Hand-Held Radiometry 
A Set of Notes Developed for Use at the 
Workshop on Hand-Held Radiometry 
Phoenix, Ariz., February 25-26, 1980
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Science and Education Administration 
Agricultural Reviews and Manuals 
ARM-W-19/October 1980 
Adding hyperlinks to pdf documents - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf document; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Adding hyperlinks to pdf documents - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
clickable pdf links; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
Hand-Held Radiometry 
A Set of Notes Developed for Use at the 
Workshop on Hand-Held Radiometry 
Phoenix, Ariz., February 25-26, 1980 
by  Ray D. Jackson,   Paul J. Pinter, Jr. 
Robert J. Reginato,  and  Sherwood B. Idso 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Science and Education Administration 
Agricultural Reviews and Manuals 
ARM-W-19/October 1980 
This portable document file version (PDF, Adobe Acrobat8) has been
prepared by scanning an original hardcopy of this publication and
converting the text using optical character recognition software.
Every attempt was made to catch errors in the translation process,
but it is likely that many still remain.
Readers should also be
aware that many advances have been made in the field of remote
sensing, new technologies are now available, and some of the
concepts that we advance in this 1980 publication are now out of
date.
Please notify Paul Pinter by email (ppinter@uswcl.ars.ag.gov)
with a
written description of any serious errors you discover and we will
try to fix them.
The original paper document is still available
upon request from the Librarian, USDA, ARS, U.S. Water Conservation
Laboratory, 4331 East Broadway Road, Phoenix, Arizona 85040.
Additional resources not originally in the Handbook can be found on
the USWCL Website which is located at http://www.uswcl.ars.ag.gov.
The original document was scanned and converted by Ms. Suzette
Maneely, Biological Science Technician at the U.S. Water
Conservation Laboratory. (June 2001)
International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) 0193-3760
Science and Education Administration, Agricultural Reviews and Manuals, Western
Series, No. 19, October 1980
Published by Agricultural Research (Western Region), Science and Education
Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Oakland, Calif. 94612
ii
ABSTRACT
Hand-held radiometers are small instruments that
measure radiation that has been reflected or emitted
from a target. Most have bandpass regions similar to
those of scanners aboard satellites now in orbit or
soon
to
be
launched.
Hand-held
radiometers
are
particularly useful for obtaining frequent spectral
and thermal data over numerous small plots having
different
treatments
such
as
irrigations
or
fertilization. Such experiments allow the development
of relationships between remotely sensed data and
agronomic variables, as well as relationships needed
for improved interpretation of satellite data and
their applications to agriculture.
A set of notes was developed to aid the beginner
in hand-held radiometry. The electromagnetic spectrum
is reviewed, and pertinent terms are defined. View
areas of multiband radiometers are developed to show
the areas of coincidence of adjacent bands. The
amounts of plant cover seen by radiometers having
different fields of view are described. Vegetation
indices are derived and discussed. Response functions
of several radiometers are shown and applied to
spectrometer data taken over 12 wheat plots, to
provide a comparison of instruments and bands within
and among instruments. The calculation of solar time
is reviewed and applied to the calculation of the
local time of LANDSAT satellite overpasses for any
particular location in the northern hemisphere.
The
use and misuse of hand-held infrared thermometers are
discussed,
and
a
procedure
for
photographic
determination of plant cover is described.
Some
suggestions
are
offered
concerning
procedures to be followed when collecting hand-held
spectral and thermal data. A list of references
pertinent to hand-held radiometry is included.
KEYWORDS:
Hand-held radiometers, remote
sensing, reflectance spectra,
thermal infrared, vegetation
indices.
iii
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We wish to acknowledge the contributions of Craig L.
Wiegand, Science and Education Administration-Agricultural
Research (SEA-AR), Weslaco, Tex., and Armand Bauer, SEA-AR,
Mandan, N. Dak.
We also wish to thank J. K. Aase, SEA-AR, Sidney, Mont.,
and C. J. Tucker, J. C. Price, and E. Chappelle, NASA/Goddard
Space Flight
Center, Greenbelt, Md., for the
data they
furnished.
Trade names and the names of commercial companies are used in
this publication solely to provide specific information.
Mention of a trade name or manufacturer does not constitute a
guarantee or warranty of the product by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture nor an endorsement by the Department over other
products not mentioned.
iv
CONTENTS
Page
Introduction...................................................................
1
The electromagnetic spectrum...................................................
3
Irradiance, radiance, reflectance, and Lambertian surfaces.....................
6
View areas of multiband radiometers............................................
8
Area of a sector and a segment of a circle...................................
8
Two-band radiometers.........................................................
9
Three-band radiometers.......................................................
9
Four-band radiometers........................................................ 10
Ratios of coincident areas to target areas................................... 11
Radiometric plant cover........................................................ 14
Case 1, row spacing = 0.3 m, row width = 0.15 m, FOV = 15°................... 15
Case 2, row spacing = 0.3 m, row width = 0.15 m, FOV = 24°................... 16
Case 3, row spacing = 1 m, row width = 0.5 m, FOV = 15°...................... 17
Vegetation indices............................................................. 21
Ratios ...................................................................... 22
Normalized difference........................................................ 24
Transformed normalized difference............................................ 24
Numerical example............................................................ 25
Perpendicular vegetation index............................................... 27
The soil line................................................................ 29
Some calculated results...................................................... 31
Radiometer response functions.................................................. 34
Relative response functions for four radiometers............................. 35
Field spectrometer data..................................................... 36
Comparison of bands among instruments........................................ 38
Comparison of vegetation indices among instruments........................... 41
The water absorption band.................................................... 42
Calculation of approximate local standard time for LANDSAT overpasses.......... 43
Time
...................................................................... 45
LANDSAT overpass times....................................................... 48
Infrared thermometers.......................................................... 51
Field use................................................................... 52
Calibrations................................................................. 52
Precautions.................................................................. 53
a)
Temperature equilibrium and warm-up periods........................... 53
b)
Operation in a noisy environment...................................... 53
c)
Operation in a dusty environment...................................... 53
d)
Miscellaneous precautions and procedures.............................. 53
Photographic determination of canopy cover..................................... 54
Standardization of measurements and recording of environmental conditions...... 55
Procedures in support of hand-held radiometer observations..................... 57
Hand-held radiometer measurements............................................ 57
Plant observations........................................................... 59
Weather data................................................................. 60
Sampling..................................................................... 60
Ground photography........................................................... 61
Terminology.................................................................. 61
Selected references............................................................ 61
v
HAND-HELD RADIOMETRY 
By Ray D. Jackson, Paul J. Pinter, Jr.,
Robert J. Reginato, and Sherwood B. Idso
1
INTRODUCTION 
Light from the sun, reflected from soils and plants, can tell us how much
plant material is present in the field, the vigor of the plants, whether plant
diseases or insects have caused damage, and other aspects important to the
production of food and fiber. Since 1972, the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA) has launched three satellites (called LANDSATs) that carry
multispectral scanners (MSS), instruments that measure reflected light in
particular wavelength bands. Future satellites of this general type will also
have a band that measures emitted thermal radiation, from which surface
temperatures can be inferred. The exploitation of satellite information for
agricultural research and for management decisions is hampered by the frequency
of coverage (once every 18 days, if cloud free) and the time required to process
the data. In addition, research data concerning the fundamental relationships
between reflected and emitted radiation and various agronomic factors found in
field situations is minimal.
Recent advances in electronic technology now allow
the construction of small instruments that mimic the satellite scanners but can
be carried and operated by one person. We call these instruments hand-held
radiometers.
For research purposes, and to aid in the interpretation of satellite data,
relationships must be developed between remotely sensed spectral data and
agronomic variables such as leaf area index, biomass, and amount of ground cover.
Such relationships can best be developed by obtaining spectral data over numerous
small plots where crops are carefully monitored and researchers can exercise some
manipulation of cultural variables such as soil water and row orientation. Hand-
held radiometers are ideally suited for these types of experiments because of
their portability. Many measurements can be made rapidly in experimental fields
inaccessable to vehicles and too small to be included in the resolution element
of aircraft- or satellite-based sensors. Additional detail on the usefulness of
hand-held radiometry was given by Tucker (1978b).
2
1
Physicist, entomologist, soil scientist, and physicist, respectively,
Science and Education Administration, Agricultural Research (SEA/AR), U.S. Water
Conservation Laboratory, 4331 East Broadway Road, Phoenix, Ariz. 85040.
2
The year in italic, when it follows the author’s name, refers to Selected
References, p. 61.
1
An important aspect of remote sensing research is the problem of comparing
data taken with various instruments having different characteristics. Some
questions that should be addressed within this context are: How do you compare
data obtained from radiometers that measure radiation in different wavelength
regions? How do you relate data taken with a wide field of view (15° for most
hand-held instruments) to data obtained with different fields of view, or to an
aircraft- or satellite- based scanner where the instantaneous field of view is
very small? What does an instrument see in terms of plants and soil back ground?
What are “vegetation indices,” and how are they used? The overriding question is:
How can we best take spectral data that are understandable and transferable to
other situations?
In 1979, the SEA/AR Wheat Yield Modeling Group contracted with NASA to
construct approximately 12 hand-held radiometers for delivery in 1980. These
radiometers, designed by Tucker et al. (1980) at the Goddard Space Flight Center
(GSFC), contain three bands that are similar to three bands of the Thematic
Mapper, the radiometer that is to be carried on LANDSAT-D (scheduled for launch
as LANDSAT-4 in 1981) (Tucker 1978a). This instrument, designated as the Mark II
3-band, was developed after Tucker had gained a considerable amount of
experimental experience with a two-band instrument described by Pearson et al.
(1976) (herein called the PMT 2-band). Another radiometer adaptable to hand-held
use has been available commercially for several years. This is the Exotech model
100A “LANDSAT Ground Truth” radiometer, whose bands, as the name implies,
correspond to bands 4 through 7 on the MSS carried by the currently orbiting
LANDSATs. All of these instruments measure portions of the electromagnetic
spectrum that are in the visible and the near infrared (IR) regions.
Our introduction to hand-held spectral radiometers occurred after a meeting
in January 1977 with Barrett Robinson and Marvin Bauer of the Laboratory for
Applications of Remote Sensing (LARS), Purdue University. They loaned us
equipment, and Barrett Robinson spent a day instructing us in the use of the
Exotech model 100A. We are starting our fourth year of measurements with the
Exotech, but due to weather conditions and a few other reasons, we have little
field experience with the Mark II 3-band.
Many of the same researchers who will be using these instruments to measure
reflected radiation have also ordered a newly developed hand-held IR
“thermometer” that measures emitted thermal radiation in the 8 to 14
µ
m (or 10.5
to 12.5
µ
m) wavelength regions, which can be related to surface temperatures.
This instrument, produced by the Telatemp Corporation, weighs about 1.1 kg and
has a pistol grip, which allows it to be held like a handgun. We have used the
Telatemp for 2 years; and for 4 years preceding that we used a Barnes PRT-5 IR
thermometer.
During these years, we have learned a bit about the use of hand-held
radiometers--much of it by trial and error--and as in most endeavors, hindsight
has been an excellent teacher. Thus, with the impending deliveries of hand-held
radiometers to our colleagues, we thought that a workshop, in which we discussed
much of what we know about the use and misuse of hand-held radiometers, would be
beneficial.
In preparing for the workshop, a set of notes developed. We share these
notes with a word of caution: We do not have all the answers, some things may
2
not be completely precise, and a few errors are bound to be disguised as facts.
Nevertheless, we hope that they will serve a useful purpose. We have cited some
literature and added other pertinent references, but no comprehensive review was
attempted. We thank Craig Wiegand, SEA/AR, Weslaco, Tex., and C. Jim Tucker,
NASA, Greenbelt, Md., who were very helpful in providing information and
assistance to us during the development of these notes. Thanks also go to Armand
Bauer, SEA/AR, Mandan, N. Dak., who gave us permission to reproduce his letter
setting out suggestions for standardization of experiments, and to J. K. Aase,
SEA/AR, Sidney, Mont., and J. C. Price and E. Chappelle, NASA/ GSFC, who provided
us with data.
THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM
A brief review of the electromagnetic spectrum may be useful for those of us
whose sophomore physics is a part of the far distant past. For a detailed
discussion, see Suits (1975).
Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy derived from oscillating magnetic
and electrostatic fields. It is capable of being transmitted through space with a
velocity c = 3 x 10
8
m/s. The frequency (
v
) of electromagnetic radiation is
related to its wavelength (
λ
) by 
Equation 1 shows that the frequency is inversely proportional to the
wavelength. An aid to the visualization of this relationship is given in figure
1. It is emphasized that the figure is merely a representation in 
Figure 1.--Graphs of the cosine. These curves facilitate the visualization of the
relationship between wavelength and frequency. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested