Executive summary 
Firms  following  a so-called  high-performance  workplace  (HPW)  strategy  place 
particular emphasis on skills development. Training and skills are integral components 
of an HPW strategy and complement other elements, such as the organization of work, 
the sharing of the benefits of improved productivity, worker participation and dialogue.  
Smaller enterprises face particular challenges in gaining access to training services 
and developing the technical and managerial capabilities that they need for growth. The 
monitoring of skill shortages and entrepreneurial opportunities, the provision of sector- 
or  cluster-specific  training  and  the  inclusion  of  entrepreneurial  and  trade  union 
organizations on the management boards of training institutions can help to ensure that 
training is relevant and accessible to smaller enterprises. 
Chapter 4 focuses on policy approaches that enable persons in rural communities, 
disadvantaged young people, persons  with  disabilities and migrant workers to  realize 
their  potential  for  productive  work  more  fully  and  contribute  more  substantially  to 
economic and social development. Within potentially marginalized groups, women are 
usually more vulnerable to social exclusion than their male counterparts.  
The  background  report  for  the  International  Labour  Conference  (ILC)  general 
discussion on the promotion of rural employment  for poverty reduction (ILO,  2008a) 
identifies  a  set  of  factors  required  to  raise  agricultural  and  off-farm  productivity, 
including  effective  means  for  persons  in  rural  communities  to  learn  about  new 
technologies, production techniques, products  and markets.  Chapter 4 examines  three 
methods  that can  be  effective in  improving access  to high  quality  and relevant skills 
training in rural communities in order to improve agricultural productivity or  to  meet 
off-farm  labour demand,  namely:  improving agricultural and  rural  extension services, 
combining  technical  and  entrepreneurship  training  in  community-based  training  and 
incorporating training on labour-based methods of investing in rural infrastructure. 
In developing countries, the education and literacy rates are lowest for girls and 
women in rural areas. Broader availability of better quality education is needed to enable 
young  people to acquire core  skills and then  be able to learn  occupational and  work 
skills.  Chapter  4  reviews  ways  of  improving  training  and  employment  services  for 
disadvantaged  young  persons,  especially  those  who  have  been  removed  from  child 
labour, live in rural areas or whose families work in the informal economy, with a view 
to  helping  them  enter  the  formal  labour  market  and  improving  their  long-term 
employability.  
People with disabilities often end up in passive assistance programmes, receiving 
disability  benefits  or  pensions  in  countries  where  such  schemes  exist,  or  relying  on 
family support or charity in countries that do not have such schemes. Four out of five 
persons with disabilities worldwide live below the poverty line and it is a massive loss 
when they are unable to contribute to national development. The chapter identifies on-
the-job  training  and  targeted  training  in focused  centres,  provided that  they are  well 
designed and accompanied by appropriate employment services, as good practices that 
increase  the  ability  of  persons  with  disabilities  to  obtain  productive  mainstream 
employment. 
Labour  migration  poses a  variety  of  challenges and  opens up  opportunities for 
training  and  the  deployment  of  skilled  labour.  These  include  compensating  for  skill 
shortages in destination countries, improving the recognition of skills across borders as a 
means  of  helping  migrant  workers  to  secure  jobs  for  which  they  are  qualified  and 
responding to development challenges in countries of origin when skilled workers find 
employment elsewhere. The potential for labour migration to contribute to development 
objectives in both countries of origin and of destination can be realized more fully by 
xi
Pdf link to attached file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add url link to pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf
Pdf link to attached file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf edit hyperlink; add hyperlink in pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
facilitating circular and return migration so that the skills acquired by migrant workers 
abroad benefit their countries of origin. In this respect, it is important to  improve the 
ethical practices of employment services with a view to preventing the exploitation of 
migrant  workers  and  to  strengthen  the  ability  of  employment  services  to  match 
competencies with local labour market needs. Bilateral and multilateral arrangements in 
the  health  care  and  education  sectors  are  ways  of  avoiding  the  negative  impact  of 
migration on these critical services in developing countries. 
Chapter  5  shifts  attention  to  the  future.  Chapters  2  to  4  examine  the  kinds  of 
challenges that are currently being faced by countries, enterprises and particular social 
groups  to  become  more  productive  and  increase  employment.  Chapter  5  presents  a 
framework  for  linking  skills  development  to  future  challenges  by  initiating  and 
sustaining  a  dynamic  development  process  and  integrating  skills  development  into 
broader national development strategies. 
Successfully using skills policies to help trigger and maintain a dynamic process of 
employment  growth  has  resulted  in  a  virtuous  circle  of  rising  productivity  and  high 
growth rates, for example in the “East Asian Tigers” (Hong Kong (China), Republic of 
Korea, Singapore), the “Celtic Tiger” (Ireland) and Costa Rica. Their experience shows 
that a development strategy that combines technological upgrading with investment in 
higher  value  added  non-traditional  sectors  (diversification)  helps  to  ensure  that 
productivity growth is accompanied by employment growth.  
This strategy relies on widespread general education and occupational competences 
as the foundation of social capabilities to innovate, transfer and absorb new technologies, 
diversify  the  production structure  into higher value added  activities  and  attract  more 
knowledge-intensive  domestic  and  foreign  investment.  It  also requires  the  collection, 
updating and dissemination of information on current and future skills requirements and 
the  translation  of  this  information  into  the  timely  supply  of  occupational  and 
entrepreneurial skills and competences. 
Coordinating  skills  development  with  the  adoption  of  new  technologies  and 
diversification  into  new  industrial  sectors  can  be  a  challenge.  Investment  in  human 
capital alone can increase the number of skilled workers, but not necessarily the number 
of  jobs  for  them.  On  the  other  hand,  increased  technology  transfer  alone,  without 
appropriately prepared workers and managers, is unlikely to sustain  local job growth. 
Inter-ministerial  coordination,  social  dialogue  and  feedback  mechanisms  between  the 
suppliers of training, workers and the suppliers of employment are important means of 
maintaining  effective  coordination.  The  chapter  reviews  the  complex  and  multilayer 
coordination mechanisms that exist in certain dynamic economies, such as Ireland.  
National development frameworks provide an opportunity for countries to integrate 
skills  development  into  broad  national  development  policies,  such  as  national 
development plans, strategies to reduce poverty and meet the Millennium Development 
Goals  (MDGs),  and  DWCPs.  These  coherent  national  frameworks  also  provide  an 
opportunity  for  labour  ministries  and  workers’  and  employers’  organizations  to 
encourage  line  ministries  (including  ministries  of  agriculture,  education,  rural 
development,  commerce  and  industry,  and  environment)  to  take  into  account  the 
employment impact, job creation potential and skills development implications of their 
policies.  Two  critically  important  institutions  for  effective  forward-looking  skills 
development are social dialogue, to coordinate the process of skills development with 
the national development strategy, and skills forecasting and labour market information 
systems, for the early identification of skills needs.  
xii 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read, Edit and Process PPTX File
PowerPoint editing function, please follow attached link directly. one or more slides from PowerPoint file. How to convert PowerPoint to PDF, render PowerPoint
add page number to pdf hyperlink; pdf reader link
VB.NET Word: .NET Word Reader & Processor Control SDK | Online
into certain VB.NET Word manipulating application, please follow attached link to find SDK owns the APIs for converting Word document file to PDF, png, gif
add links to pdf online; add links to pdf acrobat
Executive summary 
xiii
Whereas Chapter 5 examines the strategic role of skills development in achieving 
economic  and  social  development  goals  that  countries  set for  themselves,  Chapter  6 
looks at how skills policies can also help to develop effective responses to externally 
induced changes in the economy. Three contemporary global drivers of change are taken 
as  examples:  technology,  trade  and  climate  change.  Anticipating  and  managing  the 
impact of global drivers of change  draws on all three elements  of  skills development 
policy:  taking  advantage  of  emerging  opportunities  by matching  the demand  for  and 
supply  of new skills; facilitating adjustment and  mitigating  its  costs  for workers and 
enterprises adversely affected by global changes; and sustaining a dynamic development 
process.  
Technology:  while  developed  countries  are  pushing  the  technological  frontier, 
developing countries are moving towards that frontier. Imitation allows for investment in 
non-traditional sectors and for the application of new technologies to a broader variety of 
economic  activities.  This  means  that  skills  and  technology  have  to  be  enhanced 
simultaneously  in  order  to  ensure  the  sustainability  of  productivity  growth  and 
development. At the early stage of technological development, it is essential to achieve a 
minimum level of educational attainment in the population. Technological and industrial 
advancement  requires  the  broad  availability  of  high-quality  secondary  education  and 
vocational training. Finally, the ability to innovate as well as to adopt more complex and 
sophisticated technologies requires technical and vocational education and training at the 
tertiary level, and particularly skills in research and development.  
Trade: the World Commission on the  Social Dimension of Globalization (2004, 
para. 275) pointed out that: “All countries which have benefited from globalization have 
invested significantly in their education and training systems”. The recent Aid for Trade 
(AfT)  initiative  to  improve  trade  preparedness  needs  to  place  more  emphasis  on 
supporting education and skills development. Social dialogue has been shown to be an 
effective  instrument  in  reconciling  differences  on  how  to  maximize  the  benefits  and 
minimize the costs of increased participation in global markets. Social security systems 
and  active  labour  market  policies  ease  transitions  to  new  employment,  and  lifelong 
learning can also be considered as a type of unemployment insurance. 
Climate  change:  improved  knowledge  of  the  employment  and  skills  impact  of 
climate change is needed so that governments and the social partners can agree on joint 
responses at  the national, sectoral  and enterprise levels.  Mitigation  efforts  (to reduce 
global warming) and adaptation (to adjust to the local impact of climatic changes) both 
create new employment opportunities. Realizing the potential for employment growth in 
these areas will require skills development. There will also be a growing need to help 
re-skill the workers who are adversely affected and to assist the most vulnerable workers 
in developing countries to respond more effectively to the local consequences of climate 
change. 
The report concludes with a brief summary of its main policy orientations and a set 
of suggested points for discussion.  
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
page processing application, please click attached link in the for editing source TIFF file at page powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
clickable pdf links; add hyperlinks to pdf online
VB.NET TIFF: VB Code to Read Linear and 2D Barcodes from TIFF
type from TIFF document image file by following attached link. 2 of 5 barcodes from TIFF image file. Reading Component allows users scan PDF-417 barcode with a
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PowerPoint: Read & Scan Barcode Image from PPT Slide
to represent one in-memory PowerPoint document file and it image from PPT (.pptx) slide, just follow attached link. VB.NET PPT PDF-417 barcode scanning SDK to
add link to pdf file; change link in pdf file
C# Word: How to Read Barcodes from Word with C#.NET Library DLL
& read barcode image from source Word file. for reading specific barcode type by clicking attached link. C# Word PDF-417 Barcode Reading Tutorial, Detecting C#
add hyperlink pdf; active links in pdf
Abbreviations and acronyms  
ACTRAV 
ILO Bureau for Workers’ Activities 
ACT/EMP 
ILO Bureau for Employers’ Activities 
ASEAN 
Association of Southeast Asian Nations 
BDS 
business development services 
CBT 
community-based training 
CEDEFOP 
European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training 
CEE 
Central and Eastern Europe 
Cinterfor 
Inter-American Centre for Knowledge Development in Vocational 
Training, Montevideo, Uruguay 
CIS 
Commonwealth of Independent States 
COOP 
ILO Cooperative Branch 
DWCP 
Decent Work Country Programme 
ECOWAS 
Economic Community of West African States 
ESP 
Committee on Employment and Social Policy  
(ILO Governing Body) 
FAO 
Food and Agriculture Organization 
FDI 
foreign direct investment 
HPW 
high-performance workplace 
IDB 
Inter-American Development Bank 
ICA 
International Co-operative Alliance 
ICT 
information and communications technology 
ILC 
International Labour Conference 
IMF 
International Monetary Fund 
IOE 
International Organisation of Employers 
IPEC 
International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (ILO) 
IT 
information technology 
ITUC 
International Trade Union Confederation 
IYB 
Improve Your Business (ILO programme) 
KAB 
Know About Business (ILO programme) 
xv
C# Word: How to Generate Barcodes in C# Word with .NET Library
be easily inserted into MS Word file (.docx C# programming code for individual barcode type, please follow attached link. Create Micro PDF-417 in C# Word, Create
add a link to a pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
xvi 
KILM 
key indicators of the labour market (ILO) 
LDCs 
least developed countries 
LED 
local economic development 
LMI 
labour market information 
LMIS 
labour market information systems 
MDGs 
Millennium Development Goals 
MENA 
Middle East and North Africa 
MERCOSUR 
Common Market of the Southern Cone 
MNE 
multinational enterprise 
NQF 
National Qualifications Framework 
NTA 
National Training Authority 
OECD 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
OSH 
occupational safety and health 
PES 
public employment services 
PPP 
purchasing power parity 
R&D 
research and development 
SBA 
small business associations 
EMP/SEED 
Boosting  Employment  through  Small  Enterprise  Development  
(ILO Programme) 
EMP/SKILLS 
Skills and Employability Department (ILO) 
SYB 
Start Your Business (ILO programme) 
TREE 
Training for Rural Economic Empowerment (ILO programme) 
TVET 
Technical and Vocational Education and Training 
UNDP 
United Nations Development Programme 
UNICEF 
United Nations Children’s Fund 
UNESCO 
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization 
UNECE 
United Nations Economic Commission for Europe 
UNIDO 
United Nations Industrial Development Organization 
WAEMU 
West African Economic and Monetary Union 
WHO 
World Health Organization 
WISE 
Work Improvements in Small Enterprises (ILO programme) 
Chapter 1 
Productivity, employment, skills and 
development: The strategic issues 
1.  The purpose of this first chapter is to establish the centrality of skills development 
to maintaining both productivity and employment growth – in developing as well as in 
developed  economies. Skills development 
1
is as important  in combating poverty and 
exclusion as it is in maintaining competitiveness and employability. Education, training, 
and lifelong learning foster a virtuous circle of higher productivity, more employment of 
better quality, income growth, and development. Chapter 1 introduces this catalytic role 
of skills development, starting with a succinct explanation of productivity, followed by 
an  overview  of  the  conceptual  and  empirical  linkages  between  productivity  and 
employment growth, and finally an explanation of how a coherent skills development 
policy serves both short-term adjustment and long-term development goals. 
1.1. Understanding productivity 
2.  “Productivity is a relationship between outputs and inputs. It rises when an increase 
in  output occurs  with  a less  than proportionate  increase in  inputs,  or  when  the  same 
output  is  produced  with  fewer  inputs”  (ILO,  2005a,  p.  5).  Productivity  can  also  be 
considered in monetary terms. If the price received for an output rises with no increase in 
the cost of inputs, this is also seen as an increase in productivity (for example, due to an 
increase in the world price for agricultural or mining commodities). 
3.  Productivity can be measured either in terms of all factors of production combined 
(total factor productivity) or in terms of labour productivity, which is defined as output 
per unit of labour input, measured either in terms of the number of persons employed (as 
in  this report)  or  in terms  of the  number  of hours  worked (ILO, 2005a).  In order to 
examine productivity levels across countries in a meaningful way, the raw figures for 
gross domestic product  (GDP) in US dollars per  employed person  are  converted into 
comparable terms on the basis of purchasing power parity (PPP), which takes account of 
differences in the price of a standard set of goods and services in different countries. 
2
1
In this report, “skills development” is understood in broad terms, as spelled out in the conclusions concerning 
human resources training and development (ILO, 2000a, para. 5): “It is the task of basic education to ensure to 
each individual the full development of the human personality and citizenship; and to lay the foundation for 
employability. Initial training develops further his or her employability by providing general core work skills, and 
the underpinning knowledge, and industry-based and professional competencies which are portable and facilitate 
the transition into the world of work. Lifelong learning ensures that the individual’s skills and competencies are 
maintained and improved as work, technology and skill requirements change; ensures the personal and career 
development of workers; results in increases in aggregate productivity and income; and improves social equity.” 
2
In Key Indicators of the Labour Market (KILM), GDP per worker estimates are expressed in terms of 1990 US 
dollars, as the 1990 PPP made it possible to compare the largest set of countries (ILO, 2007a). Recent changes in 
calculations of PPPs of China and India, for example, may be taken into account in future computations. 
1
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
4.  Productivity  improvements  can  also  be  understood  at  different  levels.  The 
productivity of individuals may be reflected in employment rates, wage rates, stability of 
employment, job satisfaction or employability across jobs or industries. Productivity of 
enterprises, in addition to output per worker, may be measured in terms of market share 
and export performance. The benefits to societies from higher individual and enterprise 
productivity may be evident in increased competitiveness and employment or in a shift 
of employment from low to higher productivity sectors. 
5.  An increase  in  productivity at any level can be attributed to various factors, for 
example, new capital equipment, organizational changes or new skills learned on or off 
the  job.  Productivity  is  affected  by  factors  at  the  individual  level,  such  as  health, 
education, training, core skills and experience; by factors at the enterprise level, such as 
management, investment in plant and equipment and occupational safety and health; and 
by  factors  at  the  national  level,  such  as  supportive  national  macroeconomic  and 
competition  policies,  economic  growth  strategies,  policies  to  maintain  a  sustainable 
business environment and public investments in infrastructure and education. 
[A] thorough understanding of productivity would fill (and has filled) volumes as, rather 
unhelpfully, just about “everything” matters. Indeed, a truly thorough excavation of the topic 
would entail an unpacking of all the determinants of growth and development. For example, the 
prime  source of  productivity growth is  technological  change. Technological change,  in turn, 
relies on innovation, which itself is influenced by an  array of institutions, the quality of the 
supply of human capital, competitive market dynamics, spending on research and development 
(R&D),  and  investment  in general.  These in turn  depend  upon the strength  and  stability  of 
aggregate  demand, and  thus  on  the  macroeconomic  framework.  Investment  is  a  catalyst  for 
innovation, but the reverse is also true: innovation spurs investment. … 
Changes  in  the  organization  of  work  and  production  have  a  profound  influence  on 
productivity … from … the birth of the factory system ... to contemporary discussions of the 
“knowledge economy” and “high performance work systems,” both of which underscore the 
salience  of  human  capital  and  its  organization  as  a  source  of  productivity  growth  and 
competitive advantage. (ILO, 2005a, pp. 2–3; emphasis on skills-related factors added.) 
6.  It is important to recognize that skills development and other investments in human 
capital  comprise  only  one  set  of  factors  necessary  for  productivity  growth.  Skills 
development alone cannot raise enterprise and national productivity. Other factors and 
policies  are  likewise  insufficient  if  they  are  implemented  in  isolation  of  skills 
development. One of the messages of this report is that skills development must be an 
integral  part  of  broader  development  strategies  if  it  is  to  deliver  on  its  substantial 
potential to contribute to overall productivity and employment growth. 
7.  Skills are critical in the structural adjustment of economies. As economies move 
from  relative  dependence  on  agricultural  production  to  manufacturing  and  service 
industries, workers and enterprises must be able to learn new technical, entrepreneurial, 
and social skills. Inability to learn new skills because of inadequate basic education or 
lack of opportunity slows the transfer of all factors of production from lower to higher 
value added activities. 
1.2. Productivity, employment and development 
1.2.1.  The virtuous circle 
8.  Productivity  growth can  raise  incomes  and  reduce  poverty  in  a  virtuous  circle. 
Productivity growth reduces production costs and increases returns on investments, some 
of which turn into income for business  owners and  investors and some  of  which are 
turned into higher wages. Prices may go down, consumption and employment grow and 
Productivity, employment, skills and development: The strategic issues 
3
people move out of poverty. The virtuous circle is also fed through the investment side 
of the economy when some productivity gains are reinvested by a firm into product and 
process  innovations, plant and equipment improvements and measures  to expand into 
new markets, which spurs further output growth and productivity. 
9.  In  the  long  term,  productivity  is  the  main  determinant  of  income  growth. 
Productivity  gains  increase  real  income  in  the  economy,  which  can  be  distributed 
through higher wages. A low-wage, low-skill development strategy is unsustainable in 
the  long  term and incompatible with poverty  reduction. Investment in  education and 
skills helps to “pivot” an economy towards higher value added activities and dynamic 
growth sectors. 
10.  As consumption and production patterns change, work is reorganized to meet new 
demands and technologies. However this reorganization is not instantaneous and rarely 
smooth. Enterprises and workers are affected differently. Some find their skills in short 
supply  while  others  may  find  their  skills  redundant.  This  dichotomy  was  brilliantly 
captured by Schumpeter, who described the process of innovation in market economies 
as “creative destruction” (Schumpeter, 1942). Well designed and coherent policies and 
institutions can, however, improve the capacities of individuals and enterprises to adapt, 
adding to the economic creative potential while reducing and sharing the costs of the 
“destruction”  of  redundant  capacities.  Some  conditions  offset  the  cost  of  this 
displacement effect. These include: overall economic growth; accessible labour market 
information about where employment is growing and where it is declining; the absence 
of discrimination against groups for whom job loss could turn into long-term hardship; 
and  –  most  importantly  for  this  report  –  workers’  skills,  the  ready  availability  and 
affordability of training in new skills and occupations, and the base of core competencies 
that makes lifelong learning easier. 
11.  It  is  important  that  both  enterprises  and  workers  benefit  from  improved 
productivity. Improved productivity can enable enterprises to make new investments and 
fuel the innovations, diversifications and expansions into new markets that are needed 
for future growth. Improved productivity can result in higher earnings for workers, better 
working  conditions, improved  benefits  and  reduced  working hours; these in  turn  can 
improve workers’ job satisfaction and motivation. 
12.  At  the  enterprise  or  industry  level,  social  dialogue  and  collective  bargaining 
agreements enable all parties to share the benefits of productivity gains and to consider 
short-term  and  long-term  choices  (relating,  for  example,  to  profits,  wages  and  new 
investments). At the economy-wide level, labour market policies can create a conducive 
environment for fair and effective sharing of the gains (covering such issues as wages 
policy  and  minimum  wages,  collective  bargaining  institutions  to  encourage  social 
dialogue, and mechanisms for sharing labour market information). 
13.  ILO  analysis  of  labour  markets  over  the  years  shows  that  productivity  and 
employment have tended to grow in unison, particularly in Europe and many parts of 
Asia. Figure 1.1 shows that the best performance between 1991 and 2005, in terms of 
both productivity and employment, was achieved by the high-growth economies of the 
Asian and Pacific Rim (for example, China, Republic of Korea and Singapore). Most 
industrialized  countries  in  Europe  and  North  America  exhibit  slower,  although  still 
positive, growth in both productivity and employment. These countries began the period 
in question with the highest productivity levels in the world, so the incremental change 
from that high starting point is smaller. 
4
S
k
i
l
l
s
f
o
r
i
m
p
r
o
v
e
d
p
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
,
e
m
p
l
o
y
m
e
n
t
g
r
o
w
t
h
a
n
d
d
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
Figure 1.1.  Productivity and employment growth, 1991–2005 
-60
-40
-20
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
220
240
-30
-10
10
30
50
70
90
110
130
150
Employment growth 1991–2005 (%)
P
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
g
r
o
w
t
h
1
9
9
1
2
0
0
5
(
%
)
Developed Economies & European Union
Central & South Eastern Europe (non-EU) & CIS
Asia & the Pacific
Latin America & the Caribbean
Middle East
Africa
Source: Based on Key Indicators of the Labour Market, fifth edition, 2007 (Geneva, ILO).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested