using pdfdocument c# : Clickable pdf links Library software class asp.net winforms html ajax ThinkandGrowRich6-part88

60 
“If  you think you are outclassed, you are, 
You’ve got to think high to rise, 
You’ve got to be sure of yourself before 
You can ever win a prize. 
“Life’s battles don’t always go 
To the stronger or faster man, 
But soon or late the man who wins 
Is the man WHO THINKS HE CAN!” 
Observe the words which have been emphasized, and you will 
catch the deep meaning which the poet had in mind. 
Somewhere in your make-up (perhaps in the cells of your 
brain) there lies sleeping, the seed of achievement which, if aroused 
and put into action, would carry you to heights, such as you may 
never have hoped to attain. 
Just as a master musician may cause the most beautiful 
strains of music to pour forth from the strings of a violin, so may 
you arouse the genius which lies asleep in your brain, and cause it 
to drive you upward to whatever goal you may wish to achieve. 
Abraham Lincoln was a failure at everything he tried, until he 
was well past the age of forty. He was a Mr. Nobody from Nowhere, 
until a great experience came into his life, aroused the sleeping 
genius within his heart and brain, and gave the world one of its 
really great men. That “experience” was mixed with the emotions of 
sorrow and LOVE. It came to him through Anne Rutledge, the only 
woman whom he ever truly loved. 
It is a known fact that the emotion of LOVE is closely akin to 
the state of mind known as FAITH, and this for the reason that Love 
comes  very  near  to  translating  one’s  thought  impulses  into  their 
spiritual  equivalent.  During  his  work  of  research,  the  author 
discovered, from the analysis of the life-work and achievements of 
hundreds of men  of  outstanding  accomplishment, that there  was 
the  influence  of  a  woman’s  love  back  of  nearly  EVERY  ONE  OF 
THEM. The emotion of love, in the human heart and brain, creates 
a favorable field of magnetic attraction, which causes an influx of 
the higher and finer vibrations which are afloat in the ether. 
If  you  wish  evidence  of  the  power  of  FAITH,  study  the 
achievements of men and women who have employed it. At the head 
Clickable pdf links - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf in preview; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Clickable pdf links - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
clickable links in pdf files; add links to pdf document
61 
of  the  list comes the  Nazarene. Christianity is the  greatest single 
force which influences the minds of men. The basis of Christianity 
is  FAITH,  no  matter  how  many  people  may  have  perverted,  or 
misinterpreted the meaning of this great force, and no matter how 
many dogmas and creeds have been created in its name, which do 
not reflect its tenets. 
The  sum  and  substance  of  the  teachings  and  the 
achievements  of  Christ,  which  may  have  been  interpreted  as 
“miracles,” were nothing more nor less than FAITH. If there are any 
such phenomena as “miracles” they are produced only through the 
state of mind known as FAITH! Some teachers of religion, and many 
who  call  themselves  Christians,  neither  understand  nor  practice 
FAITH. 
Let  us  consider  the  power  of  FAITH,  as  it  is  now  being 
demonstrated, by  a  man  who  is  well  known  to  all  of  civilization, 
Mahatma Gandhi, of India. In this man the world has one of the 
most astounding examples known to civilization, of the possibilities 
of FAITH. Gandhi wields more potential power than any man living 
at this time, and this, despite the fact that he has none of the ortho-
dox  tools  of  power,  such  as  money,  battle  ships,  soldiers,  and 
materials  of warfare. Gandhi has no money, he has no home, he 
does not own a suit of clothes, but HE DOES HAVE POWER. How 
does he come by that power? 
HE  CREATED  IT  OUT  OF  HIS  UNDERSTANDING  OF  THE 
PRINCIPLE  OF  FAITH,  AND  THROUGH  HIS  ABILITY  TO  TRANS-
PLANT  THAT  FAITH  INTO  THE  MINDS  OF  TWO  HUNDRED 
MILLION PEOPLE. 
Gandhi  has  accomplished,  through  the  influence  of  FAITH, 
that  which  the  strongest  military  power  on  earth  could  not,  and 
never will accomplish through soldiers and military equipment. He 
has  accomplished  the  astounding  feat  of  INFLUENCING  two 
hundred million minds to COALESCE AND MOVE IN UNISON, AS A 
SINGLE MIND. 
What other force on earth, except FAITH could do as much? 
There will come a day when employees as well as employers 
will  discover the  possibilities of FAITH. That day is dawning. The 
whole world has had ample opportunity, during the recent business 
depression, to witness what the LACK OF FAITH will do to business. 
Surely,  civilization  has  produced  a  sufficient  number  of 
intelligent human beings to make use of this great lesson which the 
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Standardization (ISO). Clickable links and buttons, form fields and video can be inserted into a PDF file without quality loss. Documents, forms
add a link to a pdf; pdf link to attached file
62 
depression has taught the world. During this depression, the world 
had evidence in abundance that widespread FEAR will paralyze the 
wheels of industry and business. Out of this experience will arise 
leaders  in  business  and  industry  who  will  profit  by  the  example 
which Gandhi has set for the world, and they will apply to business 
the  same  tactics  which  he  has  used  in  building  the  greatest 
following known in the history of the world. These leaders will come 
from the rank and file of the unknown men, who now labor in the 
steel  plants, the coal mines, the  automobile factories, and  in  the 
small towns and cities of America. 
Business is due for a reform, make no mistake about this! The 
methods of the past, based upon economic combinations of FORCE 
and FEAR, will be supplanted by the better principles of FAITH and 
cooperation. Men who labor will receive more than daily wages; they 
will  receive  dividends  from  the  business,  the  same  as those  who 
supply the capital for business; but, first they must GIVE MORE TO 
THEIR  EMPLOYERS,  and  stop  this  bickering  and  bargaining  by 
force,  at  the  expense  of  the  public.  They  must  earn  the  right  to 
dividends! 
Moreover, and this is the most important thing of all—THEY 
WILL BE LED BY LEADERS WHO WILL UNDERSTAND AND APPLY 
THE PRINCIPLES EMPLOYED BY MAHATMA GANDHI. Only in this 
way  may  leaders  get  from  their  followers  the  spirit  of  FULL 
cooperation  which  constitutes  power  in  its  highest  and  most 
enduring form. 
This  stupendous  machine  age  in  which  we  live,  and  from 
which  we  are  just  emerging,  has  taken  the  soul  out  of  men.  Its 
leaders  have  driven  men  as  though  they  were  pieces  of  cold 
machinery; they were forced to do so by the employees who have 
bargained, at the expense of all concerned, to get and not to give. 
The  watchword  of  the  future  will  be  HUMAN  HAPPINESS  AND 
CONTENTMENT,  and  when  this  state  of  mind  shall  have  been 
attained, the production will take care of itself, more effectively than 
anything that has ever been accomplished where men did not, and 
could not mix FAITH and individual interest with their labor. 
Because  of  the  need  for  faith  and  cooperation  in  operating 
business and industry, it will be both interesting and profitable to 
analyze an event which provides an excellent understanding of the 
method by which industrialists and business men accumulate great 
fortunes, by giving before they try to get. 
63 
The  event  chosen  for  this  illustration  dates  back  to  1900, 
when the United States Steel Corporation was being formed. As you 
read the story, keep in mind these fundamental facts and you will 
understand how IDEAS have been converted into huge fortunes. 
First,  the  huge United  States Steel Corporation was  born in 
the mind of Charles M. Schwab, in the form of an IDEA he created 
through his IMAGINATION! Second, he mixed FAITH with his IDEA. 
Third, he formulated a PLAN for the transformation of his IDEA into 
physical and financial reality. Fourth, he put his plan into action 
with his famous  speech at the University Club. Fifth, he applied, 
and followed-through on his PLAN with PERSISTENCE, and backed 
it with firm DECISION until it had been fully carried out. Sixth, he 
prepared the way for success by a BURNING DESIRE for success. 
If you are one  of those  who have  often  wondered how great 
fortunes are accumulated, this story of the creation of the United 
States Steel Corporation will be enlightening. If you have any doubt 
that  men  can THINK  AND GROW  RICH, this  story should  dispel 
that doubt, because you can plainly see in the story of the United 
States Steel, the application of a major portion of the thirteen prin-
ciples described in this book. 
This  astounding  description  of  the  power  of  an  IDEA  was 
dramatically told by John Lowell, in the New York World-Telegram, 
with whose courtesy it is here reprinted. 
“A PRETTY AFTER-DINNER SPEECH FOR A 
BILLION DOLLARS 
“When, on the evening of December 12, 1900, some eighty of 
the  nation’s financial  nobility gathered  in  the banquet  hail of the 
University Club on Fifth Avenue to do honor to a young man from 
out of the West, not half a dozen of the guests realized they were to 
witness the most significant episode in American industrial history.  
“J. Edward Simmons and Charles Stewart Smith, their hearts 
full  of  gratitude  for  the  lavish  hospitality  bestowed  on  them  by 
Charles  M.  Schwab  during  a  recent  visit  to  Pittsburgh,  had 
arranged the dinner to introduce the thirty-eight-year-old steel man 
to eastern banking society. But they didn’t expect him to stampede 
the convention. They warned him, in fact, that the bosoms within 
New York’s stuffed shirts would not be responsive to oratory, and 
that,  if he didn’t  want  to bore the  Stilhnans  and Harrimans  and 
64 
Vanderbilts, he had better limit himself to fifteen or twenty minutes 
of polite vaporings and let it go at that. 
“Even  John  Pierpont  Morgan,  sitting  on  the  right  hand  of 
Schwab  as  became  his  imperial  dignity,  intended  to  grace  the 
banquet table with his presence only briefly. And so far as the press 
and public were concerned, the whole affair was of so little moment 
that no mention of it found its way into print the next day. 
“So the two hosts and their distinguished guests ate their way 
through  the  usual  seven  or  eight  courses.  There  was  little 
conversation and  what  there was of it was restrained. Few of the 
bankers and brokers had met Schwab, whose career had flowered 
along the banks of the Monongahela, and none knew him well. But 
before  the  evening was over,  they—and  with  them Money  Master 
Morgan — were to be swept off their feet, and a billion dollar baby, 
the United States Steel Corporation, was to be conceived. 
“It  is  perhaps  unfortunate,  for  the  sake  of  history,  that  no 
record of Charlie Schwab’s speech at the dinner ever was made. He 
repeated some parts of it at a later date during a similar meeting of 
Chicago bankers. And still later, when the Government brought suit 
to  dissolve  the  Steel  Trust,  he  gave  his  own  version,  from  the 
witness stand, of the remarks that stimulated Morgan into a frenzy 
of financial activity. 
“It  is  probable,  however,  that  it  was  a  ‘homely’  speech, 
somewhat  ungrammatical  (for  the  niceties  of  language  never 
bothered Schwab), full of epigram and threaded with wit. But aside 
from that it had a galvanic force and effect upon the five billions of 
estimated capital that was represented by the diners. After it was 
over and the gathering was still under its spell, although Schwab 
had talked for ninety minutes, Morgan led the orator to a recessed 
window  where,  dangling  their  legs  from  the  high,  uncomfortable 
seat, they talked for an hour more. 
“The magic of the Schwab personality had been turned on, full 
force,  but  what  was  more  important  and  lasting  was  the  full-
fledged, clear-cut program he laid down for the aggrandizement of 
Steel.  Many  other  men  had  tried  to  interest  Morgan  in  slapping 
together a steel trust after the pattern of the biscuit, wire and hoop, 
sugar, rubber, whisky, oil or chewing gum combinations. John W. 
Gates, the gambler, had urged it, but Morgan distrusted him. The 
Moore  boys,  Bill  and  Jim,  Chicago  stock  jobbers  who  had  glued 
together a match trust and a cracker corporation, had urged it and 
65 
failed. Elbert H. Gary, the sanctimonious country lawyer, wanted to 
foster it, but he wasn’t big enough to be impressive. Until Schwab’s 
eloquence took  J. P.  Morgan  to  the  heights from which he  could 
visualize the solid results of the most daring financial undertaking 
ever  conceived, the  project  was  regarded  as  a  delirious  dream  of 
easy-money crackpots. 
“The  financial  magnetism  that  began,  a  generation  ago,  to 
attract  thousands  of  small  and  sometimes  inefficiently  managed 
companies into large and competition-crushing combinations, had 
become  operative  in  the  steel  world  through  the  devices  of  that 
jovial business pirate, John W. Gates. Gates already had formed the 
American Steel and Wire Company out of a chain of small concerns, 
and together with Morgan had created the Federal Steel Company. 
The National Tube and American Bridge companies were two more 
Morgan concerns, and the Moore Brothers had forsaken the match 
and cookie business to form the ‘American’ group— Tin Plate, Steel 
Hoop, Sheet Steel—and the National Steel Company. 
“But by the side of Andrew Carnegie’s gigantic vertical trust, a 
trust  owned  and  operated  by  fifty-three  partners,  those  other 
combinations were picayune. They might combine to their heart’s 
content  but  the  whole  lot  of  them  couldn’t  make  a  dent  in  the 
Carnegie organization, and Morgan knew it. 
“The  eccentric  old  Scot  knew  it,  too.  From  the  magnificent 
heights of Skibo Castle he had viewed, first with amusement and 
then with resentment, the attempts of Morgan’s smaller companies 
to  cut  into  his  business.  When  the  attempts  became  too  bold, 
Carnegie’s  temper  was  translated  into  anger  and  retaliation.  He 
decided  to  duplicate  every  mill  owned  by  his  rivals.  Hitherto,  he 
hadn’t  been interested in  wire, pipe, hoops, or sheet. Instead, he 
was content to sell such companies the raw steel and let them work 
it into whatever shape they wanted. Now, with Schwab as his chief 
and able lieutenant, he planned to drive his enemies to the wall. 
“So it was that in the speech of Charles M. Schwab, Morgan 
saw  the  answer  to  his  problem  of  combination.  A  trust  without 
Carnegie-giant  of  them  all—would  be  no  trust  at  all,  a  plum 
pudding, as one writer said, without the plums. 
“Schwab’s  speech  on  the  night  of  December  12,  1900, 
undoubtedly carried the inference, though not the pledge, that the 
vast Carnegie enterprise could be brought under the Morgan tent. 
He  talked  of  the  world  future  for  steel,  of  reorganization  for 
66 
efficiency, of specialization, of the scrapping of unsuccessful mills 
and  concentration  of  effort  on  the  flourishing  properties,  of 
economies  in  the  ore  traffic,  of  economies  in  overhead  and 
administrative departments, of capturing foreign markets. 
“More than that, he told the buccaneers among them wherein 
lay the errors of their customary piracy. Their purposes, he inferred, 
bad been to create monopolies, raise prices, and pay themselves fat 
dividends  out  of  privilege.  Schwab  condemned  the  system  in  his 
heartiest manner. The shortsightedness of such a policy, he told his 
hearers, lay in the fact that it restricted the market in an era when 
everything cried for expansion. By cheapening the cost of steel, he 
argued, an ever-expanding market would be created; more uses for 
steel  would  be  devised,  and  a  goodly  portion  of  the  world  trade 
could  be  captured.  Actually,  though  he  did  not know  it,  Schwab 
was an apostle of modern mass production. 
“So the dinner at the University Club came to an end. Morgan 
went home, to think about Schwab’s rosy predictions. Schwab went 
back  to  Pittsburgh  to  run  the  steel  business  for  ‘Wee  Andra 
Carnegie,’ while Gary and the rest went back to their stock tickers, 
to fiddle around in anticipation of the next move. 
“It  was  not  long  coming.  It  took  Morgan  about one  week to 
digest the feast of reason Schwab had placed before him. When he 
had assured himself that no financial indigestion was to result, he 
sent  for  Schwab-and  found  that  young  man  rather  coy.  Mr. 
Carnegie, Schwab indicated, might not like it if he found his trusted 
company  president  had  been  flirting  with  the  Emperor  of  Wall 
Street, the Street upon which Carnegie was resolved never to tread. 
Then  it was suggested  by  John  W. Gates  the  go-between,  that if 
Schwab ‘happened’ to be in the Bellevue Hotel in Philadelphia, J. P. 
Morgan  might  also  ‘happen’  to  be  there.  When  Schwab  arrived, 
however, Morgan was inconveniently ill at his New York home, and 
so,  on  the  elder  man’s  pressing  invitation,  Schwab  went  to  New 
York and presented himself at the door of the financier’s library. 
“Now  certain  economic  historians  have  professed  the  belief 
that from the beginning to the end of the drama, the stage was set 
by  Andrew  Carnegie—that  the  dinner  to  Schwab,  the  famous 
speech,  the  Sunday  night  conference  between  Schwab  and  the 
Money King, were events arranged by the canny Scot. The truth is 
exactly the opposite. When Schwab  was called in to consummate 
the deal, he didn’t even know whether ‘the little boss,’ as Andrew 
67 
was called, would so much as listen to an offer to sell, particularly 
to a group of men whom Andrew regarded as being endowed with 
something  less  than  holiness.  But  Schwab  did  take  into  the 
conference with him, in his own handwriting, six sheets of copper-
plate figures, representing to his mind the physical worth and the 
potential earning capacity of every steel company he regarded as an 
essential star in the new metal firmament. 
“Four men pondered over these figures all night. The chief, of 
course, was Morgan, steadfast in his belief in the Divine Right of 
Money.  With  him  was  his  aristocratic  partner,  Robert  Bacon,  a 
scholar  and  a  gentleman.  The  third  was  John  W.  Gates  whom 
Morgan scorned as a gambler and used as a tool. The fourth was 
Schwab, who knew more about the processes of making and selling 
steel  than  any  whole  group  of  men  then  living.  Throughout  that 
conference, the Pittsburgher’s figures were never questioned. If he 
said a company was worth so much, then it was worth that much 
and  no  more.  He  was  insistent,  too,  upon  including  in  the  com-
bination  only  those  concerns  he  nominated.  He  had  conceived  a 
corporation  in  which  there  would  be  no  duplication,  not even  to 
satisfy the greed of friends who wanted to unload their companies 
upon the broad Morgan shoulders. Thus he left out, by design, a 
number  of  the  larger  concerns  upon  which  the  Walruses  and 
Carpenters of Wall Street had cast hungry eyes. 
“When dawn came, Morgan rose and straightened his back. 
Only one question remained. 
“‘Do you think you can persuade Andrew Carnegie to sell?’ he 
asked. 
“‘I can try,’ said Schwab. 
“‘If you can get him to sell, I will undertake the matter,’ said 
Morgan. 
“So far so good. But would Carnegie sell? How much would he 
demand?  (Schwab  thought  about  $320,000,000).  What  would  he 
take payment in? Common or preferred stocks? Bonds? Cash? No-
body could raise a third of a billion dollars in cash. 
“There was a golf game in January on the frost-cracking heath 
of the St. Andrews links in Westchester, with Andrew bundled up in 
sweaters against the cold, and Charlie talking volubly, as usual, to 
keep his spirits up. But no word of business was mentioned until 
the pair sat down in the cozy warmth of the Carnegie cottage hard 
by. Then, with the same persuasiveness that had hypnotized eighty 
68 
millionaires  at  the  University  Club,  Schwab  poured  out  the 
glittering promises  of retirement  in  comfort,  of  untold millions to 
satisfy the old man’s social caprices. Carnegie capitulated, wrote a 
figure on a slip of paper, handed it to Schwab and said, ‘all right, 
that’s what we’ll sell for.’ 
“The figure was approximately $400,000,000, and was reached 
by taking the $320,000,000 mentioned by Schwab as a basic figure, 
and  adding  to  it  $80,000,000  to  represent  the  increased  capital 
value over the previous two years. 
“Later, on the deck of a trans-Atlantic liner, the Scotsman said 
ruefully to Morgan, ‘I wish I had asked you for $100,000,000 more.’ 
“‘If you had asked for it, you’d have gotten it,’ Morgan told him 
cheerfully. 
 * 
“There  was  an  uproar,  of  course.  A  British  correspondent 
cabled that  the  foreign  steel  world  was  ‘appalled’  by  the  gigantic 
combination. President Hadley, of Yale, declared that unless trusts 
were regulated the country might expect ‘an emperor in Washington 
within the next twenty-five years.’ But that able stock manipulator, 
Keene, went at his work of shoving the new stock at the public so 
vigorously that all the excess water—estimated by some at nearly 
$600,000,000—was absorbed in a twinkling. So Carnegie had his 
millions,  and  the  Morgan  syndicate  had  $62,000,000  for  all  its 
‘trouble,’ and all the ‘boys,’ from Gates to Gary, had their millions. 
 * 
“The  thirty-eight-year-old  Schwab  had  his  reward.  He  was 
made  president  of  the  new  corporation  and  remained  in  control 
until 1930.” 
The  dramatic  story  of  “Big  Business”  which  you  have  just 
finished,  was  included  in  this  book,  because  it  is  a  perfect 
illustration of the method by which DESIRE CAN BE TRANSMUTED 
INTO ITS PHYSICAL EQUIVALENT! 
 imagine  some  readers  will  question  the  statement  that  a 
mere,  intangible  DESIRE  can  be  converted  into  its  physical 
equivalent. Doubtless some will say, “You cannot convert NOTHING 
into  SOMETHING!”  The  answer  is  in  the  story  of  United  States 
69 
Steel. 
That giant organization was created in the mind of one man. 
The  plan  by  which  the  organization  was  provided  with  the  steel 
mills that gave it financial stability was created in the mind of the 
same  man.  His  FAITH,  his  DESIRE,  his  IMAGINATION,  his 
PERSISTENCE  were  the  real  ingredients  that  went  into  United 
States Steel. The steel mills and mechanical equipment acquired by 
the  corporation,  AFTER  IT  HAD  BEEN  BROUGHT  INTO  LEGAL 
EXISTENCE, were incidental, but careful analysis will disclose the 
fact  that  the  appraised  value  of  the  properties  acquired  by  the 
corporation  increased  in  value  by  an  estimated  SIX  HUNDRED 
MILLION  DOLLARS,  by  the  mere  transaction  which  consolidated 
them under one management. 
In  other  words,  Charles M. Schwab’s IDEA,  plus  the  FAITH 
with which he  conveyed it to the minds of J.  P.  Morgan  and  the 
others, was marketed for a profit of approximately $600,000,000. 
Not an insignificant sum for a single IDEA! 
What happened to some of the men who took their share of the 
millions of  dollars of profit  made by this  transaction, is a matter 
with which we are not now concerned. The important feature of the 
astounding  achievement  is  that  it  serves  as  unquestionable 
evidence of the soundness of the philosophy described in this book, 
because this philosophy was the warp and the woof of the entire 
transaction. Moreover, the practicability of the philosophy has been 
established  by  the  fact  that  the  United  States  Steel  Corporation 
prospered,  and  became  one  of  the  richest  and  most  powerful 
corporations in America, employing thousands of people, developing 
new uses for steel, and opening new markets; thus proving that the 
$600,000,000  in  profit  which  the  Schwab  IDEA  produced  was 
earned. 
RICHES begin in the form of THOUGHT! 
The amount is limited only by the person in whose mind the 
THOUGHT  is  put  into  motion.  FAITH  removes  limitations! 
Remember  this  when  you  are  ready  to  bargain  with  Life  for 
whatever it is that you ask as your price for having passed this way. 
Remember, also, that the man who created the United States 
Steel  Corporation  was  practically  unknown  at  the  time.  He  was 
merely Andrew Carnegie’s “Man Friday” until he gave birth to his 
famous  IDEA.  After  that  he  quickly  rose  to  a  position  of  power, 
fame, and riches. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested