c# pdf manipulation : Add links to pdf acrobat software application cloud windows html azure class viewse-um006_-en-e47-part738

Creating graphic objects                  Chapter 17 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
471 
Each animation of an object (except the Touch animation) is counted 
as one connection. 
Each connection in the Connections property of an object that is linked 
to a tag is counted as one connection. 
Each pen configured in a Trend object is counted as one connection. 
Duplicate references of the same expression or tag connection are 
counted as the additional connections. For example, one display can 
contain up to 3000 numeric inputs, even if all numeric input objects 
refer to the same tag. 
Tip: 
Tags associated with embedded variables do not count 
towards the limit. 
Updating tag values continuously 
You can set up a numeric or string input object to show a tag’s value and 
update the value continuously. At run time, the appearance of a continuously 
updating input object changes to reflect which mode it is in. 
When the input object is showing a value from the programmable controller 
or server, it has a dotted border: 
This is called display mode. 
When a value is entered in the input object, but the value is yet to be 
downloaded, it has a solid border: 
This is called pending write mode. 
When the input object is ready to receive input, it has a solid border 
surrounded by a highlight box: 
This is called input mode (or input focus). 
At run time, when a graphic display containing input objects is opened, the 
first non-updating object in the index sequence receives focus. 
Add links to pdf acrobat - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link; add page number to pdf hyperlink
Add links to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink pdf; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
Chapter 17                  Creating graphic objects 
472 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
If all the input objects in the display are set to update continuously, none of 
the objects will receive initial focus. Instead, the operator must select an 
object to give it focus. 
After selecting an input object, the operator can upload a value or restore a 
recipe into the object. If an upload fails because of a communication error, 
the input object appears in outline form. 
To return to the input object to display mode, press ESC
Validating operator input 
To validate operator input, you can specify minimum and maximum values 
for numeric input objects. 
At run time, if the operator attempts to download a value outside the valid 
range, the input object changes color, an error message is logged to the 
Diagnostics List, and the download is canceled. 
To define the minimum and maximum, in the Connections tab of the 
Numeric Input Properties dialog box, specify a tag, expression, or number for 
each value. 
In the Displays Settings dialog box, you can select the colors input objects 
will become when operator input errors occur. For more information, see 
Setting up the run-time behavior of a graphic display on page 437
Alternati
vely, you can use the graphic Display object’s event 
BeforeInputFieldDownload, to validate input objects before downloads 
occur. For information about VBA and the Display object, see the 
FactoryTalk View Site Edition Help. 
Shortcut keys for retrieving and sending data 
An operator can use the following keys to retrieve data from and send data to 
the value table. You can re-assign these actions to other keys, or assign them 
to button objects. 
PgDn downloads the contents of all input objects that are in pending 
write mode (in the active graphic display) to the value table. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
active links in pdf; adding links to pdf document
Creating graphic objects                  Chapter 17 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
473 
Ctrl+PgDn downloads the contents of the selected input object to the 
value table. 
Enter downloads the contents of the selected input object to the value 
table 
If the graphic display is set up to use the on-screen keyboard, pressing 
Enter brings up the on-screen keyboard. 
Tip: 
To prevent an operator from using Enter to 
download values, or to open the on-screen 
keyboard, use the /E parameter with the Display 
command to open the graphic display. This turns 
off the Enter key. 
PgUp uploads all values from the value table and then displays them in 
the input objects in the graphic display. 
Ctrl+PgUp uploads a value from the value table for the selected input 
object. 
Tab moves among input objects. 
FactoryTalk View commands for retrieving and 
sending data 
An operator can use the following commands to retrieve data from and send 
data to the value table: 
Download downloads the contents of the selected input object to the 
value table. 
DownloadAll downloads the contents of all input objects that are in 
pending write mode to the value table. 
Upload uploads a value from the value table and displays it in the 
selected input object. 
UploadAll uploads all the values from the value table and displays 
them in the input objects. 
To let an operator use these commands, assign them to FactoryTalk View 
button objects in the graphic display. For more information, see the 
FactoryTalk View Site Edition Help. 
Parts of the on-screen keyboard 
You can set up graphic displays so that the operator can use an on-screen 
keyboard for input entry in recipe, string, or numeric input objects. You can 
Chapter 17                  Creating graphic objects 
474 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
configure the on-screen keyboard at the client level, display level, or input 
entry level. 
The keyboard that opens for string input and recipe objects (shown in the 
following illustration) accepts alphanumeric characters. The keypad that 
opens for numeric input objects accepts numeric characters only. 
Characters typed in the on-screen keyboard are transferred to the selected 
input object when the operator presses Update Field or Download in the 
on-screen keyboard, or presses Enter on a hardware keyboard. 
To do this 
Press 
Close the on-screen keyboard and store the new value in the input 
object for a subsequent download. 
Update Field 
For numeric and string input objects, close the on-screen keyboard 
and download the value or text the operator typed. 
For recipe objects, close the on-screen keyboard, open the Recipe 
dialog box, and insert the text the operator typed, into the Recipe 
File box. 
Download 
Close the on-
screen keyboard and discard the operator’s changes.
Cancel 
For more information about the on-screen keyboard, see Setting up the 
run-time behavior of a graphic display on page 437
Creating numeric and string display objects 
Use the Numeric Display and String Display tools 
to create 
objects an operator can use to view tag or expression data at run time. 
In the Numeric Display or String Display Properties dialog box, specify the 
tag or expression to display, and the appearance of the display object. For 
details about options in the Properties dialog box, click Help
Creating graphic objects                  Chapter 17 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
475 
Creating numeric and string input objects 
Use the Numeric Input and String Input tools 
to create objects an 
operator can use to enter data for tags that accept numeric values, or text. 
In the Numeric Input or String Input Properties dialog box, specify the tag 
that the operator is to interact with at run time, the appearance of the input 
object, and whether the object will continuously update the tag’s value.
For details about options in the Properties dialog box, click Help
Indicators show the status of processes or operations by showing different 
colors, captions, images, or options to reflect different states. 
You can create the following types of indicators, depending on the needs of 
the application: 
Multistate indicators show the current state of a process or operation 
by showing a different color, caption, or image to reflect different 
states. 
Symbol indicators show a symbol that changes to match the state of a 
process or operation. This lets the operator see the status of a process 
or operation at a glance. 
List indicators show a list of states for a process or operation, and 
highlight the current state. Each state is represented by a caption in the 
list. 
This lets the operator view the current state and also see the other 
possible states. For sequential processes, the list can inform the 
operator about what happens next. 
For details about setting up an indicator object, click Help 
in the object’s 
Properties dialog box. 
Setting up states for indicators 
Indicators change their appearance based on their states. In the States tab of 
the Properties dialog box, you can specify how the indicator will look in each 
of its different states. 
Most indicators have several states, and an error state. The error state occurs 
when the indicator is receiving invalid data. 
Creating the 
different types of 
indicators 
Chapter 17                  Creating graphic objects 
476 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
Tip: 
The List indicator has no error state. If the value of the 
Indicator tag does not match an available state, none of 
the states is highlighted. 
Set up states for an indicator object in the Connections tab of the Properties 
dialog box. 
Using the Least Significant bit to trigger states 
The Least Significant Bit (LSB
) trigger type changes the indicator’s state 
based on the position of the lowest bit in the tag’s value. Any higher bit 
positions are ignored. 
Each bit position in the tag’s value corresponds to one of the indicator’s 
states: for example, position 1 triggers state 1. 
The number of states a tag’s value can trigger depends on the tag’s data type. 
For example, a tag of type long integer can be used to change up to 33 of an 
indicator’s states (32 bit positions plus zero).
You can use a programmable controller to set these bits individually. 
Setting up connections for indicators 
To connect with a device such as a programmable controller, indicators use a 
tag or expression called the Indicator tag or expression. 
The Indicator tag is similar to a pilot light on a hard-wired panel. The tag or 
expression changes the indicator’s appear
ance for each of its states, 
providing visual feedback to the operator. For example, the Indicator tag can 
show that a process is running or stopped. 
Set up the Indicator tag or expression in the Connections tab of the Properties 
dialog box. 
Creating multistate indicators 
Use the Multistate Indicator tool 
to create an indicator that shows the 
current state of a process or operation by showing a different color, caption, 
or image for each state. 
In the Multistate Indicator Properties dialog box, specify state values for the 
multistate indicator. For details about options in the Properties dialog box, 
click Help. 
At run time, the multistate indicator shows the state whose value matches the 
Indicator tag or expression’s value.
Creating graphic objects                  Chapter 17 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
477 
Creating symbols 
Use the Symbol tool 
to create an indicator that shows a monochrome 
image that changes color to match the state of a process or operation. This 
lets the operator see the status of a process or operation at a glance. 
In the Symbol Properties dialog box, specify state values for the symbol 
indicator, and the image to be shown for each state. For details about options 
in the Properties dialog box, click Help. 
At run time, the symbol indicator shows the state whose value matches the 
Indicator tag or expression’s value.
Creating list indicators 
Use the List Indicator tool 
to create an indicator that shows a list of 
states for a process or operation, and highlights the current state. 
Each state is represented by a caption in the list. This type of indicator is 
useful to let an operator view the current state and also see the other possible 
states. For sequential processes, the list can inform the operator about what 
happens next. 
In the List Indicator Properties dialog box, specify state values for the list 
indicator. For details about options in the Properties dialog box, click Help
At run time, the list indicator highlights the state whose value matches the 
Indicator tag or expression’s value.
Gauges and graphs provide graphical representations of numeric values. 
Using gauges to show limits 
Gauges show numeric values in dial format. Gauges are useful for showing a 
value in relation to its lower and upper limits. 
For example, a temperature gauge shows the current temperature in relation 
to its minimum and maximum extremes. By looking at the position of the 
needle on the gauge (pointing left, up, or right), the operator can tell at a 
glance whether the temperature is nearer its lower or upper limit, or nearer 
the middle. 
Gauges are used instead of numeric displays when it’s important for the 
operator to recognize an abnormal condition immediately, either from far 
away (when the scale on the gauge isn’t visible), or before it is possible to 
make an exact reading on the gauge. 
Creating the 
different types of 
gauges and graphs 
Chapter 17                  Creating graphic objects 
478 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
Changing a gauge’s fill color at different thresholds
As the needle sweeps higher on a gauge, the area beneath the needle can fill 
with a color. To help the operator recognize abnormal conditions, you can set 
up a gauge to change its fill color when the tag value crosses a threshold. For 
example: 
If the temperature of an oven is lower than required for a recipe, the 
gauge can show the temperature in blue. 
If the temperature is in the correct range for the recipe, the gauge can 
show the temperature in green. 
If the temperature is higher than the recipe will accept, the gauge can 
show the temperature in red. 
If you use colored fills on a gauge, make sure enough of the fill is visible 
when an abnormal condition occurs, so that the operator can recognize the 
condition. 
Tip: Some people are color blind to red and 
green, so don’t 
rely on color alone to establish meaning. 
Using graphs to compare values 
Graphs display numeric values in bar graph format. 
Graphs are useful for comparing multiple values, or for representing the fill 
levels of tanks that suit readings on a vertical scale. 
Use graphs instead of numeric displays when it’s important for an operator to 
analyze the relationships between numeric values. 
It’s easier for the operator to see that one graph is at a lower level than the 
other, or that one graph’s fill is green and the other’s is red, than it is to 
subtract one numeric value from another. 
For example, one bar graph can show the required level of a tank of 
ingredients for a recipe, and a second bar graph can show the actual level of 
the tank. 
The first graph changes to represent the required level for each recipe, and 
the second graph changes as the actual level in the tank rises or drops. 
Changing a bar graph’s fill color at different thresholds
To help the operator recognize abnormal conditions, you can set up a graph 
to change its fill color when the tag value crosses a threshold. For example: 
Creating graphic objects                  Chapter 17 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
479 
If the level of the tank of ingredients is lower than the recipe requires, 
the graph can show the tank’s level in red.
If the level of the tank is in the current range for the recipe, the graph 
can show the level in yellow. 
If the level is higher than the level the recipe requires, the graph can 
show the level in green. 
Showing limits using scales with bar graphs 
Unlike gauges, bar graphs do not have integrated scales. 
Instead, you can show values on a bar graph using a scale and text. Scales 
consist of major ticks, represented by long lines, and minor ticks, represented 
by short lines. To indicate the values of major or minor ticks, use text 
objects. 
Creating gauges 
Use the Gauge tool 
to represent a numeric value using a needle on a 
dial. 
In the Gauge Properties dialog box, specify the maximum and minimum 
values of the gauge, and the tag or expression the gauge is connected to. For 
details about options in the Properties dialog box, click Help
At run time, the gauge indicates the value of the tag or expression in relation 
to the gauge’s minimum and maximum values.
Creating bar graphs 
Use the Bar Graph tool 
to create a graph that represents a numeric 
value by filling and emptying as the value rises and falls. 
In the Bar Graph Properties dialog box, specify the maximum and minimum 
values of the bar graph, and the tag or expression the graph is connected to. 
For details about options in the Properties dialog box, click Help
At run time, the graph shows the value of the tag or expression in relation to 
the graph’s minimum and maximum values.
Creating scales 
Use the Scale tool 
to create a scale for a bar graph. 
Chapter 17                  Creating graphic objects 
480 
Rockwell Automation Publication VIEWSE-UM006K-EN-E 
In the Scale Properties dialog box, specify the appearance of the scale. For 
details about options in the Properties dialog box, click Help
To place values on the scale as a legend, use text objects. Because the scale 
doesn’t change at run time, you don’t need to connect it to a tag.
In the FactoryTalk View Graphics editor, the term key can mean any of the 
following: 
Key animation links a graphic object or display to a keyboard key or 
mouse button, so that an operator can perform an action by pressing 
the key or mouse button. For more information, see Associating objects 
and displays with keys on page 531
The on-screen keyboard lets touch screen users type numbers or text 
in input objects without the need for a hardware keyboard. 
To make the on-screen keyboard available at run time, in the Behavior 
tab of the Display Settings dialog box, select the check box, Display 
on-screen keyboard. For details, see Setting up the run-time behavior 
of a graphic display on page 437
Keys are graphic objects you place on a display to simulate the 
functions of keyboard keys. This type of key can only be used with 
control list selectors, piloted control list selectors, display list selectors, 
and trends. 
Creating the different types of key objects 
For control list selectors, display list selectors, piloted control list selectors, 
or trends, you can create the following types of keys, depending on the needs 
of the application: 
Backspace moves the cursor back to the highlighted item. 
End moves to the bottom item of the page that is currently shown. For 
trends, pressing End resumes trend scaling and moves to the current or 
latest data in the trend. 
Enter selects the item that is currently highlighted. 
Home moves to the top item of the page that is currently shown. For 
trends, pressing Home pauses the trend and moves to the earliest data 
in the trend. 
Move left pauses the trend and scrolls to the left. 
Move right pauses the trend and scrolls to the right. 
Move down moves down one item in the list. For trends, pressing 
Move down scrolls down to display lower values on the vertical scale. 
Using key objects to 
simulate keyboard 
functions 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested