypothesis in
many evolutionary perspectives on the relation between technology and growth (see e.g., Freeman and
Soete, 1990). Obviously,  the  so-called information  and  communication  technologies (ICT) are  a
potential example of such a radical innovation in the current economy. Although the technology (in
the form of computers) was pioneered in the Second World War, it’s huge potential only became fully
obvious with two events of the 1980s. The first of these was the miniaturization that was the result of a
number  of  important  innovations  in  the  semiconductors  industry  (first  the  transistor,  then  the
integrated circuit, and finally the microchip). This led to small and cheap computers that could be
afforded by large amounts of users. The second event was the linking of computers in networks, and
the linking of these networks by existing telecommunications technologies (telephones).
11
It is now generally recognized that ICT is a radical innovation that unlocks important growth
potential for the world economy (OECD, 2000), as did other major innovations in the past (see. e.g.,
Freeman and Soete, 1997, for an historical account of other basic innovations and their impact on
economic growth). However, in the 1980s and early 1990s, mainstream economics was occupied with
Solow’s  paradox,  which  states  that  "we  see  computers  everywhere  except  in  the  statistics  on
10
See Cohen and Levinthal (1989) for a theoretical exposition of a similar argument at the firm level, and
Fagerberg (1988) or Fagerberg (1994) for related arguments on assimilating spillovers at the country level.
18
productivity growth". In other words, what Solow seemed to be pointing to was relatively rapid
structural change, but no associated effect on growth. Contributions to the literature that I would
characterize as evolutionary (most importantly, Freeman and Soete, 1990, and David, 1990) seemed to
be much less surprised by the lack of a direct relationship, and pointed to a time lag between the two
events.
The recent discussion indeed seems to point out that productivity growth has been positively
influenced by ICT (probably one of the earliest contributions pointing to such an effect is Van Meijl,
1995,  a  more  recent  contribution  is  Ten  Raa  and  Wolff,  1999;  OECD,  2000  discusses  recent
theoretical evidence for a large set of countries). However, a new paradox seems to emerge from these
discussions (see also Fagerberg, 2000). Now the issue is the apparent contrast between the small share
of ICT equipment in total investment and the large productivity increases that are associated with this.
More specifically, calculations show that the ICT content of the total capital stock must be relatively
small due to two factors: the rapid rate of depreciation of ICT equipment (computers typically have a
life span of 2-3 years at most, versus more than 10 years for most other machinery), and the small
share of ICT equipment in total investment expenditures. Applying a traditional growth accounting
methodology (which uses factor shares as weights to calculate contributions of sectors to growth)
would tend to conclude that the impact of ICT on overall growth is small (see, e.g., Oliner and Sichel,
1994).
However, using the most recent data available for the United States, which is probably the most
researched country with  respect  to  this  paradox,  one  must  conclude  that the  ICT  share in total
investment has grown rapidly over the 1990s (see also OECD, 2000). I used input-output tables for the
United  States  to  illustrate  the  argument.
12
The  tables  contain  71  commodities,  among  which  I
classified  five  as  ICT  commodities.  Three  of  these  five  are  manufactured  goods  (hardware):
"Computer and office equipment", "Audio, video and communication equipment"
13
, and "Electronic
components and accessories". The two services groups defined as ICT are "Communications, except
radio and TV" and "Computer and data processing services".
Table 4. The share of ICT goods in gross private fixed investment,
United States, 1992 and 1996, current prices
1992
1996
commodity group
Share Inv
direct (%)
Share Inv
direct (%)
Computer and office equipment
4.6
4.8
Audio, video and communication equipment
3.1
3.4
Electronic components and accessories
0.0
0.0
Communications, except radio and TV
0.6
0.5
Computer and data processing services
0.4
8.1
Total ICT commodities
8.7
16.8
Source: calculations on the Bureau of Economic Analysis input-output tables.
Table 4 shows how the share of ICT in investment is nearly doubled over the time span of four
years. Nearly 9% of total investment expenditures goes to ICT in 1992, versus 16.8% in 1996. This
11
See, e.g., Dalum, Freeman et al. (1999), for a fuller account of the economic context of the take-off of ICT.
12
Two tables were used (1992 and 1996), both taken from the Bureau of Economic Analysis’  website (February
2000). These two tables were the most recent ones available at the time of writing. I used the commodity by
commodity total requirements matrix, and treated it as the inverse Leontief matrix from regular input-output
analysis.
13
I would rather have used only a part of this group, i.e., communication equipment.
19
increase  results  almost  completely  from  an  increase  in  the  services  part  of  ICT,  which  is  a
phenomenon that has, e.g., attracted attention from Petit and Soete (2000). Note that these results
probably even understate the growth in real terms, because prices for ICT equipment have generally
been  falling,  especially  when  taking  into  account  quality  adjustment  (see,  e.g.,  Triplett,  1996).
Especially computer and data processing services were responsible for this rapid increase. The share
of this group increased twentyfold. The rapid growth of ICT inputs in investment over the recent
period seems to be in line with the argument by David (1990) that new radical technologies diffuse
slowly. David also shows that productivity gains associated with this diffusion generally lag behind
the diffusion itself.
Naturally, the increased demand for ICT goods (as illustrated for investment demand in the above
table) has led to a strong increase of the share of this sector in value added or gross production. An
important  element  of  the  total  demand  for  ‘pervasive’  technologies  is  associated with  ‘indirect’
demand,  i.e.,  derived  demand  from  intermediary  use.  For  example,  both  neoclassical  (e.g.,
Katsoulacos, 1986) and evolutionary oriented (e.g., Freeman and Soete, 1987) studies have pointed to
the importance of these indirect effects for employment studies such as or which suggest that such
indirect effects are important for generating new employment as a result of technological change. How
strong is this effect for ICT goods?
In order to answer this question, I apply a decomposition technique suggested by Los (1999). The
technique decomposes the growth rate of (gross) production in a commodity group into three different
effects. The first is the growth rate of overall final demand. This effect is similar for all commodity
groups, and hence I leave it out of my calculations. The second effect is related to changes in the
composition of final demand. Continuing the focus on ICT as an investment good, I have used the
composition of final private investment, i.e., the shares of commodity groups in the total investment
demand. This effect measures the impact of decisions of firms to substitute non-ICT goods for ICT
goods in their total investment bundle. An example would be to start using computers instead of
typewriters. The final effect is related to changes in the matrix describing intermediate demand (the
so-called inverse Leontief matrix). This effect measures changes in the embodiment of ICT goods in
non-ICT investment goods (e.g., numerically controlled lathes, electronics in cars).
14
The results are in Table 5. The first column (Qratio) gives the growth of gross production incurred
for total investment, i.e., the sum of direct and indirect effects. Numbers between brackets are ranks.
As could be expected from Table 4, some of the ICT commodity groups rank high. Computer services
is the group with the highest growth rate, electronic components ranks third. The second column gives
effect that is related to changes in the composition of investment demand (the ‘direct’ effect, using
typewriters instead of computers). The third column gives the indirect effect (associated with changes
in intermediate demand, or ‘technical coefficients’, e.g., embodying electronics in other investment
goods). What is interesting is that most of the ICT commodity groups, with the one exception of
electronic components (and to a lesser extent communications) have large direct effects, but relatively
low indirect effects (higher ranks in the second column than in the third column).
The column labeled ‘Share  Inv total’ gives the share of ICT commodity groups in total costs
incurred for investment. This column can be compared to Table 4 to see that for ICT as whole, the
14
Apart from the fact that a capital flow matrix was not available, this was done to bring out the embodiment of
ICT. Intermediary use can most readily be associated with embodiment, because it most often concerns
components that can actually be found inside the equipment. Of course this is much less obvious when related to
services.
20
total effect (direct plus indirect) is somewhat smaller than the direct effect. This shows that indirect
effects are not only relatively minor in a dynamic perspective, but also in a static measure.
15
The table provides three additional commodity groups that are characterized by high growth of
their share in total costs incurred for investment. These are included for reference. Together with the
two ICT groups electronic components and computer services, these sectors comprise the top-5 of
most rapidly growing components of total investment costs. The three additional sectors are all sectors
that grow from a small base (typically half a percent or less in total investment costs). All three of
these commodity groups are in services, and they typically score high on indirect effects rather than
direct effects (educational services scores high on both effects). Arguably, each of these commodity
groups can be viewed as a major application area of ICT commodities, pointing to interdependencies
not captured by the analysis here.
What this shows is that although ICT is by now a major component in total investment demand in
the United States, the pervasiveness of this radical innovation is limited in the sense that it does not
(yet) lead to comparably high indirect production effects. Obviously, such indirect effects may lead to
additional economic growth, or growth of employment. This suggests that the existing relationship
between ICT  and economic growth (e.g., ten Raa and Wolff, 1999)  must be largely ascribed to
externalities associated with the introduction of ICT equipment (as suggested already by Van Meijl,
1995).
Table 5. The importance of ICT goods in total (gross) production incurred for gross private
fixed investment, United States, 1992 and 1996, current prices
Ratio Q
direct
indirect
Share Inv total (%)
commodity group
1992
1996
ICT commodities
8.3
13.6
Computer and office equipment
1.75 (13)
1.15 (6)
0.99 (63)
2.8 (7)
3.1 (6)
Audio, video and communication equipment
1.66 (24)
1.07 (13)
1.01 (55)
1.7 (16) 1.8 (16)
Electronic components and accessories
2.37 (3)
1.12 (4)
1.38 (4)
2.0 (12)
3.0 (8)
Communications, except radio and TV
1.67 (18)
1.00 (30)
1.09 (12)
1.0 (30) 1.1 (27)
Computer and data processing services
8.88 (1)
5.98 (1)
0.97 (68)
0.8 (39)
4.6 (4)
Rapid growing investment components
Educational and social services
2.55 (2)
1.20 (3)
1.38 (3)
0.2 (77) 0.1 (64)
Radio and tv broadcasting
2.18 (4)
1.02 (19)
1.39 (1)
0.0 (87) 0.0 (87)
Insurance
2.01 (5)
0.95 (58)
1.39 (2)
0.4 (52) 0.5 (44)
‘RatioQ’: gross production incurred for investment, 1996 value divided by 1992 value; ‘direct’: impact of shifts
in composition of final demand investment component; ‘indirect’: impact of changes in the inverse Leontief
matrix (intermediate demand). RatioQ=direct*indirect*1.53 (1.53 is the value of total investment demand in
1996 divided by the value in 1992). ‘Share  Inv total’: share in total costs incurred for investment. Numbers
between brackets are ranks. Source: calculations on the Bureau of Economic Analysis input-output tables.
6. International Markets: Adjustment and Dynamics
The final conclusion from the brief review of evolutionary growth theory carried out above was that
dynamics of markets matter. Evolutionary economics suggests that markets do not adjust immediately
to long-run equilibrium associated with the patterns of comparative advantage of countries. In line
15
Sectors with strong indirect production effects are wholesale trade; business and professional services;
primary metals; real estate; lumber and wood, trucks. Electronic components (listed in Table 4) is also a sector
with strong indirect effects, see also below.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested