itextsharp datagridview to pdf c# : Add a link to a pdf file Library software component .net winforms asp.net mvc viralzzz0-part765

2
JO BROWN
is a Doctoral Researcher in the
Marketing Group,Aston Business
School;e-mail:brownj@aston.ac.uk
AMANDA J.BRODERICK
is a Senior Lecturer in the Marketing
Group,Aston Business School;
e-mail:a.j.broderick@aston.ac.uk
NICK LEE
is a Senior Lecturer and Research
Group Convenor of the Marketing
Group,Aston Business School;
e-mail:n.j.lee@aston.ac.uk
This research was part-funded by a
UK Academy of Marketing Research
Initiative Grant.
The authors are grateful for the
important contribution of the 
anonymous reviewers and the Editor 
of the Journal of Interactive Marketing
in improving this manuscript.
ord of mouth (WOM) communication is a major part of online con-
sumer interactions,particularly within the environment of online communi-
ties.Nevertheless,existing (offline) theory may be inappropriate to describe
online WOM and its influence on evaluation and purchase.The authors report
the results of a two-stage study aimed at investigating online WOM:a set of 
in-depth qualitative interviews followed by a social network analysis of a sin-
gle online community.Combined,the results provide strong evidence that
individuals behave as if Web sites themselves are primary “actors”in online
social networks and that online communities can act as a social proxy for indi-
vidual identification.The authors offer a conceptualization of online social 
networks which takes the Web site into account as an actor,an initial explo-
ration of the concept of a consumer–Web site relationship,and a conceptual
model of the online interaction and information evaluation process.
© 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, Inc.
JOURNALOF INTERACTIVE MARKETING VOLUME 21 / NUMBER 3 / SUMMER2007
PublishedonlineinWileyInterScience(www.interscience.wiley.com).DOI:10.1002/dir.20082
JO BROWN,AMANDA J.BRODERICK,AND NICK LEE
WORD OF MOUTH
COMMUNICATION WITHIN
ONLINE COMMUNITIES:
CONCEPTUALIZING THE ONLINE
SOCIALNETWORK
W
Add a link to a pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links to pdf in acrobat; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Add a link to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add page number to pdf hyperlink; adding links to pdf
WORD OF MOUTH COMMUNICATION WITHIN ONLINE COMMUNITIES
3
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
INTRODUCTION
The word of mouth (WOM) industry is experiencing
massive growth—since 2004 the Word of Mouth
Marketing Association (WOMMA) has grown from
3to 350 corporate members (WOMMA, 2007). This
growth is particularly evident in online and social
networking media. Research estimates that while
90% of WOM conversations take place offline (Keller
& Berry, 2006), just 15% of consumers account for one
third of WOM conversations in America, and those
“Conversation Catalysts” rely heavily on the Internet
as a resource for the information they pass along to
their family and friends (Keller Fay, 2006).
Existing interpersonal communication theories may be
inappropriate to describe onlineWOM behavior, since
they have tended to focus on face-to-face interaction in
which the communicators are in close proximity and
can draw upon a wealth of social context cues (Knapp &
Daly, 2002). However, research focusing on the social-
emotional nature of computer-mediated communication
(e.g., Lea & Spears, 1995; Parks & Floyd, 1996; Walther,
1992, 1996; Walther, Anderson, & Park, 1994), based on
principles in social cognition and interpersonal rela-
tionship development from social psychology, suggest
that given enough time, individuals can create fully
formed impressions of others based solely on the lin-
guistic content of written electronic messages. It 
is imperative that marketers understand how these
impressions affect the assessment and use of WOM
information about products, brands, and firms, and con-
sequential consumer behavior both online and offline.
Both scholars and practitioners of marketing are 
particularly interested in WOM communication be-
havior in the context of online communities because of
the extraordinary popularity, growth, and influence 
of such communities. For instance, according to
ComScore Media Metrix, MySpace boasts more than
100 million member profiles, the site registers 13 mil-
lion hits per day, and more than 3 million artists and
bands use it to promote albums and engage fans.
Google Inc. recently agreed to provide at least $900
million in advertising revenue over 31
2
years to News
Corp. for the right to broker advertising that appears
on MySpace and other sites (Vara, 2006).
Online communities form when enough people carry
on computer-mediated nonprivate discussions long
enough, with sufficient human feeling, to develop
what are considered “social relationships” with other
online participants (Rheingold, 1993). These commu-
nities are fluid and flexible, and may be based on a
wide range of cultural interests and social affiliations.
Consumption-related online communities are those net-
works of people whose online interactions are based
upon shared enthusiasm for, and knowledge of,a spe-
cific consumption activity or related group of activi-
ties (Kozinets, 1999). Examples include members of
an online forum that share knowledge and experi-
ences of a musical instrument, or readers of and con-
tributors to an online bulletin board devoted to a 
particular novelist.
Consumption-related online communities essentially
represent WOM networks, where individuals with an
interest in a product category interact for information
such as purchase advice, to affiliate with other like-
minded individuals, or to participate in complaint or
compliment interactions (Cothrel, 2000; Kozinets,
1999; Hoffman & Novak, 1996). While it can be argued
that the WOM communication going on within these
online communities has limited social presence in the
traditional sense, these communities provide informa-
tion and social support in both specialized and broadly
based relationships, and are becoming an important
supplement to social and consumption behavior
(Wellman, Salaff, Dimitrova, & Garton, 1996). One
study, for example, cited 84% of Internet users having
contacted at least one online community (CyberAtlas,
2001). The popularity of these emerging consumption-
focused online communities, and the WOM communi-
cation going on within them, highlights a need for
increasing scholarly attention to be paid to online
WOM communication.
To gain new insights in this important area, this
exploratory study uses a social network perspective to
examine, in an online context, three key influences on
the evaluation of marketing information that may
explain how WOM influences consumers’decision mak-
ing and attitude formation: tie strength, homophily, and
source credibility. Thus the study makes a theoretical
contribution in three primary ways. First, a wide-
ranging theoretical review reveals how the process of
WOM communication between individuals is likely to
differ in an online context. Second, the results of the
field research (consisting of in-depth qualitative inter-
views followed by a social network analysis of an online
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
clickable pdf links; pdf link to email
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; active links in pdf
4
JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING
community) provide strong evidence that individuals
relate to Web sites as if they are primary actors in the
social network and that online communities can, there-
fore, act as a social proxy for individual identification.
This extends previous models of online social interac-
tion and shows how online WOM has its own unique
benefits and drawbacks. Third, a conceptualization of
online social networks is presented, as well as a theo-
retical framework of the online interaction and infor-
mation evaluation process, which serves as an agenda
for future research into the area.
CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS
Word of Mouth Communication
WOM is a consumer-dominated channel of marketing
communication where the sender is independent of the
market. It is therefore perceived to be more reliable,
credible, and trustworthy by consumers compared to
firm-initiated communications (Schiffman & Kanuk,
1995; Arndt, 1967). Traditional communications theory
considers WOM as having a powerful influence on
behavior, especially on consumers’information search,
evaluation, and subsequent decision making (Cox,
1963; Brown & Reingen, 1987; Money, Gilly, &
Graham, 1998; G. Silverman, 2001). It provides infor-
mation concerning product performance and the social
and psychological consequences of the purchase deci-
sion (Cox, 1963). Offline, WOM can convert lower order
cognition and affect into higher order cognition and
effect, subsequently leading to committed behaviors
(Bristor, 1990). It is the credibility of WOM that, when
combined with the premise that a receiver will be more
involved in a WOM exchange than in an advertise-
ment, lends itself to the formation of such higher order
beliefs and cognitions. Through multiple exchanges,
one WOM message can reach and potentially influence
many receivers (Lau& Ng, 2001). The outcome of the
interpersonal exchanges are provision of, and/or access
to, consumption-related information that holds some
“informational value” over and above the formal adver-
tising messages provided by the company and that
holds influence over the individual’s decision making.
Social network analysis has been used to study WOM
behavior because its unit of analysis is the exchange
of (tangible and intangible) resources between social
actors (Brown & Reingen, 1987; Bansal & Voyer, 2000)
and it looks at how exchanges between pairs build
into networks (Wellman & Berkowitz, 1998). Each
kind of resource exchange is considered a social
exchange relation, and individuals who maintain the
relation are said to maintain a tie. Social network the-
orists hold that individual, group, and organizational
behavior is affected more by the kinds of ties and 
networks in which actors are involved than by the
individual attributes of the actors themselves
(Haythornthwaite, 1999).
Tie Strength
Little attention has been paid to the impact of social
structures on WOM transmission or its relational
form (e.g., Brown & Reingen, 1987; Anderson, 1998;
Bansal & Voyer, 2000). Yet the properties of the 
linkage between pairs of communicators that exist
independently of specific contents are critical to an
understanding of the process of WOM (Knoke &
Kuklinski, 1982; Brown & Reingen, 1987). All WOM
communication takes place within a social relation-
ship that may be categorized according to the close-
ness of the relationship between information seeker
and the source, represented by the construct tie
strength (Money, Gilly, & Graham, 1998; Duhan,
Johnson, Wilcox, & Harrel, 1997; Bristor, 1990). Tie
strength is “a multidimensional construct that repre-
sents the strength of the dyadic interpersonal relation-
shipsin the context of social networks” (Money, Gilly, &
Graham, 1998, p.79) and includes closeness, intimacy,
support, and association (Frenzen & Davis, 1990).
The strength of the tie may range from strong to weak
depending on the number and types of resources they
exchange, the frequency of exchanges, and the inti-
macy of the exchanges between them (Marsden &
Campbell, 1984). Strong ties are characterized by 
“(a) a sense that the relationship is intimate and
special, with a voluntary investment in the tie and a
desire for companionship with the partner; (b) an
interest in frequent interactions in multiple contexts;
and (c) a sense of mutuality of the relationship, with
the partner’s needs known and supported” (Walker,
Wasserman, & Wellman, 1994, p.57).
Research suggests that tie strength affects information
flows. Individuals in a strong tie relationship tend to
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
pdf link to specific page; adding links to pdf in preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add email link to pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
interact more frequently and exchange more informa-
tion, compared to those in a weak tie relationship
(Brown & Reingen, 1987). Thus, it would seem that con-
sumers would contribute more WOM to strong than
weak tie relational partners. In addition, strong ties
bear greater influence on the receiver’s behavior than
weaker ties due to the frequency and perceived impor-
tance of social contact among strong-tie individuals
(e.g., Bansal & Voyer, 2000). Evidence suggests that a
strong tie between a dyad is perceived by dyad mem-
bers to have a positive influence on their decision
making (Leonard-Barton, 1985).
When exploring the formation of relationships between
social actors in online communities of consumption, and
in particular regarding the place of the online commu-
nity/Web site itself within the social network, it may be
useful to draw upon the consumer-brand relationship
literature (Blackston, 1992, 1993; Hess, 1996; Moriarty,
Gronstedt, & Duncan, 1996; Palmer, 1996; Fournier,
1998), which itself draws upon Social Exchange Theory
to explain how consumers relate to brands. As Palmer
(1996, p. 253–4) argues, “individuals have an underly-
ing need for an emotional bond with high-involvement
products that they buy. Brand development and rela-
tionship development are complementary and substi-
tutable strategies toward this bonding.” Fournier (1998,
p. 345) states that for “the brand to serve as legitimate
relationship partner, it must surpass the personifica-
tion qualification and actually behave as an active,
contributing member of the dyad. Marketing actions
conducted under the rubric of interactive and address-
able communications qualify the brand as a reciprocat-
ing partner.” Fournier (1998) identifies six key
constructs that suggest strong consumer-brand rela-
tionships: love and passion, self-connection, interdepen-
dence, commitment, intimacy, and brand partner
quality. Indeed, the study of offline and online brand
communities, such as the Harley Owners Group
(Schouten & McAlexander, 1995), Star Wars fans
(Brown, Kozinets, & Sherry, 2003) and even coffee
(Kozinets, 2002) has shown that the value gained by the
members stems not from the brand itself, but from 
the social links formed as a result of using the brand.
The idea of using the consumer-brand relationship con-
cept to describe the consumer-online community rela-
tionship has considerable face validity. Both brands and
consumption-focused online community Web sites share
the characteristics of being inanimate, nebulous con-
structions concerning a market offering from a com-
pany. It is generally accepted within the literature that
brands can develop personalities and that consumers
can have some kind of “relationship” with brands
(Franz-Rudolf, Langner, Schmitt, & Geus, 2006;
Aggarwal, 2004). It is a logical extension that such con-
cepts may also be applicable to Web sites as well.
However, Patterson and O’Malley (2006) point out that
the consumer-brand relationship is one, albeit powerful,
metaphor (the interpersonal relationship metaphor)
built on the employment of another (the brand as per-
sonality metaphor). As such, the metaphor is subject to
certain limitations (Arndt, 1985) and may not be uni-
versally relevant or appropriate. Nevertheless, it is a
logical extension of the concept of a brand personality
that if brands (or indeed Web sites) have personalities,
we can treat them as people for many purposes; if they
are people, then we can have relationships with them.
Homophily
Related to, but conceptually distinct from, tie
strength is the construct of homophily (Brown &
Reingen, 1987). Homophily explains group compo-
sition in terms of the similarity of members’chara-
cteristics: the extent to which pairs of individuals 
are similar in terms of certain attributes, such as 
age, gender, education, or lifestyle (Rogers, 1983).
Homophily limits people’s social worlds in a way that
has powerful implications for the information they
receive, the attitudes they form, and the interactions
they experience (McPherson & Smith-Lovin, 1987).
The similarity of individuals predisposes them toward
a greater level of interpersonal attraction, trust, and
understanding than would be expected among dis-
similar individuals (Ruef, Aldrich, & Carter, 2003).
Thus, individuals tend to affiliate with others who
share similar interests or who are in a similar situa-
tion (Schacter, 1959). The stronger the social tie con-
necting two individuals, the more similar they tend
tobe (McPherson & Smith-Lovin, 1987; Granovetter,
1973). Tie strength, therefore, increases with
homophily. In contrast, heterophilous communication
(i.e., nonsimilar individuals such as acquaintances)
can facilitate the flow of information between diverse
segments of a social system (Rogers, 1983).
WORD OF MOUTH COMMUNICATION WITHIN ONLINE COMMUNITIES
5
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add hyperlink to pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
pdf hyperlink; add links to pdf in preview
6
JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING
Computer-Mediated Communication
The basis of tie strength and homophily—the degree
to which individuals regard each other as close and
similar—is identity, which is dependent on social
andcontextual cues. In an offline environment, the
assessment of homophily is based on cues such as
gender, age, social and professional status, and eth-
nicity, but in an online environment, these cues may
be “filtered out,” that is, missing, reduced, camou-
flaged, or even intentionally falsified. Early studies
based on the cues-filtered-out model of computer-
mediated communication (CMC) suggested that CMC
restricted communication (Hiltz, Johnson, & Turoff,
1986), offered lower levels of satisfaction, and could
be less productive than face-to-face interaction
(Kiesler & Sproull, 1992; Siegel, Dubrovsky, Kiesler, &
McGuire, 1986). The reduction of social context cues
such as verbal nuances (e.g., gaze, body language),
physical context (e.g., meeting sites, seating arrange-
ments), and observable information about social char-
acteristics (e.g., age, gender, race), combined with the
disinhibition that can result from anonymity, were
used to explain both high levels of anti-social and
aggressive exchanges (Kiesler, Zubrow, Moses, &
Geller, 1985; Siegel Dubrovsky, Kiesler, & McGuire,
1986), and a greater sense of status equalization
(Sproull & Kiesler, 1986). However, such research is
not consistent with the contemporary growth in
online communities that are expressly focused on
social bonding and communicating among individu-
als, such as MySpace. More recent work based on
Walther’s (1992) Social Information Processing model
has found positive, socially rich, relational behavior
in online communities and the development of both
friendly and romantic relationships (Walther, 1992,
1996; Tidwell & Walther, 2002; Kraut, Patterson,
Lundmark, Kiesler, Mukopadhyay, & Scherlis, 1998;
Utz, 2000).
Despite limited nonverbal cues, it is clear that social
resources such as emotional support, companionship,
and a sense of belonging are visibly exchanged online
between individuals who do not know each other in the
offline environment (Haythornthwaite, 1999). Kumar
and Benbasat (2002, p. 1) propose a new construct of
Para-Social Presence, the perceptual illusion of non-
mediation, defined as “the extent to which a medium
facilitates a sense of understanding, connection, invo-
lvement and interaction among participating social
entities.” Clearly, alternative cues or proxies for indi-
vidual information are being used. Without identity
information, determining online homophily will be sig-
nificantly different to the online individual determi-
nant of the construct. Additionally, the bases for
determining homophily may be different in that other
psychological comparisons of similarity, such as an
inclusive mind-set (Blanton, 2001) or shared group
identity (Brewer & Weber, 1991), may come into play
rather than on shared social characteristics such as
gender and socioeconomic status (Wellman, Salaff,
Dimitrova, & Garton, 1996; Kollock & Smith, 1996).
The restriction of identity information outlined above,
together with alternative (and potentially confusing
or misunderstood) contextual cues, will also impact on
the interpretation of the online content itself. The
evaluation of that content, in terms of its credibility,
is a fundamental component of the value the WOM
network has for its actors in that the perceived credi-
bility of the communication source may influence the
final judgment of the actor in the network (Grewal,
Gotlieb, & Marmorstein, 1994).
Source Credibility
Source credibility theory identifies source expertise and
source bias as elements that affect the credibility of an
information source (Buda & Zhang, 2000; Birnbaum &
Stegner, 1979). Source expertise refers to the perceived
competence of the source providing the information.
Source bias, also conceptualized as source trustworthi-
ness, refers to the possible bias/incentives that may be
reflected in the source’s information (Eagly & Chaiken,
1993; Perloff, 1993; DeZoort, Hermanson, & Houston,
1993). Asource should be perceived as more credible
when it (1) possesses greater expertise and (2) is less
prone to bias.
Proponents of the elaboration likelihood model (cogni-
tive response theory) maintain that persuasion is a
joint function of the recipients’ ’ involvement in the
outcome and the communicator’s credibility (Hass,
1981). Communicators with positive attributes (which
can be evaluated in terms of homophily and tie
strength) are assumed to be more persuasive than
communicators with less positive attributes (Eagley
& Chaiken, 1993). Attribution theory suggests that
when consumers are presented with a message, they
will make an effort to assess whether the message
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
adding links to pdf in preview; clickable links in pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Add necessary references: using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic' or any other
add link to pdf acrobat; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
provides an accurate representation. If the message
lacks in credibility, it will be discounted and will not
be very persuasive (Buda, 2003; Kelly, 1967, 1972).
However, behavioral influences are higher when the
credibility of the source is high than when it is low
(e.g., Dholakia & Sternthal, 1977; Bansal & Voyer,
2000).
Whether or not a message sender is perceived as an
“expert” (and thus of high credibility) is determined
from an evaluation of the knowledge that person
holds (Gotlieb & Sarel, 1991), as well as if—by virtue
of his or her occupation, social training or experi-
ence—that person is in a unique position (Schiffman &
Kanuk, 1995). However, in the online environment,
such evaluations must be made from the relatively
impersonal text-based resource exchange provided
byactors in the site network. Knowledge of the indi-
vidual’s attributes and background is limited, and
evaluation will take place in a reduced- or altered-
cues environment.
Personshighlyrankedinexpertisearealsolikelytopos-
sessgreaterawarenessandknowledgeaboutamarket
andproductswithinit(Mitchell&Dacin,1996),with
communicationreceiversrelyingonthatexpert’sknowl-
edge for their purchase decision. These expert t indi-
viduals, often n identified d as opinion leaders (Katz &
Lazarsfeld,1955),acceleratethediffusionofinformation.
Reputationisthuskeytoallocatingavaluetoinforma-
tion(e.g.,Tadelis,2002)andalthoughsomecommunities
employonlinereputationmechanisms(Dellarocas,2003)
orprovideexplicitinformationaboutcontributors(e.g.,
postinghistory,photograph,location,feedbackprofiles),
thesetendtobeeithermoderatedbythebrandowner
(e.g.,www.bbc.co.uk;www.tivocommunity.com), trans-
action-focused (e.g., www.ebay.com), or paid opinion
forums (e.g., , www.epinions.com). Such h sites s are e not
strictlyrepresentativeofonlineWOM,keycharacteris-
ticsofwhichincludethatcommunitiesareconsumer-
moderatedandleisure-focused,wheremembersarenot
paidfortheircontributions.Thisclearlydemarksonline
WOM from other r brand-focused d communications
onlineinasimilarmannertoofflineWOMcompared
withotherofflinebrandcommunications.
In such online WOM situations, the reduced or
altered contextual cues and identity information
mediate the ability to identify and recognize opinion
leaders. Readers of online community postings are
thus faced with the task of evaluating the opinions of
complete strangers. Aproxy for individual credibility
must, therefore, be identified.
Similarly, proxies for evaluating trustworthiness will
need to be determined online. Customers pay more
attention to WOM because it is perceived as credible,
custom tailored, and generated by people having no
self-interest in pushing a product (e.g., Arndt, 1967; 
G. Silverman, 1997). Individual evaluation of WOM
trustworthiness will be determined in terms of the
receiver’s belief that the sender’s opinions are unbiased
(Gotlieb & Sarel, 1991). Offline, perceptions of trust-
worthiness develop from the social relations the actors
participate in. The social network may also determine
trustworthiness online, but without the ability to
evaluatean individual, other cues may be emphasized.
In summary, how WOM exchanges affect subsequent
consumer behavior is shaped by three key influences:
tie strength, homophily, and source credibility.
Existing theory is based on face-to-face WOM trans-
mission. Online, identity may be difficult to ascertain,
which will impact perceptions of online tie strength,
homophily, and source credibility. To determine the
flow and nature of WOM in online communities, it is
critical to (a) explore whether and how the constructs
of tie strength, homophily, and source credibility dif-
fer to their offline counterparts and (b) to ascertain
the impact on the nomological net of relations
between these constructs.
METHOD
Study 1 Sampling and 
Data Collection
Study 1 comprised a qualitative interview study,
designed to explore the potential differences in social
network constructs in an online environment. Our
approach was inspired by Strauss’s (e.g., Strauss &
Corbin, 1998) ideas on grounded methodology, which
recommend that at each stage of research, some appre-
ciation from a prior stage (either theoretical or field-
based) be incorporated. We did not a priori specify a
sample size, but ultimately interviewed 30 respondents
from a wide range of backgrounds and demographic
segments. Their ages ranged from 22 to 43, and there
were 11 females and 19 males. Education varied from
WORD OF MOUTH COMMUNICATION WITHIN ONLINE COMMUNITIES
7
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
8
JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING
high school up to postgraduate degrees, and respondents
had occupations ranging from students, administrators,
technical specialists, and professionals to high-level
managers. While the demographic spread of respon-
dents was large, the sample was nevertheless selected
along purposive lines with an attempt to concentrate on
high users of the Internet as “key informants” (cf. G.
Silverman 2001). Furthermore, our theory does not
place a significant emphasis on individual character-
istics (such as demographics), and thus—in keeping
with our theory discovery aims—we attempted to
achieve a wide spread to enhance our ability to gen-
erate large amounts of information (cf. Zaltman,
Lemasters, & Heffring, 1982). Respondents were
solicited through means of personal contact in the
first instance; however, snowballing was also used to
expand the sample and generate additional contacts.
In order to ensure the appropriateness of partici-
pants, early in each interview a number of screening
questions were asked to ensure that each respondent
understood the idea of online communities and was a
regular user of such Web sites.
The interviews lasted between 45 and 90 minutes,
and all were taped without objection. An interview
guide, developed from existing theory and inductive
reasoning combined with discussions between the
authors and other expert assessors, was used to
ensure consistency across the multiple interviews.
In order to further enhance comparability, all inter-
views were conducted by a single author. While the
interviews were carried out in a semi-structured
manner, constant probing was able to uncover rich
insight and unexpected examples. Respondents were
asked to relate and describe their interactions with
various online community sites on the Internet, as
well as trying to categorize them into groupings
along what they felt were significant variables of dif-
ference. The aim was to discover how consumers
interact on different communities, and the key fac-
tors impacting on their behavior and interactions.
While a range of interactions was investigated empir-
ically,the focus of the study was to develop theory
based on social exchanges operating solely in an
online environment. These exchanges may consist of
receiving and/or sending WOM communication to
online communities such as discussion boards and
chat rooms where the relationship is not pursued
offline.
Study 2 Sampling and Data
Collection
In order to more closely examine some of the key issues
that had emerged from the qualitative interviews, we
performed a detailed examination of a single online
social network. Study 2 took a case study approach to
explore how a social network operates online and the
dimensionality of the social network constructs evident.
Subsequent to the interview period, a census of com-
puter texts of one online community was collected over
a period of three months (May–July 2004). In order to
select an appropriate community, we looked totheoret-
ical criteria (e.g., Strauss & Corbin, 1998). Inparticular,
the community Web site www.buffy-boards.com demon-
strated a consumption-related online community of an
experiential product, and as a result is highly appropri-
ate for our purposes. The online community operates for
fans of the TV programs Buffy the Vampire Slayer and
Angel. Even though both series have ended, there is still
an extremely active community operating around these
programs and the relevant merchandise (e.g., DVDs,
memorabilia, and the like). This type of community
shares characteristics with many of the communities
that were referred to by respondents in Study 1.
While reliable demographic characteristics of the
community members were not available, we expect
them to be broadly similar to those studied in Study 1.
Specifically, many commentators have referred to the
broad demographic appeal of Buffy the Vampire
Slayer, for example, “Buffy attracted a broad demo-
graphic. It was a show that children, their teenage
siblings, and their parents could watch” (Johnson,
2003). Users of the discussion board have to register
and Web monikers are used to anonymously identify
individual postings and contributors. The computer
texts are structured into threads (a specific subject
area posted by an individual contributor to initiate 
an online communication) and postings (individual
online communications within a thread). We identi-
fied 112 discussion threads, with 1,151 postings by
106 contributors. The contributors within the 3-
month period correspond to 54% of total registered
users.
Study 1 Analysis Approach
To ensure rigor in analysis, a number of methods
wereemployed (Miles & Huberman, 1994). Data were
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
transcribed verbatim as soon as possible and without
waiting until all interviews were completed
(D. Silverman, 2000). QSR NVIVO was utilized to
organize and code the transcripts following a meaning
condensation and categorization approach (Kvale,
1996). In keeping with the approach of the research,
some prior structure was set down, but emergent
themes were free to evolve “up” from the data, which
resulted in a coding strategy somewhere between
either wholly inductive or completely confirmatory.
This approach was adopted as prior theoretical work
had already suggested a number of key constructs
(e.g., homophily and tie strength), and thus coding at
first proceeded using these as preliminary structuring
devices. However, we were cautious not to pre-empt
new themes and concepts from emerging, and espe-
cially vigilant not to prejudice the development of the
actual “content” of previously suggested constructs. A
single coder with constant constructive discussion of
themes as they arose was utilized, which is essentially
a peer evaluation–style process such as that sug-
gested by Miles and Huberman (1994). Asecond author
then coded two of the interview transcripts and com-
pared results. An acceptable 87% inter-judge reliabil-
ity index was calculated (Perreault & Leigh, 1989). A
combination of within-case and cross-case analysis
techniques was employed (Miles & Huberman, 1994).
The cross-case analysis conceptually ordered data,
rather than compared and contrasted respondent
characteristics (say, male and female), since our theory
is at this stage a general one.
Study 2 Analysis Approach
We approached the second stage of the analysis in
sequential fashion with the first, with the primary
aim of exploring key aspects of the interview findings.
However, we did not rule out re-approaching the inter-
viewdata in light of emergent findings from the net-
work analysis. In this way we reaped some of the 
benefits of an iterative or cyclical approach to quali-
tative analysis (Dey, 2004).
Asocial network analysis of the interactions between
users, discussion threads, and individual postings
was undertaken. Specifically, we analyzed two main
aspects of the network: a) the content of each piece of
communication, and b) the location and relationship 
of each piece of communication in relation to the 
others in the network (i.e., the structure of the net-
work). The content of the communications was ana-
lyzed with a generally similar approach as Study 1,
although we based our analysis primarily on the find-
ings of Study 1 rather than existing theory. To deter-
mine the structure of the network, we coded posts
according to which thread they belonged to, who
started the thread, who the poster was, and who they
were talking to. For example, the code [T1 (5,0), (1,5)]
codes thread 1 (ordered by date) as T1, the first brack-
eted numbers refer to the user who started the thread
and who they were speaking to (5,0), and the second
bracketed numbers (1,5) refer to the user who has
written the post (user 1) directed to user 5 (the recip-
ient of the post). When 0 is used, this refers to a post
being directed to the community as a whole, rather
than a specific individual. Frequency of total posting
(usage), frequency of communication between individ-
ual and site, and communication between individual
and individual is thus addressed.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
Conceptualizing Social Networks
In the following section, we discuss the findings from
the two studies on the major differences and similari-
ties in three key constructs driving a social relationship
on- and offline. Table 1 summarizes the conceptualiza-
tions of offline and online homophily, tie strength, and
source credibility.
Online Homophily. . Traditional notions of homophily
focus on the congruence between the characteristics
of the actors in a social network, based on individual
attributes such as gender, age, and education
(Schacter, 1959; Ruef, Aldrich, & Carter, 2003).
Both Studies 1 and 2 identified homophilous social
relations as germane in the online environment.
However, our findings suggest that homophily of an
interpersonal relationship, as based on an evaluation
of individual characteristics, is not particularly rele-
vant in an online context. Rather, the findings sug-
gest that it is notions of shared group interests and
group mind-set, evaluated at the level of the Web site
itself, which drive online homophily.
In Study 1, respondents commonly mentioned themes
which appeared to display some kind of social affiliation
WORD OF MOUTH COMMUNICATION WITHIN ONLINE COMMUNITIES
9
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
10
JOURNAL OF INTERACTIVE MARKETING
with Web sites whose content, rather than the char-
acteristics of the individual members, demonstrated a
homophily of interests with the user. Here, content
refers to the actual textual content(i.e., the informa-
tion content) of the Web site, rather than who actually
provides that information (i.e., the individual users).
One interviewee typified this with the comment “[the
Web site] tries to use the technology as it should be
used, to help you get more out of your interest area.”
Both studies demonstrated that online homophily is
almost entirely independent of interpersonal factors,
such as an evaluation of individual age and socio-
economic class, traditionally associated with homophily.
Instead, other means of evaluating homophily, at the
level of the Web site, took precedence. The dominant
dimension of online homophily identified in Study 1
was shared group interests. A A match between the
information seeker’s own interests and the content
provided by the Web site was discussed by 90% of our
respondents: “My interests are reflected in my use of
it...if I want anything, it’s there,”or “It feels more
relevant and it is more . . . personal to me.”Anumber
of interview respondents also commented that a
broad range of information was important. This
seemed to tap into the idea of “serendipitous” infor-
mation. More specifically, sites with a broad range of
relevant content were seen as more likely to introduce
unexpected things of interest, feeding into the idea
that the user and Web site had a “shared interest” of
some kind. For example, “With these [sites] I might
find out about lots of other different things I was
interested in.” Similar but distinct was the idea that
sites which were less task-specific appeared more
homophilous. For example, task-specific sites tended
to be interacted with in a very focused manner—
“when I go to [Web site] and am looking for a specific
CD”—whereas more general sites were used in a
broader fashion, almost like talking to a “friend,” as
these comments from two respondents show: “If I
want to be entertained, if I’ve got some time...and
Idon’t have anything to do, then I know that I will be
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
OFFLINE
ONLINE
Tie Strength
Definition
The intensity of a social relation 
The intensity of an interactive and personalized
between pairs of individuals
relationship between an individual and a Web site
Dimensions
Importance attached to social relation
Online Web site reciprocity
Frequency of social contact
Emotional Web site closeness
Type of social relation
Homophily
Definition
The degree to which pairs of individuals 
The congruence between a user’s psychological
are similar in terms of certain attributes
attributes and Web site content
Dimensions
Matched demographic/lifestyle attributes
Shared group interests
Shared mindset
Source Credibility
Definition
Perceived competence of the individual 
Perceived competence of the Web site
source providing information
and its membership
Dimensions
Source bias (trustworthiness)
Site trustworthiness
Source expertise
Actors’expertise
TABLE 1
A Comparison Between Offline and Online Social Network Constructs
able to find an issue that engages me that I can read
about,” and “I go for ‘Notes and Queries’and tend to
get pulled into [debates] that sort of thing, because
you happen to be on the site and it’s there.” Again, it
seems that this lack of specificity influences a greater
feeling of “shared interests.”
Analysis of Study 2 identified a further dimension of
online homophily based on psychological similarity—
group mind-set. Group mind-set, textual expressions
of a like-minded group of people, is illustrated in the
online community through gratifications and collec-
tive postings. Gratifications are postings thanking
other contributors, showing appreciation and generally
supporting the consensus opinion. For example, T17
(58,0), (35,58): “Thank you very much. Very interest-
ing indeed”; T97 (87,0), (86,87): “Very cool, thanks for
posting this.” 42% of posts received a gratifying post
in response, with 44% of the users within the sample
engaging in gratifying behavior. Collective postings
refer to the online community as a group. The use of
collective words such as “our,” “we,” and “us” in the
context of group feelings and opinions suggests mem-
bers perceive the community as a unit that thinks
and feels in a convergent way. For example, T52
(87,0), (88,87): “We have to remember that even
though we may be mad at her we all still love her!”
Online Tie Strength. Moving to the concept of tie
strength, our results clearly suggest that the idea of
individual-to-individual social ties is less relevant inan
online environment than an offline one. None of f our
respondents explicitly mentioned any type of “interper-
sonal relationship” between themselves as an informa-
tion seeker and another individual as the information
source, as traditional theorists have conceptualized tie
strength (e.g., Money, Gilly, & Graham, 1998; Frenzen
& Davis, 1990). Rather, subjects appeared to use Web
sites themselves as proxies for individuals. Thus, tie
strength was developed between an information seeker
and an information source as offline theory suggests,
but online the information “source” was a Web site, not
an individual, which was discussed in some way by
80% of our interviewees in Study 1. One respondent
summarized her sense of intimacy with Web sites with
this quote regarding how she categorized different
types of online community sites: “I’ve categorized 
them really as my closeness to them...personally, 
the experience I have of them is that I feel very close to
these three [Web sites].”
Study 1 identified “interaction” or Web site recipro-
city as the most commonly mentioned aspect of tie
strength, with 60% of respondents commenting on
this. Interaction here was described by respondents
as specifically being driven by the Web site itself—not
between individual users. For example, “There’s more
interaction between [the Web site] and me.” This
could be influenced by regular emails and updates
automatically generated by a Web site. Overall, it
seemed that respondents wanted to develop these
close “relationships” with online community Web
sites, with one particularly illustrative comment
being “I like the recommendations ’cos it makes me
feel like they know me.”
In addition, Study 2 provided evidence of a Web site
relationship through both the substantial number of
collective rather than individual postings (65%)
together with the “humanization” attributed to the Web
site and commented on by several posters, for example,
T23 (35,0), “You always understand me” (emphasis
added); and T79 (56,0), “Great minds! We’re always on
the same wavelength here. I’ve come home!”
Source Credibility. . Both studies demonstrated
that Web site factors again assumed a predominant
place in individuals’evaluation of source credibility,
and thus the Web site can be seen as being an actor in
the social networking process. However, users also
appeared to spend at least some effort on attempting
to evaluate individuals who provided information to
the Web site, as well as the Web site itself. In Study 2,
individuals were identified as experts on the basis of
their knowledge (dissemination of hard to find infor-
mation and use of Web site–specific language per-
ceived as “in the know”) and their opinions actively
sought. For example, T52 (45,23), “You know your
stuff Bangal, thanks for update!”; T17 (58,0), (58,35),
“Lol. . .that’s right (35), living and breathing the
Jossverse is the only way to go!:P.” Nevertheless, eval-
uations of individual sources appeared to be based on
factors specific to the online context, which in turn
were strongly based on the Web site and content itself
rather than the individual—something of a circular
relationship.
WORD OF MOUTH COMMUNICATION WITHIN ONLINE COMMUNITIES
11
Journal of Interactive Marketing g DOI:10.1002/dir
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested