that the proportionality constant was taken as 1 (for diagrammatic purposes)
instead of the speed of light (3 x 10
8
m/s) and that cosine curves are not
necessarily the true representation of radiation waves. With this in mind, figure
1, top, shows a cosine with a frequency of 4 and a wavelength of 1/4. The center
curve is a cosine with a frequency of 2 and a wavelength of 1/2. At the bottom,
the frequency is 1 and the wavelength is 1. Thus, we see that as the wavelength
increases the frequency decreases.
The electromagnetic spectrum is diagramed in figure 2 in terms of both
wavelength and frequency. Note that wavelengths change from the short, but high
energy, gamma rays at 3 x 10-2 Angstroms (
) to the long sound waves at 300 km, a
factor of 10
17
, and that the visible range is’ only a small part of the entire
spectrum.
Figure 2.--The electromagnetic spectrum. 
Chrome pdf from link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add page number to pdf hyperlink
Chrome pdf from link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf link
Although some remote sensors utilize gamma rays and the ultraviolet, most
use the visible, IR, and microwave. Our concern here is with the visible and IR.
However, important progress is being made in using active (radar) and passive
microwaves to remotely sense agricultural scenes.
In figure 3, the visible and IR portions of the spectrum are expanded.
Numbers on the log scale indicate wavelength in micrometers. Near, intermedi-
ate, and far IR regions are shown. The portion of the IR region most useful for
temperature measurements is between 8 and 14
µ
m. Portable IR thermometers are
available with either an 8- to 14-
µ
m lens or a narrower 10.5- to 12.5-
µ
m lens.
The narrower window is most often used on satellite and aircraft based sensors
because less atmospheric absorption occurs in the narrower region.
Figure 3.-- A portion of the electromagnetic spectrum relating photographic
infrared, thermal infrared, and infrared thermometer ranges to the visible and
infrared regions.
The thermal IR region is frequently confused with the photographic IR.
Photographic IR is the transition region from the visible to the near IR. Color
IR film is sensitive to radiation up to about 0.9
µ
m, much shorter than the
wavelengths of the thermal IR.
The visible and near IR regions are expanded in figure 4. The approximate
wavelength intervals for LANDSAT and the Exotech (shown as MSS bands), the PMT 2-
band, and the Mark II 3-band are shown. The red bands for the PMT and Mark II
instruments are nearly the same and both fall entirely within the MSS5 band of
the Exotech and LANDSAT. In the IR, the PMT and the Mark II have their lower
wavelength limit within the MSS6 band and their upper limits within the MSS7
band. The Mark II has a third band in 1.55- to 1.75-
µ
m region. This is called the
water absorption band, as it is reported to be sensitive to water in vegetation.
5
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
modern browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Firefox, and RasterEdge DocImage SDK for .NET link directly. RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual
add link to pdf; add a link to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
supports multiple common browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Firefox, Safari information on them, just click the link and go VB.NET PDF Web Viewer, VB.NET PDF Windows
adding a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf online
Figure 4.--A portion of the electromagnetic spectrum which includes components of
the visible range and most of the near infrared. Approximate wavelength
intervals for LANDSAT and the Exotech (MSS) and for the PMT and the Mark II
are shown.
IRRADIANCE, RADIANCE, REFLECTANCE, AND LAMBERTIAN SURFACES 
Two terms that are used extensively in remote sensing research are radiance
and reflectance. They are easily confused with one another.
We will attempt to
give a simple explanation here.
For detailed discussions, see Silva (1978) and
Suits (1975).
On a sunny day, a target (e.g., a wheat field) receives both direct and
diffuse solar radiation. This incoming radiation is called irradiance
, symbol E,
units of watts per meter
2
(Wm
-
2
). When the radiation strikes the target, some is
reflected, some is absorbed, and some is transmitted. The ability of substances
(e.g., soils and plants) to reflect, absorb, and transmit this radiation varies
considerably, thus presenting us with a method of extracting information about
the substances. The radiation that is reflected from the target is called
radiance, symbol L, units of Wm
-
2
. A hand-held radiometer receives radiation
reflected from a target in a direction within the field of view of the
instrument. The sensors within the instrument react to the radiance and produce a
voltage that can be measured, and by calibration, related to the radiance. We can
write
L = CV
(2)
6
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Major browser supported, include chrome, firefox, ie, edge, safari, etc. Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in
add links to pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Use JS (jquery) to control PDF page navigation. Cross browser supported, like chrome, firefox, ie, edge, safari. Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
add email link to pdf; add links to pdf document
where C is a calibration factor and V is the voltage response of the instrument
to the radiance L.
We stated earlier that the radiance was radiation that was reflected from a
target, implying that the amount reflected is a property of the substance
constituting the target. This property is called the reflectance
, symbol R,
unitless, with values always less than one. Thus
L=ER
(3)
From equation 3, we see that, with R constant, L is directly proportional to the
irradiance. This relationship limits the direct use of radiance measurements
since the irradiance must also be specified. An obvious solution to this problem
is to calculate reflectances; however, this requires a measurement of
E. A good approximation of E can be obtained by measuring the radiance from a
target of known reflectance.
Standard reflectance plates can be made by carefully applying a special BaSO
4
paint to a flat metal plate after proper pretreatment of the metal; also, BaSO
4
powder can be pressed into a flat sheet (for a discussion of reflectance
standards, see Robinson and Biehl, 1979). Standard plates of this type are highly
reflective, on the order of 90 to 95 percent. When viewed at angles from 0
(nadir) to about 45°, or illuminated from angles less than 45° from vertical, they
are usually assumed to be Lambertian surfaces, although there are some
deviations. A Lambertian surface
, or a "perfectly diffuse" surface, is a surface
that reflects equally in all directions. The radiance of a uniformly illuminated
Lambertian surface of infinite extent is constant for any viewing angle. Precise
definitions and explanations of Lambertian surfaces, reflectance factors, and
other terms is beyond the scope of these notes. Silva (1978) presented a thorough
discussion of optical terms useful in remote sensing. We recommend reading Silva
(1978) and other articles to obtain complete definitions.
A standard BaSO
4
plate, calibrated with a known surface of radiation, will
have a constant reflectance R
p
. If we have a plate near the target of interest,
we can measure the radiance from the plate to get
L
p
= ER
p
(4)
and, in a short interval of time such that E does not change appreciably, measure
the unknown target to get
L
t
= ER
t
(5)
If we combine equation 4 and 5, we get
R
t
= RpL
t
/Lp
(6)
which is the bidirectional reflectance factor of the target (e.g., wheat field).
If the target (and the plate) approximate Lambertian surfaces, the reflectance
factor R
t
is independent of irradiance and viewing angles; however, cropped
fields and soil surfaces are usually not Lambertian. The radiances from these
surfaces are dependent upon the angle of illumination and the
7
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
various ASP.NET platforms. Support to view PDF document online in browser such as firefox, chrome, safari and so on. Support ASP.NET MVC
add a link to a pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Markup Drawing Library: add, delete, edit PDF markups in C#
A web based markup tool able to annotate PDF in browser such as chrome, firefox and safari in ASP.NET WebForm application. Support
add link to pdf acrobat; add hyperlinks pdf file
viewing angle. The term “bidirectional reflectance factor” is used to indicate
the angular dependence of the measurements. In the following sections, we have
used the term “reflectance” in a general sense. Where specific measurements with
a hand-held radiometer are discussed, the term “bidirectional reflectance factor”
may be more appropriate (Robinson and Biehl, 1979).
VIEW AREAS OF MULTIBAND RADIOMETERS
Multiband radiometers that are small enough to be hand-held usually con-
sist of two or more optical tubes, each containing a lens and detector assembly
for a particular bandpass. The tubes are mounted parallel with each other so as
to view approximately the same target. Although the tubes may be just a few
centimeters apart, the degree of noncoincidence is sufficient to cause differ-
ent bands to view somewhat different scenes. Thus, over nonhomogeneous tar- gets,
such as crops planted in rows, one band may view predominately soil while the
second may view mostly plants. The severity of this problem decreases as the
height that the radiometer is held above the target increases and the dis- tance
between the tubes decreases. For hand-held radiometry, the height that a
radiometer can be held above a crop is not sufficient to completely eliminate the
problem. It is instructive to examine the geometry of this situation to gain a
perspective of its significance.
Area of a sector and a segment of a circle
: The areas of coincidence for
two or more overlapping circles can be calculated by using formulas for the areas
of sectors and segments of a circle (Larsen, 1958). Figure 5 shows a sector of a
circle with center at A and radius r.
The area of the segment (A
s
), the portion
bounded by the line connecting points B and D and the arc of the circle, is the
area of the sector (
α
r
2
/2) minus the area of the two triangles of identical area,
ABC and ACD. That is,
Figure 5.--Sector of a circle. The segment of the sector is the area
bounded by the arc of the circle and the line BD.
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
An ASP.NET web-server compliant library able to highlight text in PDF file online in browser such as chrome, firefox, safari, etc.
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; pdf link open in new window
VB.NET Word: Create VB.NET Word Document Viewer in Web, Windows
in one of above mentioned VB.NET Word document viewers, please follow the link to see If needed, you can try VB.NET PDF document file viewer SDK, and VB.NET
add a link to a pdf in preview; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
where
Equations 7 and 8 form the basis for calculating coincident target areas for
two-, three-, and four-band radiometers.
Two-band radiometers
: The coincident area for a two-band radiometer is twice the
area of the segment of a circle given by equation 7, i.e.,
here x to be used in equation 8 is one-half of the distance between centers of
the two tubes. Figure 6 shows the target areas and coincident area for a two-band
radiometer.
Figure 6.--Coincident area of two overlapping circles of identical radius
whose centers are at points A and E.
Three-band radiometers
: For a three-band radiometer, the coincident area
for any two bands is the same as for a two-band instrument. The coincidence area
for all three bands requires a bit more calculation. The geometry is shown in
figure 7. We begin at the center of one of the three circles (A) and draw lines
to the intersections of two adjoining circles (lines AB and AE). To get one-third
of the coincident area, calculate the area of this segment and add the areas of
the twotriangles BCE and CDE.
The centers of the three tubes form an equilateral triangle. The distance AF
= x is one-half of the distance between the centers of two tubes. The angle
subtended by the lines AF and AC is
π
/6, because it is one-half of one of the
π
/3
angles forming an equilateral triangle. The angle subtending the arc BE is
Using
α
in equation 7, yields the area of the segment.
The distance BD is r
sin(
α
/2), and the distance CD is r cos(
α
/2) - x/cos(
π
/6). The coincident area is
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
modern browsers, including IE, Chrome, Firefox, Safari more web viewers on PDF and Word <link href="RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.css" rel="stylesheet"type
pdf reader link; pdf link to attached file
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
including IE (Internet Explorer), Chrome, Firefox, Safari you can go to PDF Web Viewer <link href="RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.css" rel="stylesheet"type
add url pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Figure 7.--Coincident area of three overlapping circles whose centers form an
equilateral triangle. The distance x is the length of the line AF and is one-
half of the distance between the centers of two circles.
Four-band radiometers:
Calculation of the coincident area for two adjoining
tubes of a four-band radiometer is the same as for a two-band instrument. The
distance x is, again, one-half of the distance between the centers of two
adjoining tubes. If the four tubes form a rectangle, the coincident area for
diagonal tubes can be calculated using equations 8 and 9 with x being one-half
the distance between diagonal tubes, which is the square root of two times the
distance between adjoining tubes.
The coincident area for the four tubes can be obtained by calculating the
area of a segment, adding the area of two identical triangles, and multiplying by
4.
Figure 8 shows the coincident area for four overlapping target areas for a
four-band radiometer.
The points A, B, E, and H represent centers of the four
tubes with a common center at C.
The sector of interest is ADG.
The angle
subtending the lines AC and AJ is
π
/4. The angle subtending the arc DG is
10
Figure 8.--Coincident area for four overlapping circles whose centers form a
square. The distance x is the length of the line AJ and is one-half of the
distance between centers of adjacent circles.
The distance DF is r sin(
α
/2) and the distance CF is r cos(
α
/2) -
2
1/2
x. The
coincident area is
Ratios of coincident areas to target areas
: The ratio of a coincident area
to the total target area for a tube can be calculated as a function of height
above a target. The closer this ratio approaches 1, the less error will be
encountered in the spectral data. For this calculation, we need to specify a
field of view (FOV)
and the distances between centers of the optical tubes for
particular instruments. For this discussion, we will use the Mark II 3-band
11
radiometer and the Exotech 4-band radiometer. Both instruments have a 15° FOV
capability. The distance between tubes for the three-band instrument is 3.8 cm,
and 6.35 for the four-band instrument. The relation between the radius of the
target area and the height of the radiometer (h) is
For a 15° FOV, r = 0.132 h. The diameter of a target circle is 26.4 cm when
the radiometer is held at 1 m, and 52.7 cm when held at 2 m. In other words, the
diameter is roughly one-fourth of the height that the radiometer is held. This is
a useful approximation when estimating target areas over row crops.
Figure 9A shows the ratio of the coincidence area to the target area as a
function of the radiometer height above the target for the Mark II 3-band and the
Exotech 4-band instruments. At 2 m in height, any two bands of the three-band
instrument will view about 91 percent of the same area. At 1 m, about 82 percent
of the same area is viewed. The coincident area for all three bands is about 87
percent at 2 m, dropping to 74 percent at 1 m.
The greater tube separation of the Exotech 4-band causes a smaller
coincident area than for the three-band. Figure 9B shows the ratio for two
adjacent bands, two diagonal bands, and for all four bands for this instrument.
At 2 m, the ratio is 85 percent, dropping to 70 percent at 1 m. The ratio for the
four-band coincident area is 71 percent at 2 m and 47 percent at 1 m.
We have considered only the height perpendicular to a flat target. In a
field, the soil surface is considered the flat target, and the radiometer is held
vertically a distance h above the soil. Plants, protruding above the surface,
alter the picture somewhat. Consider a situation in a field where the radiometer
is held 2 m above the soil surface. If plants are in the scene, the coincident
are will be less for the tops of the plants than at the soil sur face. Figure 10
shows a side view and a top view of what a single band (15° FOV) radiometer
“sees” when held 2 m above the soil surface. The centers of the plant rows
(designated by the horizontal lines) are 0.3 m apart (approximately the row
spacing of wheat in the northern Great Plains), the row width is 0.1 m and the
plant height is 0.2 m.
At 2 m, a 15° FOV radiometer will see portions of 1-1/2 rows of plants,
depending upon where the radiometer was located above the row. Depending upon
location, it is possible that the radiometer could view most of two plant rows in
one instance and only slightly over one row in another. Since it is difficult to
hand-hold a radiometer much higher than 2 m, it is necessary to take a series of
measurements at various horizontal locations (maximum height) across the rows in
order to get an adequate sample of the reflectance properties of the entire plot.
This problem can be reduced by increasing the field of view of the instrument;
however, the danger exists of getting portions of the operator’s body in the
radiometer scene. Figure 11 depicts this possibility in the form of a person
standing on a plank (to increase radiometer height) holding a radiometer. Two
fields of view, 15° and 24°, are shown. The edge of the 24° scene is about 20 cm
from the plank. The radiometer is shown level. In practice, it is very difficult
to hold a radiometer sufficiently level to guarantee no “foreign” bodies in the
scene. Furthermore, the total field of view is usually somewhat larger than that
specified by the manufacturer. Peripheral
12
Figure 9.--Ratio of coincident area to target area versus height above target
for a three-band and a four-band radiometer. For the Mark II 3-band, the
upper line considers any two of the three bands and the lower line
considers the coincident area for all three bands. For the Exotech, the
upper line is for two adjacent bands, the middle line is for two diagonal
bands, and the lower line is for all four bands.
13 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested