c# code to download pdf file : Add hyperlink pdf file Library SDK component .net asp.net html mvc wcms_0920540-part951

International Labour Conference, 97th Session, 2008 
Report V 
Skills for improved productivity, 
employment growth and 
development
Fifth item on the agenda 
International Labour Office  Geneva 
Add hyperlink pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf email link; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Add hyperlink pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf; add page number to pdf hyperlink
ISBN 978-92-2-119489-7 
ISSN 0074-6681 
First edition 2008 
The designations employed in ILO publications, which are in conformity with United Nations practice, and the 
presentation of material  therein do not imply  the expression of any  opinion whatsoever on  the part of the 
International Labour Office concerning the legal status of any country, area or territory or of its authorities, or 
concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. 
Reference to names of firms and commercial products and processes does not imply their endorsement by the 
International Labour Office, and any failure to mention a particular firm, commercial product or process is not a 
sign of disapproval. 
ILO publications can be obtained through major booksellers or ILO local offices in many countries, or direct 
from ILO Publications, International Labour Office, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Catalogues or lists of 
new publications are available free of charge from the above address, or by email: pubvente@ilo.org.  
Visit our website: www.ilo.org/publns. 
Formatted by TTE: reference Confrep\ILC97(2008)\V\ILC97-V[2008-03-0116-1]-En.doc 
Printed in Switzerland 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. can edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file permission Hyperlink Edit.
add url pdf; add links in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. edit PDF password and digital signature, and set PDF file permission Hyperlink Edit.
pdf link; add hyperlink to pdf online
Contents 
Page 
Executive summary.............................................................................................................  v 
Abbreviations and acronyms...............................................................................................  xv 
Chapter 1. Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues.........  1 
1.1.  Understanding productivity..................................................................................  1 
1.2.  Productivity, employment and development .......................................................  2 
1.3.  Skills policies for a virtuous circle: Linking productivity, employment  
and development.................................................................................................  8 
Chapter 2. Connecting skills development to productivity and employment  
growth in developing and developed countries.................................................  15 
2.1.  High-income OECD countries.............................................................................  19 
2.2.  Countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the  
Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)......................................................  30 
2.3.  Developing countries in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America,  
the Arab States and Africa..................................................................................  35 
2.4.  Least developed countries..................................................................................  48 
Chapter 3. Skills and productivity in the workplace and along value chains ......................  55 
3.1.  The sustainable enterprise: Competitiveness, productivity and  
skills development...............................................................................................  56 
3.2.  Enterprise value chains and clusters: Improving productivity and  
employment outcomes through skills development ............................................  63 
3.3.  Training in high-performance workplaces...........................................................  68 
3.4.  Improving skills and productivity in small enterprises .........................................  71 
3.5.  How governments and the social partners can support enterprise-level ........... 
training and skills development...........................................................................  75 
Chapter 4. Target groups ...................................................................................................  79 
4.1.  Rural communities ..............................................................................................  79 
4.2.  Disadvantaged youth ..........................................................................................  88 
4.3.  Persons with disabilities......................................................................................  94 
4.4.  Migrant workers...................................................................................................  99 
iii
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; adding a link to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide quick access to the website or other file.
adding hyperlinks to pdf; add links to pdf document
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
iv 
Chapter 5. Skills policies as drivers of development.......................................................... 109 
5.1.  Capabilities, technology and information: A dynamic process............................ 109 
5.2.  Coordinating skills development policies with economic policies........................ 117 
Chapter 6. Skills policies responding to global drivers of change: Technology, trade 
and climate change........................................................................................... 127 
6.1.  Building social capabilities to promote technological catching up....................... 127 
6.2.  Maximizing the benefits and minimizing the costs of trade and investment........ 131 
6.3.  Climate change................................................................................................... 139 
Main policy orientations arising out of the report................................................................. 143 
Suggested points for discussion.......................................................................................... 145 
Bibliography......................................................................................................................... 147 
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding links to pdf; adding an email link to a pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Add necessary references: The target resolution of the output tiff file, it is invalid for pdf file.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
Executive summary 
Introduction 
The central aim of this report is to examine how, within a decent work perspective, 
countries  can develop  their skills  base  so  as to  increase  both  the  quantity  and  the 
productivity  of  labour  employed  in  the  economy.  Inadequate  education  and  skills 
development  keep  economies  trapped  in  a  vicious  circle  of  low  education,  low 
productivity and low income. The report therefore analyses how strategies to upgrade 
and enhance the relevance of skills training and to improve access to skills for more 
women  and  men  can  instead  help  countries  move  to  a  virtuous  circle  of  higher 
productivity, employment and incomes growth, and development.  
Skills development 
1
is central to improving productivity. In turn, productivity is 
an important source of improved living standards  and growth. Other  critical  factors 
include macroeconomic policies to maximize opportunities for pro-poor employment 
growth, an enabling environment for sustainable enterprise development, social dialogue 
and fundamental investments in basic education, health and physical infrastructure. 
Effective  skills  development  systems  –  which  connect  education  to  technical 
training, technical training to labour market entry and labour market entry to workplace 
and lifelong learning – can help countries sustain productivity growth and translate that 
growth into more and better jobs. This report examines the challenges faced by countries 
at different levels of development and their policy options. In so doing, it seeks lessons 
that are relevant for least developed, developing and more industrialized countries in 
linking skills development systems not only to the current needs of labour markets, but 
also  to  future  needs  as  technologies,  markets,  the  environment  and  development 
strategies change. 
Background 
At its 295th Session in March 2006, the Governing Body placed the topic of skills 
for improved productivity, employment growth and development on the agenda of the 
97th  Session  (2008)  of  the  International  Labour  Conference.  In  approaching  this 
multifaceted subject, the present report seeks to apply the components of effective skills 
and employability policies articulated in the conclusions concerning human resources 
training and development agreed upon at the 88th Session of the Conference in 2000 
(ILO,  2000a)  and  in  the  Human  Resources  Development  Recommendation,  2004 
(No. 195), adopted at  the 92nd  Session  of the  Conference  in 2004. These tripartite 
discussions identified policies, programmes and institutions that can help to realize the 
potential of skills development to expand opportunities for decent work. 
1
In this report, “skills development” is understood in broad terms to mean, as spelt out in the conclusions 
concerning human resources training and development (ILO, 2000a, para. 5), basic education, initial training and 
lifelong learning.  
v
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add a link to a pdf in preview; pdf link to specific page
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
pdf edit hyperlink; add links to pdf online
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
Sequence of recent tripartite discussions 
and research on skills development in 
relation to productivity and 
employment for decent work 
1999  World Employment Report  
1998–99: Employability in the 
global economy: How training 
matters 
2000  ILC general discussion: Human 
resources training and 
development: Vocational guidance 
and vocational training 
2001  World Employment Report 2001: 
Life at work in the information 
economy 
2002  ILC general discussion on decent 
work and the informal economy 
2003  Governing Body Committee on 
Employment and Social Policy 
(ESP), Global Employment Agenda 
2004  Human Resources Development 
Recommendation, 2004  
(No. 195) 
2005  ILC general discussion: Youth: 
Pathways to decent work 
2005  World Employment Report 2004–
2005: Employment, productivity 
and poverty reduction 
2006  Governing Body ESP Committee: 
Implementing the Global 
Employment Agenda: Employment 
strategies in support of decent 
work: “Vision” document 
2006  Governing Body ESP Committee: 
Employability by improving 
knowledge and skills 
2007  Governing Body ESP Committee: 
Portability of skills 
2007  ILC general discussion on 
sustainable enterprises 
The report also builds on the research 
findings  of  several  ILO  publications  that 
analyse  the  linkages  between  skills, 
productivity and economic and employment 
growth.  A  series  of  World  Employment 
Reports, beginning in 1999, have taken up 
the issue of skills development directly or as 
a component of broader employment policy 
issues.  The  World  Employment  Report  
2004–05:  Employment,  productivity  and 
poverty  reduction  concluded  that,  for  the 
vast majority of the working  poor,  simply 
more  work,  unless  it  is  more  productive 
work, would not lead them out of poverty. It 
examined  the  conditions  under  which 
employment and productivity could grow in 
tandem and create a virtuous circle of decent 
and productive employment opportunities. 
The  knowledge accumulated in  these 
discussions  and  publications,  based  on 
analysis by the  Office  and guidance from 
constituents,  underpins  the  preparation  of 
this report (see sidebar for a chronological 
summary).  The  present  report,  in  turn, 
contributes to the knowledge base relating to 
the  skills  components  of  the  Global 
Employment  Agenda  (GEA),  which  was 
adopted by the Governing Body in March 
2003 and provides an analytical framework 
for promoting the employment components 
of  the Decent Work  Agenda. Productivity 
and employment issues feature prominently 
in  Core  Element  6  of  the  GEA  on 
employability through improved knowledge 
and skills and Core Element 2 on promoting 
technological change for higher productivity 
and job creation and improved standards of living. 
The topic of this report is particularly relevant to the skills development needs 
identified in Decent Work Country Programmes (DWCPs). As the principal vehicle for 
promoting decent work at the country level, DWCPs comprise a set of agreed priorities 
for tripartite partnership with the Office. Many of the current DWCPs identify skills 
development,  productivity  and  employment  as  national  priorities  for  improving 
competitiveness, enhancing the employability of young women and men and increasing 
decent work opportunities for disadvantaged groups. 
vi 
Executive summary 
Objectives of the report 
As  the  background  paper  for  the  general  discussion  on  skills  for  improved 
productivity,  employment  growth  and  development  at  the  98th  Session  of  the 
International Labour Conference, this report has the following objectives:  
ɽ
Provide practical examples of the “virtuous circle”, drawing lessons from national 
experience  of  investing  in  skills  development,  accelerating  the  growth  of 
investment and productivity and translating those gains into higher income and 
sustainable job creation. 
ɽ
Demonstrate  how  lifelong  learning  minimizes  the  displacement  costs  of 
technological change by preparing workers for alternative employment. 
ɽ
Increase  recognition  of  the  importance  of  synchronizing  national  skills 
development policies with policies on technology, trade and the environment. 
ɽ
Support national and international commitment to expanding the coverage of good 
quality  basic  education as  a  human  right  and  an  indispensable  foundation for 
vocational training, lifelong learning and employability. 
ɽ
Heighten awareness of the role of skills acquisition in promoting formalization in 
the informal economy.  
ɽ
Emphasize the role of employers’ and workers’ organizations in advancing skills 
development in order to improve productivity and ensure the equitable distribution 
of the benefits of productivity growth. 
ɽ
Apply  the  key  instruments  for  skills  development  identified  in  the  Human 
Resources  Development  Recommendation,  2004  (No.  195),  to  the  goal  of 
sustaining the growth of more productive employment. 
ɽ
Facilitate tripartite discussion to provide guidance for ILO research, policy support, 
partnerships and technical cooperation in relation to skills for technological change, 
increased productivity and decent work. 
Summary of the report 
Education,  training  and  lifelong  learning  foster  a  virtuous  circle  of  higher 
productivity,  more  employment  of  better  quality,  income  growth  and  development. 
Chapter 1 introduces this catalytic role of skills development. It provides a succinct 
explanation of productivity, followed by an overview of the conceptual and empirical 
linkages  between  productivity  and  employment growth,  and finally explains  how a 
coherent skills development  policy serves both  short-term  adjustment and  long-term 
development goals. 
Productivity growth reduces production costs and increases returns on investments, 
some of which provide greater income for business owners and investors, while some are 
turned into higher wages. The virtuous circle between productivity and employment is 
also fed through the investment side of the economy, when some productivity gains are 
reinvested by a firm in product and process innovations, improvements in plant and 
equipment and measures to expand into new markets, which in turn spur further output 
growth and productivity. 
The productivity of individuals may be reflected in employment rates, wage rates, 
stability of employment, job satisfaction or employability across jobs or industries. The 
productivity of enterprises, in addition to output per worker, may be measured in terms 
vii
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
of market share and export performance. The benefits to societies from higher individual 
and  enterprise  productivity  may  be  evident  in  increased  competitiveness  and 
employment or in a shift of employment from low to higher productivity sectors. 
In the long term, productivity is the main determinant of income growth. A low-
wage, low-skill, low-productivity development strategy is unsustainable in the long term 
and incompatible with poverty reduction. Investment in education and skills helps to 
“pivot” an economy towards higher value added activities and dynamic growth sectors.  
Experience  shows  that all  countries that  have succeeded  in linking skills  with 
productivity have targeted their skills development policy towards three objectives:  
(i)  Meeting skills demand in  terms  of  relevance and  quality:  so as to  ensure  the 
matching of skills supply and demand, skills policies need to develop skills that are 
relevant,  promote  lifelong  learning  and  ensure  the  delivery  of  high  levels  of 
competences and a sufficient quantity of skilled workers. Furthermore, equality of 
opportunity in access to education and work is needed to meet the demand for 
training across all sectors of society.  
(ii)  Mitigating adjustment costs: the reorganization of work in line with new demands 
and technologies results in some skills becoming redundant. The ready availability 
and affordability of training in new skills and occupations help to insure against 
prolonged unemployment or underemployment and to maintain the employability 
of workers and the sustainability of enterprises.  
(iii)  Sustaining a dynamic development process: skills development policies need to 
build  up  capabilities  and  knowledge  systems  within  the  economy  and  society 
which  induce  and  maintain  a  sustainable  process  of  economic  and  social 
development. The first two objectives of improving skills matching and mitigating 
adjustment costs are based on a labour market perspective; they focus on skills 
development  as  a  response  to  technological  and  economic  changes  and  are 
essentially  short-  and  medium-term  objectives.  In  contrast,  the  developmental 
objective  is focused  on the strategic role  of  education  and training policies in 
triggering and continuously fuelling technological change, domestic and foreign 
investment, diversification and competitiveness.  
Chapter  1  also  introduces  three  recurrent  themes  of  the  report.  First,  skills 
development  must  be  an  integral  part  of  broader  employment  and  development 
strategies  if  it  is  to  deliver  on  its  substantial  potential  to  contribute  to  overall 
productivity and employment growth. The challenge for government policy is to develop 
and foster institutional arrangements through which ministries, employers, workers and 
training institutions can respond effectively to changing skill and training needs and play 
 strategic  and  forward-looking  role  in  facilitating  and  sustaining  technological, 
economic and social advancement. To meet this challenge, effective coordinating  or 
mediating institutions are required at three levels:  
ɽ
cooperation  between  the  various  providers  of  skills  training,  such  as  schools, 
training institutions and enterprises, to establish coherent and consistent learning 
paths; 
ɽ
coordination between skills development institutions and enterprises to match skills 
supply and demand; and 
ɽ
the coordination of skills development policies with industrial, investment, trade, 
technology and macroeconomic policies so that skills development policies are 
integrated effectively into the national development strategy and policy coherence 
viii 
Executive summary 
is  achieved.  Institutions  need  to  encourage  cooperation  between  different 
ministries, ensure the effective exchange of information and forecast skill needs.  
Second, social dialogue and collective bargaining can create a broad commitment 
to education and training and a learning culture, strengthen support for the reform of 
training systems and provide channels for the ongoing communication of information 
between  employers,  workers  and  governments.  In  addition  to  promoting  skills 
development, social dialogue and collective bargaining can also be instrumental in the 
equitable and efficient distribution of the benefits of improved productivity.  
Third, gender equality is an underlying principle of decent work. Training policies 
and programmes that aim to improve productivity and employability therefore need to 
ensure equality of opportunity, be free from discrimination and take into account family 
and household obligations. In view of the essential nature of gender issues, examples of 
skills development policies and programmes which either target women or mainstream 
gender issues are highlighted throughout the report. A life-cycle approach has to be 
adopted  to  overcoming  the  challenges  that  confront  women  in  gaining  access  to 
education and training and in utilizing this training to secure better employment. This 
includes:  improving  the  access  of  girls  to  basic  education;  overcoming  logistical, 
economic  and  cultural  barriers  to  apprenticeships  and  to  secondary  and  vocational 
training  for  young  women  –  especially  in  non-traditional  occupations;  taking  into 
account  women’s  home  and  care  responsibilities  when  scheduling  workplace-based 
learning and entrepreneurship training; and meeting the training needs of women re-
entering the labour  market  and of  older  women who have not had equal  access to 
opportunities for lifelong learning .  
Chapter 2 reviews the policy challenges and experience of groups of countries at 
different levels of development in connecting skills development to productivity and 
employment growth. Consideration of each group of countries begins with a succinct 
overview of the available data on productivity, employment and education as the nearest 
available measurement of skills levels. 
A key policy challenge confronting the Organisation for Economic Co-operation 
and  Development (OECD)  countries is to ensure the continuing relevance of skills 
acquired by both job entrants and mid-career workers. Success in this respect minimizes 
the  risk  of  skills  gaps,  which  can  constrain  enterprise  growth  and  jeopardize  the 
employability of workers.  Structural transformations and heightened competition  are 
making  it  increasingly  difficult  for  workers  with  low  skills  to  find  productive 
employment. The policy responses to these challenges include improving access to and 
the relevance and quality of job-entry training, expanding lifelong learning opportunities 
and using active labour market policies to combat inequality and reintegrate older men 
and women into the labour market. The continuing adjustment of skills development 
programmes is an essential component of the restated OECD Jobs Strategy. 
Most countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the Commonwealth of 
Independent States (CIS) started the transformation process with a strong tradition of 
technical and vocational training. However, education and training participation rates 
have dropped, partly because much of the training offered by the vocational training 
system had become irrelevant in the transition from a command to a market economy. 
Efforts by these countries  to reinvigorate  skills development systems  have included 
restructuring education and training systems to the demands of the new market economy, 
using  labour  market  institutions  to  mitigate  the  negative  effects  of  economic 
restructuring and targeting training and lifelong learning to raise the adaptability and 
mobility of the workforce. 
ix
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
One important characteristic of developing countries is the combination of high 
growth and productivity in some sectors and regions with low productivity and persistent 
poverty in the large informal economy. With a view to addressing skills shortages in 
high-growth  sectors,  it  is  necessary  to  improve  coordination  between  prospective 
employers and education and training providers, increase the quantity of public training 
provision  and  encourage  workplace  learning.  The  role  of  training  in  promoting 
formalization in many countries involves focusing on: improving access to quality skills 
development  outside  high-growth  urban  areas;  combining  remedial  education  and 
employment services with technical training; implementing systems for the recognition 
of prior learning so as to open up jobs in the formal economy to those who have acquired 
skills  informally;  and  targeting  entrepreneurship  training  so  that  it  encourages  and 
enables the formalization of small enterprises.  
The least developed countries, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, parts of Asia and 
small island countries, face a vicious circle of low education and skills, low productivity 
and poverty. Only one fifth of boys and girls of secondary school age in sub-Saharan 
Africa attend school. The priority of improving the quality and availability of training 
means that it is necessary to focus on reforming education and training systems so that 
they provide the skills and competencies that will be needed to boost the growth of 
decent  work  in  the  formal  economy.  Policy  responses  need  to  place  emphasis  on 
increasing  the access  of the poor  to training, upgrading  apprenticeship  training and 
improving the relevance of training in public institutions by strengthening coordination 
and partnerships with the private sector and combining institution-based education and 
training with enterprise-based learning. 
Chapter 3 identifies skills development as one of the critically important drivers of 
productivity growth and competitiveness at the enterprise level. Agreements between 
employers and workers are important means of promoting workplace learning and of 
ensuring that increased productivity benefits both employers and workers. Policies that 
encourage  enterprises  to  increase  on-the-job  training  and  workers  to  participate  in 
lifelong learning, with a view to improving performance and increasing the quantity and 
quality of employment, differ according to the various types of enterprise. 
Inter-firm  alliances  of  enterprises  along  global  value  chains  related  to 
multinational  enterprises  offer  opportunities  for  economies  of  scale  in  skills 
development, for example by reducing the costs of training for individual enterprises 
through the sharing of certain costs between allied enterprises. Arrangements whereby a 
lead  firm  in  a  value  chain  sets  the  standards  for  skills  development,  develops  the 
curriculum  and  training  materials  and,  in  some  cases,  provides  the  facilities  and 
personnel to deliver the training, can provide a high quality of workplace training linked 
to the requirements of the production system. Experience also shows that training in the 
areas of compliance with labour standards and national labour law, conflict resolution 
and  representation  is  important  in  value  chains  and  corresponds  well  with  worker 
training in technical fields. 
Workforce skills are also a fundamental condition for the emergence of clusters – 
groups  of  enterprises  that  gain  performance  advantages  through  their  proximity. 
Specialized  competencies  are  developed  both  within  and  between  firms,  offering  a 
competitive advantage for the firms within the cluster. A proactive role by governments 
in establishing linkages with multinational companies for the development of clusters 
and  in  supporting  cooperation  between  firms  in  clusters  can  help  to  stimulate  the 
adoption of technologies and skills upgrading programmes. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested