Due to the time constants of the AG-42, more time (~5 sec) must be given for
the thermometer to reach a stable reading when targets alternate between
very hot soil to cool plants than if the targets are consistently within the
same temperature range.
The AG-42 has the capability of measuring not only the target surface
temperature but also the target-air temperature differential. This latter
parameter is obtained by merely pulling the trigger on the gun when pointing
it at the surface of interest. A few precautions are in order in using this
capability. The thermistor, which senses air temperatures, is housed in the
front part of the gun and consequently is slightly influenced by the
surrounding metal. Equilibrating the gun out-of-doors for about 30 min tends
to minimize the influence of the housing on the reading of the thermistor;
however, we have found in some of our laboratory tests that the thermistor
may actually be reading about a degree lower than the ambient air
temperature. As a consequence, a separate calibration should be made if the
AG-42 is to be used in the target- air differential mode.
We have observed that it is not possible to get an accurate reading while
walking with the PRT-5 due to the needle fluctuations of the analog readout.
Shade must be provided for the AG-42 digital readout. The red LED display
washes out in normal daylight. Shading can be effected by slipping the
leather holster or a length of 3-inch-diameter black PVC over the rear of
the gun.
A helpful exercise for each operator to go through before using an IR
thermometer is to determine its field of view. Mount the instrument on a
tripod at about the same height and angle that would be used in the field
when looking at a crop. While one person observes the readout, another
person should be on one side of the estimated field of view with a small
piece of aluminum foil. Place the foil on the ground and move it towards the
field of view. The operator can tell from the output of the IR thermometer
when the foil comes within the field of view as the temperature will drop
considerably. (Aluminum has an emissivity of ~0.08.) Place a stake at this
particular point tangent to the field of view. The foil mover can go around
the field of view of the instrument placing stakes and can mark out fairly
well the area seen by the instrument when held in the normal oblique
position. The same procedure can be used if the gun is to be held looking
straight down.
PHOTOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CANOPY COVER
An estimate of percent plant canopy cover is useful when interpreting
remotely sensed measurements. It is important to know what proportion of the
target area viewed by a radiometer is green canopy and how much is bare soil
or senescent brown or yellow leaves. We have found that color slides taken
at weekly intervals throughout the growing season are sufficient to quantify
these cover relationships. The technique is inexpensive, fairly rapid, and
yields reproducible results. In addition to providing a means for
quantifying cover relationships in situ, photographs are invaluable for
documenting the general growth patterns and vigor of the plants, determining
phenological growth stages, and documenting canopy architecture, lodging,
and visual symptoms of nutrient
54
Pdf edit hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf; add links to pdf
Pdf edit hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink in pdf; active links in pdf
deficiency, disease, and insect damage. In some instances, it is possible
to monitor a plant’s short-term response to water stress such as leaf
rolling or curling--a condition that can not be easily documented by other
measurement techniques.
We take two nadir-oriented and one oblique photograph per plot each week.
The nadir-oriented pictures are taken looking straight down at the same
target areas each time from a height of about 2 m. Photographs are normally
taken at 1/60 sec using ASA 64 color slide film and focusing approximately
one-third of the way into the canopy. The photographs are usually taken
around solar-noon so that the depth of light penetration into the canopy is
near maximum and the high light levels result in the greatest possible
depth of field. We use an automatic exposure, motor-driven, 35-mm camera,
equipped with a 50-mm focal length, f. 1.8 lens, which has a horizontal
field-of-view of about 46
. It also has a data back, which enables each
frame to be labeled with a scene identification code or the calendar date.
Resultant slides are projected onto a 50C by 70-cm screen of white gridded
posterboard on which 200 dots were randomly positioned. Each dot is
classified according to the type of target it "hits." The grid network on
the screen reduces the chances of double counting a particular dot.
Tabulation is facilitated by a mechanical counter. The categories we use to
classify hits are bare soil, sunlit and shaded; green leaves, sunlit and
shaded; brown leaves, sunlit and shaded; heads, sunlit and shaded; awes;
unclassified shadow; and comments. Examples of percent green cover, percent
brown cover, and percent bare soil data are given in figure 48. The data
show the type of results one might expect from wheat canopies planted at
different times of the year.
There is a systematic bias introduced whenever a lens with a field-of-view
greater than zero is used. Although wide-angle lenses may seem attractive
because of the relatively larger target area that can be viewed, their use
should be avoided. Plants at the perimeter of images taken with wide-angle
lenses (i.e., focal length <50 mm) will be viewed obliquely and thus
present more cross-sectional percent cover than would occur if one were to
look straight down on the images. This is the same problem that exists with
radio meters as was discussed in section 5. The data presented in figure 48
have not been corrected for field-of-view induced bias; however, we
attempted to minimize this error by projecting the slides so that only the
center two-thirds of the photograph is analyzed. Williams (1979) presented
an error analysis of the photographic technique for measuring percent
vegetative cover.
STANDARDIZATION OF MEASUREMENTS AND RECORDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL 
CONDITIONS 
During the American Society of Agronomy meetings at Ft. Collins, Colo.
(August 1979), the yield modeling group met to develop a set of standards
to strive for uniformity in data collection with hand-held radiometers.
Armand Bauer collected the various comments and put together an excellent
set of instructions. The following is taken directly from Bauer’s letter of
13 August
1979.
1. Maintain two bare soil areas as a reference in the field in which
measurements are made. One should be kept "natural" (exposed to
55
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
adding links to pdf in preview; pdf link to attached file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlinks to pdf online; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
Figure 8.--Fraction of bare soil, green biomass, and brown biomass for three
wheat plots over a growing season.
air) and other made wet before measurement is made. Surface should be smooth
or should have the same surface roughness as the field in which measurements
are made. If tillage is a variable, maintain areas of surface roughness
included in the experiment.
2.
Be consistent in the time of day that reflection measurements are made.
a.Record the exact location of each site. Specify by latitude and
longitude.
b.Record time of day measurements are made (begin, end). Solar noon
one hour is preferred.
c.Daily measurements are preferred - best results usually are obtained
on sunny days.
d.Keep a log of prevailing weather conditions during time of
measurement.
e.Record the row direction.
f.Caution
(1) Onset of stress, or stress affects reflectance.
(2) Wind increases the "error" in data.
(3) Avoid days with high cirrus clouds; days as free of clouds as
possible are preferred.
56
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers
add hyperlink pdf document; chrome pdf from link
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package
add hyperlink pdf; add links pdf document
3. Number of measurements per plot.
a.Depends on growth stage, but a minimum of six per plot is
recommended. Don’t stand in one plot to make these. Take the first
one over the row (eyeballed) - take step - take reading - take step -
take reading, etc.
b.Ray Jackson can be contacted if more detailed information is needed.
4. Height above crop that radiometer is to be held.
Recommend a minimum of one meter above top of crop canopy. Precision
is greater with heights above one meter.
5. Orientation while holding instrument when measurements are made.
a.Whenever possible, stand to north and extend hand-held radio meter
toward south.
b.Avoid measurements in shadows cast by reader or by other extraneous
sources.
c.Be consistent.
6. Instrument bearer should avoid wearing light-colored clothes; avoid
white shoes or bare feet.
7. BaSO
4
plates for calibration will be supplied with the instrument. Avoid
scratching, abrasion, etc. Keep protected from elements of weather when
not in use. Insects (especially grasshoppers) are "bad news" if they
crawl on the plates.
8. Remember to maintain a log of "standardized" plant data. (Percent cover
etc.; take pictures when possible.)
9. Keep track of everything you do. This may provide clues to improvement
in use of the instrument.
PROCEDURES IN SUPPORT OF HAND-HELD RADIOMETER OBSERVATIONS 
At the SEA/AR Yield Group meeting in August 1979 at Ft. Collins, Colo.,
Craig Wiegand was asked to provide information in addition to that contained in
Armand Bauer’s letter (previous section). Wiegand’s material is presented in
this section.
A.
Hand-held radiometer measurements
1. Record the time of each plot or treatment observations to the nearest 5
minutes (ideally a daily check of the National Bureau of Standards,
Greenwich meridian time from radio station WWV would be helpful).
2. Soil background showing through the canopy will affect readings.
Therefore, (a) remove plants from a small area (in plots or turn-row)
57
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
change link in pdf; adding links to pdf document
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add a link to a pdf file
that are tilled the same as the area where canopy measurements are
made, and make same spectral observations as over canopies, (b) note
whether soil surface is visibly wet or dry at time of observations,
and (c) work, if can, in fields that have been soil mapped by SCS
and superimpose this information on experimental areas used, and (d)
graph bare soil readings along with canopy readings as a f(time).
The spectral observations for the canopy variables should
extrapolate to the soil background observation at zero leaf area
index, biomass or plant height if surface conditions of the soil are
the same at bare soil sites as at the cropped sites.
3. The proportion of the incident sunlight that is specular versus
diffuse on a given measurement day may prove to be a useful
characterizer of atmospheric condition. Thus, it may prove useful to
obtain radiance measurements of selected canopy sites, the reference
panel, and the bare soil areas when shaded and unshaded. Shading can
be accomplished by fixing a piece of plywood, sheet aluminum, or
even cardboard to a pole and shading the area where measurements are
made. Size of the shaded area should be such that the field of view
of the hand-held radiometer is completely filled by shadow. A
minimum size shade is probably about twice the size of the
reflectance standard; it should be held high enough above the target
that 10 percent or less of the sky is obscured.
a.The shadowed observations yield information on the signal expected
from the shadows within the canopies. (The major components of the
spectral signals are sunlit vegetation, sunlit soil, and shadowed
leaves and soil.)
b.Note: Irradiance is a measure of hemispherical downwelling energy
influx; it is usually measured with the sensor pointing upward
with a cosine response diffuser over the sensor. Radiance
measurements are made looking downward with an instrument that has
a small solid angle field of view (say from 2 to 20 degrees) such
as the hand-held radiometers have. (See attached reference on
terminology.) The radiance measurement for the sunlit reference
panel is proportional to the specular solar plus diffuse sky
irradiance. The shaded panel reading represents the diffuse (or
sky) irradiance. Subtraction of the shaded reading from the sunlit
reading yields the specular irradiance component of the incident
flux.
Caution
:
For irradiance to be inferred from radiance
measurements the surfaces have to be Lambertian (perfect
diffusers). The BaSO
4
panel, plant leaves and soil are not
perfectly Lambertian but come fairly close.
4. Although signals will be lower, bidirectional reflectance theory
such as Suits’ indicates that observations under overcast conditions
are meaningful.
Caution
:
Lower signals are subject to greater influence by the same
noise than full sun readings would be.
5. The reflectance standard must be level, not obscured from the sky by
58
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Signatures. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark
clickable pdf links; add hyperlink to pdf in
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; c# read pdf from url
plants or other surrounding objects - such as the observer - and the
radiometer should be perpendicular to it. The same holds for plant
canopy observations.
B.
Plant observations
1.
Table 5 gives the simple correlation between various spectral intervals
and percent ground cover, leaf area index, fresh biomass, dry biomass, and
plant water content of spring wheat (Aldrich et al. 1978). In the visible
(0.40 to 0.74
µ
m) and water absorption bands (1.3 to 2.5
µ
m) the
correlations are negative because plants are obscuring the more reflective
soil background. In these wavelengths, plant leaves are efficient
absorbers - by pigments and water, respectively. Within the reflective
infrared (0.74 to 1.3
µ
m) wavelength interval, the correlations are
positive due to multiple transmission and reflectance of impinging light
by the translucent leaves and leaf layers.
2.
Plant height should also be measured routinely. It is an easy, non-
destructive measurement that can be taken at sites of repetitive spectral
measurements. It will differ somewhat from year to year for a given
species at a location just as yields and the other plant parameters do.
Table 5.--The linear correlations (r) of the proposed thematic mapper and LANDSAT
MSS wavelength bands with percent soil cover, 1eaf area index, fresh and dry
biomass, and plant water content of spring wheat (from Aldrich et al. 1978)
59
It can be measured by sighting across the tops of plants to a meter stick,
as distance ground to tip of uplifted leaf (or inflorescence), or as
distance from ground (or crown) to the uppermost leaf ligule (or collar)
that completely surrounds the stem or pseudostem.
Unfortunately, there
seems to be no standardization.
3.
Plant population per unit ground area is useful. It need be obtained only
once - when the stand is firmly established.
Caution
:
If sorghum or corn, e.g., are planted in a "clumsy" pattern, some
plants will be puny and barren. Thus even in nontillering crops, number of
plants present is not necessarily synonymous with the number of heads or
ears produced per unit ground area.
4.
Episodic events, such as leaf or stem rust infestation, foliage-damaging
freezes, insect infestations sufficient to damage the plants or lower
yield, hot winds, etc., need to be noted.
5.
Phenologic events during plant development, such as those in the Feekes
scale for small grains, should be recorded.
C.
Weather data
Measure and record the following when feasible:
1.
Maximum and minimum daily temperature.
2.
Insolation.
3.
Daily precipitation.
D.
Sampling
1.
All observations should be representative of the field or plot being ob-
served.
a.
Ideally spectral observations should encompass the area occupied by at
least three rows and middles. Not so difficult for small grains, but
more of a problem for corn, soybeans, cotton, etc. Alternative here may
be a permanently positioned pipe that the pole supporting the radiometer
can be inserted into. Then, length of the arm supporting the radiometer
becomes a design consideration also. If a permanently positioned pipe is
used, and the arm supporting the radiometer is the row width, beginning
measurements over the row the permanent pipe is in and continuing every
45
1
around the circle formed by pivoting the arm yields four
observations over rows and four over middles between rows. Those two
sets will differ until the leaves overlap in the middles. These readings
made looking into the sun could differ from those looking with the sun
if proportion of sunlit leaves versus shadow differ in the two look
directions.
b.
Phenological measurements on four or five representative plants that
can be averaged have been adequate in my experience. Heading, anthesis,
etc., however, are often based on their observation on half the plants
or tillers present, so that subjective judgement is almost always
involved.
60
c.
There are statistical guides such as the following for determining
number of observations or samples to take: The number of samples
required to estimate the true plot mean within 10 percent is given by
wherein,
t is the abscissa of the normal curve which cuts off an area
α
at
the
tails (in this case
α
= 0.05, t
2
~ 4), S
2
is the variance,
d is the amount of error allowed, (0.10) (mean).
d.
Experiments should be restricted to what can be done well. A lot of
poorly documented treatments are less valuable than a restricted
number that are more adequately characterized. (Small is beautiful.)
E. Ground photography
See PHOTOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CANOPY COVER.
F. Terminology
See p. 58-63, Vol. I, "Manual of Remote Sensing," American Society of
Photogrammetry, Falls Church, Va. 1975.
SELECTED REFERENCES
(Literature cited in text is indicated by *)
Aase, J. K., and Siddoway, F. H. 1980. Determining winter wheat stand densities
using spectral reflectance measurements. Agron. J. 72:149-152.
Aldrich, J. S., Bauer, N. E., Hixson, M. M., and others. 1978. Proc. Int’l Sympos.
on Remote Sensing Observation and Inventory of Earth Resources and Endangered
Environment 1:629-649.
*Allen, W. A., and Richardson, A. J. 1968. Interaction of light with a plant
canopy. Optical Soc. Am. 58:1023-1031.
Allen, W. A., Gausman, H. W., Richardson, A. J., and Wiegand, C. L. 1970. Mean
effective optical constants of thirteen kinds of plant leaves. Applied Optics
9:2573-2577.
Conaway, J., and van Bavel, C. H. N. 1967. Evaporation from a wet soil surface
calculated from a radiometrically determined surface temperature. J. Applied
Meteorol. 6:650-655.
*Deering, D. W., Rouse, J. W., Jr., Haas, R. H., and Schell, H. H. 1975. Measuring
"forage production" of grazing units from Landsat MSS data. Proc. Tenth Int.
Symp. on Remote Sensing of Environment. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor. P. 1169-
1198.
61
*Deering, D. W. 1978. Rangeland reflectance characteristics measured by aircraft
and spacecraft sensors. Ph.D. Diss. Texas A&M Univ. College Station, 338 p.
*Duggin, M. J. 1977. Likely effects of solar elevation on the quantification of
changes in vegetation with maturity using sequential Landsat imagery. Applied
Optics 16:521-523.
Ehrler, W. L., Idso, S. B., Jackson, R. D., and Reginato, R. J. 1978. DiurnaL
changes in plant water potential and canopy temperature of wheat as affected by
drought. Agron. Jour. 70:999-1004.
Gausman, H. W., and Allen, W. A. 1973. Optical parameters of leaves of thirty
plant species. Plant Physiol. 52:57-62.
Gausman, H. W., Learner, R. W., Noriega, J. R., and Rodriguez, R. R. 1977. Field-
measured spectroradiometer reflectances of disked and nondisked soil with and
without wheat straw. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. J. 41:793-796.
Hatfield, J. L. 1979. Canopy temperatures: The usefulness and reliability of
remote measurements. Agron. J. 71:889-892.
Hatfield, J. L., Reginato, R. J., Idso, S. B., and Jackson, R. D. 1978. Surface
temperature and albedo observations as tools for evapotranspiration and crop-
yield estimations. In COSPAR: The Contribution of Space Observations to Global
Food Information Systems, Edited by E. A. Godby and J. Otterman, Pergamon
Press, Oxford and New York. P. 101-104.
Hatfield, J. L., Reginato, R. J., Jackson, R. D., and others. 1979.
Remote
sensing of surface temperature and soil moisture, evapotranspiration and yield
estimations.
Proc. of 5th Canadian Remote Sens. Symp., Victoria, Brit. Col.
P. 460-466.
Holben, B. N., Tucker, C. J., and Fan, C. J. 1980. Spectral assessment of soybean
leaf area and leaf biomass. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing
46:651-656.
Idso, S. B., Jackson, R. D., and Reginato, R. J. 1976. Compensating for environ-
mental variability in the thermal inertia approach to remote sensing of soil
moisture. Jour. of Appl. Meteorol. 15:811-817.
Idso, S. B., Jackson, R. D., and Reginato, R. J. 1976. Determining emittances for
use in infrared thermometry: A simple technique for expanding the utility of
existing methods. Jour, of Appl. Meteorol. 15:16-20.
Idso, S. B., Jackson, R. D., and Reginato, R. J. 1978.
Remote sensing for agri-
culture water management and crop yield prediction. Agric. Water Mgmt.
1:299-310.
Idso, S. B., Reginato, R. J., Hatfield, J. L. and others. 1980. A generalization
of the stress-degree day concept of yield prediction to accommodate a diversity
of crops. Agricultural Meteorol. 21:205-211.
62
Idso, S. B., Schmugge, T. J., Jackson, R. D., and Reginato, R. J. 1975. The
utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of soil
water status. Jour. Geophys. Res. (O&A) 80:3044-3049.
Jackson, R. D., Idso, S. B., Reginato, R. J., and Ehrler, W. L. 1977. Crop
temperature reveals stress. Crops and Soils 29:10-13.
*Jackson, R. D., Pinter, P. J., Jr., Idso, S. B., and Reginato, R. J. 1979.
Wheat spectral reflectance: Interaction between crop configuration, sun
elevation, and azimuth angle. Applied Optics 18:3730-3722.
Jackson, R. D., Reginato, R. J., and Idso, S. B. 1977. Wheat canopy temperature:
A practical tool for evaluating water requirements. Water Resources Res.
13:651-656.
*Jackson, R. D., Reginato, R. J., Pinter, P. J., Jr., and Idso, S. B. 1979. Plant
canopy information extraction from composite scene reflectance of row crops.
Applied Optics 18:3775-3782.
Kanemasu, E. T. 1974. Seasonal canopy reflectance patterns of wheat, sorghum, and
soybean. Remote Sensing of Environment 3:43-47.
*Kauth, R. J., and Thomas, C. S. 1976. The tasseled cap - A graphic description
of the spectral-temperal development of agricultural crops as seen by Landsat.
Proc. Symp. on Machine Processing of Remotely Sensed Data.
P. 41-51.
West Lafayette, Ind.
Kimes, D. S., Idso, S. B., Pinter, P. J., Jr., and others. 1980. Complexities of
nadir-looking radiometric temperature measurements of plant canopies. Applied
Optics 19:2162-2168.
Kimes, D. S., Idso, S. B., Pinter, P. J., Jr., and others. View angle effects in
radiometric measurement of plant canopy temperatures. Remote Sensing of
Environment. (In press).
Kimes, D. S., Markham, B. L., Tucker, C. J., and McMurtrey, J. E. 1980. Temporal
relationships between spectral response and agronomic variables of a corn
canopy. NASA/GSFC TM. (In preparation).
*Larsen, H. D. 1958. Compiler, Rinehart Mathematical Tables, Formulas and Curves,
Rinehart and Co., New York. P. 192-193.
Learner, R. W., and LaRocca, A. J. 1973. Calibration of field spectroradio
meters. Optical Engineering 12:124-130.
*Learner, R. W., Noriega, J. R., and Wiegand, C. L. 1978. Seasonal changes in
reflectance of two wheat cultivars. Agron. J. 70:113-118.
LeMaster, E. W., Chance, J. E., and Wiegand, C. L. 1980. A seasonal verification
of the Suit’s spectral reflectance model for wheat. Photogrammetric Engineering
and Remote Sensing 46:107-114.
63
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested