c# code to download pdf file : Add links to pdf document software Library project winforms .net asp.net UWP WCLPUB-0784-Jackson3-part946

equation 16 yields,
Thus, the ratio of the radiance will equal the ratio of the reflectance only
when the radiance measured over a standard reference plate (at very close to the
same time as the radiances over the target are measured) is equal in the two
bands and when the standard plate reflectances for the two bands are equal.
We therefore extend Wiegand’s comments to include a request that, when
ratios are reported, the means of obtaining the ratios be specified (i.e.,
voltage ratios, radiance ratios, or reflectance ratios).
Normalized difference
: A normalized difference is a ratio of the difference
between values for two bands and the sum of the values for the two bands. This
ratio was developed as a vegetation index by Don Deering and Bob Haas during a
LANDSAT-l rangeland study and was discussed by Rouse et al. (1973), Deering et
al. (1975), and Deering (1978). They used the LANDSAT IR and red channels to form
the difference ratio and named this ratio the Vegetation Index, i.e.,
Subsequently, as more researchers became involved and more data became available,
the term “Vegetation Index” became applied to almost all band combinations used
as a measure of vegetation. Deering (1978) has since proposed that this index be
named the Normalized Difference (ND). We concur and will use this term in
subsequent discussions; however, we will not restrict our definition of the ND to
the red and IR bands, but will use it as a general term for any two band
difference/sum ratio.
Writing the ND in terms of radiance, we have
We see that, as with the ratio, it should be clearly stated what bands are used,
and whether the input data are voltages, radiances, or reflectances. It is left
as an exercise for those interested to use the relation L = CV in equation 21 and
to show that a different value of ND will obtain if reflectances are used instead
of radiances.
Transformed ND
: For scenes in which the vegetation density is low, ND may
become negative. This can be seen by examination of figure 22. For very low
vegetation densities, the radiance will be nearly that of the soil. In this case,
a band in the red region will have a larger value than a band in the IR, and the
differences will be negative. To avoid the negative values and to minimize some
possible statistical problems, a constant 0.5 was added to the normalized differ-
ence and a square-root transformation was applied. Thus,
24
Add links to pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
Add links to pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
was defined, and is known as the transformed ND. As a reminder, the terminology
“Normalized Difference” is relatively new. Most of the literature uses the terms
“Vegetation Index” and “Transformed Vegetation Index.”
Numerical example
:
The above discussion indicates that ratio and difference
ratio vegetation indices may not be the same for indices calculated using radi-
ance values and those calculated using reflectance values. The degree of differ-
ence can readily be seen using some actual values that were obtained during a
field experiment using an Exotech model 100A hand-held radiometer.
The radiance
data shown in table 1 were taken over a wheat plot at 1135 MST on 1 February,
1980. Twelve measurements were made over the plot and 12 were made over a BaSO
4
plate immediately after (within one minute). The raw data were averaged and
converted to radiances using equation 15 and the calibration factors supplied by
the instrument manufacturer. Values for the BaSO
4
plate reflectance (R
p
) were for
a plate loaned to us by LARS, Purdue University. The actual plate used in these
experiments was constructed in a similar manner to the LARS plate; however, the
true values of R
p
may differ. For this discussion, the absolute value of the
plate reflectance is not important. The concepts involved will not be altered by
a small difference in the numbers.
Table 1.B-Spectral data taken over a wheat plot and a BaSO
4
reflectance plate,
using an Exotech model 100A hand-held radiometer
Irradiance values were calculated using equations 17 and 18. The data in table
1 were used to calculate ratios and normalized differences for several two-band
combinations of the four bands of the Exotech. These data are presented
25
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Add necessary references:
add hyperlinks to pdf; add url link to pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically. Document
clickable pdf links; adding links to pdf in preview
in table 2. In the table, the bands are assigned the letters a and b to facili-
tate their use in equations 16 and 21.
Two visible bands, such as MSS4 and MSS5, are not often used to calculate
vegetation indices; however, the results in table 2 show that, if used, the
radiance and reflectance ratios may differ by about 20 percent, and the ND even
changes sign. The bands MSS6 and MSS5 can be considered as IR and red. The ratio
MSS6/MSS5 is 27 percent different when radiances rather than reflectances are
used. The ND is about 9 percent different. MSS7 and MSS5 are two frequently used
bands for calculating the ratio and the ND. These bands show less than 5 percent
difference for the ratio, and the ND has less than 1 percent difference.
Table 2.--Band ratios and normalized differences calculated using radiance ratios
and reflectance ratios of spectral data obtained over wheat with an Exotech
model 100A hand-held radiometer. The symbols L and R indicate that values used
for the indices were radiance and reflectance, respectively
Examination of equations 17, 18, and 19 shows that the radiance ratio dif-
fers from the reflectance ratio mostly by the ratio of the irradiance of the two
bands. The irradiance values shown in table 2 are, therefore, the key to the
differences observed. Irradiance values of MSS5 and MSS7 are not very different
from each other but are quite different from values of MSS4 and MSS6. The use of
MSS5 and MSS7 in vegetation indices would not show much difference whether
radiance or reflectance values were used. Combinations of bands that show quite
different irradiance values will exhibit the largest difference between those
values calculated with radiances and reflectances.
This example underscores the need for carefully describing how various
indices are calculated and shows that the irradiance is not the same in every
band. This latter point plays a role when data obtained from instruments with
different band widths are compared.
26
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
adding a link to a pdf; clickable links in pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
pdf link to email; add hyperlink in pdf
Perpendicular Vegetation Index
: In addition to ratios and difference ratios,
many other combinations of spectral bands have been used as vegetation indices.
The Perpendicular Vegetation Index (PVI) of Richardson and Wiegand (1977) stands
out among these. The development of the PVI follows many of the arguments used by
Kauth and Thomas (1976) to produce the “tasseled cap” model of vegetation devel-
opment. Whereas Kauth and Thomas used vector analysis in four dimensional space
to produce a tasseled cap (a plot of the data looks like a tasseled cap), Rich-
ardson and Wiegand used algebraic relations in two dimensions. Both groups used
LANDSAT data as the basis for their developments.
We will use a two dimensional approach similar to that of Richardson and
Wiegand (1977). Kauth and Thomas (1976) and Richardson and Wiegand (1977) showed
that a plot of LANDSAT digital data from bare soil fields of MSS7 (IR) versus
MSS5 (red), or MSS6 (IR) versus MSS5 (see fig. 4 or table 1 for wave length re-
gions corresponding to these band numbers) yielded a straight line. Richardson
and Wiegand commented that the soil line appeared constant from one overpass date
to another and that the intercept was not significantly different from zero. This
comment indicates that the soil line may be constant for various soils and that
wet and dry soil would fall on the same line. When vegetation covers part of the
soil, reflectances in the red band will decrease and the IR will increase (for
most soils). This is shown schematically in figure 23. Point C represents data
containing vegetation but with some soil background showing. The PVI is the per-
pendicular distance from the soil line to the point in question. To calculate
this distance, an equation for the soil line is needed. We define Y as a band in
the IR (it can be MSS6 or MSS7 or the Mark II IR band), and X as a band in the
visible (usually in the red region, MSS5 or the Mark II red band). The soil line
is
The coefficients a
0
and a
1
are found by linear regression of data taken over bare
soils. To find the distance from a line to a point, reduce the equation of the
line to normal form and substitute the coordinates of the point in the equation
(Rider, 1947), i.e.
where the subscript i indicates that X
i
and Y
i
are coordinates of a point not on
the soil line, which for convenience is called a vegetation point.
Figure 23 shows a soil line and five points representing measurements over
soils and vegetated surfaces. Points A and B represent bare soil data. Point A
represents the highly reflective dry soil, whereas point B represents the less
reflective wet soil. (A rough surface that produced microshadows would have a
similar effect.) Data for soils at intermediate water contents would fall between
points A and B on the soil line. It is possible, in theory, to calibrate a point
on the line as to its water content. In practice, a quantitative scale would be
difficult to develop, but qualitative measures of wet, medium, and dry evalua-
tions of the surface soil may be practical for some soils.
Points C and D in figure 23 are representative of data taken over a vege-
tated field having about 25 percent plant cover. Point E represents a location
with essentially 100 percent plant cover. From figure 22, we see that the red
27
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add hyperlink to pdf online; add links in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add link to pdf; add links to pdf document
Figure 23.--Diagram of the soil line and vegetation points for use in
calculating the Perpendicular Vegetation Index.
band decreases and the IR band increases as one goes from soils to vegetation.
Points C and D represent the same amount of vegetation yet plot quite differently
on the graph. This case demonstrates the strength of the PVI as a vegetation in-
dex. The points plot differently, but both are the same distance from the soil
line and therefore would have the same value for the PVI. This situation could
arise by taking a measurement over the field when the soil was dry (point C),
irrigating the field, and repeating the measurement when the soil was wet (point
D). At point E (100 percent cover), no effect on spectral measurements would be
observed by the soil surface changing from wet to dry. In theory, the PVI removes
the effect of soil background. The point on the soil line where the perpendicular
line to the point originates gives some information about soil conditions (if,
for the particular soil, the wet and dry end points on the soil line are known),
but only in proportion to the amount of soil viewed. Richardson and Wiegand
(
1977) developed the PVI in terms of the coordinates on the soil line, allowing
them to obtain values for the soil reflectance in the vegetation-soil scene.
Obtaining the coordinates of the point on the soil line where the line from
the vegetation point is perpendicular requires a little review of algebra and
geometry. The equation for the soil line is Y = a
0
a
l
X. Let the line from a vege-
tation point to the soil line be Y = b
0
b
l
x. At
the point of intersection of the
two lines, the values of Y and the values of X will be the same. Thus, the two
equations are solved simultaneously for K and Y. We equate
and solve for X
s
, yielding
where the subscripts indicate that the coordinates are on the soil line.
Writing the two equations with X as the dependent variable and solving for
Y
s
yields
28
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively. are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
adding an email link to a pdf; adding links to pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add email link to pdf; pdf hyperlink
The point (X
s
, Y
s
) is represented by a square symbol in figure 23.
Equations
26 and 27 are essentially the same as equations 5 and 6 of Richardson and Wiegand
(1977). (We chose to put the IR band as the ordinate and the red band on the
abscissa in our development, opposite to the way Richardson and Wiegand labeled
theirs. Both ways are correct.)
We now have values for the coordinates at the vegetation point (X
i
, Y
i
) and
at the intersection of the perpendicular on the soil line (X
s
, Y
s
). Using the
Pythagorean Theorem, we can solve for the distance between the two points, i.e.,
which is an equivalent form of the PVI developed by Richardson and Wiegand (1977)
(their equation 4). If only the PVI is of interest and information on soil back-
ground is not required, equation 24 requires less computation. If the point on
the soil line is of interest, then equations 26 and 27 need to be solved. The
slope of the vegetation line (b
1
) is equal to C1/a
1
because the two lines are
perpendicular. The intercept of the vegetation line (b
o
) is Y
i
+(l/a
1
)X
1
. The coor-
dinates for the intersection with the soil lines are
Equations 29 and 30 give the soil line coordinates for the perpendicular to the
vegetation point in terms of the coordinates of the vegetation point and the
coefficients of the equation for the soil line.
In this development of PVI, the equations have deliberately been left in
terms of unevaluated coefficients. An interested person can chose a particular
visible band (preferably in the red region) for the X and a near IR band for the
Y, determine the soil line (and thus the coefficients a
1
and a
o
), and utilize the
PVI. Richardson and Wiegand’s development was in terms of radiances in specific
LANDSAT MSS bands.
The soil line
: The soil line is basic to the PVI of Richardson and Wiegand
(1977) and to the tasseled cap of Kauth and Thomas (1976). The assumptions are
that the soil line is linear and all soils yield data that fall on the line.
Adequate tests of these assumptions using LANDSAT data would require a consider-
able amount of ground data collection and computer time. Hand-held radiometer
data can be used advantageously in this case to provide an insight as to the
validity of the assumption.
At the U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory at Phoenix, measurements of dry
and wet bare soil are a routine part of the spectral measurements program. Data
for the 1979 season (139 data points) are shown in figure 24. Regression analysis
indicates that a linear relation is a good representation of the data (r
2
=
0.98), supporting the assumption of linearity in the development of the PVI.
Using the regression coefficients shown in figure 24 in equation 24 yields
Where Y refers to the MSS7 reflectance and X to the MSS5 reflectance.
29
Figure 24.C-The soil line (bare soil data) using red (MSS5) and infrared (MSS7)
bands. Data taken with an Exotech model 100 hand-held radiometer.
The data were all taken while the soils were sunlit. In a plant canopy,
portions of the soil viewed by a radiometer may be shaded. Data for shaded soils
would fall close to the origin and probably would not be represented by the ex-
trapolation of the linear line to the point of intersection with the ordinate.
This situation needs additional study.
Some insight into this situation, and the assumption that different soils
will fall on the same line, can be gleaned from figure 25, where data for eight
different porous materials are shown. In the following discussion of symbols, the
coordinates (X, Y) of the wettest and driest data points for these measurements
are given. The circular symbols (25 of the 40 data pairs) furnished by J. K.
Aase
3
are for Williams loam near Sidney, which has reflectance coordinates that
range from (0.065, 0.119) to (0.229, 0.313). Three crosses represent wet and dry
Avondale loam, a light-colored soil from near Phoenix whose reflectance coordi-
nate range was (0.123, 0.193) to (0.275, 0.353). Two plus symbols represent a
red-colored soil, coordinates (0.080, 0.124) and (0.091, 0.150), that had the
smallest range of all. Two square symbols represent a light, reddish soil, coor-
dinates (0.147, 0.205) and (0.271, 0.361). Two lazy diamond symbols represent a
mixture of Avondale loam and a silica sand, coordinates (0.151, 0.210) and
(0.313, 0.403). Two inverted triangles represent a Superstition sand from near
Yuma, Ariz., coordinates (0.283, 0.334) and (0.404, 0.446). Two triangles repre-
sent a white silica sand, coordinates (0.457, 0.547) and (0.583, 0.661). Two
diamonds represent black cinders from near Flagstaff, Ariz., coordinates (0.023,
0.030) and (0.064, 0.077).
_________
3
Personal communication.
30
The data in figure 25 demonstrate the considerable range of reflectance
values for different porous materials and also the range of reflectances for the
same material when going from wet to dry (or vice versa). A conclusion that can
be drawn is that the soil line is not linear over a wide range of soils and other
porous materials. This is in contrast to figure 24, where the data were quite
linear. We conclude that when an individual soil is considered and the range of
data from wet to dry is determined for sunlit conditions, the data are suffi-
ciently linear that the PVI can be used. Additional work is required to account
for the nonlinear nature of the soil line when various materials are considered.
Figure 25.--The soil line for eight different porous materials ranging from black
cinders to soils to white silica sand. The circular symbols represent Williams
loam, data furnished by J. K. Aase, Sidney, Mont.
Other symbols are discussed
in the text.
Some readers may have noticed that we have used reflectances exclusively in
this section. Radiances can be used, but since they are directly proportional to
the irradiance their coordinates on a soil line will vary with sun angle. This is
demonstrated in figure 26 where radiance values, taken at 10 time periods (spaced
between 0800 and 1630 hours) during one day, are shown. At first glance, it is
reassuring to see the linearity of the data; however, it can lead to the errone-
ous conclusion that both radiances and reflectances can be used directly in cal-
culating the PVI.
Consider only the numerator in equation 24 (the denominator is a constant),
i.e., Y
i
C 
a
1
X
i
C 
a
o
. If Y and X are in terms of radiance, a change in irradiance
will change the PVI drastically, since the X and Y terms are of opposite sign. It
is theoretically possible to overcome this problem by adjusting all X and Y val-
ues to constant irradiance levels.
Some calculated results
:
The purpose of obtaining vegetation indices is to
gain information about vegetative growth. A question thus arises as to what
31
Figure 26.--The “soil line” for a set of diurnal measurements in terms of radi-
ance. Circular symbols represent dry soil and crosses represent wet soil.
values of the several indices might be expected as a field changes from bare soil
to full green vegetative cover. Although not considered here, the change from
full green vegetative cover to completely senesced dry straw is of equal inter-
est.
Wiegand et al. (1974), Richardson et al. (1975), and Jackson et al. (1979)
discussed a linear model for calculating the spectral reflectance for composite
scenes (scenes containing both soil and vegetation, sunlit and shaded). The model
can be written as
where R
c
= composite scene reflectance, f
v1
=
fraction of sunlit vegetation,
R
vl
= reflectance of sunlit vegetation, f
vd
= fraction of shaded vegetation, R
vd
= reflectance of shaded vegetation, f
s1
= fraction of sunlit soil, R
sl
=
reflectance of sunlit soil, f
sd
= fraction of shaded soil, and R
sd
= reflectance
of shaded soil.
Data were taken with an Exotech hand-held radiometer over wet and dry bare
soil and over a dense green sunlit wheat canopy.
The measurements were repeated
while the sun was blocked out over the target area to yield values for shaded
reflectances. The red (MSS5) and one IR (MSS7) band of the Exotech were used.
Reflectance values were for the red band: R
vl
= 0.0256, R
s1
dry = 0.226, R
sl
wet =
0.136, R
sd
= 0.15 R
sl
.
Reflectance values for the IR band were R
vl
= 0.535, R
sl
dry
= 0.299, R
sl
wet = 0.197, and R
sd
= 0.11 R
sl
. We assumed that all vegetation was
sunlit, making the fraction f
vd
= 0.
32
Calculations were made for four cases: sunlit vegetation and sunlit dry
soil (a situation that would occur at solar noon), sunlit plants and sunlit wet
soil (solar noon situation), sunlit plants and shaded dry soil, and sunlit
plants and shaded wet soil. The latter two cases would occur for north-south
plant rows during the morning hours if the plants are relatively tall. It is a
somewhat fictitious situation at low values of plant cover; for low plant cover
with completely shaded soil, the solar elevation would be so low that other
problems would beset a reflection measurement.
Another caution that should be kept in mind about results calculated using
equation 32 is that it is implicity assumed that plants absorb or reflect the
incident radiation and thereby produce shadows.
This is a reasonable assumption
in the visible region but does not hold for the IR. Some IR radiation is trans-
mitted through plant leaves, making quite different “shadows” than we see with
our eyes. Allen and Richardson (1968) have shown that IR radiation can penetrate
eight layers of plant leaves before all the energy is reflected or absorbed.
Wiegand et al. (1979) stated that the first leaf absorbs about 10 percent of the
impinging light in the near IR with the remainder being divided equally between
transmission and reflection. The light transmitted by the first leaves and the
light that penetrates between the leaves interacts with lower leaves until it is
completely attenuated at a leaf area index of 8. This complex interaction of the
near IR and plants in the field requires some additional modeling.
With the above cautions in mind (but unaccounted for), we proceed to cal-
culate the IR/red ratios, ND, and the PVI over the range of 0 to full green
plant cover. Figure 27 shows results for the IR/red ratio. For the sunlit soil
conditions (both wet and dry, representative of solar noon measurements), the
ratio is not very sensitive to plant cover. For shaded soil conditions
Figure 27.--Calculated IR/red ratio as a function of plant cover for the condi-
tions of sunlit plants and sunlit and shaded, wet and dry soil.
33
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested