Target groups 
Table 4.1.  Agricultural extension reform strategies 
Funding 
Public 
Private 
Market reforms 
Delivery 
Public 
Revision of public sector extension 
via downsizing and some cost 
recovery (Canada, Israel, United 
States) 
Cost recovery (fee-based) systems 
(OECD countries; previously in 
Mexico) 
Private 
Pluralism, partnerships, power-
sharing (Chile, Estonia, Hungary, 
Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, 
Republic of Korea) 
Full privatization and 
commercialization (Netherlands, 
New Zealand, England and Wales)
Non-market reforms 
Political 
Fiscal 
Administrative issues 
Decentralization to lower tiers of 
government (Colombia, Indonesia, 
Mexico, Philippines, Uganda and 
others) 
Transfer (delegation) of 
responsibility to other entities 
(Bolivia, to farmer organizations; 
Ecuador, mixed with farmer-led 
NGO programmes; Peru, extension 
devolved to NGOs) 
Source: Rivera, 2001, p. 24. 
219.  Two forms of private sector provision of extension services merit specific mention. 
First,  producer  associations  focus  on  enhancing  the  performance  of  local  producer 
organizations, including improving their ability to provide services to upgrade farmers’ 
technical  capacities  and  broaden  know-how  in  business  and  financial  management, 
marketing  and advocacy. 
6
This is proving a cost-effective channel for reaching rural 
entrepreneurs. The number of producer organizations found in remote rural communities 
has expanded considerably and in many countries they are already a major source  of 
access to rural skills training.  
220.  Second,  industry-sourced  technical  training  helps  channel  knowledge  and 
information  within  the  input  (seeds,  fertilizer,  related  financial  services)  and  output 
distribution systems (harvest and post-harvest handling, marketing, etc.) through public–
private partnerships and company-provided extension services. Although these practices 
have  been  commonplace  for  larger  agribusiness  operations,  it  is  only  recently  that 
smallholders,  primarily through  their producer associations or  grouped as suppliers to 
main  buyers,  have  become  beneficiaries  of  product-  and  market-specific  technical 
support. Farmers’ and rural community organizations, supported by public agencies, are 
needed, however,  to make  sure that  individual farmers and  rural  businesses  have full 
information  about  the  products  or  technologies  being  delivered  through  industry-
provided training and are able to make well-informed choices. 
221.  As pointed out in Chapter 2, for those products and agro-based industries that are 
highly dependent on  international markets, relationships within value chains can help 
meet specific skill challenges for adopting new technologies or productivity-enhancing 
workplace  practices.  Competitiveness  in  agriculture-based  products  in  developing 
6
Cooperatives are an  important form  of “member-owned” producer associations. Their role in information-
sharing, skills  development, market access and  other  important contributions  to  agricultural productivity  are 
examined in the report, Promotion of rural employment for poverty reduction (ILO, 2008a, Ch. 4).  
85
Pdf hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add url to pdf
Pdf hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
accessible links in pdf; add links to pdf document
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
countries is changing from the traditional base of primary resources, commodities and 
low-cost, low-skilled labour to manufactured products, speciality agricultural products 
and services. While a few countries are making the transition well, the majority are not 
participating in the process and their skills base is increasingly inadequate to do so. For 
international markets, agricultural exports need to be low-cost, high-quality and at high 
volumes, with flexible delivery, including rapid turnaround. Public extension services 
and support services within value chains are important means of improving international 
competitiveness and thereby boosting employment growth in both rural and urban areas. 
222.  Community-based training (CBT) has high potential for delivering skills training in 
remote  areas  not  integrated  into  global  value  chains  and  lacking  formal  educational 
institutions. Proximity to urban markets can be a key factor of rural productivity, both in 
providing opportunities for non-farm employment and for affecting agriculture directly 
through  easier  knowledge  transfer  and  improved  access  to  consumers  and  suppliers. 
More remote rural areas are characterized by localized and thin labour markets offering a 
restricted choice of jobs, narrow training opportunities, limited and costly transport and 
communications, low investment and low pay. 
223.  CBT can be an effective means to improve the productivity and employability of 
the rural poor, especially  women, disenfranchised youth,  persons with disabilities and 
communities rebuilding  after  natural  disasters  or  civil  strife. But  CBT  works  only  if 
skills development is linked to broader local economic development efforts, particularly 
for  infrastructure  designed  to integrate remote areas. The  starting point is  to  identify 
potential economic opportunities and existing learning and training assets (institutions, 
apprenticeships, informal learning). The second step is to then identify the skills required 
(as  well as  other input  or  infrastructure  needs)  to  enable  communities  to  realize  the 
potential  of  these  opportunities  for  local  employment  and  earnings.  On  the  basis  of 
understanding  demand  for  skills  and  gaps  in  the  local  supply  of  training,  then  it  is 
possible to design and deliver (or improve existing) relevant community-based training. 
The final, but crucial step is to provide post-training services, such as entrepreneurship 
support, help in obtaining wage employment and access to credit and markets (box 4.4). 
Box 4.4 
Training for Rural Economic Empowerment (TREE) 
The  ILO’s TREE programme is a  community-based training  package to promote 
income  generation  and  employment  creation.  Implemented  with  local  and  national 
partners in Pakistan (North Western Frontier Province) and the Philippines (Autonomous 
Region  in  Muslim  Mindanao  –  ARMM),  TREE  targeted  society’s  most  marginalized 
groups  –  the  rural  poor,  particularly  rural  women,  disenfranchised  male  youth  and 
persons with disabilities who had lost their livelihoods in regional conflict. These groups 
lacked opportunities for training and skills development which could help them access 
jobs.  The  TREE  programme  identified  local  economic  opportunities,  designed  and 
delivered community-based skills training and provided follow-up services after training. 
The programme was adapted to the socio-cultural characteristics and local conditions in 
each country. 
The independent project evaluation of the pilot TREE programme (December 2007) 
documented considerable success in training both men and women. In the Philippines, 
for example, tracer studies showed that 94 per cent of those interviewed attributed their 
present economic activities to the training they had received under the programme. In 
Pakistan,  literacy  programmes  were  included  in  the  programme,  greatly  improving 
participants’  ability  to  benefit  from  vocational  training.  Some  56  per  cent  of  the 
programme participants in skills development or literacy were women. 
Additional lessons are being learned from adapting the TREE approach to ongoing 
technical cooperation work in Sri Lanka, Madagascar, Niger, Burkina Faso and Nepal.  
86 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
clickable links in pdf files; pdf links
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add links pdf document; pdf link to attached file
Target groups 
224.  Combining technical and entrepreneurship training is particularly important in rural 
areas. The scarcity of formal employment in far-flung areas means that for many people 
the best prospect of turning technical training into livelihood is through self-employment. 
Technical  and  entrepreneurship  training  can  be  combined  through  integrated  local 
economic development programmes (as  well as  by  incorporating  business knowledge 
and skills in formal secondary and tertiary education). 
7
225.  CBT is a public investment – whether financed through national budgets or with 
donor assistance. It is a tool for targeting deprived areas, for extending the benefits of 
national economic growth to disadvantaged regions, for reaching the poorest of the poor. 
But this approach can be an investment, not a charity, under several conditions: (1) if it 
helps integrate local producers into larger markets beyond their geographical areas; (2) if 
the  skills  training  is  of  sufficient  quality  that  products  and  services  produced  are 
competitive  in  local  and  national  markets;  and  (3)  if  demonstration  projects  are 
undertaken in partnership with national agencies responsible for local or decentralized 
development which can track results and draw lessons for adapting successful practices 
to other communities. 
226.  Labour-based  methods  to  improve  rural  infrastructure  invest in  both  skills  and 
physical  assets  to  boost  rural  productivity  and  create  jobs.  Roads,  flood  control, 
irrigation and other infrastructure are critical for stabilizing production, increasing yields 
per acre and improving transport to markets for agricultural products. But an even higher 
boost  to  agricultural  productivity  is  attained  when  these  investments  are  made  with 
appropriate labour-based methods. As explained in the report on rural employment (ILO, 
2008a,  Ch.  4),  the  income  earned  locally  is  higher  proportionally  than  when  more 
equipment-based methods are used, and this has a larger multiplier effect in the locality. 
227.  Labour-based  methods  can  provide  productive  employment  opportunities.  They 
may employ persons at a higher level of productivity than their alternative employment 
opportunities  in  situations  of  high  underemployment  or  unemployment  (ILO,  2005a, 
Ch. 4). However, for persons in rural communities to be able to fill this new source of 
labour demand, some training is usually needed. A premium on training will result in 
construction  trades,  building  and  maintenance,  small  contractor  bidding  for  public 
contracts  and  community-based  planning  to  enable  local  communities  to  work  with 
national agencies in setting priorities for infrastructure investments. 
228.  In summary, boosting skills development in rural areas will not in itself create jobs. 
Demand for skills is driven by sustainable enterprise growth and investment, which in 
turn can be stimulated by policy incentives that target and support rural employment. 
Pathways out of rural poverty and towards more dynamic growth are founded on skills 
development to improve the competitiveness of rural activities, technical and business 
skills  to  raise  agricultural  productivity,  and  basic  skills  development.  This  requires 
upgrading  the  quality  of  skills  provision  as  well  as  extending  its  availability  to 
underserved rural areas. Productivity gains in the agricultural sector will not be sufficient 
to reduce poverty, however. Support  to  individuals in identifying  and moving to new 
non-traditional,  primarily  non-farm  areas  of  work  is  also  needed.  Governments  and 
social  partners  have  a clear  role in  strengthening  rural  institutions  and decentralizing 
planning and delivery of skills development services, and linking this to improved local 
governance, coordination and integration of services targeting rural people. 
7
This is the purpose of the ILO’s Know About Business (KAB) programme for secondary, tertiary or technical 
and vocational education and training (TVET) institutions. 
87
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
add hyperlink to pdf; chrome pdf from link
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB.NET. Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border.
add hyperlink pdf document; adding a link to a pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
4.2. Disadvantaged youth 
229.  The ILO estimates that 85 million young people (between the ages of 15 and 24) 
are unemployed, 300 million are working but remain poor (living on less than US$2 a 
day) and 20 million have withdrawn from the labour market (ILO, 2006b, p. 5). Many of 
these young people cannot  access the  education and training  that  could enhance their 
productivity  and chances of finding decent work. Particularly vulnerable are illiterate 
young people, school dropouts, (former) child labourers, youth in rural areas or in the 
informal economy and young women.  
230.  The conclusions on promoting pathways to decent work  for youth (ILO, 2005d) 
observe  that  failure  to find  a  job  may  be  due  to  lack  of  relevant skills  and  training 
opportunities,  low  demand  for  young  people’s  skills  obtained  through  training  or 
changing labour market demand. The result may be long periods of job search, higher 
unemployment  and  sustained  periods  of  lower-skilled  and  precarious  work.  The 
conclusions call for targeted interventions to  overcome disadvantages  and to promote 
social inclusion and greater equity.  
231.  For young people,  as for  all  workers,  sustained  economic growth  supported  by 
sound  economic  policy  is  fundamental  to  creating  opportunities  for  good  jobs. 
Evaluations  show  that  in  the  absence  of  job  and  labour  market  opportunities  many 
programmes that have trained unemployed young people have not succeeded in raising 
their employment rates and incomes (Bennell, 1999). These are sobering findings when 
considering the prospects for assisting disadvantaged youth in developing countries in 
gaining access to decent productive work.  
232.  This section focuses on how to increase access to training for disadvantaged youth 
and how to ensure that this training leads to more productive employment. It concludes 
by  drawing  attention  to  the  roles  of  institutions  and  actors  in  implementing  these 
solutions. This section builds on the broader review of the application of policies and 
programmes  to  promote  youth  employment  discussed  by  the  Governing  Body 
Committee on Employment and Social Policy in November 2006 (ILO, 2006k). 
8
4.2.1.  Overcoming education and skill disadvantages 
233.  Low  educational  attainment  deprives  young  people  of  learning  core  skills  and 
being able to participate in job training. Individuals are considered most employable, 
able to find and retain jobs and adaptable to workplace changes when they have broad-
based education and training, basic and portable high-level skills, including teamwork, 
problem  solving,  ICT,  communication  and  language  skills (ILO,  2000a,  para.  9).  As 
depicted in figure 1.4 in Chapter 1 of this report, “core work skills” would also include 
literacy  and numeracy,  ability to learn and  social  and interpersonal skills.  Core skills 
should be every individual’s intellectual foundation when leaving school (ILO, 2007i). 
234.  However, 96 million young women and 57 million young men are illiterate, most 
of  them  in  developing  countries.  School  attendance  rates  are  lowest  in  sub-Saharan 
Africa:  as  low  as  59  per  cent  for  girls  in  primary  school  and  only  22  per  cent  in 
secondary  school  (table  4.2).  Less  than  20  per  cent  of  boys  and  girls  in  the  region 
complete  secondary  school,  meaning  that  most  are  at  a  severe  disadvantage  upon 
entering the labour market. These figures suggest that a significant proportion of young 
people in the world lack basic core and employability skills. Exclusion from education 
8
Along with skills development and employability, this review highlighted the importance of economic policies 
to expand employment, enterprise development, labour market policies and institutions,  and governance and 
social dialogue as the critical policy instruments for youth employment (GB.297/ESP/4). 
88 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document
add email link to pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document
check links in pdf; pdf hyperlink
Target groups 
and training is at the root of child labour, low-paid and poor quality jobs and the vicious 
circle of poverty and social exclusion (ILO, 2005e).  
Table 4.2.  Average school attendance rates, by sex (per cent) 
Primary school   
Secondary school
Boys 
Girls 
Boys 
Girls
World 
78 
75   
46 
43 
Sub-Saharan Africa 
63 
59   
21 
22 
Source: UNICEF, 2007. 
235.  Opportunities  and  risks  faced  at  one  stage  in  the  life  of  individuals  frequently 
influence their transition to the next. Hence, the areas of vulnerability that affect children 
and youth must be addressed early in life. Many actors have a role to play in this process: 
national and local authorities, the social partners, members of civil society and young 
people themselves. A major challenge is to devise education and training policies and 
measures that break the vicious circle of inadequate basic education and low productivity, 
and support the transition of disadvantaged young people into decent work.  
236.  The links between child labour and youth employment problems are extensive and 
education and training can do much to alleviate both at the same time. Child labourers 
cannot participate in education and skills programmes that could help them access good 
jobs as young adults. For poor families, the value of educating and training their children 
and earning future income from their work is often less attractive than the immediate 
income from putting them to work (Freedman, 2008). The policy challenge is to provide 
incentives to children and their families that encourage refraining from, or withdrawing 
from, child labour; and to educate and train them so that they can access decent work. 
9
237.  Are  children, once  removed  from  hazardous working  conditions,  being properly 
equipped to access good jobs  at an appropriate age? In 2003, the ILO’s International 
Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC) reviewed non-formal education 
and skills training which it supported in nine countries. 
10
The review found that in some 
instances the vocational training provided was not necessarily relevant to labour market 
needs. The report went on to suggest more systematic use of labour market surveys and 
pre-training  counselling  or  career  guidance  to  help  determine  what  vocational  skills 
should be taught (ILO, 2006o). 
238.  The  ILO  report  recommended  outreach  skills  training  –  in  informal  settings, 
usually at simple venues – to ensure that training is accessible and relevant. Training 
there would encourage youth to put their new skills to use and earn incomes in their local 
communities and so avoid training-induced migration to urban areas. For example, IPEC 
9
Some successful approaches to reducing child labour that integrate education and alternative family earnings 
include the Programa de Erradicação do Trabalho Infantil (Programme for the Eradication of Child Labour) in 
Brazil, which extends the time children stay in school, thus limiting the time available for work (Tabatabai, 
2006); helping parents of child domestic labourers in Kenya create income-generating activities as a substitute for 
children’s income and improving their access to education (ILO, 2004d, p. 25); and improving education for 
children in hazardous agricultural work in East Africa combined with skills and grants to help families undertake 
alternative  activities  (ILO, 2006n,  p. 5).  Combining quality education with school  feeding programmes  and 
providing cash incentives can also discourage child labour. Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programmes ensure 
regular  payments  to poor  households on  condition  that they meet certain obligations, such  as sending their 
children to school and vaccinating them. Although reduction of child labour is seldom an objective, CCTs have 
been effective in reducing it (Tabatabai, 2006, p. vii). 
10
Bangladesh, Cambodia, Colombia, India, Kenya, Peru, Philippines, Senegal and Turkey. 
89
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
add a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlinks pdf file
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
add links to pdf in preview; add link to pdf
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
supports  apprenticeship  training  programmes  with  local  businesses  and  craftspersons 
that assist rural youth in learning new skills instead of having to travel to urban areas for 
training (ILO, 2006o). 
239.  The key points on training in rural areas in section 4.1 apply in particular to young 
persons in rural communities: the importance of selecting trades and occupations where 
skills development will be relevant; of providing trainees with labour market information, 
job search assistance and other employment services; and of integrating entrepreneurial 
training and technical training in preparing youth for self-employment. There are many 
examples of initiatives that combine these elements. 
ɽ
Bangladesh offers young people in rural areas various forms of training for self-
employment.  Around  555,000  young  people  received  training  between  October 
2001  and  March  2004  in  some  300  training  centres  run  by  the  Department  of 
Youth,  of  whom  approximately  341,680  entered  self-employment  (ILO,  2005e, 
p. 57). 
11
ɽ
In India, the Training of Rural Youth for Self-Employment (TRYSEM) programme 
trains rural poor  aged 18–35 in technical and entrepreneurial skills for wage- or 
self-employment. So far, some 54 per cent of trainees have been women and 28 per 
cent have been  illiterate. High unemployment  (50 per cent) among those young 
people  who  had  undergone  training  raised  demand  for  better  labour  market 
information and job search assistance. For example, the Baatchit project, targeting 
rural youth aged 15–24, fits together vocational training, entrepreneurial skills and 
career guidance, including building awareness about available career options, job 
vacancies and recruitment processes. However, many trainees’ lack of education 
reduced  the  effectiveness  of  training  (Brewer,  2004),  underscoring  the  need  to 
make vocational training complementary to basic education and core employability 
skills training.  
ɽ
In Nigeria, the National Open Apprenticeship Scheme (NOAS) educates and trains 
unemployed young people in over 100 occupations. An offshoot of the NOAS is 
the School-on-Wheels  programme, which provides mobile vocational training to 
school  leavers  and other unskilled persons  in rural areas. After the three-month 
training, graduates are absorbed into the NOAS. Over 21,000 young people have 
benefited from the programme so far (Brewer, 2004, pp. 43 and 116).  
240.  Out-of-school  youth  primarily  find  livelihoods  in  the  informal  economy.  In  its 
World Employment Report 1998–99 devoted to training, the ILO pointed out that a major 
shortcoming  of  earlier  training  strategies  in  developing  countries  was  an  exclusive 
concentration on the needs of the formal economy, in spite of the fact that it accounted 
for a much smaller proportion of total and new employment than the informal economy. 
241.  As pointed out in section 2.4, traditional apprenticeships are the largest source of 
skills for the informal economy. The informal apprenticeship system can be an effective 
means of skill development in the informal economy as this is where most entrepreneurs 
in the micro-enterprise sub-sector acquired their skills. However, apprenticeship training 
tends to be  limited to the practical skills  of  a trade, generally transferred through the 
observation and replication of tasks carried out by an experienced worker. To be more 
effective  in  increasing  employability,  some  combination  of  hands-on  experience  and 
systematic  knowledge  is  required.  For  example,  the  apprenticeship  programme  in 
Nigeria  mentioned  above  offers theory classes  on  Saturdays  as  a complement  to  the 
11
The centres  offered  training in poultry rearing,  beef  fattening,  livestock rearing,  food processing, kitchen 
gardening, handicrafts and leather work. 
90 
Target groups 
practical training received. Good practice is to link apprenticeship training with formal 
schooling so young people have an incentive to remain in school and acquire the core 
skills  needed  for  work  and  for  making  their  way  through  life.  Finally,  a  system  for 
certifying  the  skills  mastered  by  the  apprentice  –  recognized  by  employers  in  other 
localities and in the formal economy  – can help young people make the transition to 
work in the formal economy. National efforts to upgrade the quality of apprenticeship 
training, such as by several countries in West Africa, incorporate these elements of core 
skills, employment services and recognition. 
242.  Specific “second chance” interventions are needed for school dropouts who may 
have left school before acquiring basic literacy and numeracy skills and who have drifted 
into  low-paid,  unskilled work in  the informal economy. This  need is growing  across 
countries regardless of development levels. For young people  and others facing long-
term unemployment, “second chance” programmes offer an alternative to labour market 
exclusion and long-term joblessness. A review of “second chance” programmes pointed 
out  that  they  must  do  more  than  provide  technical  competencies;  they  must  also 
compensate  for  inadequate  education  and  provide  the  competencies  needed  for  both 
work  and  life  (World  Bank,  2006).  Experience  in  Spain  has  also  highlighted  how 
important it  is that employers accept placements  of youth  and organize working time 
around coursework, tutoring and other support (box 4.5). 
Box 4.5 
“Second chance” programme in Spanish cities 
The  European  Association  of  Cities for  Second  Chance  Schools  reports on  the 
experience  in  four Spanish  cities: Bilbao, Cadiz,  Gijón and Barcelona. In  Bilbao, the 
programme  is  divided  into  phases  with  a  decreasing  share  of  coursework  and  an 
increasing  proportion  of  workshops,  tutoring  and  in-company  work  over  a  two-year 
period. The programme benefits from the strong local involvement of the Confederation 
of Basque Enterprises. In Cadiz, the programme is supported and promoted by Cadiz 
University in close collaboration with the City Council. The Association credits the role of 
employers  in  raising  the  success  level  of  the  “Second  chance”  programmes  –  in 
accepting students and trainees and their flexible working time in order to accommodate 
more technical training and individualized support services to help young people make 
the transition into the labour force. 
Source: European Association of Cities for Second Chance Schools, 2007. 
243.  Overcoming  exclusion  from  education  and  training  opportunities  is  the  first 
priority in improving young women’s employability. Many youth education and training 
programmes, including traditional apprenticeships, are biased against girls and women. 
Others, by not directly addressing constraints on girls going to school and young women 
participating in vocational training, fail to meet objectives of equitable access for women 
and men. 
244.  At  the  level  of  basic  education,  effective  programmes  to  keep  girls  in  school 
require a comprehensive approach. Increasing the proportion of girls’ school attendance 
and  moving  toward  better  male/female  equity  in  schooling  often  requires  special 
measures to induce parents to enrol their daughters and keep them in school (Biasiato, 
2007; Atchoarena and Gasperini, 2003). Practical changes have proved to make a big 
difference, such as separate latrines for girls and adjusting school times to accommodate 
household or marketing responsibilities. More fundamental measures include increasing 
the number of female teachers (as role models  and as a source of encouragement  for 
young girls and  reassurance for  parents),  removing  gender stereotypes  from teaching 
materials  and  training  teachers  to  avoid  early  occupational  segregation  (such  as 
91
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
favouring  boys  over  girls  in  mathematics  lessons).  Furthermore,  in  some  places 
measures  to  overcome  cultural  resistance  to  girls’  education  may  require  incentive 
schemes,  such  as  stipends  to  families  who  enrol  daughters  in  school.  This  kind  of 
comprehensive approach has proven effective, as seen in the example from Bangladesh 
profiled in box 4.6. 
Box 4.6 
Bangladesh: Assisting girls and young women with  
access to secondary education and skills training 
The  Female  Secondary  School  Assistance  Programme,  financed  by  the 
International Development Association (IDA), supported government efforts to improve 
girls’ access to secondary education (grades 6–10) in rural areas. They and their families 
were  given  cash  stipends  to  cover  tuition  and  personal  costs.  This  incentive  was 
combined with  efforts to  increase  the  proportion  of female  teachers, to  invest in the 
provision of water and sanitation facilities, and to improve community involvement in the 
incorporation of occupational skills into the training. 
By 2005, girls accounted for 56 per cent of secondary enrolments in areas covered 
by the programme, compared to 33 per cent in 1991. Their attendance rates increased to 
91  per  cent, surpassing  the  boys’  attendance  rate (86 per cent).  Overall,  access  to 
secondary  education  increased  substantially  for  girls  in  Bangladesh,  jumping  from 
1.1 million in 1991 to 3.9 million in 2005. An increasing number of the girls enrolled come 
from disadvantaged or remote areas.  
Source: IDA, 2007. 
245.  Overcoming occupational segregation in employment starts with removing gender 
stereotyping from education and training. In the Latin American Pro-Joven programmes, 
measures to open non-traditional occupations and careers to women include widening 
the types of internships offered to both sexes, improving counselling and career guidance 
services, and raising teachers’ and trainers’ awareness of the importance of discarding 
gender-based expectations in relation to students and their selection of courses of study – 
in particular welcoming young men into training in occupations traditionally dominated 
by women and vice versa (Aedo and Nuñez, 2003). 
246.  Widespread  discrimination  on  account  of  ethnicity  or  caste  adds  to  girls’ 
difficulties  in  accessing  education  and  young  women’s  barriers  to  employment  on 
account  of  gender  bias.  In  Guatemala,  only  26  per  cent  of  indigenous  non-Spanish-
speaking girls complete primary school, compared to 62 per cent of Spanish-speaking 
girls; in the Slovak Republic,  only 9 per cent of Roma  girls attend secondary school 
compared with 54 per cent of Slovak girls (Lewis and Lockheed, 2007). In Viet Nam, 
19 per cent of ethnic minority girls had not attended school compared to 2 per cent of 
Viet girls (Morris, 2006). Specific policies, and their local enforcement, combined with 
awareness-raising campaigns, are required to improve equity in access to education and 
hence to training and employment for minority groups, and in particular for girls and 
young women in these groups. 
247.  Programmes and policies that target disadvantaged youth are most effective if they 
tackle the specific causes of the disadvantage: remote location, informal economy, lack 
of  basic  education,  discrimination,  etc.  Active  labour  market  policies  and 
macroeconomic  policies  aiming  at full employment are  also  needed.  Across  different 
projects targeting different groups of young people, however, common good practices 
can be discerned. Brewer (2004), in an exhaustive review of training projects’ impact on 
young women and men, summarized the key features of effective training practices for 
disadvantaged youth: data collection and mapping of marginalized populations; needs-
based  assessments;  training  components;  social  support  and  labour  market  services 
92 
Target groups 
(including  vocational  guidance  and  counselling); 
12
financial  support;  physical 
infrastructure; and coordination, cooperation and commitment (page 34). 
4.2.2. Institutional keys to success: Inter-ministry collaboration  
and social dialogue  
248.  An ILO Tripartite Meeting on Youth Employment (ILO, 2004b) called for closer 
coordination between government institutions and agencies, both at national and local 
levels. As a minimum, coordination is called for between ministries of education and 
ministries of labour and, where they exist, ministries of youth. At the international level, 
the Youth Employment Network (YEN) – a collaboration between the UN, the World 
Bank and the ILO – has encouraged countries to draw up national action plans entailing 
comprehensive efforts extending across ministries, social partners and civil society and 
has sought international financial and technical support for their implementation. 
13
249.  One  example  of  inter-ministerial  and  local/national  collaboration  is  the  Young 
People’s  Self-Support  and  Challenge  Plan  in  Japan.  It  engages  four  Ministries: 
Education,  Culture,  Sports,  Science  and  Technology;  Health,  Labour  and  Welfare; 
Economy, Trade and Industry; and Economic and Fiscal Policy, ensuring that a holistic 
approach  is  pursued  in  promoting  youth  employment  (ILO,  2005e,  p.  51).  Canada’s 
Youth Employment Strategy involves 13 government departments and agencies working 
in partnership with employers’ and workers’ organizations. 
250.  Agency  coordination  at  national  and  local  levels  and  a  high  degree  of 
decentralization are equally important. This was illustrated by Chile Joven, a programme 
widely cited in surveys of youth training and employment programmes. Beginning in the 
1990s (and completed in 2000), the programme targeted unemployed, underemployed or 
in  other  ways  vulnerable  young  people.  It  was  highly  decentralized:  some  1,000 
recognized private and public training providers participated in competitive bidding for 
programme contracts. It provided 400 hours of formal training, combined with two–three 
months’  work  experience  in  enterprises.  It  also  trained  young  people  for  self-
employment.  Altogether  some  190,000  young  people  aged  16–24  participated  in  the 
programme opening up new labour market opportunities for many participants. On the 
basis of the success  in Chile, the programme was replicated in  Argentina, Colombia, 
Peru and Uruguay. 
14
251.  The conclusions of the ILO Subregional Tripartite Meeting of Experts on Decent 
Employment for Young People (ILO, 2007n, para. 5(a)) summarized the importance of 
inter-ministerial  collaboration  and  partnerships  with  trade  unions  and  employers’ 
organizations: 
[Education  and  training  policies]  could  be  made  more  responsive  to  labour  market 
requirements by engaging employers’ and workers’ organizations that are the main actors in the 
labour market. Vocational education and training should include work experience and be based 
on  broad  occupationally  related  and  employability  skills  …  Workplace  learning  fosters 
productivity, innovation, competitiveness and improves occupational health and safety ... Policy 
coherence and more effective coordination across systems and institutions, including between 
12
For a review of good practices in career guidance, see Hansen, 2006. On the basis of this research, career 
guidance materials have been developed in ILO projects in Ethiopia, Indonesia and the Philippines. 
13
The YEN was established in 2001. The priorities of national action plans are the “four Es”: employability, 
equal opportunities for young men and young women, entrepreneurship and employment creation. 
14
For information on Chile Joven and similar programmes in Latin America, see Bennell, 1999, p. 37; Brewer, 
2004, pp. 29 and 86–88; Godfrey, 2003, p. 40; ILO, 1999, p. 181; ILO, 2000c, pp. 28–30; ILO, 2004b, p. 34; and 
O’Higgins, 2001, p. 139. 
93
Skills for improved productivity, employment growth and development 
ministries of education and of labour, should be sought at all levels of education, training and 
lifelong learning. 
252.  To conclude, effective youth employability strategies combine activities on several 
fronts:  skills  development,  work  experience  and  provision  of  labour  market  services. 
They engage a range of relevant government departments, work together with employers 
and  workers’  organizations and  other  organizations,  and  include  marginalized youth. 
Such comprehensive approaches to skills development and the creation of decent work 
for young people must be supported by a healthy macroeconomic climate that stimulates 
investment, economic growth and increased employment opportunities. There is no short 
cut to enhancing skills development opportunities for disadvantaged youth. However, the 
lessons of experience and the conclusions of tripartite discussions on skills development 
as a component of youth employment (ILO, 2005d; ILO, 2004e) provide a blueprint for 
collective action.  
4.3. Persons with disabilities 
253.  The  importance  of  skills  training  for  persons  with  disabilities  has  long  been 
recognized  by  the  ILO,  with  an  emphasis  on  promoting  access  to  general  skills 
development services along with and under the same conditions as non-disabled people 
wherever  possible  (Recommendation  No.  99,  1955;  Convention  No.  159  and 
Recommendation No. 168, 1983). This theme of inclusion is further enhanced in later 
ILO instruments and in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 
2006.  
254.  This section of the  report  focuses on  approaches, programmes and policies that 
bring persons with disabilities into the mainstream of economic and productive life by 
improving  their  access  to  decent  quality  learning,  training  and  employment  services. 
Much of the available information on policies is from OECD countries, while many of 
the lessons from programmes and projects are gleaned from experience in developing 
countries.  
4.3.1. Skill needs to improve employability and productivity 
255.  Disabled  persons,  in  particular  women,  are generally very disadvantaged  in  the 
labour  market.  They  tend  to  be  more  inactive,  to  be  over-represented  among  the 
unemployed  and  to  have  much  lower  earnings  than  non-disabled  people.  Their 
experience of early adult life is often beset by frustration, disappointment and reduced 
confidence in the strengths they bring to the labour market because career aspirations 
have simply not translated into employment (Burchardt, 2005). 
256.  In  connection  with  their  marginalized  position  in the  labour  force,  people  with 
disabilities often end up in passive assistance programmes, receiving disability benefits 
or  pensions,  in  countries  where  such  schemes  exist  or  relying  on  family  support  or 
charity in countries which do not have such schemes. They are more likely to be poor: 
82 per  cent  of  disabled  people worldwide live  below the  poverty  line  (Hope, 2003); 
20 per cent of all people living on less than a dollar a day worldwide are disabled (Elwan, 
1999).  Like  other  poor  people,  persons  with  disabilities  have  very  limited  access  to 
education and training that could help improve their potential productivity, employment 
and income-earning prospects.  
257.  Women and girls with disabilities face double discrimination in education, training 
and employment that cuts across cultures and development levels. Whereas significant 
progress has been achieved globally with regard to literacy rates and education levels in 
94 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested