c# code to download pdf file : Add hyperlink to pdf in application control utility azure web page .net visual studio WCLPUB-0784-Jackson5-part948

Figure 38.--A comparison of the red bands on the Mark II with MSS4 and MSS5
of LANDSAT-1. Data are for 12 wheat subplots.
Figure 39 .--A comparison of the IR band on the Mark II with the IR band on the
PMT 2-band. Data are for 12 wheat plots.
satellite will overfly particular sites in the United States is important for
planning experiments in which aircraft and ground data are to be a simultaneously
obtained. Duggin (1977) and Jackson et al. (1979) have shown that spectral data
taken over row crops are affected by the solar elevation, and hence time of day,
necessitating coincident times for satellite-aircraft and ground data collection
to minimize discrepancies caused by solar elevation changes.
44
Add hyperlink to pdf in - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link; add links to pdf in preview
Add hyperlink to pdf in - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf email link; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Figure 40.--Correlation of the IR band of the Mark II with MSS6 and MSS7 of the
Exotech. Data are for 12 wheat subplots.
Figure 4l.--A comparison of the IR band of the Mark II with MSS6 and MSS7
of LANDSAT-1. Data are for 12 wheat subplots.
Time
:
Time is calculated from the Greenwich meridian (zero longitude).
There are three commonly used ways of reporting time: standard time, civil time,
and solar time. A civil day is defined as precisely 24 hours. Thus, for each de-
gree of longitude, the time change is 1440 min/360° = 4 min/degree. For any par-
ticular west longitude, the local civil time (LCT) is less than Greenwich time by
4 min/degree.
45
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
clickable links in pdf files; add url to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add links to pdf online; add links to pdf
Figure 42.--A comparison of the water absorption and the IR bands of the Mark
II. Data are for 12 wheat subplots.
Figure 43.--A comparison of the water absorption and the red bands of the Mark
II. Data are for 12 wheat subplots.
The inconvenience of using LCT for everyday use is readily apparent when
one considers that every location in east-west directions has a different time.
Thus, time zones have been defined with the LCT of a designated meridian near the
center of the zone used for the entire zone. For the United States, these meridi-
ans are 75° W. longitude (Eastern standard time), 90° W. longitude (Central stan-
dard time), 105° W. longitude (Mountain standard time), and 120° W. longitude
(Pacific standard time).
Note that the difference between the meridians is 15°
longitude or one hour of civil time.
46
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; change link in pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
add hyperlinks pdf file; add link to pdf file
Figure 44.--A comparison of the IR/red ratios for the Mark II and the Exotech
for plant cover ranging from 40 to 100 percent.
Figure 45.--A comparison of the normalized differences for the Exotech MSS5 and
MSS7 bands and the Mark II IR and red bands for plant cover ranging from 40 to
100 percent.
At a particular longitude (x), the difference between the LCT and the local
standard time is:
T (longitude) = 4(longitude of standard meridian in time zone CCCC x) (33)
and the LCT at X is
47
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
chrome pdf from link; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add,
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; accessible links in pdf
where M designates the standard meridian within the time zone, and LCT(M) repre-
sents the standard time for that time zone.
For example, Phoenix is at about 112° W.
Since LCT (105° W.) is Mountain standard time (MST), it is 1132 MST in Phoenix
when it is civil noon at 105° W. Conversely, civil noon at Phoenix occurs at 1228
hours.
Solar time, the time shown by a sundial, differs from civil time by the equa-
tion of time (Threlkeld 1962). This difference is caused by irregularities in the
earth’s rotation, obliquity of the earth’s orbit, and other factors. Values for
the equation of time are given in table 4. These data, interpolated from table
14.2 of Threlkeld (1962), are for 1958. Threlkeld stated that, for practical pur-
poses, these values could be used for any year, and that for any one day the equa-
tion of time may be considered constant. Leap year causes only a small error. From
table 4, the equation of time for 15 February is about minus 14 min and for 1
November about plus 16 min. The value in table 4, for a particular day, added
algebraically to LCT at the longitude of interested yields solar time. Thus, solar
time at Phoenix is LCT at 105° W. minus 28 plus equation of time, and conversely,
the LCT at a particular solar time is solar time plus 28 minus equation of time.
As an example, solar noon at Phoenix on 15 February and 1 November would be: 1200
+ 28 + 14 = 1242, and 1200 + 28 - 16 = 1212 MST, respectively.
LANDSAT overpass times
: The usual response to a query as to when LANDSAT
passes over is 0930. This is the nominal time that LANDSAT crosses the Equator and
is given in terms of LCT.
Some literature may refer to the LCT as the local mean
time. If the orbits were perfectly sun synchronous, the equatorial crossing time
(ECT) would be constant at near the nominal 0930; however, the three LANDSAT sat-
ellites have been slightly nonsun synchronous, and the ECT’s have changed over the
years (fig. 46). The ECT for LANDSAT-1 changed about 1 hour and 45 min during 6
years of operation.
LANDSAT-2 underwent an orbit adjust during the period 2 No-
vember 1977 to 2 February 1978. LANDSAT-3 appears to be closest to a sun synchro-
nous orbit of the three satellites.
The ECT versus time path can be closely approximated with a quadratic equa-
tion. For LANDSAT-3, the equation is
where T is the time in consecutive days since 1 January 1978. Equation 36 will
approximate the ECT for LANDSAT-3 only until orbital adjustments are made. Data
are periodically available from the GSFC. If extensive experiments are planned in
which accurate LANDSAT crossover times are needed, consult with NASA.
Since the satellites cross the United States in a south-southwesterly direc-
tion, the orbital paths will cross a specific U.S. location at LCT some minutes
ahead of the local civil ECT. The orbital path will cross several degrees of lon-
gitude in traveling from a point over the United States to a point over
48
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
pdf link to specific page; adding links to pdf document
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add links pdf document
Table 4.--Daily (Julian Day) values for the equation of time (EQTM in
minutes) interpolated from a table given by Threlkeld (1962)
DAY
EQTM
DAY
EQTM
DAY
EQTM
DAY
EQTM
DAY
EQTM
1
- 3.3
74
- 9.2
147
3.1
220
- 5.7
293
15.0
2
- 3.7
75
- 9.0
148
2.9
221
- 5.5
294
15.2
3
- 4.2
76
- 8.7
149
2.8
222
- 5.4
295
15.3
4
- 4.7
77
- 8.4
150
2.7
223
- 5.3
296
15.5
S
- 5.1
78
- 8.1
151
2.6
224
- 5.1
297
15.6
6
- 5.6
79
- 7.8
152
2.4
225
- 4.9
298
15.8
7
- 6.0
80
- 7.5
153
2.3
226
- 4.8
299
15.9
8
- 6.4
81
- 7.2
154
2.1
227
- 4.6
300
16.0
9
- 6.9
82
- 6.9
155
2.0
228
- 4.4
301
16.1
10 - 7.3
83
- 6.6
156
1.8
229
- 4.2
302
16.2
11 - 7.7
84
- 6.3
157
1.6
230
- 4.0
303
16.2
12 - 8.1
85
- 6.0
158
1.4
231
- 3.8
304
16.3
13 - 8.5
86
- 5.7
159
1.2
232
- 3.5
305
16.3
14 - 8.8
87
- 5.4
160
1.1
233
- 3.3
306
16.4
15 - 9.2
88
- 5.1
161
0.9
234
- 3.1
307
16.4
16 - 9.6
89
- 4.8
162
0.7
235
- 2.8
308
16.4
17 - 9.9
90
- 4.5
163
0.5
236
- 2.6
309
16.4
18 - 10.2
91
- 4.2
164
0.3
237
- 2.3
310
16.4
19 - 10.6
92
- 3.9
165
0.1
238
- 2.0
311
16.3
20 - 10.9
93
- 3.6
166
- 0.2
239
- 1.7
312
16.3
21 - 11.2
94
- 3.3
167
- 0.4
240
- 1.5
313
16.2
22 - 11.4
95
- 3.0
168
- 0.6
241
- 1.2
314
16.1
23 - 11.7
96
- 2.7
169
- 0.8
242
- 0.9
315
16.0
24 - 12.0
97
- 2.4
170
- 1.0
243
- 0.6
316
15.9
25 - 12.2
98
- 2.1
171
- 1.2
244
- 0.2
317
15.8
?6 - 12.5
99
- 1.8
172
- 1.4
245
0.1
318
15.6
27 - 12.7
100
- 1.6
173
- 1.7
246
0.4
319
15.5
28 - 12.9
101
- 1.3
174
- 1.9
247
0.7
320
15.3
29 - 13.1
102
- 1.0
175
- 2.1
248
1.0
321
15.1
30 - 13.2
103
- 0.8
176
- 2.3
249
1.4
322
14.9
31 - 13.4
104
- 0.5
177
- 2.5
250
1.7
323
14.7
32 - 13.6
105
- 0.3
178
- 2.7
251
2.0
324
14.5
33 - 13.7
106
- 0.0
179
- 2.9
252
2.4
325
14.3
34 - 13.8
107
0.2
180
- 3.1
253
2.7
326
14.0
35 - 31.9
108
0.5
181
- 3.4
254
3.1
327
13.8
36 - 14.0
109
0.7
182
- 3.5
255
3.4
328
13.5
37 - 14.1
110
0.9
183
- 3.7
256
3.8
329
13.2
38 - 14.2
111
1.1
184
- 3.9
257
4.1
330
12.9
39 - 14.2
112
1.3
185
- 4.1
258
4.5
331
12.6
40 - 14.3
113
1.5
186
- 4.3
259
4.8
332
12.3
41 - 14.3
114
1.7
187
- 4.5
260
5.2
333
11.9
42 - 14.3
115
1.9
188
- 4.6
261
5.5
334
11.6
43 - 14.3
116
2.1
189
- 4.8
262
5.9
335
11.2
44 - 14.3
117
2.2
190
- 5.0
263
6.3
336
10.9
45 - 14.3
118
2.4
191
- 5.1
264
6.6
337
10.5
46 - 14.3
119
2.5
192
- 5.2
265
7.0
338
10.1
47 - 14.2
120
2.7
193
- 5.4
266
7.3
339
9.7
48 - 14.1
121
2.8
194
- 5.5
267
7.7
340
9.3
49 - 14.1
122
3.0
195
- 5.6
268
8.0
341
8.9
50 - 14.0
123
3.1
196
- 5.8
269
8.4
342
8.4
51 - 13.9
124
3.2
197
- 5.9
270
8.7
343
8.0
52 - 13.8
125
3.3
198
- 6.0
271
9.0
344
7.5
53 - 13.7
126
3.4
199
- 6.0
272
9.4
345
7.1
54 - 13.6
127
3.4
200
- 6.1
273
9.7
346
6.6
55 - 13.4
128
3.5
201
- 6.2
274
10.0
347
6.2
56 - 13.3
129
3.6
202
- 6.3
275
10.4
348
5.7
57 - 13.1
130
3.6
203
- 6.3
276
10.7
349
5.2
58 - 13.0
131
3.7
204
- 6.4
277
11.0
350
4.8
59 - 12.8
132
3.7
205
- 6.4
278
11.3
351
4.3
60 - 12.6
133
3.7
206
- 6.4
279
11.6
352
3.8
61 - 12.4
134
3.7
207
- 6.4
280
11.9
353
3.3
62 - 12.2
135
3.7
208
- 6.4
281
12.2
354
2.8
63 - 12.0
136
3.7
209
- 6.4
282
12.5
355
2.3
64 - 11.8
137
3.7
210
- 6.4
283
12.7
356
1.8
65 - 11.6
138
3.7
211
- 6.4
284
13.0
357
1.3
66 - 11.3
139
3.7
212
- 6.3
285
13.3
358
0.7
67 - 11.1
140
3.6
213
- 6.3
286
13.5
359
0.2
68 - 10.8
141
3.6
214
- 6.2
287
13.8
360
- 0.3
69 - 10.6
142
3.5
215
- 6.2
288
14.0
361
- 0.8
70 - 10.3
143
3.4
216
- 6.1
289
14.2
362
- 1.3
71 - 10.0
144
3.3
217
- 6.0
290
14.4
363
- 1.8
72 - 9.8
145
3.3
218
- 5.9
291
14.6
364
- 2.3
73 - 9.5
146
3.2
219
- 5.8
292
14.8
365
- 2.8
49
Figure 46.--Equatorial crossing time (local civil or mean time) for the three
LANDSAT satellites. The last data shown are for 23 July 1979. (Data furnished
by John Price, NASA/GSFC).
the Equator. The exact number of degrees displacement depends upon the latitudi-
nal distance of the ground site of interest from the equator. Figure 47 shows the
time difference that adjusts the ECT to a particular latitude in the northern
hemisphere. These data account for the longitudinal change. For Phoenix (33
26’
N., 112
O1’ W.), the time difference is about 21 min, assuming that the orbital
path is directly above Phoenix. An approximate equation for this time difference
is
where
T (latitude) is in minutes and L is in degrees north latitude.
To calculate the local standard time for a LANDSAT-3 overpass for a
particular latitude and longitude:
(a)Use equation 36 to estimate the ECT for the particular day.
(b)Use equation 37 to estimate the
T (latitude) adjustment (in minutes).
(c)Calculate
T (longitude) from equation 33 (in minutes).
(d)Add (a) + (b) + (c).
50
Figure 47.--The time difference in minutes between the local civil time at a
particular north latitude and the local civil time of equatorial crossing
(data furnished by NASA/GSFC).
Example: The LANDSAT-3 overpass time for 18 July 1979 on the nearest orbital
track over Phoenix was
(a)18 July 1979 was day 365 + 199 = 564. Using equation 36,
ECT = 9.515 hours (0931).
(b)
T (33
lat.) = 21.46 min (round to 21).
(c)
T (112
long.) = 28 min.
(d) 0931 + 21 min + 28 min = 1020 MST.
The value of 1020 will decrease slightly with time until the orbit is
adjusted. If no orbital adjustments are made, on 1 January 1981, the overpass
time will be at approximately 1004 MST.
LANDSAT orbit tracks are approximately 1.43
of longitude apart. This
translates to 5.7 min. Therefore, the overpass time is bracketed by
2.9 min
to allow for the fact that the satellite may not be directly overhead. Maps
showing the orbit path are available from NASA. These maps also give the date
of overpass. LANDSAT’s repeat cycle is 18 days.
INFRARED THERMOMETERS
IR thermometers provide a noncontact means for measuring the apparent
emitted thermal radiation from an object.
If the emissivity
6
of the object is
known (the emissivity of most vegetation and soil surfaces is between 0.93 and
_________
6
Emissivity refers to the relative efficiency with which an object emits
radiation. Swain and Davis (1978) define it as "the ratio of the radiation
given off by a surface to the radiation given off by a blackbody at the same
temperature; a blackbody has an emissivity of 1, other objects between 0 and
1."
51
0.97, for complex canopy structures it approaches 1.0), the absolute
temperature can then be determined. Scanning IR thermometers mounted in
aircraft and satellite platforms are able to collect data over broad
regions, while portable hand-held devices can be used on the ground to
provide temperatures of more limited, identified targets. Two major
advantages of IR thermometers are their capability to rapidly determine
temperatures remotely and nondestructively and to integrate temperatures
areally over the entire field of view, thus avoiding single point
measurement and the associated sampling problems.
Many types of hand-held IR thermometers are available. The February
1980 issue of "Measurements and Control" gives an extensive list of
commercially available instruments, with specifications, prices, and
manufacturer’s addresses.
Field use
:
To obtain representative canopy temperatures, it is
desirable to point the IR thermometer so that a maximum amount of
vegetation is viewed by the sensor. This can be accomplished by viewing the
target obliquely and at right angles to any structures that might be
present in the field. The target area viewed by a circular field-of-view
instrument when deployed in an oblique fashion is teardrop shaped, and the
upper edge of the target is much higher than one might intuitively expect
(especially with larger, i.e., 20
, field-of- view lenses). We usually take
readings looking in several different directions to minimize effects that
insolation angle and viewing azimuth angle may have on apparent target
temperature. Our routine measurements are taken 1 to 2 hours following
solar noon, a time when a maximum difference between canopy and air
temperature usually occurs. Routine weather observations, i.e., cloud
cover, windspeed, precipitation, target conditions, and wet and dry bulb
air temperatures, are recorded whenever canopy temperatures are measured.
Calibrations
:
Experience has shown us that the readout temperature on
most factory calibrated instruments is not an accurate representation of
apparent blackbody temperatures. This probably results from the fact that
calibration is a tedious and difficult procedure for which good standards
have not yet been devised and also because the calibrations of each
instrument tend to drift with age of the electronics, the sensors, and the
wear and tear of field usage. For these reasons, we calibrate all
instruments as precisely as possible under standardized conditions using a
precision blackbody calibration device. Such calibrations are routinely
carried out at 2- to 4-week intervals and whenever an instrument is
suspected to be in error. Care is taken to calibrate instruments as close
as possible to the manner in which they are used in the field. For example,
both the PRT-5 and Telatemp are calibrated on battery rather than line
power because they are rarely used in the field on line power. Since the
calibrations of our IR thermometers are usually linear, it is a simple
matter to arrive at corrected apparent temperatures in the field either
with a portable calculator or a calibration curve, or after collecting
instrument readout data, to make the corrections on a computer.
To keep constant check on thermometers between calibrations, we have
found it helpful to institute a two-temperature calibration check each time
the instruments are used. We suspended a black cavity into an inexpensive
circulating water bath and then simultaneously recorded the temperature of
the water with a mercury-in-glass thermometer and the temperature of the
black cavity with the IR thermometer. A heater in the water bath was used
to raise the temperature
52
of the water by 10
to 15
C so that about 20 min later, after canopy
temperatures were taken, a second calibration check at the higher
temperature could be made. Any deviation from the expected is an indication
that the IR thermometer needs recalibration. Certain manufacturers will
provide a black-body plate with a thermometer imbedded in it to perform
these daily checks. Used in a fairly stable environment with no direct
insolation falling on the plate, these will probably provide an excellent
way to check the daily performance of the IR thermometer. We cannot
overstress the importance of good calibration and regular daily checks.
Precautions
:
We have noted the following precautions in the use of IR
thermometers, which we share with other users with the hope it will spare
them having to discover it for themselves.
a)
Temperature equilibrium and warm-up periods
. Laboratory
calibrations have determined that the most reliable data can be expected
when the instruments have been equilibrated out-of-doors in the shade for
about 30 min prior to the readings. This allows the electronics and the
housing of the instrument to come to equilibrium with the air temperature
and generally gives more stable readings. In addition, the air-temperature
sensor provided on the AG-42 will not give correct target-air differentials
unless this procedure is followed. Taking the IR thermometer out of a air-
conditioned pickup and immediately using it in 110
F air temperatures is
not suggested when target-air differentials are required. Also, the target-
air differential must be calibrated in a known temperature room before the
data in that mode can be trusted, because the factory calibration of the
thermistor air temperature device may be in error. The PRT-5 requires an
initial warmup so that the internal reference temperature will heat up
sufficiently and stabilize. The AG-42 does not require "on" time to warm
up. The instrument "comes to life" instantly upon demand.
b)
Operation in a "noisy" environment
. Instruments should not be
calibrated or operated in any area that might be considered noisy from an
electrical signal standpoint. We have found that stray signals from
electronic devices and CB radios can change the output of some instruments.
c)
Operation in dusty environment
. This should be avoided when
possible. Dust should not be allowed to accumulate on the optics of the
instruments. It can be removed by blasts of Dust Off, a commmercially
available product used in the photography industry.
Caution
:
Do not use Dust Off prior to or during any measurements or
calibrations.
The refrigerant propellant 2,2-4 dichloro-difluoroethane
used in that product is an effective filter in a portion of the thermal
spectrum. It will alter apparent temperatures significantly, especially if
the target temperature is different from air temperature. After a blast of
Dust Off, we found that apparent temperature of a target was 36
C when its
true temperature was 40
C and the air temperature was 25
C. We found this
effect persists much longer than expected (15 to 30 min).
d)
Miscellaneous precautions and procedures
. Do not allow instruments
to get wet or allow water to enter the lens areas. Leave the instruments on
charge when they are not in use. Both the PRT-5 and Telatemp have trickle
charging circuits so that the batteries cannot be overcharged. Do not point
the sensor at the sun.
53
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested